Herron School of Art and Design faculty, alumni to strut their stuff in August

Sax on the Rocks 12x12 oil canvas

Phil O’Malley,      Sax on the Rocks,  Oil on Canvas,      12” x 12”

The Biennial Faculty Show will kick off the fall gallery season at Herron School of Art and Design in Eskenazi Hall’s main galleries. This year’s exhibition will be an exercise in eclecticism with faculty members exhibiting from a variety of departments. All tenured and tenure-track faculty, lecturers and program technicians were invited to participate.

Also opening in the Marsh Gallery August 1 is Print or Die an annual print exchange created and curated by Dominic Senibaldi (M.F.A. in Printmaking, 2013). Print or Die will showcase works from two years of the exchange, and illustrate the ideas behind the print exchange culture and its importance in contemporary printmaking. Artists from coast to coast participate.

In the Basile Gallery, also opening August 1, is 316: A Thesis Exhibition by Eric D. Johnson (M.F.A. in Printmaking, 2014). Johnson describes the concept for the exhibition as emerging from strain on the support systems of the modern world caused by mass production, consumption and waste, and observation of critical tipping points and cascading failures.

Works will be available for purchase on opening night.

Rounding out the month, opening on August 29 and continuing through September 19, will be solo shows by alumnus Phil O’Malley (B.F.A., ‘07) in the Marsh Gallery and Assistant Professor in Furniture Design Katie Hudnall in the Basile Gallery.

O’Malley has planned a “making of” exhibition, The Moment of Conception?, as a companion to the mid-August unveiling of his, 20’ x 40’ as yet untitled work, a monumental installation which will hang in the front lobby of Clowes Memorial Hall. The work is the pinnacle creation in a series called Deep Down. Its creation and installation is also being documented by local National Public Broadcast Service station, WFYI. O’Malley said the series was spurred by “several selections of popular music” from his formative years, translated via paint into vivid visual representations. “Now they’re laid out, varnished, nailed to their boards,” he said, “and placed in their four-sided coffins for their viewing. We’re so sorry, Uncle Albert.”

Hudnall’s exhibition of current work blurs the lines between woodworking and furniture techniques and media and those of sculpture and drawing in a search for new and compelling ways to reach the audiences for these forms.

“The language of furniture, and of utilitarian objects in general, has greatly influenced these hybrids as I search for ways to directly interact with my viewers,” Hudnall said. “In the newest work, an interactive element is integral to experiencing the piece. The viewer might open and close a door, or a drawer might activate another section of the work, revealing intricate drawings that open like books, or umbrella-like forms that raise and lower out of the top of the piece. This exhibition raises questions about the notion of communication. Viewers may work together to operate a piece, making it something that a single viewer cannot fully experience on their own.”