Confucius Institute in Indianapolis celebrates fifth anniversary

The Confucius Institute in Indianapolis will celebrate its fifth anniversary by doing what it has done since 2007: offering programs for Hoosiers that provide a window into China.

Beginning April 22, the weeklong celebration includes three Chinese films, a reception, followed by student performances and a symposium, “China in Africa: A New Model of International Development?” co-sponsored by the institute and the Sagamore Institute.

The films will be shown at 5:45 p.m. in IUPUI’s Taylor Hall, 815 W. Michigan St. The films, which are free and open to the public, are “Painted Skin: The Resurrection,” April 22; “Red Sorghum,” April 23; and “The Treatment,” April 25.

A nonpolitical and nonprofit organization, the institute was established at IUPUI through an agreement between the Office of Chinese Language Council International and IUPUI, in partnership with Sun Yat-Sen University in China. The Confucius Institute at IUPUI is one of about 90 institutes in the U.S. and 400 around the world.

The Confucius Institute at IUPUI facilitates mutual understanding between the people of China and the people of central Indiana by promoting Chinese language and culture, and it creates educational, business and community relationships, said Dr. Joe Xu, a professor of anatomy and cell biology at the IU School of Medicine and the founding director of the Confucius Institute at IUPUI.

“It’s important for people in Indiana to see and understand China, if only through the window provided by the Confucius Institute,” Xu said. “Helping people know each other reduces misunderstanding.”

Since it opened its doors, the Confucius Institute has engaged Indianapolis and central Indiana residents through numerous activities, including promoting business exchanges; facilitating government exchanges; teaching Chinese using a variety of methods, including multimedia and the Internet; training teachers to teach Chinese in primary schools, high schools and colleges; teaching Chinese courses of various types in a variety of arenas; sponsoring academic activities, cultural exchange programs and Chinese language competitions; and showcasing Chinese movies and television programming.

“Whoever wants to understand Chinese culture and language, we are there for them,” Xu said.

The institute has established three Confucius classrooms for students in grades K-8 or K-12: two in Indianapolis and one in Brownsburg. It offers summer study abroad programs in China for high school students, college students and the general public as well as a K-8 Chinese language and culture summer camp at IUPUI. One-on-one Chinese language and cultural tutoring are  also available at the institute, as are translation and interpretation services.

The Confucius Institute has helped establish or participated in a range of cultural activities in Indianapolis, including a Chinese Language and Cultural Fair, the Indy 500 Parade, Indianapolis Chinese Festival and Chinese New Year celebration.

The partnership with Sun Yat-Sen University, a top-ten university in China with strong programs in the humanities, social sciences, business, law and life sciences, has produced a number of exchange programs at IUPUI, including programs at the Kelley School of Business and the Schools of Education, Informatics, Liberal Arts, Medicine and Public and Environmental Affairs.

IUPUI Cultural Arts Gallery, IU Art Museum partner to showcase Morton Bradley’s math-inspired art

NDIANAPOLIS — With their brilliant colors and their display of the Harvard University graduate’s understanding of science, Morton C. Bradley’s sculptures are full of life. When viewed, the mathematically inspired creations evoke words such as “crystal,” “kaleidoscope,” “prism” and “snowflake.”

The Cultural Arts Gallery at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, in partnership with the Indiana University Art Museum in Bloomington, invites the IUPUI campus community and the public to view an upcoming exhibit of Bradley’s work.

“Color and Form: Selected Works by Morton C. Bradley Jr.” opens Monday, Jan. 7, and runs through Friday, Jan. 25, at the IUPUI Cultural Arts Gallery in Suite 240 of the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd. Nine of Bradley’s hanging sculptures and 11 sculptures mounted on pedestals will be on display.

Morton C. “Bob” Bradley, born in 1912, was the visionary behind the geometric sculptures that were created over decades by a workshop of talented artists and engineers. Bradley bequeathed the creations to Indiana University at his death in 2004.

“Bob Bradley’s works represent a complex combination of geometry and color theory,” said Sherry Rouse, curator of campus art at IU Bloomington. “He started simply but grew to love the more complex forms of the stellated dodecahedra and the icosahedra as he worked with his fabricators to create sculptures. Toward the end of his life, he began to experiment with minimal surface sculptures that are delightful to the eye and challenging to the viewer.”

Bradley’s first art pieces were paintings and drawings that were unrelated to the sculptures. His work evolved into an exploration of the Platonic solids and progressed to other polyhedrons, with his designs progressing over the years.

Much of Bradley’s inspiration came from traditional two-dimensional patterns from around the world, such as Italian cathedrals and Egyptian and Arabic architecture and textiles. His transformation of the two-dimensional patterns onto multiple intersecting planes resulted in the three-dimensional forms.

Bradley worked as a painting conservator at the Fogg Museum at Harvard and wrote “The Treatment of Pictures,” the 1950 book that remains a historic reference for painting conservators. He was also a researcher and theorist on subjects such as sentence structure, teaching methodology for foreign languages, anthropometry and music theory.

“Morton Bradley was a quiet genius whose accomplishments as an artist deal with great universal ideas,” said Heidi Gealt, director of the IU Art Museum. “It is a genuine pleasure to share Mr. Bradley’s beautiful legacy with Cultural Arts Galley patrons.”

Exhibit activities include a lecture and book signing featuring Lynn Gamwell, a leading author on the intersection of art, mathematics and science. Gamwell is the author of “Color and Form: The Geometric Sculptures of Morton C. Bradley, Jr.,” recently published by IU Press. Gamwell put Bradley’s unique fusion of color, form and mathematical ideas in its historical context in her earlier book, “Exploring the Invisible: Art, Science, and the Spiritual.”

Gamwell’s lecture will take place from 4 to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 22, in Room 450A of the IUPUI Campus Center. The book signing precedes the lecture, from 3 to 4 p.m., in the Barnes & Noble on the first floor of the IUPUI Campus Center.

“Color and Form,” a traveling exhibit previously on view at Indiana University Northwest, is made possible through IU’s Moveable Feast of the Arts Initiative, supported by the Lilly Endowment.

The IUPUI Cultural Arts Gallery is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 1 to 7 p.m. Sunday. Admission is free.

Source: http://newscenter.iupui.edu/5888/IUPUI-Cultural-Arts-Gallery-IU-Art-Museum-partner-to-showcase-Morton-Bradleys-mathinspired-art

Artist-in Residence Performance: Tim Hardy in The Ancient Mariner, A Dramatic Song Cycle Inspired by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

DATE: Friday, September 14, 2012

TIME: 8:00PM – 9:30PM

LOCATION: Crystal Terrace Ball Room, Columbia Club; 121 Monument Circle; Indianapolis, IN 46202 

Tickets available here. $25 general, $15 students.

The IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute (IAHI) and Butler University’s Jordan College of Fine Art are pleased to present the American premiere of this unique musical program featuring internationally acclaimed performer Tim Hardy of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London, and piano accompaniment by Rebecca Edie.

The 2012 artist-in-residence at the IAHI, Tim Hardy has performed with the Royal Shakespeare Company, with the Opera Music Theatre London, and at prestigious theaters across the United Kingdom and Europe. he has narrated more than 300 television documentaries, and his extensive directing credits include Romeo and Juliet, Twelve Angry Men, and the Crucible.

Award-winning composer Geoff Page has created an impressive body of musicals that include Academy of Death, A Christmas Carol, and The Signalman.

Tickets available here.

 

Ancient Mariner Flyer

Artist-in-Residence Lecture: Tim Hardy, “From Shakespeare to Shaw to Sondheim: Theatre for the 21st Century”

DATE: Thursday, September 6, 2012

TIME: 7:30PM – 9:30PM

LOCATION: Basile Auditorium, Eskenazi Hall, IUPUI; 735 W. New York St.; Indianapolis, IN 46202 

THIS EVENT IS FREE BUT SPACE IS LIMITED. TO RESERVE YOUR SEAT, CLICK HERE.

Tim Hardy looks at our seemingly constant need for drama of one kind or another — stories, theater, film, opera, literature. Concentrating principally on theater, he identifies how drama has changed through the centuries, reflecting the society it serves.  By staying relevant to its audiences, theater still succeeds in “holding a mirror up to nature” in such a way that we can both recognize ourselves and be wonderfully surprised and informed.

As a professional actor since the mid-sixties, Tim Hardy argues that if we don’t keep an ever-vigilant eye out for lazy, repetitive theatre — and he offers examples — if we don’t truthfully and completely re-invent the means whereby we would excite, inform, and delight our audiences, then we are on the short route to what the great director Peter Brook calls “dead theatre.”  From this there can be no recovery.

The IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute is pleased to welcome internationally-acclaimed actor/director Tim Hardy as a 2012 artist-in-residence.  Based in London, Mr. Hardy is on the faculty of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA) and has performed with the Royal Shakespeare Company (in Peter Brook’s Marat/Sade and Peter Hall’s Henry V) and at prestigious theatres across the United Kingdom and Europe.  A company member of Opera Music Theatre London, Mr. Hardy has also performed in numerous operas and musical theatre productions including La Traviata, The Magic Flute, and Guys and Dolls. He has narrated over 300 television documentaries, including series for The Discovery Channel and The History Channel, and his on-camera television work includes roles opposite Ian McKellen and Michael Gambon. Mr. Hardy’s extensive directing credits include Romeo and Juliet, Othello, Twelfth Night, Julius Caesar, Twelve Angry Men, The Crucible, Gaslight, Lady Windermere’s Fan, The Seagull, The Arcadians, and The Doll’s House.

This event is co-sponsored by the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and the The New Oxford Shakespeare at IUPUI.

For tickets, click here.

IUPUI professor receives Association of Midwest Museums Distinguished Service Award

The Association of Midwest Museums has honored an Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis professor for long-term distinguished service to the museum profession.

Elizabeth Kryder-Reid, who teaches museum studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, is the recipient of the 2012 Association of Midwest Museums Distinguished Service Award. The association’s awards committee unanimously voted to present the annual award to Kryder-Reid in recognition of her outstanding commitment to the association and her exemplary service to the museum profession.

The IUPUI professor accepted the award today during a ceremony at the association’s general conference, which takes place through July 26 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in downtown Indianapolis.

The Association of Midwest Museums, established in 1927, provides programs and services to museums throughout an eight-state region in the Midwest. More than 400 museum professionals are attending this year’s association conference in Indianapolis. The three-day event features outstanding sessions, guest speakers, and tours and receptions at museums in the host city.

Westfield to introduce Herron student Katey Bonar’s new sculpture with a meet the artist event on July 27

A new sculpture titled Passaggio graces the entrance to Asa Bales Park in downtown Westfield. The City’s Grand Junction Task Group commissioned the work through Herron School of Art and Design’s Basile Center for Art, Design and Public Life.  Senior sculpture major Katey Bonar is the artist.
The public is invited to a Meet the Artist Event on Friday, July 27 from 6pm to 8pm at the sculpture in the park, which is located at 205 W. Hoover Street.

Three, 13-foot columns comprise the main sculpture. The columns are fabricated from steel tubing covered by polyurethane foam with a fiberglass skin and joined by concentric rings of steel tubing suspended inside the columns at the top. Near the columns are two ring groupings made of thermoplastic, flanking a sidewalk.

Katey Bonar Passaggio 2012

Katey Bonar. Passaggio. 2012

The name Passaggio references a passageway or turning point in a journey, which brings together the emphasis of history, present, and future.   Passaggio, functions as an entry way, but also a space for visitors to explore and experience as part of the park itself.
“I feel like opening an art piece like this in Westfield gives an opportunity for residents to reflect on the past, as well as to examine where they are now and where they want to be in the future, both collectively and personally,” said Bonar.
All of the visual cues in Passaggio relate to natural visual patterns that reflect time passing. The concentric ring patterns mirror the growth rings in trees. The columns’ ridges and grooves echo eroded landmasses or stratified geologic forms.  According to Bonar, the pavilion rings overhead are a way to examine the potential of looking up to the sky as an intangible place and as a possible map of the yet to come.  In the two thermoplastic ring groupings, viewers have the opportunity to trace history.

Bonar will be available to discuss the sculpture and the details behind the meaning during the Meet the Artist Event. The City is encouraging residents to make an evening of it by stopping at the weekly Farmers Market on their way to the park across the street.

About the Basile Center
The Frank and Katrina Basile Center for Art, Design and Public Life is Herron’s laboratory for applying the talents and skills of Herron students and faculty to the needs of businesses, nonprofit organizations and government agencies. It connects artists in all media with community partners who are interested in providing real-world and professional practice experiences through public art commissions, art and design competitions and civic engagement opportunities. The skill and knowledge students gain from
conceptualizing and competing for community-based commissions better prepares them for the world outside college. Students often work with architects, engineers, electricians, fabrication design houses, printer companies and landscape architects to get the job done, resulting in an extraordinarily well-rounded practical experience. For more information, visit http://www.herron.iupui.edu/basile-center.

A Visit to the Herron School of Art and Design Sculpture Studios

Herron School of Art and Design faculty and students were busy this afternoon when we took a visit to the sculpture studios on Indiana Avenue. For those of you who are familiar only with the Eskanazi Hall building, Herron has a 30,000 square foot facility on Indiana Avenue. In fact, it’s currently undergoing an expansion and will be rededicated as the Sydney and Lois Eskenazi Fine Art Center.

Robert Horvath-Braincandy

Robert Horvath. Braincandy. 2010

One of the faculty we met with is Robert Horvath, Assistant Professor at the Herron School of Art and Design. Horvath explores the world behind the glamour-obsessed contemporary world. What initially appears beautiful has a menace and decay to it. In his words, his imagery “forces a visual duality: the escapist pop culture youth can no longer hide from the horrors of reality.”

Today, Robert was busy working on his IAHI funded project, a new series of ceramics which pursue some of the themes that he has developed in his paintings.

 

Benjamin Horvath

Robert Horvath

For more about Robert Horvath and his work, see http://www.herron.iupui.edu/faculty/robert-horvath.

 

 

Benjamin Sunderlin

Benjamin Sunderlin

 

We also bumped in to Benjamin Sunderlin, a student of the Herron School of Art and Design. Sunderlin showed us the casts that he was making for the IAHI and Herron. The casts show reduced size sections of the Parthenon frieze, which were molded from casts purchased for the Herron School in the 1920s and 1930s. We’ll have more to say about his project in upcoming posts.

 

Fifth Annual Book Arts Exhibit Sponsored by IUPUI University Library

IUPUI University Library’s Herron Art Library has partnered with the Harrison Center for the Arts to sponsor Bookmark, an IDADA (Indianapolis Downtown Artists & Dealers Association) First Friday event. The exhibit opening reception is Friday, August 3rd at 6:00 p.m. at the Harrison Center for the Arts located at 1505 N. Delaware Street, Indianapolis. The artwork will be on view until August 29th.  Both the reception and exhibit are free and open to the public.

Bookmark builds on four years of successful collaboration between the library and the Harrison Center to promote local and regional book artists in the field of fine arts. Featured artists include Sara Brooks of Asheville, North Carolina (www.sarabrooksphoto.com), Joy M. Campbell from Santa Fe, New Mexico (www.joymcampbellbookartist.com), David Johnson of Muncie, Indiana (www.vampandtramp.com/finepress/a/amelia-press.html) and Indianapolis’ own Elyce Elder (http://www.discoverfountainsquare.com/merchant.cfm?id=136 ).  As in the past, the University Library will award a $400 prize to the best in show.

Also returning this year to give a hands-on talk about Artists’ Books are nationally recognized book arts dealers, Bill and Vicki Stewart of Vamp & Tramp Booksellers LLC.

The Herron Art Library will also have on exhibit recently acquired artist books from its Special Collection of Artists’ books and fine press books. These works will be on display at the opening night reception. The Herron Art Library, part of the IUPUI University Library, is located inside the Herron School of Art and Design and is home to a museum-caliber collection of artists’ books.

The Herron Art Library’s collection of artists’ books contains many forms of the book arts from fine press books illustrated by artists such as Mark Rothko to miniature books, some conveying powerful messages addressing social and family issues of personal significance to the respective book artist.  Artists’ books often become a very personal extension and means of expression of a significant event or issue of an artists’ life.

Significant book artists represented in our collection include Julie Chen, Ron King, Emily Artinian, Lois Morrison, and local book artists, Bonnie Stahlnacker, Paul Brown, Karen Baldner among many others. New additions to the collection can be seen in the Artist book Alcove by visiting the Herron Art Library on the IUPUI campus at 735 W. New York Street, Indianapolis, Indiana.

Any resident of Indiana is eligible for an IUPUI University Library card.  Our resources and librarians are also available on-line at http://www.ulib.iupui.edu. Browse our on-line collections to learn more about the road to Indiana Statehood, the history of the National FFA Organization, the writer James Whitcomb Riley and much more, or contact a librarian specialist for help with professional and school-related research.

Bliss’s homage to Indiana Avenue musicians makes national news

Wes Montgomery and other jazz greats of Indiana are getting some larger-than-life recognition, thanks to a recent work by Pamela Bliss, a Herron adjunct faculty member known for her murals.

“I had wanted to paint a mural of Wes Montgomery somewhere in Indy for years,” said Bliss. When Indianapolis conceived the “46 for XLVI” project, to create memorable public art as a welcome for Super Bowl visitors, Bliss was one of the many artists commissioned to provide the 46 murals.

Indiana Avenue Jazz Masters was the second of two murals Bliss created for the project, the other being a 38-foot-tall likeness of Kurt Vonnegut. Jazz Masters is visible from its namesake street, appropriately ensconced on the south exterior wall of the Musicians’ Repair and Sales building on Capitol Ave. The mural is also visible from New York Street a few blocks east of Herron.

Although Montgomery died in the 1960s, a few weeks after the big game it so happened that the Jazz Kitchen in Broad Ripple was holding a record release party for him. The celebration launched a CD of newly-discovered Indianapolis recordings by Montgomery from the late 1950s.

Mark Sheldon, a local contributor to DownBeat, arranged for Bliss to sit with the editor of the magazine for the event. The editor visited the mural, and news of Bliss’s work went national in Bobby Reed’s “First Take” column in the April issue.

Chicago-based DownBeat has been covering the jazz scene since 1934 and is arguably the last word on Jazz and related musical genres.

Montgomery is in good company on the wall of Musicans’ Repair. J.J. Johnson, Freddie Hubbard and IU’s own David Baker are in the mural as well. Bliss is in the process of adding more figures to the work, which will be dedicated in mid-July.

“I have done several jazz-themed murals in Richmond, Indiana, documenting the legacy of the Starr Piano Company and Gennett Records,” Bliss said.

“Whenever I do a mural,” she continued, “especially one that honors or memorializes, I want to be as historically correct and appropriate as possible. Public murals are a very powerful way to communicate. The public is imprinted with an image directly and subliminally and it becomes truth to them after they live with it for awhile.”

Now the truth is there for all to see. Indiana Avenue has a jazz heritage worthy of continued celebration.

Bliss said, “I feel very small—no pun intended—in the wake of what these great people have accomplished. I feel very privileged to help recognize them.”

IUPUI Hosts International Research Conference For Linguists

(INDIANAPOLIS)—International researchers in the field of linguistics and second language acquisition will be in Indianapolis August 9-11 for a conference sponsored by the Indiana Center for Intercultural Communication (ICIC), a language and cultural training center that is part of the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

The 7th Intercultural Rhetoric and Discourse Conference will feature speakers from China, Egypt, Mexico, Brazil, Iran, Japan, Turkey, Spain and Russia, noted Ulla Connor, Ph.D., ICIC Director.

Connor is considered one of the leading researchers in the field of contrastive rhetoric, which examines how first language and culture affect writing in English as a second language and applies research findings to language teaching and workplace management. She has published more than 80 articles, book chapters and books published on the subject. Her book, Contrastive Rhetoric (Cambridge University Press, 1996), is now considered a classic in the field.

Under Connor’s direction, ICIC helped to establish the first week-long Institute on Contrastive Rhetoric and Written Discourse Analysis in 2004, followed by the First Conference on Intercultural Rhetoric and Written Discourse Analysis in 2005 on the IUPUI campus.

“The conferences were created to further research in contrastive/intercultural rhetoric and intercultural discourse, and to create collaborations among leading research universities and organizations,” Connor said. “The conferences typically attract more than 100 participants from the U.S and abroad.”

Noted linguist Diane Belcher, from Georgia State University, will deliver the opening plenary address on entitled, “What We Need and Don’t Need Intercultural Rhetoric for: A Retrospective and Prospective Look at an Evolving Research Area.”

IUPUI professors Marta Antón, André Buchenot, Thomas Upton and Estela Ene and ICIC Visiting Scholars Xiaojun Zhang and Zhiqing Hu are also scheduled to give presentations during the conference. Additional information is available at:http://liberalarts.iupui.edu/icic/conference/.