Grant Keeney, May graduate (B.F.A. in Furniture Design), went for playability and style in herron_posterhis designs when Brunswick Billiards asked for a new approach to table tennis. The purveyor of home game room products came back to Herron on the heels of its successful 2014 venture through the Basile Center for Art, Design and Public Life to create version six of the iconic Gold Crown billiards table. The winning design, by Colin Tury (M.F.A. in Furniture Design, ’14), is slated for production in 2017.

Keeney’s two concepts wowed Brunswick with their angles, clean lines and Mid-Century forms. “The legs fold up and the table folds in half, but you won’t want to put it away,” Keeney said, as he presented his prototype of the extruded aluminum “CL-1” table with soft-close accessory drawers for stowing the net, paddles and balls. His second design, the “Cornerstone,” features 360 degree pivoting casters built into the legs, and a low-slung, arched base. “There’s nothing out there like it close to this price point,” he said. “These designs target Millennials and everyone else.”

In addition to Herron faculty members, Brunswick representatives Brent Hutton (B.A. ’79 Bloomington), LifeFitness vice president of global consumer sales; John Kazik, vice president of business development; and Greg Tennis, manufacturing and sourcing engineer, were on hand for the April presentations from the six students who took on the challenge. Eighteen students had attended a March call for proposals where Hutton described the project in detail and called on them to bring their creativity to bear.

Brunswick also chose designs by seniors Ben Sallee and Vance Wilson as second and third place winners. The finalists earned $1,500, $1,000 and $500 awards, respectively, and each student who presented earned a stipend for their materials and time.

Cory Robinson, chair of the Department of Fine Arts at Herron, said, “For fine art and design students this kind of project is gold. Real professional practice that comes from working with an established company like Brunswick is not the same as a simulation.”

For this project, the school again brought in special expertise from Glen Fuller, who ran a customized class for the students who created designs for Brunswick. “Glen brings work experience as a professional industrial designer. He’s coming from a place of authority and put the students through their paces conducting in-depth market research on trends and competition in the leisure sports industry,” Robinson said.

Robinson encourages businesses that want to partner with Herron to begin the conversation well in advance. “The ideal situation is for us to accept a new project in the spring semester, so that we can use the summer to work on it as well, and then complete the assignment and present in the fall,” he said. “The businesses that partner with us seem very pleased and energized by the experience. They are learning something new, too.”


The need for conversations around race and sexual orientation remains timely, as recent uAzQoo77_400x400events demonstrate that while progress is being made, much more must be done to realize full inclusion, equality and justice. It begins with increasing our understanding so we may be effective advocates and allies.
These structured, 3½-day dialogues provide selected participants the opportunity to explore issues related to race or sexual orientation in a safe environment where all voices can be heard in a climate of civility and respect. They can help improve the campus culture, build an inclusive and welcoming community, and improve inter-office relations for faculty and staff alike.

Two dialogue opportunities are being offered for fall:
October: Dialogue on Race
Thurs., Oct. 22
Fri., Oct. 23
Mon., Oct. 26
Tues., Oct. 27 (9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.)
November: Dialogue on Sexual Orientation
Mon., Nov. 2
Wed., Nov. 4
Wed., Nov. 11
Fri., Nov. 13 (9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.)
9:00 A.M. – 4:00 P.M. (each day,except as noted)

Steps of the IGD Model:
Stage 1: Creating a Shared Meaning of Dialogue
Stage 2: Identity, Social Relations and Conflict
Stage 3: Issues of Equity, Fairness and Inclusion: “Hot Topics”
Stage 4: Alliances and Empowerment

Registration Process: Please express your interest in participating by responding to this Survey Monkey Link.  Respond by: Oct 16 (race dialogue) or Oct. 26 (sex. orient. dialogue)
*Note: These dialogues require general parity (i.e., 50/50) in representation among participants based on the selected social identity for the dialogue (people of color/white; LGBT/straight). Ultimate selection for the dialogues will be based on efforts to achieve this parity.

Yvonne Chaka Chaka “Princess of Africa” at IUPUI

Yvonne Chaka Chaka – internationally famous South African singer, songwriter, Chaka_Headshotentrepreneur, and humanitarian – is dubbed the “Princess of Africa” by her fans, including Nelson Mandela and Desmond Tutu.
She’ll be coming to Indianapolis October 12 and 13, sponsored by SOHO, a locally-based NGO that works in Swaziland, as well as various IUPUI units. Chaka Chaka will be speaking at IUPUI with Gail Masondo, author and life recovery coach, on: INDABA: Empowering Women and Youth in Africa & the U.S.

Monday, October 12th
IUPUI Campus Center, room 450

  • 1:30 – 2:45pm: Yvonne Chaka and Gail Masondo in Conversation
  • 2:45 – 4:00pm: Game-Changers Panel with Campus and Community Partners: What Can I Do?
    Ongoing Social Involvement and Resource Fair in CE 4th floor atriumAll events are free and open to the public. Learn more at:

Hourglass Is Back

For those of you who have been wishing for a return of Hourglass, it’s back! And this time, indianapolis-museum-of-art-dusk-david-pixelparableit will be held in BIG TENT at the Indianapolis Museum of Art 11/7 and 11/28!  And what’s BIG TENT, no less than a 40 foot diameter, 360 degree audio and visual environment, completely surrounding you in music and video.

We are very excited about this and hope you’ll mark the calendar with these dates.

A sixty-minute continuous arc of live and electronic music encouraging attendees to live in the moment with a community in motion. With Robin Cox -violin/composer, Shawn Goodman -bass clarinet, video by Ben Smith, and movement facilitated by Stephanie Nugent.,

11/7/15 at 4pm
Indianapolis Museum of Art, in the Toby Theater (as part of the Community Day “Secrets” event)

11/28/15 at 6pm
Indianapolis Museum of Art, in the Deer Zinc Pavilion (as part of the IMA’s “Silent Night” event)

Liberal Arts Sabbatical Series returns to IUPUI for 2015-16 school year

INDIANAPOLIS—Professors in the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue iu-logoUniversity Indianapolis will discuss their sabbatical projects throughout the 2015-16 school year. Topics include the process of creating the forged writings of Madeleine Hachard, growing up during the Nigerian civil war, and using online resources to teach drama.

The series is free and open to the public. The lectures will take place from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. in the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd., Room 268.

Friday, Oct. 9:Jing Wang, world languages and cultures, “Revealing Textbook Writers’ Perspectives.” Well-written textbooks are language instructors’ best friends; yet poorly prepared ones can burden instructors. This study interviews textbook writers to examine popular beginning and intermediate Chinese language textbooks used in the U.S. Study results reveal theoretical frameworks used by the textbook writers and consequently provide key information on textbook selection and language instruction—in Chinese and beyond.

Tuesday, Oct. 27: Daniella Kostroun, history, “The Invention of Madeleine Hachard and Other Discoveries About the 1727 Ursuline Mission to New Orleans.” Madeleine Hachard is considered Louisiana’s first female author, but the writings attributed to her are forgeries. Learn about the discovery of evidence documenting the fraud behind Hachard’s alleged writings as well as new insights about the pioneering Ursulines once we move beyond the “myth” of Hachard.

Friday, Nov. 13: David Craig, religious studies, “Religious Freedom and the Politics of Public Accommodations.” Given the controversy around Indiana’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act, how should we think about corporate religious freedom and public accommodations? Shifting the focus from individuals’ religious beliefs to organizations’ mission integrity may create more common ground.

Tuesday, Feb. 2: Una Osili, economics/philanthropic studies, “War and Human Capital: Growing Up During the Nigerian Civil War.” Civil conflict is an obstacle to development in the developing world. The Nigerian Civil War was the first modern civil war in sub Saharan Africa. Four decades later, this study documents the war’s significant, long-run economic impact. Those exposed to the war as children and adolescents exhibit reduced adult stature, as well as adverse education, health and marriage outcomes.

Friday, Feb. 12: Brian McDonald, English, “A Dramatic Difference! Enhancing the Teaching and Learning of Drama With Online Tools.” Canvas, IUPUI’s new online teaching and learning environment, has user-friendly features that enhance faculty opportunities and student experiences. How can these capabilities be used to develop assignments that integrate both the textual and performative aspects of dramatic literature?

Wednesday, March 16: Anne Royalty, economics, “What Happens When Physicians Work Together?” Multi-specialty physician practices are increasingly common. These integrated settings may make it easier to coordinate patient care for patients seeing more than one doctor in the practice. Do practices that include general practitioners and specialists improve health outcomes or eliminate wasteful spending?

Visitor parking is available for a fee in the Vermont Street Garage.

For more information or to RSVP, email

IUPUI to host seminar to motivate, prepare Hispanic students for college

INDIANAPOLIS — Nationally known spoken-word poet, hip-hop artist and actor Michael Reyes and other Hispanic professionals from various career fields will share theiMichael Reyes, META 2015 keynote speakerr success stories during an annual college preparedness program for Hispanic students. The program is designed to motivate and encourage the students to pursue a post-secondary education.

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, in partnership with DePauw University, Ivy Tech Community College, Indianapolis Public Schools and other community partners, will welcome about 300 Hispanic students from high schools across the state to IUPUI on Monday, Sept. 28, for the annual “META: Mapping Education Towards Achievement.”

META 2015 will take place from 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd. The workshop includes two career path sessions during which Hispanic and bilingual professionals will share how their high school and college educations have contributed to their career success. META students will also receive information about higher education admissions, scholarships and financial aid processes, and related immigration law.

Reyes will deliver the keynote address from 12:35 to 1:15 p.m. in Room 450 of the Campus Center.

Planning for college isn’t easy for any high school student, and for Hispanic students, particularly those who would be first-generation college students, the process can be even more challenging because of cultural differences and language barriers. More than 90 percent of those attending the workshop will be the first in their families to attend college.

Event organizers said Reyes’ success in the arts and communication field and his Chicano/Mexican background give him a direct connection to META students as a role model and inspiration.

As a leader in progressive and radical music, Reyes combines cultural stories of resistance, raw hip-hop and inspiring poems to reach youth and elders alike, challenging the main social ills faced by communities of color.

“He is great at telling narratives that cause his audience to think critically about our perception of Latinos,” said Cindy Gil, coordinator of Hispanic engagement initiatives in the Office of Community Engagement at IUPUI. “He also highlights truths about the struggles and successes faced when seeking educational achievement in the U.S.

“META students will immediately identify with someone who shares a similar identity, history and experience as them while being empowered through the arts and education.”

Reyes will also teach a workshop session about poetry, creative writing and spoken word. Gil said that focusing on skills explored in that session will not only be useful for students’ future arts endeavors but will also strengthen their abilities to prepare for and succeed in college, and to advocate for themselves in their high schools and communities. Reyes will also lead a workshop at 6 p.m. Sept. 29 in Campus Center Room 409.

IUPUI Chancellor Nasser H. Paydar, as well as representatives from the Consulate of Mexico in Indianapolis and the Office of Congressman Andre Carson, will deliver brief remarks during the workshop.

In addition to IUPUI, DePauw, Ivy Tech and IPS, META sponsors include La Plaza, Indiana Latino Institute, the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, the School of Informatics and Computing at IUPUI and Butler and Marian universities.

IU McKinney presents Constitution Day Program with review of Supreme Court cases

INDIANAPOLIS — The Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law will 472103_w296commemorate Constitution Day on Sept. 17 with the program “Review of Recent Supreme Court Cases.”

Professors from IU McKinney, on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus, will discuss issues in their areas of expertise raised in recent U.S. Supreme Court cases.

They include:

The event will be at 12:45 p.m. Sept.17 in Room 300, Inlow Hall, 530 W. New York St. It is open to the public and carries with it 1.3 hours of continuing legal education credit. The program is free, and registration is encouraged on the law school’s website.

Constitution Day commemorates the signing of the United States Constitution, which occurred Sept. 17, 1787. The law school celebrates the occasion every year with a public program.

Award winning alumnus Rogelio Gutierrez returns to speak at Made in Mexico opening September 30

The photography and installation-based art of Herron School of Art and Design alumni who herron_posterwork and live in the United States but share cultural and familial roots in Mexico will be featured in Made in Mexico, opening on Wednesday, September 30 with an artist’s talk, live performance and reception beginning at 6:00 p.m.

The exhibition, in the Berkshire, Reese and Paul galleries, will feature works by Leticia Alvarez, Susana Cortez (M.F.A. in Sculpture, 2013), Rogelio Gutierrez (M.F.A. in Printmaking, 2011) and Tommey Reyes (B.F.A. in Photography, 2005), curated by Linda Adele Goodine.

A companion video installation by Goodine, Made in Mexico, her place, almost her place, not her place, will open in the Marsh Gallery.

New works by Meredith Knapp Brickell, associate professor of art and art history at DePauw University, will open in the Basile Gallery. Brickell is one of the recipients of the 2015-16 Creative Renewal Arts Fellowship from the Arts Council of Indianapolis.

Gutierrez will present the visiting artist’s talk in the Basile Auditorium, to be immediately followed by Cortez’s live performance.

Gutierrez went on from Herron to a tenure track as an award-winning professor of printmaking at the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at Arizona State University-School of Art, Tempe. “I was extremely honored and grateful to be selected for the Herberger Institute School of Arts’ Endowed Professor of Art Award, which provides funding for research and travel,” he said. It allowed him to create the solo exhibition FARMAS, which debuted at Arts Visalia Visual Art Center in California and traveled to Casa Siglo XIX Museo-Sebastian in Chihuahua, Mexico. Its next stop is scheduled for the Slocomb Galleries at Middle Tennessee State University in spring 2016.

The California native studied at Herron because he “wanted to get out of my comfort zone in the West and see what the Midwest was all about; Indianapolis was the perfect place for that. Herron has a strong reputation in the academic print world and I was interested in the public aspect of the curriculum.”

His focus is on printmaking because “It is a democratic art form that is meant for the masses. Printmaking has a rich history of important Mexican printmakers like Leopoldo Mendez and Jose Guadalupe Posada who were a big part of the Mexican Revolution Movement. Printmakers and artists associated with that movement truly had an important message; they are some of my favorite artists and inspire me to make work that connects to a wide audience including your non-traditional art goer,” he said.

There is likely to be some lively political discussion during his talk, given the season: “Politics always make an impact in my work,” Gutierrez said. “As you know, I am in the ring of fire here in Arizona when it comes to immigration and Latino issues. I have a project that I am working on that is related to these issues; I will share it during my lecture.”

Terence Main is Herron’s 2015 Distinguished Alumnus

Terence Main (B.F.A. ‘76) is the 2015 recipient of the Distinguished Alumni Award. The herron_posterHerron Alumni Association gives the award to recognize outstanding alumni who have brought honor to their alma mater by distinguishing themselves professionally or through extraordinary service to the school and university.
Dean Valerie Eickmeier and Herron Alumni Association President Sara Love will present the award on Wednesday, October 28 at 6:00 p.m. in the Basile Auditorium in Eskenazi Hall.

Immediately following the presentation, Herron Gallery Director Colin Tuis Nesbit will lead a conversation with Main about works from Turning Line, an exhibition of his drawings that is opening in the Basile Gallery. Dean Eickmeier and Mark Rushman, curator of contemporary art at the Indiana State Museum, will join the conversation. A reception will follow.

Main went on from Herron to earn an M.F.A. degree from Cranbrook Academy of Art in 1978. His work is in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum of Fine Arts, the Denver Art Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston and the Indianapolis Museum of Art, among others.

Speaking of Main’s work, art critic Ronny Cohen described him as an “object-maker and sculptor who has been re-mapping the boundaries of design and art since the early 1980s.” The exhibit at Herron will provide insight to the role drawings play “in generating the fresh, bold and intriguing forms of the chairs, benches, tables and lighting structures that Main is known for.”

Main’s work is known around the world. Clodagh Design International commissioned him in 2014 to create Urban Dogs—cast stone, sculptural benches—for Abinginton House on the High Line in New York City. Via the Magen Gallery, Peter Marino commissioned Main to create Five, a cast aluminum bench that graces Dior showrooms from Florence to Shanghai.

Main joins recent recipients of the Distinguished Alumni Award including Steve Mueller (B.F.A. ’76), 2014; Lois Main Templeton (B.F.A. ’81 in Painting), 2013; Garo Antresian (’48 in Fine Arts), 2012; Mike Garber (B.F.A. ’97 in Visual Communications), 2011; David Bowen (B.F.A. ’99 in Sculpture), 2010; Leah Traugott (’46 in Painting), 2009; and Lois Davis (’47 in Painting), 2008.

Professor Publishes Second Volume of Authoritative Biography

Ray-Bradbury-UnboundFully established in the slick magazines, award-winning, and on the brink of placing Fahrenheit 451 in the American canon, Ray Bradbury entered the autumn of 1953 as a literary figure transcending fantasy and science fiction. In Ray Bradbury Unbound, Jonathan R. Eller continues the story begun in his acclaimed Becoming Ray Bradbury, following the beloved writer’s evolution from a short story master to a multi-media creative force and outspoken visionary.

Drawn into screenwriting by the chance to adapt Moby Dick for film, Bradbury soon established himself in Hollywood’s vast and overlapping film and television empires. The work swallowed up creative energy once devoted to literary pursuits and often left Bradbury frustrated with studio executives.

Yet his successes endowed him with the gravitas to emerge as a much sought after cultural commentator. His passionate advocacy in Life and other media outlets validated the U.S. space program’s mission — a favor repaid when NASA’s astronauts gathered to meet Bradbury during his 1967 visit to Houston. Over time, his public addresses and interviews allowed him to assume the role of a dreamer of futures voicing opinions on technology, the moon landing, and humanity’s ultimate destiny.

Eller draws on many years of interviews with Bradbury as well as an unprecedented access to personal papers and private collections to portray the origins and outcomes of Bradbury’s countless creative endeavors. The result is the definitive story of how a great American author helped shape his times.

“A thorough documentation of Bradbury’s career. . . . This warm, informative biography depicts him as a thoughtful and disciplined writer who helped make science fiction a respected literary genre.”–Kirkus

“Eller captures the joy of creations that new forms allowed Bradbury, such as the intensely visual interpretation of Moby Dick that he wrote for director John Huston. . . . Fans who know Bradbury only for his fiction are likely to enjoy this diverse look at his work and creative process.”–Publishers Weekly

“Intimate, conscientious, and triumphant, a truly profound examination of Bradbury’s accomplishments and legacy. Highly recommended for all sf lovers and those with an appreciation for non-fiction and literature.”–Library Journal

“Engaging. . . . Eller’s second volume of Bradbury’s biography is ultimately a melancholy and cautionary tale.”–Washington Post

“Few contemporary authors have been written about as extensively as Ray Bradbury, but no one has surpassed Jonathan Eller. In his previous study, Becoming Ray Bradbury, he captured the odd nature of Bradbury’s imagination perfectly in the context of his life and age — keeping a myriad of influences and ambitions in perspective. With the publication of Ray Bradbury Unbound, Eller not only confirms his position as the great comprehensive Bradbury scholar. He has also written what may be the best single account of a major science fiction author’s rise to fame and achievement.”–Dana Gioia, author of Pity the Beautiful and former chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts

Jonathan R. Eller is a Chancellor’s Professor of English at Indiana University-Purdue University in Indianapolis, the senior textual editor of the Institute for American Thought, and director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at IUPUI. Becoming Ray Bradbury was a runner-up for the 2011 Locus Award for best nonfiction book in the science fiction and fantasy field.