Demonstrating extraordinary generosity through legacy gifts

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Alumna Doris J. Brinkman (1950s) remembered Herron in her estate plans Image Herron staff

Ordinary people are demonstrating extraordinary generosity by leaving legacy gifts to Herron in their wills and estate plans. Each of their stories represents something important to them. Because of their commitment to Herron’s mission, their priorities will continue, and their gifts will remind us that we, too, can make a difference in the lives that follow.

 

Read about some of Herron’s friends and alumni who have done just that:

Ruth Lilly
Robert B. Berkshire
Doris Brinkman
Harry and James Esamann
Frank and Katrina Basile
Edith Moore

How do you get started?

Think beyond cash gifts made today. Options include a simple directive in your will or naming Herron as a beneficiary of your life insurance, pension plan, IRA or trust. Click here for bequest language.

As a professional school of Indiana University, Herron works closely with the IU Foundation as it stewards and maintains your gift. To learn more about other types of gifts and various ways to give visit IUF’s website.

Have you already remembered Herron in your plans?

Perhaps you have already remembered Herron in your will or estate plans. If so, we invite you to notify Herron’s Office of Development so that we can celebrate with you. We can help document your gift to help ensure your intentions are carried out in the future.

As always, your support may be given anonymously, if you prefer. Simply notify Herron’s development staff about your philanthropic plans.

Want to learn more?

Herron’s staff and faculty look forward to learning about your philanthropic plans today so that your generosity can be recognized during your lifetime. To learn more about leaving a legacy at Herron School of Art and Design, contact Kim Hodges at (317) 278-9472 or kshodges@iupui.edu or Glennda McGann at (317) 278-9477 or gmmcgann@iupui.edu

First Herron Open: Mini Golf Mega Art an unqualified success

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(r to l) IUPUI alumnus Carlos Knox, player development with the Indiana Fever; Herron Dean’s Advisory Board member Conrad Piccirillo; his daughter, Caitlyn Piccirillo; and Indiana Fever star forward Tamika Catchings enjoying the Herron Open. Image John R. Gentry Jr.

The first Herron Open: Mini Golf Mega Art, which took place in early June, was an unqualified success. Nearly 200 attendees were on hand to play the nine-hole miniature golf course inside Eskenazi Hall, created by teams of Herron students and faculty. The Herron Alumni Association designed a hole, too. It won the People’s Choice Award. The Sculpture Department’s hole, which came complete with students dressed as moles, won the Chairs’ Choice Award.

The event netted more than $30,000 in new scholarship support for Herron students.

Herron Open: Mini Golf Mega Art was selected as a NUVO Top Pick of the Week and featured in the Indianapolis Star’s 10 Things To Do. It was also covered by the Indianapolis Recorder, WTHR’s sports reporter Rich Nye, and mentioned on WFYI’s The Art of the Matter.

One thing is for sure (although at press time we don’t know exactly when) the event will return!

Central Indiana Community Foundation helps Herron’s art therapy program produce a skilled and in-demand workforce

UntitledJob placement is 100 percent for the first cohort of eight graduate students who earned a master’s degree in Art Therapy from Herron School of Art and Design this May, said Juliet King, program director and professor of Art Therapy. Launched only two years ago, the program has developed vigorously, in large part due to philanthropic support from individuals and foundations.

The Frank Curtis and Irving Moxley Springer Fund, a fund of the Central Indiana Community Foundation, put its support into bringing together Herron students—who must complete 1,000 hours of supervised, clinical training as part of their degrees requirements—and community members who can benefit from art therapy services.

Herron’s Art Therapy program is one of only 34 two-year, full-time, residential programs in the country—offering graduate art therapy education in preparation for the dual credentials of Registered Art Therapist and Licensed Mental Health Counselor.

Herron currently is working with nearly 30 community organizations to pair its art therapy students with programs that serve youths, adults, the aged and other vulnerable populations. Qualified professionals must supervise Herron’s students in a clinical setting. That requires investment.

Andrew Black, a grants officer of the Central Indiana Community Foundation, said “The Art Therapy grant was in alignment with The Frank Curtis and Irving Moxley Springer Fund because it promotes the making of art and provides important health and social services to improve the physical, mental and emotional well-being of people of all ages, many of whom are dealing with significant physical and/or mental health challenges.”

Frank began work at Eli Lilly and Company in 1937. He and his wife, Irving, became incredibly generous philanthropists. Both are now deceased, but their fund, established in 1998, will continue in perpetuity as they wished.

King said, “It’s exciting to see the full cycle of the impact of the program. We are helping children and adults cope with illness, injury and trauma while the graduate students gain the academic experience necessary to become a trained professional and contribute to the workforce of Indiana and beyond.” She added, “We are grateful to the Frank Curtis and Irving Moxley Springer Fund and CICF for the assistance in successfully developing the program.”

The program’s first eight graduates are Linda Adeniyi, Uriah Graham, Amy Granger, Katherine Hearn, Amanda Krieger, Heidi Moffat, Hillary Timmerman and Natalie Wallace. These alumni were hired by providers including Adult & Child Community Mental Health, MENTOR Network, Midtown Community Mental Health, Season’s Hospice, Legacy House, Meridian Health Services and Gallaudet University that provide school- and home-based counseling, health therapy and hospice care.

Nine students are projected to graduate in 2015 and 13 in 2016.

Black added, “Not only does this therapy provide counselors, therapists, or case workers with an additional and often times necessary alternative method for communication, it also provides some of our most vulnerable populations with a creative outlet that promotes self-expression, increases their ability to cope with their circumstances or challenges, and ultimately aids in their rehabilitative progress and contributes to their quality of life.”

To learn more about supporting Herron’s Art Therapy Program, contact Kim Hodges, Office of Development, at 317-278-9472 or kshodges@iupui.edu.

Furniture Design graduate students imagine a new version of Brunswick Billiard’s most iconic pool table

UntitledBrunswick Billiards President Brent Hutton approached Herron School of Art and Design to connect with the talented faculty and students in its Furniture Design Program. The task? To reimagine the Gold Crown pool table for its sixth edition. The Gold Crown is Brunswick’s most iconic table—preferred by the pros and tapped by Hollywood to serve as the centerpiece of such classic movies as The Color of Money and The Hustler.

Through the school’s Basile Center for Art, Design and Public Life, 11 furniture design graduate students got the chance to create a new version. The Basile Center pairs Herron students and faculty with real client projects. Everyone involved gets an education in the process.

Brunswick views pool as a more than a game. Each pool table is a finely crafted piece of furniture, so the pairing was perfect.

Over the years, Hutton’s exposure to Herron as a Bedford, Indiana native and an alumnus of Indiana University has made a favorable impression. He has spent lunches between business meetings in Indianapolis at Herron, looking at student work. “The thing I remembered most is the freshness of the ideas,” he said. “I really did not see that anywhere else, and at the time I was traveling to New York and Chicago.

“The fit for me,” Hutton continued, “was, unlike an industrial design school, this was studio design, and I thought leading edge in terms of art and thinking.” Hutton considered the leap he was about to take working with students. “It was a risk we took,” he said, “but I tell you, it could not have worked out any better.”

Guided by faculty members Cory Robinson, Katie Hudnall and Glen Fuller, a detailed specification provided by Brunswick and their own research, the students had the opportunity to work on a project that would have been an exhilarating and challenging assignment for a seasoned professional—refreshing the Gold Crown’s appeal to a tech culture and a female audience while retaining its iconic brand attributes.

At the end of June, three finalists remained; Sam Ladwig, Shelley Spicuzza and Colin Tury. When the designs were presented to a gathering of Brunswick Billiards’ top retailers, they met with an enthusiastic response. The students will gain more than a hefty notch on their belts; the first place designer wins an award of $2,500, and the two honorable mention designers will walk away with $500 each. A decision about which design goes into production is expected later this summer. We’ll keep Herronline readers updated as this story develops. Click the link below to hear an interview with the finalists produced by James Gray of WFIU radio. http://indianapublicmedia.org/arts/brunswick-billiards-iupui-team/

Funding Opportunities for Research Commercialization and Economic Success (FORCES)

imagesThe FORCES program is designed to support IUPUI researchers in the successful transformation of their research findings into commercially viable outcomes. The key goals of FORCES are to support: 1) realization of short-term projects that will enhance commercial value of IUPUI intellectual property assets, by facilitating commercialization of inventions, technologies, or other intellectual property derived from existing research projects, and 2) development of research initiatives that show great promise for commercialization of the research outcomes. The next RTR application deadline is September 15, 2014For grant guidelines and application forms, go to http://research.iupui.edu/funding/.

Enhanced Mentoring Program with Opportunities for Ways to Excel in Research (EMPOWER)

imagesThe Enhanced Mentoring Program with Opportunities for Ways to Excel in Research (EMPOWER) has been developed to support IUPUI faculty who are historically underrepresented and/or excluded populations in their discipline or area of scholarship and historically denied admission to higher education or that discipline, 1) to become successful in sponsored research and scholarly activity, and 2) to achieve significant professional growth and advancement. The program sustains mentorship opportunities through the EMPOWER Grant Program, supporting achievement of excellence in research and scholarly activity, and optimal attainment of academic career goals and objectives. The next EMPOWER application deadline is September 5, 2014. For grant guidelines and application forms, go to http://res! earch.iupui.edu/funding/.

NEH Challenge Grants

NEH LogoNEH challenge grants are capacity-building grants, intended to help institutions and organizations secure long-term support for their humanities programs and resources. Through these awards, many organizations and institutions have been able to increase their humanities capacity and secure the permanent support of an endowment. Grants may be used to establish or enhance endowments or spend-down funds that generate expendable earnings to support and enhance ongoing program activities. Challenge grants may also provide capital directly supporting the procurement of long-lasting objects, such as acquisitions for archives and collections, the purchase of equipment, and the construction or renovation of facilities needed for humanities activities. Funds spent directly must be shown to bring long-term benefits to the institution and to the humanities more broadly. Grantee institutions may also expend up to 10 percent of total grant funds (federal funds plus matching funds) to defray costs of fundraising to meet the NEH challenge. Because of the matching requirement, these NEH grants also strengthen the humanities by encouraging nonfederal sources of support.
Award Amount:
NEH will offer successful applicants a matching grant. The requested grant amount should be appropriate to the humanities needs and the fundraising capacity of the institution. The federal portions of NEH challenge grants have ranged in recent years from $75,000 to $500,000. Requests for more than $500,000 are unlikely to be funded at that level. Note that the program encourages requests for smaller grants for sharply defined purposes.
 
Fund-raising:
NEH challenge grants assist institutions in developing sources of support for humanities programs, and fundraising is an integral part of the long-term planning that challenge grants require. Persons raising the funds as well as those who will be directly responsible for the humanities programs should be fully involved in the planning from the outset. Grant recipients must raise, from nonfederal donors, three times the amount of federal funds offered. HBCUs, Tribal Colleges and Universities, and two-year colleges, however, are required to raise only two times the federal amount.
Eligibility:
With the exception of elementary and secondary schools (public or private) and school districts, any U.S. nonprofit institution (public agency, private nonprofit organization, federally recognized Indian tribal government) working wholly or in part with the humanities may apply for a challenge grant. Affiliated institutions (for example, a university museum) should consult with NEH staff on questions of separate eligibility. Institutions that support research, education, preservation, and public programming in humanities disciplines are eligible to apply for an NEH challenge grant.
 
Limitation:  One per campus  
Institutions may apply for only one NEH challenge grant in a calendar year.
To apply for IU Internal competition:
For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, by October 1, 2014 for internal competition.
·         1-2 page research statement briefly describing the proposed project, especially its humanities content, and the humanities credentials of the scholars and other staff who would be involved in planning and implementing the project. Also include plans for raising matching funds. Limitation does not include references.
·         A Letter from the Chair or Dean
·         2-3 page abbreviated CV for the PI
NOTE: Since this program requires a substantial fund raising activity, it is recommended that each Center or unit (department or school) works with the IU Foundation prior to the internal competition.

IU Internal Deadline: 10/1/2014

Preliminary Draft Deadline: 3/24/2015
Prospective applicants who wish to submit a preliminary draft proposal should do so four to six weeks before the application deadline.
NEH Proposal Deadline: 5/5/2015
Brief Description:
NOTE UPDATED INTERNAL DEADLINE: The NEH Program Officer indicated that selected applicants should begin raising required matches as early as December.
Updated guidelines will be posted at least two months in advance of the deadline listed. In the meantime, please use the guidelines for the previous deadline, to get a sense of what is involved in assembling an application.

2014-2015 IUPUI Conference Fund

imagesThe Office of Academic Affairs is pleased to announce matching support for academic conferences or symposia organized by faculty members or professional staff and convened in Indianapolis [preferably at IUPUI] between July 1, 2014, and June 30, 2015. Those events that bring external audiences to IUPUI will be given preference. Awards will be made up to $1,500 if matched equally by the school or department.

Requests must predate the conference or symposium by at least one month. The Office of Academic Affairs will review submissions and make awards. Successful applicants will acknowledge IUPUI support in all publicity and in any publications resulting from the conference or symposium.

Brief proposals (not exceeding two pages) should be submitted with the completed application form, and should include:

*topic, objectives, and description of the conference or symposium 
*venue 
*summary (up to one paragraph) of the background of each prospective and/or confirmed speaker or key participant 
*expected outcomes of the conference (impacts across the IUPUI campus, press releases, proceedings, publications) 
*budget: categories include honoraria, food, lodging, travel, and supplies (awardees should consult with the Office of Research Development to determine allowable expenses for receptions or social events)

Please submit IUPUI Conference Fund applications to Melissa Lavitt, Ph.D., Senior Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs [mlavitt@iupui.edu] in the Office of Academic Affairs, AO126.

The 2014-2015 IUPUI Conference Fund Proposal Form is available here.

NSF Cultivating Cultures for Ethical STEM (CCE STEM)

NationalScienceFoundationIU Internal Deadline: 11/12/2014
NSF Proposal Deadline: 2/17/2015
Brief Description:
Accepts proposals for innovative research projects to foster ethical STEM research in all of the fields of science and engineering that NSF supports, including within interdisciplinary, inter-institutional and international contexts. CCE STEM research projects will use basic research to produce knowledge about what constitutes responsible or irresponsible, just or unjust scientific practices and sociotechnical systems, and how to best instill students with this knowledge.
Proposed research should seek to provide answers to the following: What constitutes ethical STEM research and practice? Which cultural and institutional contexts promote ethical STEM research and practice and why?’ Factors one might consider include: honor codes, professional ethics codes and licensing requirements, an ethic of service and/or service learning, life-long learning requirements, curricula or membership in organizations (e.g. Engineers without Borders) that stress social responsibility or humanitarian goals, institutions that serve under-represented groups, institutions where academic and research integrity are cultivated at multiple levels, institutions that cultivate ethics across the curriculum, or programs that promote group work, or do not grade. Do certain labs have a culture of academic integrity? What practices contribute to the establishment and maintenance of ethical cultures and how can these practices be transferred, extended to, or integrated into other research and learning settings?
Successful proposals will include a comparative dimension, either 1) between or within institutional settings that differ along the factors suggested or other factors, or 2) Institutional Transformation (IT) awards, where the comparison is over time– before and after an intervention. For IT, investigators are expected to gather and report baseline data in the first annual report. (See the reporting section of this solicitation for additional reporting requirements for both types of awards).
Award Amount:
·         The anticipated funding amount each year is $3,050,000 for an estimated 6-8 Standard Grants. The maximum award duration is 5 years.
·         Estimated program budget, number of awards and average award size/duration are subject to the availability of funds.
·         Cost Sharing Requirements: Inclusion of voluntary committed cost sharing is prohibited.
Eligibility:
NSF expects project teams to include persons with appropriate expertise. This might include expertise in the domain or domains of science or engineering on which the project focuses, in ethics, values, evaluation, and pedagogy.
Limitation: One per University
To apply for IU Internal competition:
For consideration as an institutional nominee, submit the following documents electronically to limited submission, limsub@iu.edu, by November 12, 2014 for internal coordination. Although not required, it is recommended that you contact Donna Carter at limsub.iu.edu indicating your interest in this program to help expedite the review process.
·         1-2 page Project Narrative (limitation does not include references)
·         A Letter of Nomination from Chair or Dean
·         Abbreviated CV for the PI (not to exceed 3 pages)
IUPUI applicants must copy Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, on submissions.

IU units can display art from university collection

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“Untitled Triptych” by Betty C. Boyle, hangs in the office of IU’s associate vice president for marketing, Rob Zinkan. The watercolor painting is part of the university’s campus art collection. | Photo By Marjorie Richards

Most Americans spend the majority of their waking hours at work, so why not spend those hours in a space that inspires?

IU employees from all campuses can do just that by working with the university’s campus art curators to turn blank walls and empty corridors into beautiful conversation pieces.

Sherry Rouse, curator of campus art, and Katie Chattin, assistant curator of campus art, oversee IU’s Campus Art Collection, which includes all public art on IU campuses not displayed in museums, as well as hundreds of paintings, sculptures, drawings, textiles and more currently hidden away in storage.

Rouse said IU units willing to invest some money in bringing the artwork up to display quality can showcase world-class pieces specifically chosen to meet the needs of their campus spaces.

“Decorating isn’t what we do,” said Rouse, who explained she works hard to match clients with art they not only enjoy, but that is also appropriate for the location. A number of environmental factors, such as sunlight and accessibility, go into each decision, she said. Ultimately, it’s about what’s best for the art.

“I don’t hang artwork over drinking fountains,” Rouse said with a laugh.

Recent clients of Rouse include leaders of IU Communications’ Bloomington team, Rob Zinkan, IU’s associate vice president for marketing, and Tim Keller, director of Creative Services. Zinkan and Keller worked with Rouse to install three hanging sculptures and one painting at the unit’s office in the historic Von Lee building, along Kirkwood Avenue.

Zinkan, who first used IU’s campus art collection years ago at IUPUC, said overall employee feedback on the new office artwork has been very positive.

“We have a great team of creative professionals, so we wanted to have an environment that inspires great creative work,” he said.

Rouse said she was pleased too — especially about finding a home for three Morton C. Bradley sculptures, of which the university has more than 300 in storage.

“It’s obvious that (IU Communications employees) are clearly stimulated by what happened there,” she said.

Though salvage fees vary depending on each work of art, they are typically a fraction of the total value of the piece, Rouse said. For example, one might be able to display an $800 painting after paying only $100 for a new frame and installation by campus carpenters.

Once installation is complete, Rouse and her team are in charge of maintaining the pieces. Only the university’s art curators and campus carpenters are authorized to touch and move the pieces, so future plans for the artwork will always need to be vetted through them.

Those interested in displaying some of IU’s campus art collection in their campus buildings – particularly ones with public spaces – should contact Katie Chattin at kchattin@iupui.edu or 812-855-5360 to set up a consultation.

by Andrea Zeek