IUPUI Native American studies program to host event on defining, recognizing stereotypes

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IUPUI houses a Native American Student Alliance, offers a minor in Native American & Indigenous Studies and hosts events throughout the year for students, staff and the community.

Join IUPUI’s Native American studies community Saturday, Sept. 13, for a program for educators on how to define, discuss and learn to recognize stereotypes about American Indians.

The event, “Beyond American Indian Stereotypes: A Symposium for Educators,” will be held 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Eiteljorg Museum. Nationally-known educators will speak, attendees will be able to participate in breakout sessions and depart with a tool kit of resources to incorporate information about American Indians in a variety of interdisciplinary studies.

IUPUI houses a Native American Student Alliance, offers a minor in Native American & Indigenous Studies and hosts events throughout the year for students, staff and the community.

IUPUI has long seen the importance of providing the entire community with student-centered services, learning experiences and programs that enhance diversity and promote an inclusive atmosphere.

With these goals in mind, IUPUI is one of the few universities enthusiastically supporting a better understanding and appreciation of American Indian ingenuity, philosophy and contributions. Most important is the university’s willingness to work closely with the Pokagons and IUPUI’s American Indian programs in the development and implementation of these initiatives.

The Pokagons are the only federally recognized tribe in Indiana with a two-state designation of Indian Country status in northern Indiana and southern Michigan. IU, with eight campuses in Indiana, lies within Pokagon Band access for educational programs.

IUPUI houses a Native American Student Alliance, offers a minor in Native American & Indigenous Studies and hosts events throughout the year for students, staff and the community.

The “Beyond American Indian Stereotypes” event hopes to introduce educators to different perspectives of Native American cultures on a wide variety of topics and facilitate the inclusion of information about American Indians in a variety of interdisciplinary studies.

Register today by calling 317-275-1310 or learn more by visiting the Eiteljorg Museum’s event calendar.

Common Theme filling essential purpose for a focus on tough issues

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2013-15 Common Theme, “Find Your Voice: Hear My Voice.”

For Jane Luzar and Khadija Khaja, “respectful conversation and dialogue” is the glue that holds a large college campus together even when views are completely different.

That’s what they envisioned for the Common Theme at IUPUI, launched a year ago to help the campus deal with issues that could lead to polarized discourse in teaching and learning climates.

Khaja is a faculty member from the School of Social Work and the Academic Affairs Faculty Fellow responsible for the 2013-15 Common Theme, “Find Your Voice: Hear My Voice.”

Khaja facilitates the program, working closely with mentor Dean Jane Luzar of Honors College, the director of project, and an interdisciplinary collaboration of Common Theme steering committee faculty, staff, community members and students.

There are numerous events planned for 2014-15, but the two most significant on this year’s Common Theme calendar include keynote talks by the distinguished Rev. Harold Good on September 10 and by author/filmmaker Phil Cousineau on Nov. 19. Cousineau wrote “Beyond Forgiveness, Reflections on Atonement: Healing the Past, Making Amends, and Restoring Balance in our Lives and World.”

For Luzar, Common Theme fills a vital role campus role.

“We wanted to develop a way for our campus to discuss important issues without them getting bogged down in politics or personalities,” Luzar said. “Common Theme helps achieve that goal.”

Luzar is convinced that IUPUI is on the right track to encourage a free flow of ideas and generate thought, particularly among students. For example, she said, Good is known for helping shepherd Northern Ireland in a direction toward fewer guns and a peace agreement among previously warring factions.

“If you think about it, that’s a rather timely subject for those of us in Indianapolis,” Luzar said, referring to the escalating number of shootings and murders in our city. She is hopeful that Good’s commitment to peace, justice and reconciliation might rub off on guests attending Good’s IUPUI appearance.

Campus reaction to Common Theme events has been solid, the Honors College official noted.

Khaja and co-investigators Kathy Grove, Dan Griffith and Ian McIntosh led 33 focus groups to help discover when discussions tended to break down. “It was clear that students, faculty, staff and some community members wanted more cross-campus conversations,” she said.

For example “we heard all the time that faculty didn’t feel comfortable expressing themselves or their opinions in class because they worried that some students would penalize them for being too conservative or too liberal,” Luzar noted. “And we heard the same things from some students about faculty reaction.”

The focus groups identified a wide array of hot-button issues, including bullying and cyber-bullying, race, religion, sexual identity and many more.

Events and workshops have been well attended to try and address some of the issues. But it can be difficult to measure the value of a program like Common Theme can be, Luzar said.

The project is drawing wide interest. The collaboration between Common Theme and the Office for Intergroup Dialogue and Civil Community will be discussed at this month’s annual conference and expo of the College and University Professional Association for Human Resources. And the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks invited Khaja to speak on lessons learned and how to implement such a program.

“Khaja’s research has helped us find ways to get schools otherwise siloed to work together and focus on key topics,” Luzar said. “That’s useful to building our campus community.”

by Ric Burrous

IUPUI alumna receives Kennedy Center leadership award for arts accessibility program

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Kristina Johnson

INDIANAPOLIS — An IUPUI alumna recently received a prestigious national award for a project helping to open the world of cultural arts to people with disabilities.

Kristina Johnson, a 2013 museum studies graduate in the School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, is the recipient of a Kennedy Center Leadership Exchange in Arts and Disability Award in recognition of her work with AcessIndy.

Part of IUPUI’s Cultural Heritage Research Center, AccessIndy is a program designed to unite museum and cultural arts professionals as they work toward improving access and inclusion within their organizations. In addition to developing a Web-based resource library, AccessIndy has been offering a series of roundtable discussions for museum and cultural professionals about access and inclusion in the Indiana arts.

“I had discovered NYC’s Museum Access Consortium at the (2012) LEAD conference and used that group as a model for what we’re doing in Indianapolis,” Johnson said. She also credits conference presentations by Betty Siegel, president emeritus of Kennesaw State University, and Lynn Walsh, manager of guest access and inclusiveness at Chicago’s Children Museum, as inspirations for AccessIndy.

Leadership Exchange in Arts and Disability Awards are given to “outstanding arts administrators and institutions whose leadership and work furthers the field of accessibility.” Johnson was one of four recipients honored during the 14th annual LEAD conference held Aug. 1 to 6 in Chicago.

“To the extent that a LEAD Award recognizes not just impact in the community, but outstanding professionals in the field, I can think of no more deserving recipient than Kris Johnson,” said Elizabeth Kryder-Reid, associate professor of museum studies and director of the Cultural Heritage Research Center. “Her work in Indianapolis is a classic example of what happens when seeds are planted in fertile ground. … It has been a catalyst for sharing information across institutions and for individual organizations to build their capacity to be more inclusive and accessible to all audiences.”

Johnson launched AccessIndy in November 2012. She plans to expand the program as a statewide resource for all cultural arts professionals in Indiana and continue promoting the program as a model for other regions across the U.S.

The LEAD Award “is probably the most meaningful award I could have received because it’s a big ‘thumbs up’ from people whom I deeply admire and validates that I’m on the right track in my career,” Johnson said. “That being said, I’m not doing this work all by myself. I have the support of the Cultural Heritage Research Center, the museum studies program, the Indiana Arts Commission and many museum professionals in Indianapolis. I see this award as a spotlight on Indy as an emerging epicenter of progress in the movement to broaden access and inclusion in the cultural arts.”

IUPUI Center for Translating Research Into Practice (TRIP) Community Showcase

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Dr. Jeffrey Kline, Bantz-Petronio Translating Research into Practice Award

Join us for an opportunity to engage with several of IUPUI’s distinguished faculty scholars as they present their translational research and illustrate how they improve peoples lives at the IUPUI TRIP Community Showcase. The Showcase will also feature a presentation by Dr. Jeffrey Kline, the Bantz-Petronio Translating Research into Practice Award recipient. Dr. Kline will present on “Facial expression as a diagnostic tool for pulmonary embolism.”

This reception is an opportunity to talk with Dr. Kline and other TRIP faculty one-on-one, to ask questions, and to explore the research ideas they are pursuing. Appetizers and refreshments will be served. The event is free and open to the public, but RSVPs are requested. Parking is available in the adjacent Vermont Street Garage for a nominal cost. We hope you will join us, meet some of the talent at IUPUI, find connections, and learn about cutting-edge research.

Wednesday, September 17, 2014
5–6:30 p.m.
IUPUI Campus Center
Room 450
420 University Blvd
Indianapolis, Indiana 46202

RSVP

Projects:
Facial expression as a diagnostic tool for pulmonary embolism
Jeffrey Kline
Bantz-Petronio Translating Research into Practice Award recipient- School of Medicine

Challenges and strategies for interdisciplinary undergraduate engagement: an international perspective
Stephanie Boys- School of Social Work
Carrie Hagan- Robert H. McKinney School of Law

Improving health care systems for access to care by underserved patients
Brad Doebbeling- School of Informatics

Authenticity issues of presenting culture to tourists
Yao-Yi Fu- School of Physical Education and Tourism Management

Translating patient experiences into patient education: Impact of the liver transplantation process on everyday lives
Patricia Scott- School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

Development and testing of an implementation strategy for the housing first model
Dennis Watson- Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health and the IU Center for Health Policy

Upcoming Grant Deadlines for New Frontiers in the Arts & Humanities

IU Limestone SymbolThe IU Vice President for Research invites  proposals for the 2014-15 New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities grants program. The objective of the New Frontiers program is to help faculty members from all Indiana University campuses by supporting the initial stages of path-breaking and transformative programs of scholarly or creative activity in the arts and humanities.

In 2014–2015 there will be four funding programs:

New Frontiers of Creativity and Scholarship grants of up to $50,000 to assist in the development of innovative works of scholarship or creative activity (deadline October 15, 2014).

New Frontiers Experimentation grants of up to $15,000 to fund the very preliminary stages of new trajectories in research or creative activity (deadline January 15, 2015 and June 15, 2015).

New Frontiers/New Currents grants of to $20,000 to fund workshops, symposia, or small conferences with major distinguished thinkers on timely topics of significant and broad interest (deadlines February 2, 2015 and August 1, 2015).

New Frontiers Exploratory Travel Fellowships of up to $3,000 to support national and international travel for faculty pursuing new and innovative research projects (deadlines October 15, December 15, February 15, April 15).

The full Request for Proposals, with further information about each of these programs, is available on-line at: http://research.iu.edu/funding_newfrontiers.shtml

All proposals must be submitted electronically, via the online application form at the address above.

If you have questions about the New Frontiers program, please review the RFP and the Frequently Asked Questions available at http://research.iu.edu/funding_newfrontiers.shtml, or contact Faith Kirkham Hawkins, Chief of Staff to the Vice President for Research (fhawkins@iu.edu).

If you would like help preparing your proposal or if are looking for collaborators, please feel free to contact the Director of the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, Jason M. Kelly, at iahi@iupui.edu

Rev. Harold Good to speak on peace in Northern Ireland and Indianapolis roots

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The Rev. Harold Good

INDIANAPOLIS — The Rev. Harold Good, an internationally renowned peacemaker, will be at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis on Sept. 10 to speak about Indianapolis and the road to peace in Northern Ireland.

As former president of the Methodist Church in Ireland, Good played a key role in Northern Ireland’s peacemaking process.

The lecture, at 1 p.m. in the Lilly Auditorium of University Library, is free and open to the public.

“Rev. Good is in a unique position to speak about issues of peace, justice and reconciliation,” said Robert White, chair of the Department of Sociology in the IU School of Liberal Arts. “Along with the late Father Alec Reid, Rev. Good was one of two members of the clergy trusted enough by paramilitaries that he was asked to witness the final decommissioning of weapons of the Provisional Irish Republican Army in 2005.”

A native of Ireland, Good spent several years in Indianapolis as a student and pastor before returning to Ireland in the 1970s.

Good has demonstrated a lifetime commitment to peace, justice and reconciliation. During his time as Methodist Church leader, Good joined Northern Ireland’s other main church leaders to press for peace and engage in talks with U.K. Prime Minister Tony Blair. Known for his ministry on the streets of Northern Ireland, Good displayed both physical and spiritual courage in working to reconcile the Protestant and Catholic communities, and urging the end to violent action and reaction.

The lecture is sponsored by the IUPUI Common Theme on Civil Discourse, the Office of International Affairs, the Sociology Department of the IU School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI Honors College, and the Methodist Church of Indiana and Christian Theological Seminary.

National journal features papers from IUPUI Frederick Douglass conference and IUPUI professor as guest editor

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Frederick Douglass

INDIANAPOLIS — The latest issue of a leading scholarly journal about African American history includes the publication of several papers presented during an Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis conference on the life and work of Frederick Douglass.

IUPUI professor John R. Kaufman-McKivigan served as guest editor for “Rediscovering the Life and Times of Frederick Douglass,” a special edition of the Journal of African American History.

The Association for the Study of African American Life and History recently announced the publication of “Rediscovering the Life and Times of Frederick Douglass” as the Winter/Spring 2014 volume of the association’s Journal of African American History.

Started in 1916 as the Journal of Negro History by Carter G. Woodson — who founded the Association for the Study of African American Life and History and the observance of what is now known as Black History Month — the Journal of African American History is a peer-reviewed quarterly. The journal is considered the “jewel” of the association and the premier publication in its field.

“I am very pleased that the Journal of African American History has printed the papers delivered at a stimulating symposium held on our campus in October 2012,” Kaufman-McKivigan said. “It is my hope that these highly insightful essays will draw attention to this often overlooked gem of an autobiography by Douglass.”

Kaufman-McKivigan, the Mary O’Brien Gibson Professor of United States History in the Indiana University School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, is project director and editor of the Frederick Douglass Papers Edition, one of four scholarly publications housed in the Institute for American Thought, also part of the School of Liberal Arts. He specializes in antebellum America, Civil War studies, American ethnic history and American working-class history.

According to an Association for the Study of African American Life and History press release, the journal contributors are leading historians of 19th-century U.S. and African American history who offer insightful and well-documented analyses of “Life and Times of Frederick Douglass,” one of three autobiographical works.

A runaway slave turned abolitionist in antebellum America, Douglass became an influential writer and thinker of the Civil War and Reconstruction periods. The 2012 IUPUI conference celebrated the publication of the Frederick Douglass Papers’ first scholarly edition of Douglass’ final autobiography.

The special journal issue includes one article written by Kaufman-McKivigan, “Stalwart Douglass: ‘Life and Times’ as Political Manifesto.” He also wrote the journal’s introduction.

In addition to chapters on the Douglass autobiography, the special issue includes about 20 book reviews, as well as three essay reviews such as “12 Years a Slave: Narrative, History and Film.”

The Winter-Spring 2014 issue is available for purchase in hard copy and for course use through association publications director Karen May at kmay@asalh.net. A digital version soon will be available through ISTOR Current Journals.

More Hospitals Use the Healing Powers of Public Art

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‘Mike Kelley 1,’ video art by Jennifer Steinkamp at the Cleveland Clinic. The Cleveland Clinic Center for Medical Art and Photography

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Researchers are learning more about the precise ways paintings and other works of art help patients and families in the healing process. With studies showing a direct link between the content of images and the brain’s reaction to pain, stress, and anxiety, hospitals are considering and choosing artworks based on the evidence and giving it a higher priority than merely decoration for sterile rooms and corridors.

“These are not just accoutrements or aesthetics anymore,” says Lisa Harris, a nephrologist and chief executive of Eskenazi Health, affiliated with the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis.

With a $1.5 million budget from donors, she says, the health system commissioned 19 artists to create original works to support “the sense of optimism, vitality and energy” for the Sidney & Lois Eskenazi Hospital, which opened last December. “This is right down the fairway of what we need to be doing to promote health,” Dr. Harris says.

“Paths Crossed,” by Maine artist Aaron T. Stephan, is a large, spiraling wooden sculpture composed of six intertwined ladders suspended from the ceiling in the hospital’s two-story main concourse.

To Dr. Harris, it is a visual representation of the hospital’s approach to care, with “lives intertwined as we go from health to sickness and back to health again,” she says. People have reacted differently, she notes. “Some see it as DNA, and some see it as a roller coaster.”

Anne Berry, 81, says, “It makes me think of flying.” She visits the hospital for procedures and tests such as a mammogram and always takes time to look at the artworks. She has “white coat syndrome,” which makes her nervous about going to a doctor, but she says, “I have found the art and the environment at Eskenazi makes it less stress-inducing for me.”

Close to half of hospitals have arts programs, which include art therapy classes and musical performances, according to a 2009 report from the Society for Arts in Healthcare, now known as the Arts & Health Alliance.

Permanent art displays are most prevalent, and the trend continues to grow, says Steven Libman, outgoing executive director and now a consultant for the nonprofit.

Though many hospitals are in a budget crunch, funds for art are often provided by philanthropy, or built into construction budgets of new facilities.

For help with choosing art works, consultants, hospital curators and art committees turn to studies such as those gathered in the nonprofit Center for Health Design’s “Guide to Evidence-Based Art.”

Research suggests patients are positively affected by nature themes and figurative art with unambiguous, positive faces that convey a sense of security and safety.

Some studies have found that patients are likely to respond negatively to art with negative images or icons. Abstract art also often rates low in patient preferences compared with representational art.

One 1993 study found that patients exposed to a nature image experienced less postoperative anxiety and were more likely to switch to weaker painkillers than those who viewed an abstract image or no image.

A 2011 study found that nature images helped calm restless behavior and noise levels in two Texas emergency department waiting rooms.

A 2012 review of neuroscience studies published in the Health Environments Research & Design Journal found that images of fearful or angry faces, ambiguous subject matter, high novelty and unfamiliarity, lack of realism and sharp contours elicit negative emotional responses in the brain and suggested they should be avoided.

Hospitals aren’t shying away from art whose content is open to interpretation or might make patients reflect. In the spring 2014 issue of the same journal, the Cleveland Clinic reported that patients surveyed on its contemporary collection—which includes abstract and nonrepresentational imagery by some prominent artists—reported a significant positive effect on their experience and on mood, stress, comfort and expectations.

The study suggested patients may respond positively to the diversity of the collection and to other types of art in addition to nature art.

Still, says Iva Fattorini, a dermatologist and global chairwoman of the Cleveland Clinic’s Arts & Medicine Institute, the focus is on art that is “not disturbing, but uplifting and diverse.” The aim “is to take your mind away from the disease and replace the time you are losing inside hospital with some beauty.”

Some patients in its survey reported they were motivated to get out of bed to view the artwork. Patients with post-traumatic stress disorder and generalized anxiety disorder reported the most significant positive improvement in mood.

One popular piece is “Mike Kelley 1″ by artist Jennifer Steinkamp; an illuminated video installation of a large tree that cycles through the seasons, changing color and moving as if in a breeze.

Heather Kreinbrink says when her daughter Allison had a stroke at age 12 in 2010 and was hospitalized for a week, she and her husband, Rod, found looking at the installation outside the children’s wing provided a sense of calm amid their fear and exhaustion.

“It ended up being something we would go to every day for peace and to come to terms with what was happening,” she says.

When Allison was discharged, her parents brought her to see it. “It made me think as I saw other kids being pushed in wheelchairs by their parents, how awesome it is to be able to have something like that to take your mind of everything you are going through,” says Allison, now 16. Each year when she returns for a checkup, she poses for a picture in front of the tree.

Jeffrey Rothenberg, an obstetrician and gynecologist and chief medical officer at Indiana University Health’s University Hospital, says he learned to make glass art himself as a stress reliever. He is chairman of a public art committee for Indiana University School of Medicine’s Eugene and Marilyn Glick Eye Institute that called on artists with ties to Indiana to create works for a building devoted to vision.

“People sent in a lot of great pictures, but some of them were blurry or misty mornings”—not the best visuals, Dr. Rothenberg says, for “people getting their eyes dilated so they can’t see.”

The committee has chosen a range of works aimed at promoting healing and providing comfort, mostly purchased and some donated after the works were selected, including a glass wall sculpture and mobile by Dr. Rothenberg that he donated. Images in health-care settings shouldn’t be shocking, Dr. Rothenberg says, yet “at the same time you don’t want something so boring and generic that people walk away.”

The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., chooses art to create a “healing environment,” says Chrysanthe Yates, director of its Lyndra P. Daniel Center for Humanities in Medicine.

Despite artistic merit, not all works fit the bill. For example, the hospital passed on an option to display a show of works about the Vietnam War, “which were beautiful but very stark and for obvious reasons not appropriate,” she says.

Mayo also exhibits pieces on loan from Jacksonville’s Cummer Museum of Art and Gardens. The institutions are collaborating on a program for Alzheimer’s and dementia patients and their caregivers, who meet at the museum for conversations about art works as a means of soothing and relieving stress. A research study is planned to measure those effects.

Write to Laura Landro at laura.landro@wsj.com

 

TEDxIndianapolis and the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute Team Up for Free Ticket Giveway

TEDxIndianapolis and Entanglements LectureTEDxIndianapolis and the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute have teamed up for a free ticket giveaway for two inspiring and entertaining events during the month of October.

Just tweet or retweet this announcement between September 3 and September 8 with the hashtag #IAHITEDx, and you will be entered into our drawing to win a ticket to the Entanglements Lecture on October 8 and a ticket to TEDxIndianapolis on October 21.

The Entanglements Lecture is a new series that brings together scientists, humanists, and artists to discuss “big questions” that affect all of us.  At the inaugural event on October 8, E.O. Wilson, two-time Pulitzer Prize winning biologist and recipient of the TED Prize, will join Katherine Hayles, specialist in the culture of cyborgs and virtual bodies, in a conversation that will take us on a journey to answer one of humanity’s most fundamental questions: “What makes us human?”

TEDxIndianapolis is a self-organized, local platform to share big, TED-like ideas. Organized by Jim Walker with the incredible support of partners, sponsors, and volunteers, this year’s TEDxIndianapolis will explore the theme Get Outside IN at Hilbert Circle Theatre on October 21, 2014. Tickets are on sale now. More than 500 people attended the first TEDxIndianapolis, DESIGN LEARNING, at the Indianapolis Museum of Art in 2012 (photos here/videos here). And more than 1,200 people converged at last year’s TEDxIndianapolis, held on October 22, 2013, at the Hilbert Circle Theatre. It was a day of Big Ideas, conversation, and inspiration related to the theme of MIX IT UP, a rousing mashup of local and national speakers and performers, plus recorded TED talks and engaging interactive experiences. Read more about the 2013 TEDxIndianapolis in last year’s event wrap-up.

More event details are below.


Entanglements Lecture Series
E.O. Wilson and Katherine Hayles, “What Makes us Human?”
October 8, 2014 | 7:00-8:45
Indianapolis Central Library, Clowes Auditorium
$35 general admission | $15 students

When did we become human? Are human and animal societies that much different? Do we already live in an age of cyborgs?

E.O. Wilson and Katherine Hayles visit Indianapolis as part of the new IAHI Entanglements Lecture Series.  Entanglements brings together scientists, humanists, and artists to discuss “big questions” that affect all of us.

At our inaugural event, E.O. Wilson, two-time Pulitzer Prize winning biologist, will join Katherine Hayles, specialist in the culture of cyborgs and virtual bodies, in a conversation that will take us on a journey to answer one of humanity’s most fundamental questions: “What makes us human?”

Over the course of this evening, Wilson and Hayles will discuss the evolution of human consciousness, the relationship between biology, society, culture, and technology, and the future of humanity.  This will be an event that changes the way you think about yourself and your world.

EO WilsonDr. E.O. Wilson is Professor Emeritus and Honorary Curator in Entomology at Harvard University.  He is a two time Pulitzer Prize winner, a National Medal of Science awardee, a Crafoord Prize recipient (given by the Academy in fields of science it does not cover by the Nobel Prize), and a TED Prize Winner.  In fact, he has received over 100 awards throughout his career. He is the author of numerous books, including SociobiologyThe AntsThe Diversity of Life,ConsilienceThe Social Conquest of Earth, and Letters to a Young Scientist.  During his career he has explored the biggest questions through the littlest creatures — ants. He is a prominent environmental advocate, and in March 2014, the government of Mozambique opened the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Laboratory in Gorongosa National Park — a tribute to Wilson’s worldwide impact.

Katherine HaylesDr. Katherine Hayles is Professor of Literature at Duke University.  Her book, How We Became Posthuman, published in 1999, was named one of the best 25 books of 1999 by The Village Voice and received the Rene Wellek Prize for Best Book in Literary Theory.  She is the author of multiple books, including The Cosmic Web, Chaos Bound, Writing Machines, How We Think, and My Mother Was a Computer.  A recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, two NEH Fellowships, a Rockefeller Residential Fellowship, and a National Humanities Center Fellowship, Dr. Hayles  is a leading social and literary critic with interests in cyborg anthropology, digital humanities, electronic literature, science and technology, science fiction, and critical theory.

The Entanglements Lecture Series is made possible through the generous support of the Efroymson Family Fund, the IU School of Dentistry, and the Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute.

This event is a collaboration between the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, Indiana Humanities, and the Spirit and Place Festival.

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TEDxIndianapolis
October 21, 2014 | 8:00-5:30
Hilbert Circle Theater
$69 early bird admission | $79 after Sept. 30

Like all TEDx events, TEDxIndianapolis is a self-organized, local platform to share big, TED-like ideas. Organized by Jim Walker with the incredible support of partners, sponsors, and volunteers, this year’s TEDxIndianapolis will explore the theme Get Outside IN at Hilbert Circle Theatre on October 21, 2014.Tickets are on sale now. 

More than 500 people attended the first TEDxIndianapolis, DESIGN LEARNING, at the Indianapolis Museum of Art in 2012 (photos here/videos here). And more than 1,200 people converged at last year’s TEDxIndianapolis, held on October 22, 2013, at the Hilbert Circle Theatre. It was a day of Big Ideas, conversation, and inspiration related to the theme of MIX IT UP, a rousing mashup of local and national speakers and performers, plus recorded TED talks and engaging interactive experiences. Read more about the 2013 TEDxIndianapolis in last year’s event wrap-up.

 

“In the Shadow of Terror: Providing Healthcare on the Northern Cameroon-Nigeria Border ”

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Dr. Ellen Einterz, Director of the Kolofata District Hospital and Chief Medical Officer for the Kolofata Health District

Over the past several years, northeastern Nigeria has been wracked by violence promulgated by a group of extremists whose stated aim is to topple the status quo and establish a universal caliphate based on Islamic law. Thousands have died, and at least a million left homeless since the carnage began. Border areas in neighboring countries, including Cameroon, have been touched by the climate of terror, military reaction, and the flight of refugees.

Since 1990, Dr. Ellen Einterz, an IU graduate, has lived on the border between Cameroon and Nigeria’s Borno State. She is the Director of the Kolofata District Hospital and Chief Medical Officer for the Kolofata Health District. In her talk, she will briefly explore the conflict in its historical and present day context and provide an account of her recent personal experience as a physician in the exceptionally poor corner of Africa being rocked by this tragedy.

This lecture is presented by Medical Humanities & Health Studies and the IUPUI Global Health Student Interest Group and generous support from The IUPUI Office of International Affairs, The Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, and the Africana Studies Program in the School of Liberal Arts.