Herron’s summer exhibitions range from photography to painting to sculpture and video

Herron School of Art and Design’s 2015 summer exhibitions will feature works by five herron_posterartists in a range of media from photography to painting to sculpture and video.

A reception in Eskenazi Hall on July 10 from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. will open the galleries, which are free and open to the public. The exhibitions continue through Jul 31.

Michelle Given lives and works in Indianapolis and has taught at Murray State University as well as Indiana University. Her work in this show includes interior spaces, landscapes and cityscapes, and video.

Stacey M. Holloway, Herron alumna (B.F.A. 2006) and former faculty member,is an assistant professor of sculpture at the University of Alabama, Birmingham. Her cache of poignant yet whimsical dioramas sold out at a recent gallery show in New York, so she has promised to make new works for this exhibition.

Valerie Eickmeier, dean of Herron, will exhibit selected works created during her recent sabbatical that meld real experiences and observations with imagined and reinterpreted images.

These paintings are based on changing sequences in nature as well as contemplation of the underlying forces that create change. In the Marsh Gallery, recent works by Marianne Glick will be on display. The civic leader and philanthropist began painting in 2004 as she searched for a creative outlet to replace gardening during the winter. She describes herself as an abstract expressionist who works mostly in watercolor and acrylic. The Basile Gallery will feature works by R. Stephen Lehman. A prosthodontist by
profession, Lehman began his love of photography in college shooting campus parties. He likens his seriousness about the medium to that of legendary cellist Pablo Casals,
who was once asked why, at 93, he continued to practice three hours a day. Casals replied, “I’m beginning to notice some improvement.”

Parking Information
Park courtesy of The Great Frame Up Indianapolis in the visitor section of the Sports Complex Garage (west of Herron’s Eskenazi Hall), or park on the upper floors of the
Riverwalk Garage (south of the Sports Complex Garage) until 6:00 p.m. Park on any floor after 6:00 p.m. Bring your parking ticket to the Herron Galleries for validation.

IU Alumni Association honors six volunteers for their service

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — During its annual Alumni Leaders Conference on June 4 to 6, the thIndiana University Alumni Association will honor five individuals for their service and volunteer leadership to the IUAA and acknowledge a sixth person who received an award in May.

Four alumni volunteers will receive the IUAA President’s Award, established in 1993 to pay tribute to their service to the organization. It is the highest award given by the IU Alumni Association to a volunteer leader. One volunteer received his President’s Award during the Asia-Pacific Alumni Conference in Bali in May.

The IUAA also will present the Gertrude Rich Award, honoring the memory of the wife of Claude Rich, director of the IUAA from 1948 to 1968. It is given to a spouse or partner of an alumni leader who has exemplified the spirit of Gertrude Rich in making outstanding contributions to the IUAA.

The 2015 recipients of the IUAA President’s Award are Pam Berke, BS’92; Tin S. “Philip” Chua, MBA’88; Kimberly J. Davis, MS’78; Michael J. Garber, BFA’97; and Nancy L. Hamblin, BS’78, MS’82.

Also being presented at the Alumni Leaders Conference is the Gertrude Rich Award, which will be awarded to Gwendolyn May-Barlow.

Pam Berke

Berke, of Centennial, Colo., has a long history of service to the Colorado Chapter of the IU Alumni Association. She has held several offices in the chapter, including secretary for more than 10 years. She is credited with helping to shape the current board structure. Even after stepping down, she has continued to be a major part of the chapter and one of the main contributors to its events. She has served as the chapter’s representative to the IUAA Executive Council, as an IU student recruiter and as an assistant for Kelley School of Business events.

Tin S. “Philip” Chua

In the past few years, Chua, as president of the Singapore chapter of the IU Alumni Association, has contributed to its significant growth and to the development of regional chapters. In 2013, he organized and led his team to host an alumni dinner for President Michael A. McRobbie and Provost Lauren Robel for more than 170 people. He has served as an executive career coach and participated in the Marshall Goldsmith training in 2014. He is a dedicated student recruiter. He has facilitated and strengthened institutional partnerships for IU that have benefited the Kelley School of Business, Jacobs School of Music and Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. His President’s Award was bestowed during his attendance at the recent Asia-Pacific Alumni Conference in Bali.

Kimberly J. Davis

Davis’ skills as an educator, writer, presenter and video producer have served her well in her association with the IU Alumni Association. She has served on the IUAA Executive Council and has a long affiliation with the IU GLBT Alumni Association, serving on the board twice and as president from 2001 to 2005. Still on the advisory board for the GLBT Student Support Services Office, Davis, of Bloomington, Ind., has mentored countless youth. She has participated on numerous panels regarding a wide range of GLBT topics. She received the GLBTAA Distinguished Alumni Award in 2014 and the GLBT Spirit Award in 2004.

Michael J. Garber

Garber, of Carmel, Ind., has been a diligent volunteer for the IU Alumni Association for several years, representing the Herron School of Art and Design on the association’s Executive Council. He has served on the Herron Alumni Association board as a member, secretary/treasurer and president, and he still holds honorary membership on the board. He has been involved with the annual IUPUI Alumni Holiday Night at the Children’s Museum and has offered insight for Herron alumni programs. He donates his time and talent as a designer to help advance the mission of the Herron Alumni Association.

Nancy L. Hamblin

Hamblin, of Munster, Ind., has gone above and beyond in her volunteer service to the IUAA. She has served two terms on the IU Alumni Association Executive Council and has been on the IUAA Board of Managers as a member, vice chair, chair-elect, chair and past chair. She has served the IUAA Lakeshore Region chapter as a board member and scholarship chair. In addition, she has served on the IU Northwest Chancellor’s Board of Advisors, its executive committee and its philanthropy committee. She also has served on the IU School of Education Board of Visitors and volunteered with the IUAA Student Alumni Association.

Gwendolyn May-Barlow

The 2015 recipient of the Gertrude Rich Award is Gwendolyn May-Barlow of Chicago. She is an IU advocate, encouraging the best and brightest of her students at the City College of Chicago to investigate IU for their college experience. May-Barlow participated fully during the term of her husband, Michael Barlow, BFA’85, as IU Alumni Association chairman in 2010-11. She is an IUAA life member and served as a host for a 2013 Hoosier Travelers trip, “Treasures of Southern Africa.”

The IU Alumni Association is dedicated to serving the university and its diverse alumni, students and friends. As one of the nation’s largest alumni organizations, serving more than 600,000 graduates worldwide, the IUAA provides many programs and services to its members, nonmember alumni and the university. For more information, call 800-824-3044.

An interactive discussion looks at landscape painting as a mirror of life’s relationships

INDIANAPOLIS — Landscape painting has long provided humans with an artistic form for The Mirror of Landscape Advertcontemplating the relationship between nature, society and culture.

In an interactive discussion this week, New York-based artist Rebecca Allan and Jason M. Kelly, associate professor of history and director of the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Arts and Humanities Institute, will engage the audience in a conversation about the role of landscape painting in mediating our relationship with the environment and with each other.

The Mirror of Landscape” discussion takes place at 7 p.m. Thursday, June 4, at the DeBoest Lecture Hall, Indianapolis Museum of Art, 4000 Michigan Road.

Tickets are free and available online.

The discussion will explore five paintings, created between 1750 and 2015. The event will end in a visit to the Indianapolis Museum of Art’s Pont-Aven gallery to examine Paul Gauguin’s “The Flageolet Player on the Cliff.”

This event is presented by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the Indianapolis Museum of Art and the Rivers of the Anthropocene project.

Herron grad’s personal blog of ‘Things Organized Neatly’ takes international award

INDIANAPOLIS — “Let me organize your things,” said Austin Radcliffe, and with those five 476770_w296words the Herron School of Art and Design graduate accepted the 2015 People’s Voice Webby Award for Personal Blog/Website during the 19th Annual Webby Awards on May 18.

Presented by the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences, the Webby Awards honors excellence on the Internet, in the categories of websites, advertising and media, online film and video, mobile sites and apps, and social. This year’s 344 winners were chosen from nearly 13,000 entries from all 50 states and more than 60 countries.

Radcliffe’s award-winning website, “Things Organized Neatly,” includes images of just that — things organized neatly — created and curated by him.

His latest creation, “Springs Organized Neatly,” was created specifically in celebration of his Webby award; the award logo and trophy are springs. The photo was shot in collaboration with Brooke Shanesy.

“Images on my blog come from artists, mainly photographers, all over the world,” Radcliffe said. “I have featured approximately one photo every day for the last five years, so I couldn’t have done it all myself. The site has become a documentation of the trend/style of organizing things neatly.”

Other posts include:

A child’s make-believe super hero costume
Nicholas Jacobsen’s objects left behind in an old plumbing company.
Robert Wilson’s neatly organized cup and saucers for the launch of a new line of ceramics.
Jim Golden’s hair barrettes.
Renee Altov’s disassembled 1980s Mitsubishi Colt.

During the star-studded awards ceremony in New York, Radcliffe and other Webby winners received their Webby statues, a silver spring, and acknowledged their wins in five-word acceptance speeches, a Webby tradition.

“It is very exciting to be recognized by such a prestigious Internet award, for a blog project I started while at Herron,” Radcliffe said. “The awards ceremony was surreal and definitely memorable. I don’t know exactly what it will lead to, though I have already gotten a few new emails from creative agencies who want to work together.”

A resident of Cincinnati, Radcliffe graduated from Herron, on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus, in 2012 with a major in fine art and art history. His organized things have earned him an invitation to work with Tate Galleries in London, a book deal and more than 350,000 Tumblr followers.

Heineman Foundation Seed Money for Start-up and New Projects

Brief Description:
The purpose of the Foundation is to provide seed money to start-up projects and new 227604_w296projects within existing organizations for a maximum of three to five years. The Foundation’s general areas of interest are the following:
· Programs that enable economically challenged women to enter and remain in the workplace
· Environmental research that will help prevent, reduce and/or eliminate water degradation
· Live music performance for education and outreach
· Research into prevention and treatment of childhood illnesses
· Programs that enable youth to think, create, and communicate effectively
· Programs that support and promote high achievement in music, science, and literature

Award Amount:
Grants are funded once a year, following the November board meeting. Multi-year grants are not given. The average range of donations is $20,000 to $50,000, per annum.

Eligibility:
The Foundation seeks projects in proximity to their directors. Although applications from other states are not excluded, those applicants (Indiana included) should be aware that their chances to receive funding are remote.

Limitation: One per Indiana University
Do not accept multiple submissions per year from an organization.

To apply for IU Internal competition:
For consideration as an institutional nominee, submit the following documents electronically to limited submission, limsub@iu.edu, by July 1, 2015 for internal coordination. To expedite the review process, we request that investigators who intend to submit a proposal send an email 1 week before the internal deadline with the intended investigator names/affiliations and proposal title to limsub@iu.edu with the subject line: L0954 Notice of Intent.

1. A summary of the project for which you are requesting funding, limited to 400 words.
2. Your project’s budget, and how many years the project has existed.
3. Abbreviated CV, not exceeding 3 pages, or a biosketch for the PI

IUPUI applicants must copy Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, on submissions.

IU Internal Deadline: 7/1/2015
Foundation Application Deadline: 9/1/2015

Limited Submission URL: http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=3543

Stanczykiewicz named director of The Fund Raising School at IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy

INDIANAPOLIS — Bill Stanczykiewicz has been appointed director of The Fund Raising School-mnibrd05-11-2014sp1d00120140510img-inibrd09-03-2013s11sq7a2m and senior lecturer in philanthropic studies at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, located on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus.

Stanczykiewicz currently is president and CEO of the Indiana Youth Institute, a statewide nonprofit that promotes healthy youth development and academic achievement by providing capacity-building professional development, technical assistance and funding for educators, youth workers and other community leaders.

“Bill is a proven chief executive, a seasoned fundraiser and a passionate spokesperson for the unique value The Fund Raising School brings to each nonprofit it serves,” said Amir Pasic, dean of the school. “As we address the training needs of those who lead society’s vital organizations, we are fortunate to have him lead this effort and join the leadership of the IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy.”

Stanczykiewicz will forge The Fund Raising School’s future as it begins its fifth decade of service to fundraisers, volunteers and nonprofit leaders. Dedicated to teaching ethical fundraising for more than 40 years, The Fund Raising School has taught on six continents and has a global network of more than 43,000 alumni.

“The Fund Raising School is the nation’s premier resource for teaching practical skills and useful strategies that strengthen fund development for a diverse range of nonprofit organizations,” Stanczykiewicz said. “I look forward to continued expansion of The Fund Raising School’s extraordinary impact as part of the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy’s unique and comprehensive efforts to improve philanthropy and the world.”

As director, Stanczykiewicz will oversee the professional development program’s 10-course, research-based curriculum and its team of more than 50 faculty members whose expertise and hands-on experience bridge the academic and professional perspectives.

Herron student creates Scout the raccoon as mascot for School of Medicine safety program

INDIANAPOLIS — The pediatrics unit at Indiana University School of Medicine has a new safety “hero.”475795_w296

Dressed in red high-top tennis shoes, and a red shirt emblazoned with a golden capital “S,” Safety Scout – a blue raccoon – is the newly commissioned mascot for the Division of Safety Education and Outreach, part of the IU School of Medicine Department of Pediatrics at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

The adorable raccoon beat out cats, dogs, squirrels, rabbits and even a skunk vying for the role of safety mascot.

Scout is the creation of Herron School of Art and Design junior Trisha Mason, one of 10 illustration and drawing students who presented preliminary concepts for potential mascots at the urging of foundation studies professor Vance Farrow. All 10 had previously tackled some character design as students in Herron associate professor Kathleen O’Connell’s Illustration II course.

Safety Education and Outreach Director Susan Stanley said her division has wanted a mascot for a number of years. She turned to Herron, also part of the IUPUI campus, for help after designs submitted from professional illustrators didn’t capture the essence needed.

The mascot character needed to be gender neutral, expressive, cute and cuddly. It needed a wardrobe, too, including de rigueur items like a bike helmet and life jacket. It also needed to appeal to parents, but especially to children in a broad age range — because accidents are the leading cause of death in children ages one to 14.

Mason’s choice of a raccoon as a mascot sprang from personal experience. “We had a little raccoon family living under our porch in Mooresville,” Mason said.

As for Scout’s blue fur and red clothing, “I was drawing from different superheroes,” Mason said. “I got the color scheme from Superman.”

Developing the mascot is Mason’s first paid art job. Images of Scout will appear on the safety brochures, flyers and other resources the division distributes by mass mailings and during community events throughout Indiana with the focus on preventing accidental injuries to children and seniors.

The safety education and outreach unit annually distributes 30,000 pieces of literature on various topics, including bike, outdoor, water and fire safety. Scout will appear on Riley Red Wagon series material which is available in English and Spanish.

Users can also download copies of safety literature from the IU School of Medicine Safety Store website .

Scout is scheduled to make his first appearance on safety literature in early 2016, and could later make the transition to a costumed character.

Religion, Spirituality & The Arts Seminar

Please join Rabbi Sasso on Wednesday, June 3 from 6:00pm-8:00pm in Shelton RSA Exhib June 2015_Page_2Auditorium at Christian Theological Seminary for a reception and art opening.

We are also inviting artists to apply for the 4th round of workshops held this Fall. Please see attached Call for Entry and pass this along to any artists you think might enjoy this experience and connection with other artists.

Artist applications will be accepted for round 4 starting May 19 through, and including, June 8, 2015.

Applicants may be anyone in the community who is active (as a professional or amateur) in one of the artistic disciplines. Selected applicants must be able to make a commitment to attend all six seminar sessions and engage in open and respectful dialogue. There will be a matriculation fee of $100. Seminar participants will produce creative work to be performed and/or exhibited in a public forum.

Please visit our webpage below.

https://www.butler.edu/religion-arts

Emerging Voices: You Are A Writer

Emerging Voices is a literary fellowship that aims to provide new writers, who lack access, thwith the tools they will need to launch a professional writing career. The eight-month fellowship includes:

PROFESSIONAL MENTORSHIP: Emerging Voices Mentors are carefully chosen from PEN Center USA’s membership and from professional writers based in Los Angeles. The Mentor-Fellow relationship is expected to challenge the fellow’s work and compel significant creative progress. Over the course of the fellowship, Emerging Voices Fellows and Mentors should meet three times in person, and be in contact at least once a month. In these three meetings, Mentors will offer written feedback on the Emerging Voices Fellows’ work in progress. Authors who have been mentors in the past include Ron Carlson, Harryette Mullen, Chris Abani, Ramona Ausubel, Meghan Daum, and Sherman Alexie.

CLASSES AT THE UCLA EXTENSION WRITERS’ PROGRAM: Participants will attend two free courses (a 12-week writing course and a one-day workshop) at UCLA Extension, donated by the Writers’ Program. Program Manager will assist the Emerging Voices Fellows with course selection.

AUTHOR EVENINGS: Every Monday, fellows will meet with a visiting author, editor or publisher and ask questions about craft. Fellows must read each visiting author’s book before the evening. A schedule of Author Evenings will be distributed at the first Emerging Voices orientation meeting. Authors who have participated in the past have included Jonathan Lethem, Percival Everett, Maggie Nelson, Cynthia Bond, Aimee Bender, Jerry Stahl, and Bruce Bauman, senior editor of the literary magazine Black Clock.

MASTER CLASSES: After completing the UCLA Extension Writers’ Program courses, Emerging Voices Fellows will enroll in a Master Class. The Master Class is a genre-specific workshop with a professional writer that affords fellows the opportunity to exchange feedback on their works in progress. Previous Master Class Instructors have included Diana Wagman, Alex Espinoza , and Paul Mandelbaum.

VOLUNTEER PROJECT: All Emerging Voices Fellows are expected to complete a 25-hour volunteer project that is relevant to the literary community. A few of the organizations that have participated included WriteGirl, 826LA, Cedars-Sinai Hospital, and STARS – San Diego Youth Services.

VOICE INSTRUCTION CLASS: The Fellowship will provide a one-day workshop with Dave Thomas, a professional voice actor. The Emerging Voices Fellows will read their work in a recording studio and receive instruction on reading their work publicly.

PUBLIC READINGS: Fellows will participate in three public readings, The Welcome Party, Tongue & Groove Salon, and the Final Reading. Fellows have read in various venues and events including the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, Silver Lake Jubilee, Skylight Bookstore, The Standard, Downtown LA. and Hotel Café. For the past five years, the fellowship has culminated in a Final Reading held in Hammer Museum’s Billy Wilder Theater, showcasing the progress each fellow has made in his or her work.

STIPEND: The fellowship includes a $1,000 stipend, given in $500 increments.

Participants need not be published, but the fellowship is directed toward poets and writers of fiction and creative nonfiction with clear ideas of what they hope to accomplish through their writing.

Deadline for applications: August 10, 2015
The Emerging Voices Fellowship runs from January to July.

Download the application here.

The Mirror of Landscape: An Interactive Discussion with Rebecca Allan and Jason M. Kelly

The Mirror of Landscape AdvertDate: June 4, 2015
Time: 7 pm
Location: DeBoest Lecture Hall, Indianapolis Museum of Art
Tickets are free and available here

Landscape painting has long provided humans with an artistic form for contemplating the relationship between nature, society, and culture. It is a profoundly engaging and intellectually powerful mode of expression that has served a host of purposes over the last 300 years — from buttressing social hierarchy to criticizing injustice to highlighting scientific discovery to expressing human hopes and anxieties.

In this interactive discussion, New York based artist Rebecca Allan and Dr. Jason M. Kelly, Associate Professor of History and Director of the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, will engage the audience in a conversation about the role of landscape painting in mediating our relationship with the environment and with each other. We will explore five paintings, created between 1750 and 2015. The discussion will end in a visit to the IMA’s Pont-Aven gallery to examine Paul Gauguin’s Flageolet Player on the Cliff.

Presented by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the Indianapolis Museum of Art, and the Rivers of the Anthropocene Project.