Reading at the Table | Health Care as a Social Good: Religious Values and American Democracy

Presenter: David CraigDavid Craig Image
Date: 2/2/2016
Time: 11:30-1:00 PM
Location: University Club

Register here.

David M. Craig traveled across the United States to assess health care access, delivery and finance in this country. He interviewed religious hospital administrators and interfaith activists, learning how they balance the values of economic efficiency and community accountability. He met with conservatives, liberals, and moderates, reviewing their ideas for market reform or support for the Affordable Care Act. He discovered that health care in the US is not a private good or a public good. Decades of public policy and philanthropic service have made health care a shared social good. Health Care as a Social Good: Religious Values and the American Democracy argues that as escalating health costs absorb more and more of family income and government budgets, we need to take stock of the full range of health care values to create a different and more affordable community-based health care system. Transformation of that system is a national priority but Americans have failed to find a way to work together that bypasses our differences. Craig insists that community engagement around the common religious conviction that healing is a shared responsibility can help us achieve this transformation—one that will not only help us realize a new and better system, but one that reflects the ideals of American democracy and the common good.

Internal Funding | IU Collaborative Research Grants 2015-16 Request for Proposals

Indiana University Collaborative Research Grants program is accepting proposals Indiana University-logothrough February 15, 2016. The full Request for Proposals is available online, but allow me to highlight a few elements of the program.

The IUCRG program is designed to encourage new faculty collaborations across traditional disciplinary, campus, school, or departmental boundaries. We seek proposals from teams of faculty from different disciplines, campuses, schools, or departments.

The IUCRG program is particularly targeted toward collaborations focused on new, innovative, or potentially transformative research that is fundamentally shaped by the collaborative nature of the team – partners doing things together that could not be undertaken without the partnership.

IUCRG funding is intended as seed funding to help develop pilot data or proof-of-concept evidence that will serve as the basis for future proposals for external funding. We seek proposals that represent a first, defined stage in a larger research trajectory that will attract external funding for subsequent stages.

The IUCRG program is open to projects in a variety of disciplines: Biological/Life Sciences (non-medical); Physical Sciences (physics, chemistry, astronomy, chemistry, geology/Earth sciences); Engineering; Computer Science and Informatics; Health and Medical Sciences; Social and Behavioral Sciences. (Teams including faculty in the arts and humanities are welcome to apply, but projects focused within the arts and humanities should be directed toward IU’s New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities program.)

Please visit the full Request for Proposals for more information, and contact Faith Hawkins(fhawkins@iu.edu or IUCRG@iu.edu) if you have questions.

Press Release: Five finalists selected for IU Grand Challenges research program

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Five teams have been selected to submit full proposals for IU Vice President of Research Fred Cate Imagefunding through the Indiana University Grand Challenges Program, the most ambitious research program in the university’s history.

The program, launched in September, will invest up to $300 million over five years to address some of the most urgent challenges facing Indiana and the world.

The finalists were selected from 21 teams of IU faculty members that submitted preliminary proposals in November. Applicants represented 20 schools on five IU campuses across the state.

“The Grand Challenges program offers a unique and exciting opportunity for IU to lead the way in developing responses to our society’s most complex and important problems,” said IU President Michael A. McRobbie. “The number of faculty members who participated in the preliminary proposals we received strongly reflects our faculty’s commitment to transformative, innovative and interdisciplinary research that benefits the people of Indiana, the nation and the world.”

The selected preliminary proposals and their team leaders are:

  • “Health Equity in Indiana and Beyond,” David Burr, Distinguished Professor and associate vice chancellor for research at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, and Michael Reece, professor and associate dean at the IU School of Public Health-Bloomington.
  • “Preparing for Change: Sustaining Nature’s Assets, Public Health and Human Well-Being,” Ellen Ketterson, Distinguished Professor in the IU Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences’ Department of Biology.
  • “Shaping Our Future: Knowledge, Science and Governance for Sustainable Water Resources,” Todd Royer, associate professor in the IU School of Public and Environmental Affairs in Bloomington.
  • “Transforming Environmental Protection and Health for Indiana and Beyond,” Joseph Shaw, associate professor in the IU School of Public and Environmental Affairs in Bloomington.
  • “Precision Medicine Initiative,” Anantha Shekhar, associate vice president for clinical affairs at IU and executive associate dean for research at the IU School of Medicine on the IUPUI campus.

All preliminary proposals were evaluated by a faculty review committee, which recommended a subset for further consideration to McRobbie, who named the five selected for development into full proposals.

IU Vice President for Research Fred Cate, whose office is overseeing the Grand Challenges Program, noted that all five proposals selected for further development focused on medicine or the environmental science and policy, which are recognized strengths of IU.

“While we received proposals from a wide variety of fields, these five proposals impressed the reviewers as not only strong in their own right but as addressing issues of particular importance to the people and economy of Indiana,” Cate said. “Moreover, these proposals draw effectively on a wide range of strengths at IU, including not only health care and environmental science, but basic sciences, information technology, and public policy and management.”

Over the next four months, Cate said, members of the Office of the Vice President for Research and other campus and university offices will work with the teams to develop the strongest proposals possible.

In addition to substantial financial support, the IU Grand Challenges Program will also provide up to 30 new faculty positions, as well as support for faculty startup needs, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, equipment and facilities for each funded proposal.

Full proposals from the finalists are due April 18, and McRobbie is expected to announce the one or two to be funded in June. More information on each proposal is available at the Grand Challenges Program website.

RESEARCH NOTICE| ArtPlace National Creative PlaceMaking Fund – Limited Submission

Limited Submission: http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=3697Indiana University-logo

IU Internal Deadline: 1/20/2016

Registration Deadline: 2/16/2016

ArtPlace Application Deadline: 3/2/2016

Brief Description:

The National Creative Placemaking Fund invests in planning and development projects where arts and culture play a central role. ArtPlace actively seeks to build a portfolio of funded projects that is a microcosm of the varied creative placemaking strategies used across the United States through this program. Since 2011, the National Creative Placemaking Fund has invested in 227 projects across 152 communities of all sizes in 43 states and the District of Columbia.
If you are thinking about a project that:

1. Focuses on a neighborhood or other geographic community

2. Is looking to work on a community challenge related to agriculture/food; economic development; education/youth; environment/energy; health; housing, immigration; public safety; transportation; or workforce development

3. Has a way that artists, arts organizations, and/or arts activities can help address that challenge

4. Will have a way of knowing whether the project has made progress on the challenge then you should think about submitting an application.

Award Amount:

The National Creative Placemaking Fund generally provides support between $50,000 and $500,000 for individual projects. There is no required match. Despite not requiring a match, ArtPlace values its investments’ ability to leverage additional federal, regional, and local public/private funding.

Limitation: One per Indiana University

Applicants may only submit one application per year (determined by EIN).

To apply for IU Internal competition:

For consideration as an institutional nominee, submit the following documents electronically to limited submission, limsub@iu.edu, by Jan 20, 2016 for internal coordination. To expedite the review process, we request that investigators who intend to submit a proposal send an email 1 week before the internal deadline with the proposal title to limsub@iu.edu with the subject line: L1016 Notice of Intent.

Project information that includes:

1. Project Title

  • a description of the community where the project will take place. Image describing the community to someone who knows nothing about it. [900 characters including spaces]
  • the community planning and development challenge/opportunity that this project will address? [900 characters including spaces]
  • how the will project deploy arts and culture to address this planning and development challenge or opportunity? [900 characters including spaces]
  • what will be different in this community when this project is completed? [900 characters including spaces]
  •  no more than 1/2 page of any other pertinent information that you’d like to include.

2. Abbreviated CV, not exceeding 3 pages, or a biosketch for the PI

IUPUI applicants must copy Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, on submissions.

RESEARCH NOTICE| NEA Art Works & Challenge America – Limited Submission

Internal Campus Deadline: 1/20/2016Indiana University-logo

Art Works – NEA Feb deadline
http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=3692
NEA Application Deadline: 2/18/2016


Art Works – NEA July deadline

http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=3693
NEA Application Deadline: 7/14/2016

Challenge America Fast-Track
http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=3694
NEA Application Deadline: 4/14/2016

For Complete Guidelines: https://www.arts.gov/grants/apply-grant/grants-organizations

ARTWORKS Brief Description:

The guiding principle of “Art Works” is at the center of everything we do at the NEA. “Art Works” refers to three things: the works of art themselves, the ways art works on audiences, and the fact that art is work for the artists and arts professionals who make up the field. Art works by enhancing the value of individuals and communities, by connecting us to each other and to something greater than ourselves, and by empowering creativity and innovation in our society and economy. The arts exist for beauty itself, but they also are an inexhaustible source of meaning and inspiration. The NEA welcomes projects that:

  • Are likely to prove transformative with the potential for meaningful change, whether in the development or enhancement of new or existing art forms, new approaches to the creation or presentation of art, or new ways of engaging the public with art;
  •  Are distinctive, offering fresh insights and new value for their fields and/or the public through unconventional solutions; and
  • Have the potential to be shared and/or emulated, or are likely to lead to other advances in the field.

See the website to determine a specific discipline’s deadline (Feb or July).

ARTWORKS Award Amount:

  • Grants generally will range from $10,000 to $100,000. No grants will be made below $10,000. Grants of $100,000 or more will be made only in rare instances, and only for projects that the Arts Endowment determines demonstrate exceptional national or regional significance and impact. In the past few years, well over half of the agency’s grants have been for amounts less than $25,000.
  • All grants require a nonfederal match of at least 1 to 1. For example, if an organization receives a $10,000 grant, the total eligible project costs must be at least $20,000 and the organization must provide at least $10,000 toward the project from nonfederal sources.

Grants awarded under these guidelines generally may cover a period of performance of up to two years. The two-year period is intended to allow an applicant sufficient time to plan, execute, and close out its project, not to repeat a one-year project for a second year.

CHALLENGE AMERICA Brief Description:

The Challenge America category offers support primarily to small and mid-sized organizations for projects that extend the reach of the arts to underserved populations — those whose opportunities to experience the arts are limited by geography, ethnicity, economics, or disability. Age alone (e.g., youth, seniors) does not qualify a group as underserved; at least one of the underserved characteristics noted above also must be present. Grants are available for professional arts programming and for projects that emphasize the potential of the arts in community development. This category encourages and supports the following objective:

  • Engagement: Engaging the public with diverse and excellent art. CHALLENGE AMERICA Award Amount:
  • All Fast-Track grants are for $10,000.
  • All grants require a nonfederal match of at least 1 to 1. For example, if an organization receives a $10,000 grant, the total eligible project costs must be at least $20,000 and the organization must provide at least $10,000 toward the project from nonfederal sources.
  • Grants awarded under these guidelines generally may cover a period of support of up to two years. The two-year period is intended to allow an applicant sufficient time to plan, execute, and close out its project, not to repeat a one-year project for a second year.

Grants generally are smaller in scope and shorter in duration than other projects supported under these guidelines. It is anticipated that most projects – including planning and close-out time – will be substantially shorter.

Limitation: One per Campus

An organization may submit only one application under these FY 2017 Art Works guidelines, with few exceptions:

  • One each for a parent organization that comprises separately identifiable and independent components such as the IU Art Museum, Traditional Arts Indiana, WFIU and WTIU.
  • One from each campus as the lead for a distinctly different project.

This shared limitation of one per campus applies to L0406 Challenge America Fast-Track (4/14/2016 deadline) AND L0468a&b Art Works (both 2/18/2016 and 7/14/2016 deadlines).

To apply for IU Internal competition:

For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, by January 20, 2016 for internal competition. To expedite the review process, we request that investigators who intend to submit a proposal send an email 1 week before the internal deadline with the intended investigator names and affiliations and proposal title to your campus representative with the subject line: NEA Notice of Intent.

  • 1-2 page Project Narrative (limitation does not include references) listing the discipline of interest at the top.
  • A letter of support from Chair or Dean (letter must include IU units which will be contributing required match)
  • Abbreviated CV, not exceeding 3 pages, or a biosketch for the PI

Research Notice| NEA Art Works: Creativity Connects – Limited Submission

Limited Submission URL: http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=3695Indiana University-logo

IU Campus Internal Deadline: 1/20/2016
NEA Application Deadline: 3/3/2016

URL For Guidelines: https://www.arts.gov/grants/apply-grant/grants-organizations

Brief Description:
Creativity Connects is an initiative that will show how the arts are central to the country’s creativity ecosystem, investigate how support systems for the arts have changed, explore how the arts connect with other industries, and invest in innovative projects to spark new ideas for the arts field.

A key component to the Creativity Connects initiative is a pilot grant opportunity in the Art Works category to support partnerships between arts organizations and organizations from non-arts sectors that include, but are not limited to, business, education, environment, faith, finance, food, health, law, science, and technology.

Art Works: Creativity Connects grants will seek to benefit the arts and non-arts sectors by:

  • Demonstrating the value of working with the arts.
  • Supporting the infrastructure for the arts to work in new ways with new sectors.
  • Building bridges that create new relationships and constituencies.
  • Creating innovative partnership projects to advance common goals.

Award Amount:

  • All grants require a nonfederal match of at least 1 to 1. For example, if an organization receives a $20,000 grant, the total eligible project costs must be at least $40,000 and the official applicant organization must provide at least $20,000 toward the project from nonfederal sources.
  • Grants generally will range from $20,000 to $100,000. No grants will be made below $20,000. Grants of $100,000 or more will be made only in rare instances, and only for projects that we determine demonstrate exceptional national or regional significance and impact.
  • The National Endowment for the Arts’ support of a project can start no sooner than January 1, 2017. Grants awarded under these guidelines generally may cover a period of performance of up to two years.

Eligibility:

Art Works: Creativity Connects grants require a partnership between an arts organization and an organization from a non-arts sector. An arts organization must serve as the official applicant and have a non-arts partner confirmed at the time of application.

Limitation: One per campus

  • An organization may submit only one application for an Art Works: Creativity Connects grant.
  • An organization that submits an application to Art Works: Creativity Connects is still eligible to submit an application to other National Endowment for the Arts funding opportunities including other areas of Art Works (L0468a & L0468b) and Challenge America (L0406). In each case, the request must be for a distinctly different project.

To apply for IU Internal competition:

For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, by January 20, 2016 for internal competition. To expedite the review process, we request that investigators who intend to submit a proposal send an email 1 week before the internal deadline with the intended investigator names and affiliations and proposal title to your campus representative with the subject line: L1015 Notice of Intent.

  •  1-2 page Project Narrative (limitation does not include references)
  •  A letter of support from Chair or Dean (letter must include IU units which will be contributing required match)
  • Abbreviated CV, not exceeding 3 pages, or a biosketch for the PI

Reminder| IU Collaborative Research Grants program: Informational Sessions at IUPUI and IUSM, January 8th, 2016

As you may be aware, the 2015-16 IU Collaborative Research Grants program Request for Proposals is available on-line (http://research.iu.edu/funding_collaborative.shtml). The IUCRG program is Indiana University-logodesigned to foster new collaborations among faculty members working on research that will significantly advance a field or break new ground in the sciences, social sciences, and behavioral sciences.

Over the past five years, we have awarded just over $5 million to 65 teams composed of 222 IU faculty members. Teams of researchers from different disciplines, departments, schools or campuses who have not previously worked together in the proposal’s subject matter are eligible to submit proposals, which are due on Monday, February 15th, 2016.

We will be hosting two information workshops on Friday, January 8th. Please join us to learn more about the program and to garner some advice for writing a successful proposal.

The sessions will be held as follows:

10:30 – 11:30 am, IUPUI University Library, Room 1126
2:00 – 3:00 pm, IUSM Research 2, Room E101, 950 West Walnut Street(adjacent to Walther Hall)

Update: Division of Preservation and Access: Research and Development (formerly Preservation and Access Research and Development Grants)

Deadline
21 Jun 2016- for Projects Beginning January 2017National Endowment For The Humanitites Logo

A summary of this opportunity is listed below.

The Research and Development program supports projects that address major challenges in preserving or providing access to humanities collections and resources. These challenges include the need to find better ways to preserve materials of critical importance to the nation’s cultural heritage—from fragile artifacts and manuscripts to analog recordings and digital assets subject to technological obsolescence—and to develop advanced modes of organizing, searching, discovering, and using such materials.

This program recognizes that finding solutions to complex problems often requires forming interdisciplinary project teams, bringing together participants with expertise in the humanities; in preservation; and in information, computer, and natural science.

All projects must demonstrate how advances in preservation and access would benefit the cultural heritage community in supporting humanities research, teaching, or public programming

The deadline is confirmed now to give applicants the opportunity to start preparing their applications. Updated guidelines will be posted by NEH at least two months in advance of the deadline.

Sponsor
National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)

Award: $2.1M grant will advance research on women’s and men’s giving, increase understanding of motivations

INDIANAPOLIS — Research about men’s and women’s giving will be accelerated as a IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy Logoresult of a new $2.1 million research grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to the Women’s Philanthropy Institute at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus.

“Increasing and improving philanthropy requires that we continually increase the depth and breadth of knowledge about giving,” said Amir Pasic, the Eugene R. Tempel Dean of the IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. “We thank the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation for their support of this important research, which will provide women and men donors with insights that help them give more effectively and better understand why they give differently.”

The wide-ranging, three-year project will marshal myriad approaches and multiple scholars to address two central areas of research. The first will identify and examine the factors that influence men and women to give more, to give more intentionally and to give more effectively. Researchers will explore the effects of issues such as donor education, household decision-making, life cycle and demographic changes, and technology and newer forms of philanthropy such as crowdfunding. The second area of research will focus on charitable giving to aid women and girls, including who gives, where they give, what factors influence their giving, how to increase giving and how to engage more men and younger women in supporting these causes.

The project will produce a variety of accessible, easy-to-use resources to inform and assist donors, nonprofits and others.

The new project builds on insights developed under an earlier report that identified, among other results, ways that women’s and men’s differing preferences, priorities and financial resources influence couples’ charitable giving. The project also demonstrated that nearly half of all donors make contributions to causes that aid women and girls. Looking at giving by gender, it found that half of women donors and two out of five men donors give to these causes.

“The initial research enabled us to step back and take a comprehensive look at the field of gender and philanthropy, identify the related research that has been conducted to date, and determine the major gaps in the understanding of these issues,” said Debra Mesch, Eileen Lamb O’Gara Chair in Women’s Philanthropy, director of WPI and principal investigator for the project. “This new grant acknowledges that while knowledge about gender and philanthropy has come a long way in a relatively short period, we have barely scratched the surface, and many key research questions remain to be answered.”

The Women’s Philanthropy Institute is in the vanguard of building the body of knowledge on women’s leadership in philanthropy and how women think about and practice their giving. Its Women Give research series and its other studies have revealed important new insights into women’s giving. The knowledge and resources generated by the new grant will leverage and expand upon that foundation.

“Providing research that informs practice is a key tenet of the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy,” said Una Osili, co-principal investigator for the project. “Through this new research, donors at all levels of giving — nonprofit and fundraising professionals, financial and donor advisors, scholars, and others — will gain greater understanding of gender and philanthropy, the capacity of women’s giving, and opportunities to expand the donor base and increase charitable giving.”

About the Women’s Philanthropy Institute

The Women’s Philanthropy Institute is part of the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. WPI increases understanding of women’s philanthropy through rigorous research and education, interpreting and sharing these insights broadly to improve philanthropy. Learn more. Follow us on Twitter and “Like” us on Facebook.

About the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy

The Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy is dedicated to improving philanthropy to improve the world by training and empowering students and professionals to be innovators and leaders who create positive and lasting change. The school offers a comprehensive approach to philanthropy through its academic, research and international programs and through The Fund Raising School, Lake Institute on Faith & Giving, and the Women’s Philanthropy Institute. Follow us on Twitter or “Like” us on Facebook.

Press Release: IUPUI economics professor comments on significance and controversy of Federal Reserve rate increase

INDIANAPOLIS — Today, the Federal Reserve increased the interest rate it pays on bank Steven Russell Imagereserves by one-quarter of one percent, from 0.25 percent to 0.5 percent. While this increase is slight and is not likely to have a major impact on the economy, its significance lies in two facts, according to Steven Russell, professor and chair of the Department of Economics in the School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

  • “It is the first time the Fed has moved to increase market interest rates since the financial crisis, and it likely begins a period of gradual rate increases.”
  • “It is the first time the Fed has used a new method for trying to increase market interest rates, which is increasing the interest rate it pays on bank reserves. In the past, the Fed has used changes in reserve supply to try to increase the rate banks pay when they borrow reserves from other banks.”

Russell also commented on the potential for the rate increase to be seen as controversial:

  • “The Fed’s rate increase is potentially controversial because steps to increase market interest rates are usually justified by the argument that there is a need to slow the pace of economic activity in order to restrain inflation. But the pace of economic activity is still modest, and the inflation rate is well below the Fed’s target rate — 2 percent — and shows few signs of increasing.
  • “Nonetheless, the Fed has been under pressure to start moving to increase market rates in order to demonstrate its continued commitment to maintaining low inflation,” Russell said. “And it has finally concluded that the economy is strong enough to justify bowing to that pressure.”

Russell holds a doctorate in economics from the University of Minnesota. His research interests are in macroeconomics — the study of how the levels of important economic indicators such as the inflation rate, the real GDP growth rate, the prime interest rate, and the unemployment rate get determined — and monetary economics, the study of the role of money in the economy and how government policy about money and credit can affect those economic indicators. Russell can be reached for interviews at 317-278-7214 or shrusse@iupui.edu.