Book by IUPUI professor puts Native American mascot imagery into historical context

INDIANAPOLIS — Twenty-first-century efforts to legitimize Native American athletic team Guiliano-225x300names and mascots miscast tribal history, argues the author of a book examining the history of Native American imagery in college sports and exposing its ties to a crisis of identity among white, middle-class men.

Under pressure from the NCAA, Native Americans and others, many colleges have dropped their use of Native American team names and mascots. The NCAA has granted waivers to a few schools, including Florida State University, which has the support of the Florida Seminole Tribe for its use of the Seminole nickname.

“There were no Native American tribes involved in the creation of these identities, so why would colleges go to them for approval now?” said Jennifer Guiliano, assistant professor of history at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and author of “Indian Spectacle: College Mascots and the Anxiety of Modern America.”

Contrary to popular thought, mascots do not represent the history of particular tribes, but rather they commingle native identities across historical periods and tribal lines, the professor said.

Guiliano said “Indian Spectacle” points out that “none of the mascots were created with accurate tribal representation.”

Representations of Indians became “tied to mascotry in the 1920s when the University of Illinois — in an attempt to create a half-time spectacle for its band performance — merges with Indian representation,” said Guiliano, who teaches in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Looking at the history of the creation and spread of Native American mascots and imagery, one finds middle-class men who are facing identity issues, Guiliano said.

In the face of challenges to their identity — immigration, urbanization and industrialization — white middle-class men in the 1920s and 1930s used Native American culture and imagery to reduce their anxiety about who they were and what mattered, according to Guiliano, who as a youth attended University of Illinois games and watched Chief Illiniwek perform. Competitive sports provided an arena in which men could legitimately act out their anxieties and celebrate their identity by cheering on misguided, narrow perceptions of Native Americans as inherently violent, she said.

“Because it was a moment when they couldn’t test their masculinity on the battlefield — America wasn’t fighting a war — the sort of battle on the football field became a replacement on how you could prove your masculinity,” Guiliano said. Men who weren’t good enough to play chose to be in the band or to be ardent fans, and they adopted the Indian identity to alleviate their anxiety over societal changes, according to the professor.

Arbor Day Foundation honors IUPUI as a Tree Campus USA

INDIANAPOLIS – Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis was honored with a 2014 Tree Campus USA recognition by the Arbor Day Foundation for its commitment to effective urban forest management.

The award marks the third time IUPUI has received the Tree Campus USA recog476311_w296nition.

Leading up to the award May 5, the campus participated in the 2015 Arbor Day tree planting program. Twenty Honors College students, with the support of Campus Facility Services, planted 16 trees May 1.

IUPUI also participated in an NCAA tree-planting event during the Final Four in Indianapolis last month. Four trees were planted in an area designated Celebration Plaza, between one of the NCAA’s buildings and the Herron School of Art and Design.

Tree Campus USA is a national program created in 2008 by the Arbor Day Foundation and sponsored by Toyota to honor colleges and universities for effective campus forest management and for engaging staff and students in conservation goals.

According to the foundation, IUPUI achieved the title of Tree Campus USA by meeting five standards, which include maintaining a tree advisory committee, a campus tree-care plan, dedicated annual expenditures for its campus tree program, an Arbor Day observance and student service-learning project.

About the Arbor Day Foundation:

The Arbor Day Foundation is a million-member nonprofit conservation and education organization with the mission to inspire people to plant, nurture and celebrate trees.

Labor movement efforts in Indianapolis are barometer of service-sector advances nationwide

INDIANAPOLIS — Indianapolis is a good barometer of how service-sector labor movement Fran-Quigley-profileefforts could fair nationwide, some labor workers say.

A new book by Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law professor Fran Quigley examines the rise of service-sector workers in the U.S. labor movement. “If We Can Win Here: The New Front Lines of the Labor Movement” tells the stories of janitors, fry cooks and health care aides in Indianapolis and their struggle for better pay.

Quigley will discuss “If We Can Win Here,” published by Cornell University Press, at a book launch at 5 p.m. Friday, May 8, at Bookmamas, 9 S. Johnson Ave., Indianapolis.

“From fast-food worker ‘Fight for 15′ strikes to campaigns to increase the minimum wage to unionization of food service workers and janitors, there is a great deal of high-profile activity across the country in this area,” Quigley said. “This book is a close-up, grassroots view of those workers and those campaigns in one community — Indianapolis — where traditional union organizing has been a challenge in recent decades.”

Indianapolis service-sector workers have experienced some success, the professor said.

“Food service workers at universities across Indianapolis, as well as at the airport, have organized into unions and won better pay and more job security in their first contracts,” Quigley said. “Janitors and security guards are still fighting for better pay, but their struggles and the broader Fight for 15 efforts all contribute to an increasing awareness of the need to pay living wages, which is boosting the campaign to raise the minimum wage.”

The book launch will include a discussion of workers’ rights. Some of the workers Quigley wrote about in his book will attend the event and be available for media questions.

Quigley is a clinical professor of law and teaches in the Health and Human Rights Clinic at IU McKinney on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus. Clinic students advocate for rights on behalf of the poor and have a special focus on representing low-wage workers.

New accelerated degree programs at IUPUI speed students to in-demand, well-paying jobs

INDIANAPOLIS — Students will save thousands of dollars, graduate a year earlier and be informatics logopositioned for in-demand and well-paying jobs thanks to academic career paths being created by the IU School of Informatics and Computing and other schools at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

Beginning with its own programs, including bioinformatics, health informatics, human-computer interaction and media arts and sciences, the informatics school developed accelerated programs that enable students to earn an undergraduate degree and a master’s in five years, instead of six. That move would save Indiana students $7,000 in tuition and fees and save out-of-state residents $18,000.

With a master’s and advanced informatics skills, students in these degree programs will be prepared for jobs paying an average of $71,000.

Similar programs are being developed that will allow students in other IUPUI schools — including health and rehabilitation science, public health, business, public affairs, science, physical education and tourism management, philanthropy and law — to complete undergraduate degrees in their respective schools in four years and then complete an informatics master’s degree in one year.

Informatics is the application of information technology to other fields.

Look/See showcases M.F.A. Exhibition and more during Herron’s biggest events of the year

Look/See 2015 Logo Courtesy of Herron StaffThis year at Herron School of Art and Design, there’s even more to May, with two Visual Communication Design events kicking off our celebration of the academic year end leading up to Look/See on Thursday, May 7, which includes a full slate of events at both Herron buildings.

Design Day at Herron—May 4
2015 marks the first-ever Design Day at Herron: Design Thinking for People Centered Innovation from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in room 143 of Eskenazi Hall. This introductory Design Thinking workshop will bring together visual communication design practitioners and community members to explore a particular challenge affecting Indianapolis. This workshop is open to anybody who is curious about Design Thinking. For more information, contact Youngbok Hong, coordinator, Design Thinking and Design Leadership Graduate Program, at youhong@iupui.edu. To register on a first-come, first-served basis,
RSVP to herron4u@iupui.edu. Use subject line “Herron Design Day” and include your name and phone number.

Momentum: Design in Action—May 6
Momentum is an exhibit of senior Visual Communication Design portfolios and capstone projects that will demonstrate the 37 students’ various interests, creative problem-solving processes and plans for the future, revealing the connections that they have made through the course of their time at Herron.

The May 6 opening is by invitation only for members of the local design community. The public opening will be on May 7 from 5:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m. in room 122 of Eskenazi Hall. Visit vcd.iupui.edu for more information.

Look/See—May 7

Honors and Awards
To start the party, join us for the Honors and Awards ceremony in the IUPUI Campus Center, room CE450, at 4:00 p.m. Everyone is welcome to come and cheer the accomplishments of students and faculty alike.

M.F.A. Exhibition
Then it’s on to the 2015 M.F.A. Exhibition beginning at 5:00 p.m., which showcases pinnacle works by master’s degree candidates Brent Aldrich, Stephanie J. Beisel, Carly Connelly, Di Sun, Matthew Eickhoff, Jonathan Love, Andrés Marcial, Kristen Jane Morsches, Katie R. Smith, Stephen Smolinski, Shelley Spicuzza and Jac Tardie.

This culminating exhibition takes up all the available gallery space in both Eskenazi Hall and Eskenazi Fine Arts Center. Colin Nesbit, Herron’s gallery director, describes Look/See as “the crescendo of the academic year at Herron. For the students whose works comprise the 2015 MFA Exhibition, the last two years have build up to this single event. These students’ works represent the array of fine arts programs available at Herron performing at their highest level.”

Art Therapy
Nesbit continued, “and this year for the first time, Herron master’s degree candidates in Art Therapy Bonnie Burke, Chelsea Leeds, Elisa Pamelia, Meghan Sullivan, Mu-Chien Tsai, and Kaycee Wilson are going to have a display that explains their discipline and includes versions of their theses for people to look at.

Visual Communication Design
Master’s degree candidates in Visual Communication Design Kaelyn Donnelly, Jennifer Smerdel and Nicholas Walters also will have an interactive exhibition including panels describing their research processes, outcomes and contexts.”

Think It Make It Lab
The public will also get its first chance to see Herron’s new Think It Make It Lab in Eskenazi Hall, which is chock-full of the latest in 3-D and other digital technologies. Live demonstrations of 3-D printing and laser cutting will be included, with a memento for visitors to take home.

The festivities include tours, open studios and a print and ceramics sale, along with refreshments.

Complimentary parking courtesy of The Great Frame Up Indianapolis will be available. Shuttle service between buildings will be available throughout the evening.

IUPUI library collaborates to create digital collection honoring Allison Transmission’s centennial

INDIANAPOLIS — As part of ongoing efforts to preserve and share the history of Allison thTransmission in honor of the manufacturer’s centennial in 2015, Allison and University Library at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis have collaborated in the creation of a new digital collection.

The project, executed by the University Library Center for Digital Scholarship, enables unprecedented access to Allison Transmission’s heritage in a searchable database. The online collection includes newsletters, brochures, advertisements, press releases and selected photographs.

Following current preservation standards for scanning and metadata creation, the Center for Digital Scholarship has created the most comprehensive digital collection of Allison materials available to the public. The project, which began in December 2013 with a pilot collection of 137 digital objects, now includes more than 2,600 items. The selections are from a larger archival collection held by Allison.

Creating digital files allows rare and fragile original items to be preserved and protected. Preservation of the digitized copies is also secure in that high-resolution master files are backed up on multiple servers and protected by University Library for future generations.

The Center for Digital Scholarship works to provide open access to IUPUI scholarship, research data and the cultural heritage of Indiana communities. The center disseminates unique scholarship, data and artifacts created by IUPUI faculty, students, staff and community partners; advocates for both the rights of authors, and the public’s fair use and open access to information and publications; implements best practices for the creation, description, preservation, sharing and reuse of digital collections; and provides digital scholarship consultations and literacy services.

About Allison Transmission

Allison Transmission is the world’s largest manufacturer of fully automatic transmissions for medium- and heavy-duty commercial vehicles and is a leading manufacturer of hybrid-propulsion systems for city buses. Allison transmissions are used in a variety of applications including refuse, construction, fire, distribution, bus, motorhomes, defense and energy. Founded in 1915 by James A. Allison, the company is headquartered in Indianapolis with additional manufacturing facilities in Hungary and India.

About IUPUI University Library

Serving nearly 1 million visitors a year, 10 percent of them community users, the University Library at IUPUI supports students and faculty across all of IUPUI’s more than 200 degree programs with research expertise and a wide array of resources. Resources include signature collections like the Joseph and Matthew Payton Philanthropic Studies Library, the Ruth Lilly Special Collections & Archives and the Herron Art Library, plus over 60 digital collections.

Informatics students help create app to enhance Dream Cars exhibit experience at IMA

Dream Cars Image from IMAmuseum.orgThousands of people are expected to visit the Indianapolis Museum of Art to see a unique type of motor spectacle when it opens Sunday. When they do, their experience will be enhanced by the Dream Cars Design Studio app created in cooperation with two Indiana University School of Informatics and Computing students at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

Dream Cars: Innovative Design, Visionary Ideas, May 3 – Aug. 23, will feature rare concept cars from the early 1930s to the 21st century, showcasing some of the most unique vehicles ever created by top names in the automotive field, including General Motors, Porsche, Bugatti and BMW.

Visitors to the exhibition will be also able to learn about the car design process in the Damon C. and Kay D. Davis Lab — on the second floor of the museum—through videos, images and a number of participatory activities, such as designing their own dream car using the Dream Cars Design Studio iPad app.

The app will guide children (6 and older) and adults through a number of steps, such as selecting fuel and engine types, the car silhouette, various accessories and colors. At each step, visitors will be able to see how their design and engineering choices affect a number of variables including cost, fuel efficiency and speed. The completed cars can be shared with family and friends by email, and will also be projected on the wall in the Davis Lab. The app will also be available for download, free of charge, in the App Store.

The app was developed by graduate student Vance Vaden, project manager and animator, and freshman Michael Auer, interaction developer.

Vaden and Auer began working on the app in September 2014, and collaborated with the IMA’s interpretation and technology team on the project. The app was completed in December.

“It’s fairly experimental for all of us right now,” said Zeb Wood, media arts and science lecturer at IUPUI. “The museum wanted to try using technology to enhance the exhibit, and we wanted to give students the chance to work on a real-world project for real clients.”

Among the app requirements: It had to be entertaining and easy to use for all ages, yet more informative for adults.

“It was a difficult challenge,” Wood said. “But these two wanted the opportunity, we briefed them, and they have been dealing with an entire committee at the IMA ever since.

“We have students who sometimes graduate without creating something like this. Now we have a freshman and a first-semester graduate student creating fully functional apps. This is a huge jump for us,” Wood continued.

“The success of the project will open the eyes of other students. “They are going to say, ‘I don’t have to wait four years to try to create something for a community partner. I can get started right away.’”

The experience is one Auer won’t forget.

“This project has given me the chance to learn about working with a professional development team,” Auer said. “My previous projects were mostly solo ventures, and so making the transition to a team-based one was incredibly enlightening. Since most projects in the real world are centered on group work and deadlines, experiencing these things really improved my skills.”

Auer, who volunteered for the project, said his ability to write algorithms and solve problems increased ten-fold. “There is a big difference between working for yourself and working for a large art museum, and I believe that it really pushed me to become better at what I do.”

Vaden also found the project to be an interesting experience.

“Having an actual client definitely changed the way I approached each task, since everything I did was for them, rather than for a grade and myself,” said Vaden. “I found myself communicating more and paying close attention to wording and detail a lot more than I usually would. “The internship was probably the best experience I had this semester since I got more professional experience and worked in a different environment than I had ever worked in previously.”

“What makes this particular project unique is the fact that the museum was so willing to work in tandem with the school’s students, treating this as a learning experience for both student and the professionals on the IMA side of things,” said Travis Faas, media arts and science lecturer at IUPUI.

Perhaps the most interesting part of this project is the skill levels involved, Faas said.

“The primary developer, Michael, was a first-semester freshman going into this project,” he said. “Working along with this team, he has had more opportunity to learn ‘how it is done’ in the real world compared to many of his peers. It is a real eye-opener to learn just how much work goes into the production of an even relatively simple app.”

Interpretation materials and content for the Indianapolis Museum of Art’s presentation of Dream Cars: Innovative Design, Visionary Ideas were created with the support of an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.

The exhibition will open at the IMA on May 3, 2015. Tickets are $18 for adults and $10 for children ages 6 to 17. Admission is free for children under five years, college students from non-profit and public colleges and universities in Marion County, and IMA members.

Workshop: Introduction to Databases for the Digital Humanities

Michael Mandiberg. Database at Postmasters, March 2009. CC BY-SA 2.0 https://www.flickr.com/photos/theredproject/3332644561/sizes/lMay 19, 2015
2-4 pm
IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, IUPUI Library room UL 4115P
Free Registration

Databases are becoming increasingly important to research projects in the humanities. From storing to structuring to analyzing our digitized corpuses and data sets, databases provide humanists with a powerful tool to ask new questions and to discover new answers to old questions. But, where does the scholar who is new to databases begin?

This workshop will introduce you to the basics of database design for humanities research. You will learn on SQLite (http://sqlite.org), a flexible and versatile open source database engine that is the most widely deployed SQL database engine in the world.

What will you learn in this workshop

  • Database concepts
  • How common data manipulation/cleaning tasks can be accomplished in SQLite
  • How to import vast amounts of data in SQLite
  • How to query data from SQLite
  • How to use SQLite’s full feature set (e.g. full-text search and geospatial data store) to simplify analysis

What will you need?

  • A personal laptop with internet connection
  • Data used for the demonstration will be provided. You are welcome to bring your own data sets

WONDER AND THE NATURAL WORLD: A Call for Grant Proposals

Logo for CSRES courtesy of News.iupui.eduCALL FOR GRANT PROPOSALS: Symposia, workshops, performances, and seminar series for departments, institutes, and research centers at all IU campuses
Deadline for submission: June 15, 2015
Awards announced by mid-July 2015

The IU Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics, and Society (CSRES) announces a grant competition on the theme of Wonder and the Natural World. Departments, research centers, and institutes across all IU campuses may apply for funds to support or supplement symposia, workshops, seminar series, performances, or small conferences during the 2015-2016 academic year that align with the Consortium’s two-year theme of Wonder and the Natural World. This call for proposals is part of a two-year thematic initiative sponsored by CSRES.

Wonder has been framed as a key moral disposition, as well as an aesthetic, emotional, or cognitive response; depending on its objects and orientation, it may display both salutary and sinister dimensions. Wonder at nature is prompted by the odd and uncanny, the strange and novel, the transcendent and sublime, as well as encounters with the monstrous and horrific. It has variously been associated with, or dissociated from, curiosity, awe, intimations of divinity, infinity, the sublime, the miraculous or supernatural, feelings of astonishment and puzzlement. We welcome projects that explore wonder or its cognate terms in relation to nature or the natural, broadly construed. Proposals should clearly relate the project to the announced theme.

Grants will be awarded in amounts up to $2500, $5000, and $7500 depending on the scope of the proposed project. Funds can be used for travel and honoraria for external speakers, as well as hospitality expenses in keeping with university regulations. IU faculty may not receive honoraria. Applications for funding should include:

• summary of the project (750 words max.)
• a list of invited presenters
• a detailed budget
• letter of support from department chair or school/unit dean (included with the application or emailed separately)
• evidence of other funding obtained or requested (for requests over $2000)

Questions about the grant competition, and complete grant proposals may be emailed to CSRES Director Lisa Sideris at lsideris@indiana.edu.

The Indiana University Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics, and Society is an interdisciplinary association of scholars, academic programs, and research centers from the eight campuses of Indiana University. Their mandate is to aid in the development of research and scholarship to better understand religion, ethics, values, and spirituality in society. An initiative of the IU Vice President for Research Office, CSRES is also supported by the Office of the President, The Office of the Executive Vice President and Chancellor, IUPUI, and the College of Arts and Sciences at IU Bloomington.

15 teams to share $1 million in collaborative grants through IU Research program

IU Vice President of Research Jorge JosIU Vice President of Research Jorge JoséBLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Indiana University Vice President for Research Jorge José has announced over $1 million in collaborative research grants to be shared among 15 newly formed research teams. Members of the teams represent 21 departments from eight schools on three IU campuses.

The IU Collaborative Research Grants program, initiated by José and now in its fifth year, awards teams of researchers up to $75,000 to support collaborative, innovative projects with a high likelihood of securing external funding. Each project team includes faculty members from different campuses, schools, departments or disciplines.

“As it was envisioned to do, the Collaborative Research Grants program continues to increase the capacity for our investigators to do meaningful and innovative work through new partnerships,” José said. “This increased capacity for collaboration is an especially important outcome of this program.”

This year, 44 investigators make up 15 teams that represent departments and schools from Indiana University Bloomington, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and IU Southeast, in addition to one team that had a member from Purdue University.

IU President Michael A. McRobbie called the program and the most recent round of awards integral to stimulating new opportunities for sharing knowledge and expertise that lead to discovery.

“Vice President José has energetically promoted and supported this program to encourage faculty to contribute their expertise in shared, innovative ways,” McRobbie said. “As the end of his tenure draws near, Indiana University can reflect positively on the distinct successes that have been achieved by this program: New and highly productive partnerships have been forged that have already led to new discoveries; the university’s investment has been realized more than ten-fold thanks to subsequent related funding; and a new framework has been developed for our faculty that stimulates creative, passionate investigation through shared knowledge.”

Since a collaboration funded by the inaugural round of grants in 2010-11, Giovanna Guidoboni, an associate professor of mathematics at IUPUI, and Alon Harris, professor of cellular and integrative physiology at the IU School of Medicine, have seen their initial round of work on modeling glaucoma result in enormous benefits.

Following their original round of research, the pair received three external grants, including one from the National Science Foundation for over $275,000. They have also founded a new scientific journal, the Journal for Modeling in Ophthalmology; established an agreement of international cooperation with the Polytechnic University of Milan (Italy); and co-organized an international workshop in Europe.

“That 2011 collaborative research grant has indeed led to an incredible number of great successes,” Guidoboni said.

Craig Pikaard, the Carlos O. Miller Professor and Distinguished Professor of Biology at IU Bloomington, was funded in 2011 with Haixu Tang, an associate professor in the School of Informatics and Computing at IU Bloomington. Pikaard said spin-out benefits from that original grant continue to this day.

“This is a valuable university program that helped jump-start the collaboration between my lab and the group Haixu Tang leads,” he said “It also helped me obtain a highly coveted Howard Hughes Medical Institute-Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation investigator position. Haixu and I continue to collaborate, and we hold regular meetings of our groups.”

In total, it is estimated that the $3 million distributed by IU during just the first three years of the grants program has thus far helped Collaborative Research Grant-funded investigators earn more than $88 million in new external funding. This figure is expected to grow as those funded more recently pursue external funding opportunities.

“The idea behind the program was to create incentives for researchers to initiate new collaborations to address important problems in transformative ways,” José said. “While we can fund only about 15 percent of the applications, just the process of preparing applications has created some new partnerships across the university. The program has been a success so far, and we believe it will continue to be in the future.”

The 15 projects awarded funding this year are:

Single Cell Studies With Scanning Sniffer Patch Microscopy:
Lane Allen Baker, Department of Chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington; and Theodore Cummins, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, IU School of Medicine.

Investigating the Relationship Between Cumulative Disadvantage and Telomere Length as a Contributor to Cancer Disparities:
Silvia Bigatti, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, IUPUI; Brittney-Shea Herbert, Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, IU School of Medicine; Kenzie Latham, Department of Sociology, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI; and Anna Maria Storniolo, Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, IU School of Medicine.

Mechanism of the Regulation of DNA Replication by PIF1 Family Helicases:
Matthew L. Bochman, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington; Yuichiro Takagi, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, IU School of Medicine; and Amber Mosley, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, IU School of Medicine.

Matrix Engineering With Adipose Stem Cells to Promote Islet Function and Longevity: Robert V. Considine, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, IU School of Medicine; Raghu Mirmira, Department of Pediatrics, IU School of Medicine; and Sherry L. Voytik-Harbin, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University.

Using in vivo Microscopy to Build Predictive Models of Drug-induced Liver Injury: Kenneth Dunn, Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, IU School of Medicine; Richard Day, Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology, IU School of Medicine; and Steve Pressé, Department of Physics, School of Science, IUPUI.

Understanding Naturalistic Bicyclist Behavior for Safety and Sustainability:
David Good, School of Public and Environmental Affairs, IU Bloomington; Lauren Christopher, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI; Stanley Chien, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI; Jiang Zheng, Department of Computer and Information Science, School of Science, IUPUI; and Yaobin Chen, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI.

Neurotherapeutic Potential of Adipose Stem Cell-Conditioned Medium in ALS:
Kathryn Jones, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, IU School of Medicine; and Keith March, Department of Medicine, Krannert Institute of Cardiology, IU School of Medicine.

The Impact of the Public Investment in Education in the Academic Performance of K-12 English Language Learners in Southern Indiana:
Haeil Jung, SPEA, IU Bloomington; Magdalena Herdoíza-Estévez, School of Education, IU Southeast; Cathy Johnson, School of Education, IU Southeast; and Jacquelyn Singleton, School of Education, IU Southeast.

Developing Remote Sensing Techniques for Detection of Toxin-Producing Cyanobacteria:
Lin Li, Department of Earth Sciences, School of Science, IUPUI; Kevin Mandernack, Department of Earth Sciences, School of Science, IUPUI; and David Kehoe, Department of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington.

Effect of Antarctic Weathering on Global Climate:
Kathy Licht, Department of Earth Sciences, School of Science, IUPUI; and David Bish, Department of Geological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington.

A Novel Approach to Discover Drug Resistance Genes in Breast Cancer Cells:
Tao Lu, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, IU School of Medicine; and Lang Li, Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, IU School of Medicine.

Induction and Maintenance of Chronic Migraine: Regulation of TRP Channels by Endogenous N-acyl Amide Lipids:
Gerry Oxford, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, IU School of Medicine; Heather Bradshaw, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington; and Joyce Hurley, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, IU School of Medicine.

Optical-Based, Label-Free Multiplex Assay for Direct Quantification of microRNAs in Serum and Cancer Cells:
Rajesh Sardar, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, School of Science, IUPUI; and Murray Korc, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, IU School of Medicine.

Developmental Adaptation to Chronic Hypoxia:
Robert Tepper, Department of Pediatrics, IU School of Medicine; Mircea Ivan, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, IU School of Medicine; and Kenneth Nephew, Medical Sciences Program, IU School of Medicine-Bloomington.

Hippo/YAP Signaling Controls Protein Redistribution and Organ Size in Critical Illness:
Clark Wells, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biochemistry, IU School of Medicine; Teresa Zimmers, Department of Surgery, IU School of Medicine; and Leonidas Koniaris, Department of Surgery, IU School of Medicine.