Archive for Announcements

2014-2015 fellowship in clinical ethics

fairbanks center fellow
2014-2015 Ethics Fellowship Applications Open

Applications are available for the 2014-2015 Clinical Ethics Fellowship sponsored by the Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics. The application deadline is April 30, 2014.

This nine-month, part time fellowship focuses on training health care professionals in clinical ethics, including ethics consultation, hospital ethics committee work, and ethics research. Graduates will become capable members of the ethics community. The target audience for the fellowship includes physicians, nurses, chaplains, and social workers. Other members of the community (e.g. attorneys or members of administrative staffs) may also apply.

Application to the fellowship is competitive. The application process includes submission of a written application (which includes several brief narrative essays), a letter of support from the applicant’s immediate supervisor, one letter of recommendation, and interviews with Fairbanks Center staff.

For an application and additional information go to the Fairbanks Center website or contact Robin Bandy, JD, MA, Fairbanks Center Program Manager, at 317-962-9260, or rbandy@iuhealth.org .

“The Education of Auma Obama,” a film by Branwen Okpako: screening and discussion with filmmaker

branwen okpako
Wednesday, April 23, 2014
6:00 – 9:00 p.m.
University Library, Lily Auditorium
755 W. Michigan St., Indianapolis, IN 46202

Admission free Reception with light refreshments to follow

Branwen Okpako is a highly talented and successful Nigerian-Welsh documentary filmmaker, who now lives and works in Berlin, Germany, where in 1999 she received a degree in Film Directing from the prestigious German Film and Television Academy in Berlin. Since 1995 she has produced several videos, mixed media installations, and films. Her work has been selected to be shown at film festivals in Europe, Great Britain, Africa, North America, and the Middle East. In addition to her work as a filmmaker, Okpako offers seminars, workshops, and projects in film studies and filmmaking and lectures at universities in the US, Canada, Europe, and other parts of the world. Topics of her presentations include: Intersections of Race, Gender, and Otherness in Film; Black Identity in German Cinema; Migration and Multiculturalism in Contemporary Europe; The Art of Filmmaking; The Theory and Practice of Screenplay Writing, to name just a few.

For her 2000/2001 film, Dreckfresser (Dirt for Dinner), Okpako received, among others, the German Next-Generation-First-Steps Award for Best Documentary Film. For her 2002 film, Sehe ich was du nicht siehst? (Do I see what you do not see?), she received the D-motion special prize for the city of Halle, Germany. Her most acclaimed film, The Education of Auma Obama, (Die Geschichte der Auma Obama) has brought Okpako much attention. The film is a captivating and intimate portrait of the U.S. president’s older half-sister, who embodies a post-colonial, feminist identity. Dr. Auma Obama studied German at the University of Heidelberg from 1981 to 1987 before continuing with graduate studies at the University of Bayreuth, earning a PhD in 1996. Her dissertation was on the conception of labor in Germany and its literary reflections. For The Education of Auma Obama, Okpako received the 2012 African Movie Academy Award for Best Diaspora Documentary, the Festival Founders Award for Best Documentary at the Pan African Film Festival in Los Angeles (both in 2012), and the Viewers Choice Award at the Africa International Film Festival (2011).

Her most recent project, Fluch der Medea (The Curse of Medea), a docu-drama about the life of the late German writer Christa Wolf, was shown at the Berlin Film Festival in 2014.

Okpako is currently a visiting professor of German at Earlham College in Richmond, Indiana. This event is co-sponsored by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and the IUPUI Max Kade German-American Center, with additional support from the Department of World Languages and Cultures and the German Program. For additional information contact: Jason M. Kelly, Director, IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, iahi@iupui.edu, (317) 274-1689 Claudia Grossmann, Interim Director, IUPUI Max Kade German-American Center,cgrossma@iupui.edu, (317) 274-3943

Hoosier Bard Presents: Arden of Fevershame

Hoosier Bard Productions, the theatrical arm of Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis’ New Oxford Shakespeare, will stage its fourth play next month at the Indianapolis Public Library’s Central Library branch.

Directed by Terri Bourus, “Arden of Fevershame” will begin at 7:30 p.m. April 3 to 5 and 11 to 12 at the library, 40 East St. Clair St.

“Arden of Fevershame” encompasses elements of passion, intrigue, murder and suspense, tempered with comedy. Bourus said her version will employ a “film noir atmosphere of fog and shadow” to reflect the theme: the tension of the crime.

“The increasing nervousness of the young wife and her lover, the ultimate crime and what happens afterwards are all part of the mystery,” Bourus said. “It’s the first domestic tragedy and the very first black comedy in English drama.”

Bourus, founding director of Hoosier Bard, is an Equity actor as well as a professor of English drama in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. Explaining Hoosier Bard’s mission, she said, “Every play we do has an editorial crux linked to it: a crux that can only be solved through performance.”

Each of the plays Bourus has directed — “Young Hamlet,” “History of Cardenio,” “Measure for Measure” and now “Arden” — is considered editorially problematic in some important way. Hoosier Bard stages these plays to test those editorial problems. Using the stage as a kind of laboratory for theater experiments, editors can make important inroads — changing the way they emend the text, making the edition that the NOS team is even now creating, ever more valuable to scholars, theater practitioners, and students. This singular approach has garnered international attention, a phenomenon Bourus attributes to the company’s singular vision: “edit and do theater, which makes us very unique.”

An aspect that makes this production of “Arden” unique, and that led Bourus to change the traditionally used title to the play, is also the kind of pun and word-play for which Shakespeare is known.
“I realized as I was reading the [earliest extant] text, printed in 1592, that the running head did not say ‘Faversham.’ It said ‘Fevershame,’” Bourus said. “True to form, Shakespeare seems to have twisted the title. Rather than ‘Faversham,’ the name of the town where the action actually happened, he penned ‘Fevershame.’”

Tickets are available by credit card online.: $10 for students with a valid ID, $10 for seniors and $20 for general admission. Tickets will also be available by check or cash at the door.

There will be two performances using ASL interpreters. Parking is free of charge in the Central Library lot. Click here for event updates.

“Solving the Mystery of Australia’s African coins”: a conversation with members of the Past Masters team

African coin
Monday April 7, 2014
12:00 – 1:30 p.m.
IUPUI ES2132 Global Crossroads
902 W. New York Street, Indianapolis

In 1944, five coins from the medieval Sultanate of Kilwa in present day Tanzania were found on the north Australian coast. These rare coins have only been found outside of East Africa on two occasions (one in the ruins of Great Zimbabwe and another in Oman). How they travelled 8,000km to a remote island in north-east Arnhem Land was the subject of a multidisciplinary expedition in July 2013. Come and learn what was discovered by the Past Masters and also the next steps in unravelling the mystery.

Dr. Ian McIntosh is an adjunct professor of anthropology in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and author of many publications on the Yolngu of north-east Arnhem Land.

Michael Hermes, an expert in Indigenous cultural resource management, specializes in training Aboriginal cultural heritage officers.

Dr. Tim Stone is a specialist on the geomorphology of the northern Australian coastline with 30 years of experience with Aboriginal Australians and is best known for his work on what constitutes an archaeological site.

For more information, contact Ian McIntosh at imcintos@iupui.edu or 317 2743776

Health Communication Ph.D. launched

SLA at IUPUI logo

The Department of Communication Studies in the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis is now accepting applications for its newest post-graduate degree: a doctorate in health communication.

The new degree program opens in fall 2014. Academically well-prepared and highly motivated individuals interested in the study of health communication are invited to apply. A master’s degree is required for admission. The application deadline is Feb. 1.

Health communication is defined as the study and use of communication strategies to inform and influence decisions that affect health issues such as individual access to and use of health information; the dissemination of public health messages; consumer education on health issues; patient-health professional relationships; and health disparities. It is increasingly being recognized as a necessary element of efforts to improve both personal and public health.

The new degree program will help prepare the workforce needed for an ever-changing health care environment in which communication is becoming more vital to building relationships between patients and health care providers; encouraging people to adopt healthy behaviors; promoting public health initiatives; and helping society as a whole adapt to emerging technologies, according to Professor Jennifer Bute, director of graduate studies for the Department of Communication Studies.

“Health communication scholars and professionals are uniquely suited to aid not only their academic departments, but also the medical profession and the broader community in recognizing the critical role that communication plays in achieving health-related goals,” Bute said. “From supporting lifestyle changes to encouraging adherence to treatment plans to navigating changing health policies, communication is at the very heart of today’s most pressing health issues.”

A minimum of 90 credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree is required to complete coursework for the IU advanced degree in health communication. Credit hours required include coursework in communication theory and research methods, along with seminars in content areas such as health provider-consumer communication, intercultural communication and group communication. Students will also complete comprehensive exams and perform research in the field.

Students in the doctoral program will have opportunities to obtain competency for teaching and research in various areas, including health interpersonal relationships, intercultural health and mediated communication in health care such as health campaign development. Students will also participate in research on health and medical communication issues and develop skills necessary to translate research on clinical problems in practice.

Employment opportunities for degree recipients will include positions in academia as well as health care.

“We are proud to add this new Ph.D. program to our degree offerings in the IU School of Liberal Arts,” Dean William Blomquist said. “These doctoral students will work with faculty in the Department of Communication Studies and in other departments and schools across the IUPUI campus to improve research and practice in the growing and vital field of health communication. The graduates from this program will comprise the next generation of scholars helping to make health care, disease prevention and risk management in the United States and around the world more effective.”

NEH summer stipends – limited submission

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IU Internal Deadline: 6/16/2014

NEH Proposal Deadline: 9/30/2014

Limited Submission website.

Brief Description:

From NEH website: Updated guidelines will be posted at least two months in advance of the deadline listed. In the meantime, please use the guidelines for the previous deadline, to get a sense of what is involved in assembling an application.

Summer Stipends support individuals pursuing advanced research that is of value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Recipients usually produce articles, monographs, books, digital materials, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly resources. Summer Stipends support continuous full-time work on a humanities project for a period of two months. Summer Stipends support projects at any stage of development.

The Summer Stipends program welcomes projects that respond to NEH’s Bridging Cultures initiative. Such projects could focus on cultures internationally or within the United States. International projects might seek to enlarge Americans’ understanding of other places and times, as well as other perspectives and intellectual traditions. American projects might explore the great variety of cultural influences on, and myriad subcultures within, American society. These projects might also investigate how Americans have approached and attempted to surmount seemingly unbridgeable cultural divides, or examine the ideals of civility and civic discourse that have informed this quest. In connection with a focus on civic discourse, projects might explore the role of women in America’s civic life as well as the civic role of women in other cultures and regions of the world.

Award Amount:

Summer Stipends provide $6,000 for two consecutive months of full-time research and writing. Recipients must work full-time on their projects for these two months and may hold other research grants supporting the same project during this time. Summer Stipends normally support work carried out during the summer months, but arrangements can be made for other times of the year. NEH Summer Stipends do not require cost sharing and do not include indirect costs.

Eligibility:

· Only individual applicants are eligible to apply for Summer Stipends.

· All applicants must have completed their formal education by the application deadline. While applicants need not have advanced degrees, individuals currently enrolled in a degree-granting program are ineligible to apply.

· Individuals who have held or been awarded a major fellowship or research grant or its equivalent within the three academic years prior to the deadline are ineligible. See Program details.

· Individuals who have received Summer Stipends may apply to support a new stage of their projects.

· See Program details for more specific information.

Limitation:

INTERNAL COMPETITION NECESSARY: TWO FACULTY MEMBERS PER CAMPUS

Only two faculty members teaching full-time at colleges and universities may be nominated by their institutions (campus) to apply for a Summer Stipend.

APPLICANTS EXEMPT FROM NOMINATION / NO INTERNAL COMPETITION NEEDED

The following individuals may apply online without a nomination or internal competition:

· independent scholars not affiliated with a college or university;

· college or university staff members who are not faculty members and will not be teaching during the academic year preceding the award tenure

· emeritus faculty; and

· adjunct faculty, part-time faculty, and applicants with academic appointments that terminate by the summer of the award tenure.

To apply for IU Internal competition:

IUPUI: For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, by June 16, 2014 for internal competition.

1. Provide a 1-2 page summary that includes the following: (limitation does not include references)

· Project Title

· Project Director Name and Credentials

· Research and contribution: Describe the intellectual significance of the proposed project, including its value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Provide an overview of the project, explaining the basic ideas, problems, or questions examined by the study. Explain how the project will complement, challenge, or expand relevant studies in the field.

· Methods and work plan: Describe your method(s) and clarify the part or stage of the project that will be supported by the Summer Stipend. Provide a work plan, describing what you will accomplish during the award period. Your work plan must be based on a full-time commitment to the project; part-time work is not allowed. If you do not anticipate finishing the entire project during the award period, discuss your plan for doing so. For book projects, explain how the final project will be organized. If possible, provide a brief chapter outline. For digital projects, describe the technologies that will be used and developed, and how the scholarship will be presented to benefit audiences in the humanities.

· Final product and dissemination: Describe the intended audience and the intended results of the project. If relevant, explain how the results will be disseminated and why these means are appropriate to the subject matter and audience.

2. A Letter from the Chair or Dean

3. 1-2 page abbreviated CV which includes:

· Current and Past Positions

· Education: List degrees, dates awarded, and titles of theses or dissertations

· Awards and Honors: Include dates. If you have received support from NEH, indicate the dates of these grants and any resulting publications.

· Publications: Include full citations for publications and presentations

· Other Relevant Professional Activities & Accomplishments

2015 NACBS-Huntington Library Fellowship

NACBS logo

Applications due 15 November 2014

The North American Conference on British Studies (NACBS), in collaboration with the Huntington Library, offers annually the NACBS-Huntington Library Fellowship to aid in dissertation research in British Studies using the collections of the library. The amount of the fellowship is $3000. A requirement for holding the fellowship is that the time of tenure be spent in residence at the Huntington Library. The time of residence varies but may be as brief as one month. Applicants must be U. S. or Canadian citizens or permanent residents and enrolled in a Ph.D. program in a U.S. or Canadian institution.

Nominations and applications for the 2015 award are invited. Please note that the applications are due on November 15, 2014. Applications should consist of a curriculum vitae, two supporting letters (one from the applicant’s dissertation advisor), and a description of the dissertation research project. The letter should include a description of the materials to be consulted at the Huntington and the reason that these are essential sources for the dissertation.

A copy of the application package should be sent to each member of the Huntington Library Fellowship Committee. Letters should be placed in sealed envelopes, signed across the flap and given to the applicant for inclusion in the application package. Applications must be postmarked by November 15, 2014. Awards will be announced by January 30, 2015. For full guidelines, visit the fellowship website.

Applicants for the NACBS fellowship are also welcome to apply to supplement that award with a short-term award from the Huntington Library itself under the terms of its own fellowship competition, the closing date for which is also November 15, 2014.

Kress Foundation invites applications for scholarly European art projects

kress logo
History of Art Grants Program
  • Supports scholarly projects that will enhance the understanding and appreciation of European art and architecture.
  • Grants are awarded to non-profit institutions with 501(c) 3 status, based in the United States, including supporting foundations of European institutions.
  • These are competitive grants. Please see ‘Past Grants’ and ‘Annual Reports’ for past awards and typical levels of funding and review our Grants FAQs for answers to common application questions.
  • In addition to submitting printed materials, applicants must include a CD containing a complete set of the application materials. The materials on the CD must be presented as a single PDF document.
  • Application Deadlines*: January 15, April 1, and October 1

The History of Art program supports scholarly projects that will enhance the appreciation and understanding of European art and architecture. Grants are awarded to projects that create and disseminate specialized knowledge, including archival projects, development and dissemination of scholarly databases, documentation projects, museum exhibitions and publications, photographic campaigns, scholarly catalogues and publications, and technical and scientific studies.

Grants are also awarded for activities that permit art historians to share their expertise through international exchanges, professional meetings, conferences, symposia, consultations, the presentation of research, and other professional events.

For full application guidelines, visit the Kress Foundation website.

“Faith and Medicine: Integration or Separation?” | Fairbanks Ethics Lecture Series

Dr. James Lynch Jr.Faith and Medicine: Integration or Separation?
Fairbanks Ethics Lecture Series
Presented by: Visiting Scholar James W. Lynch Jr, MD, FACP

When: Wednesday April 2, 2014
Time: 12:00-1:00 pm
Location: Riley Outpatient Center Auditorium

Co-sponsored by the MHHS Spirit of Medicine Program. Free CME/CE Credit Offered

Objectives:

  1. Articulate the various forces shaping how we think about the relationships between faith and medicine in the 21st century.
  2. Discuss how the term “professionalism” can be distorted to undermine compassion and empathy as parts of healthy physician-patient relationships.
  3. Describe the ways practitioners address their own spiritual beliefs (or lack thereof) in relation to patients and their beliefs.
  4. Identify how to address complexities that arise in discussing spiritual issues with patients or in choosing not to discuss them.

**Please Note– Lunch will not be provided.  Food and drinks are NOT permitted in the ROC Auditorium.**

About the Lecturer:

Dr. Lynch received his BA from the University of Virginia and MD from Eastern VA Medical School in 1984.  After internal medicine training at the University of Florida, he did his training in medical oncology at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda MD.  In 1991 he returned to the UFCOM and has served in multiple roles during this tenure including, course director in Oncology, program director for hematology/oncology, section chief of hematology/oncology at the VAMC and now serves as the Assistant Dean for Admissions.  He is a nationally recognized and  published expert in the diagnosis and treatment of lymphomas. He has received multiple teaching awards including clinical teacher of the year 4 times, the Hippocratic award three times, is a member of the College of Medicine Society of Teaching Scholars and in 2006 was honored by the University of Florida as one of 5 Distinguished Teaching Scholars.  He was co-founder with his wife of the Christian Study Center at the University of Florida and serves as its board president. He and his wife Laura, have 4 children and 3 grandchildren.

The Spirit of Medicine Reading and Discussion Program is funded by an IU Health Values Grant. This three-year program available to IU medical students includes monthly meetings to discuss seminar readings and opportunities to meet with thought leaders in spirituality and medicine.  Participants also attend lectures presented by notable visiting scholars and enjoy the opportunity to engage scholars in further conversations.

The Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics sponsors the Fairbanks Ethics Lecture Series as an educational outreach to physicians and staff of Indiana University Health hospitals and interested others in the central Indiana community.  Lectures are free, open to all, and do not require pre-registration.  Continuing education credit is offered to physicians, nurses, social workers, and chaplains at no charge, regardless of their institutional affiliation.

For questions and comments, please contact Amy Chamness at achamnes@iuhealth.org or (317)962-1721.  For additional information about the Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics, please visit our website at www.fairbankscenter.org.

Contact:

Amy R. Chamness-Douthit
Program Coordinator- Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics
Indiana University Health (www.iuhealth.org)
Noyes E-130|317.962.1721 (office)|317.962.9262 (fax)
(website) www.fairbankscenter.org

 

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