Lecture: McKinney panel to discuss national, international responses to refugee crises

INDIANAPOLIS — Responses to the world refugee crisis are the focus of an upcoming 482544_w296public panel discussion at the IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law, located on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus. McKinney School of Law will present “World Refugee Crisis? Domestic and International Responses” from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 15 in the Wynne Courtroom of the law school building, Inlow Hall, 530 W. New York St.  The presentation is part of the McKinney Graduate Studies Lecture Series.

The informative panel discussion will address the domestic and legal frameworks for dealing with the issue of refugees, Bravo said. Panel members include Sam Sites, 2017 McKinney J.D. candidate, who through the law school’s Program in International Human Rights Law interned with the Legal Resources Centre in Accra, Ghana, and the Organization for Aid to Refugees in Prague. His internship assignments included weekly visits to a refugee camp and a refugee detention center. A better understanding of the world refugee crisis is invaluable for the typical American, Sites said.

“It’s important for Americans to have a better understanding of the world refugee crisis so that we can better aid refugees and countries that are helping them. Americans have always been generous, so it’s also important for them to know about organizations they can support to help refugees, even if they won’t necessarily meet any of the refugees,” Sites said. “There are many human-rights and refugee organizations that are based in the United States, so there are opportunities to serve and to respond within the U.S. You don’t have to travel or be fluent in a different language to help refugees.”

Other panel members are:

  • Mahja Zeon, deputy prosecutor, Marion County Prosecutor’s Office
  • Carleen Miller, executive director, Exodus Refugee Immigration Inc.
  • Bernard Trujillo, professor, Valparaiso University School of Law

The event is free, but registration is strongly encouraged. Additional information is available on the McKinney website.


Updates for Humanities Indicators

Over the past few months, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences has been active inAmerican_Academy_of_Arts_and_Sciences_logo-prv its support for the humanities, with new reports on the employment status and earnings of humanities majors, the financial health of not-for-profit humanities organizations, metrics on the qualifications of school teachers, international comparisons of levels of adult literacy, and trends in public reading rates.

Key findings:
· https://www.amacad.org/images/cmsData/IndIII-4p_sm.jpgIn 2013, the median annual earnings for humanities majors were $50,000 for those who held only a bachelor’s degree and $71,000 for those with an advanced degree (in any field). Both amounts were $7,000 below the median for graduates from all fields with similar degree attainment (but still well above the median of $42,000 for all U.S. workers).
· The salary differential between humanities majors and graduates from most other fields shrinks with time in the workforce.
· Humanities majors had somewhat higher rates of unemployment than graduates from all fields. The gap in unemployment narrows with time in the workforce and an advanced degree.
· A comparatively large share of humanities graduates go into education-related occupations—especially among those with terminal bachelor’s degrees, where humanities majors are second only to education graduates.
· Among the 42% of undergraduate humanities majors who had gone on to earn an advanced degree, workers were more evenly distributed across occupational categories than majors in most of the other fields.
· Revenues of humanities not-for profits have largely recovered from recession, but not all organizations survived.
· Less than 70% of students in each of several types of high school humanities classes were taught by a teacher with both a college major in the subject and state certification to teach it.
· While a growing number of recent humanities PhDs report their research was “interdisciplinary,” most confined their work within the humanities.
· The median time to PhD for students who paid for their education with personal savings or employer support was two years longer than the median for those who relied on scholarships, grants, and assistantships.
· An international study finds that literacy and occupational skill levels are highly correlated.

New in the Academy Data Forum:
· Christine Henseler (Union College) argues for a more expansive view of the value of the humanities.
· John Dichtl (American Association for State and Local History) and Carole Rosenstein (George Mason University) discuss gaps in what we know about humanities nonprofits.
· Barbara Cambridge National Council for Teachers of English) and Nancy McTygue (California History-Social Science Project) fill in gaps between the numbers on teacher on teacher credentials and classroom experience.
· Jamie Carroll and Chandra Muller (University of Texas at Austin) assess what recent changed in the intended majors of college-bound seniors might portend for the humanities.

· The Lincoln Project releases a new publication to examine state funding of higher education and describes challenges that state governments face. (And in case you missed it, the first Lincoln Project publication was Public Research Universities: Why They Matter.
· 50 years of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)In response to a bipartisan Congressional request, the Academy is initiating the first national study on foreign language learning in more than 30 years.
· We are pleased to mark the 50th anniversary of the National Endowment for the Humanities—a vital sponsor for our work. The co-chair of the Academy’s Commission on the Humanities, Richard H. Brodhead (Duke Univ.), delivered the keynote address “On the Fate and Fortunes of Public Goods” at a symposium commemorating the event.







Grant Keeney, May graduate (B.F.A. in Furniture Design), went for playability and style in herron_posterhis designs when Brunswick Billiards asked for a new approach to table tennis. The purveyor of home game room products came back to Herron on the heels of its successful 2014 venture through the Basile Center for Art, Design and Public Life to create version six of the iconic Gold Crown billiards table. The winning design, by Colin Tury (M.F.A. in Furniture Design, ’14), is slated for production in 2017.

Keeney’s two concepts wowed Brunswick with their angles, clean lines and Mid-Century forms. “The legs fold up and the table folds in half, but you won’t want to put it away,” Keeney said, as he presented his prototype of the extruded aluminum “CL-1” table with soft-close accessory drawers for stowing the net, paddles and balls. His second design, the “Cornerstone,” features 360 degree pivoting casters built into the legs, and a low-slung, arched base. “There’s nothing out there like it close to this price point,” he said. “These designs target Millennials and everyone else.”

In addition to Herron faculty members, Brunswick representatives Brent Hutton (B.A. ’79 Bloomington), LifeFitness vice president of global consumer sales; John Kazik, vice president of business development; and Greg Tennis, manufacturing and sourcing engineer, were on hand for the April presentations from the six students who took on the challenge. Eighteen students had attended a March call for proposals where Hutton described the project in detail and called on them to bring their creativity to bear.

Brunswick also chose designs by seniors Ben Sallee and Vance Wilson as second and third place winners. The finalists earned $1,500, $1,000 and $500 awards, respectively, and each student who presented earned a stipend for their materials and time.

Cory Robinson, chair of the Department of Fine Arts at Herron, said, “For fine art and design students this kind of project is gold. Real professional practice that comes from working with an established company like Brunswick is not the same as a simulation.”

For this project, the school again brought in special expertise from Glen Fuller, who ran a customized class for the students who created designs for Brunswick. “Glen brings work experience as a professional industrial designer. He’s coming from a place of authority and put the students through their paces conducting in-depth market research on trends and competition in the leisure sports industry,” Robinson said.

Robinson encourages businesses that want to partner with Herron to begin the conversation well in advance. “The ideal situation is for us to accept a new project in the spring semester, so that we can use the summer to work on it as well, and then complete the assignment and present in the fall,” he said. “The businesses that partner with us seem very pleased and energized by the experience. They are learning something new, too.”

Art, Education, and the Making of Future Creative Thinkers: Anila Quayyum Agha

Anita Quayyum Agha: Associate Professor of Drawing and Foundation Studies,
A successful art practice need not be measured solely on commercial success but also on anila_agha_mainthe quality of life of the practitioner. Artistic excellence in creative fields is often the result of a great deal of time spent in research: analyzing, synthesizing and then producing well crafted art or design work that is heartfelt, layered and relevant to our times. The source of my own artwork has been interpretations of contrasts and similarities, within cultures/religions/rituals of people of myriad cultures. This subject matter requires deep intellectual introspection, concept development and research to assimilate it into the artwork. Having a disciplined approach to exploring a broad spectrum of ideas helps to formulate the foundations for a successful and self-sustaining long-term practice. Furthermore artistic training provides opportunities to explore a wide array of interests and to experiment and innovate with a variety of materials/processes along with conceptual development and a mastery of the visual language to deal with the challenges present in our current societies and which is essential for success in the world today. Such skills are transferable into myriad disciplines for professional advancement for students while simultaneously adding value to their lives through personal well being.

October 12, 2015
Reception: 4:30-5:30 PM
Lecture: 5:30-7:00 PM
IUPUI Campus Center Theater 420 University Blvd. Indianapolis, IN 46202

IUPUI professor Edward Curtis to edit new book series on Africana religions

INDIANAPOLIS — Pennsylvania State University Press has named Edward Curtis,http://www.iupui.edu/~iahi/wp/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/398357_w296.jpg Millennium Chair of the Liberal Arts and professor of religious studies in the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, the co-editor of a new book series.

Curtis, co-founder of the Journal of Africana Religions, says that the book series will adopt the journal’s global vision of both African and African diasporic religions.

“Like the journal, the book series will emphasize the translocal nature of Africana religions across national, regional and hemispheric boundaries,” Curtis said. The journal is also published by Pennsylvania State University Press.

The IUPUI professor will co-edit the book series with Sylvester A. Johnson, associate professor of African American studies and religious studies at Northwestern University. Johnson is also the co-founder of the Journal of Africana Religions.

Curtis sees the book series as yet another sign of the growing interest in Africana religions and their global reach.

“National and colonial-drawn boundaries have too long shaped the formation of knowledge about black people and their religious commitments,” the IUPUI professor said. “This book series will help to nurture a community of scholars dedicated to analyzing the entire Africana world in all its richness.”

The series’ editorial board includes Afe Adogame of Princeton Theological Seminary, Sylviane Diouf of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Paul Christopher Johnson of the University of Michigan, Elizabeth Pérez of Dartmouth College, Elisha P. Renne of the University of Michigan and Judith Weisenfeld of Princeton University.

“We want to publish academic monographs in addition to books designed for classroom use about Africana religious experiences, identities, beliefs, aesthetics, ethics and institutions,” co-editor Sylvester Johnson said. “And we welcome a variety of methods, including archival, theoretical, literary, sociological and ethnographic approaches.”


The need for conversations around race and sexual orientation remains timely, as recent uAzQoo77_400x400events demonstrate that while progress is being made, much more must be done to realize full inclusion, equality and justice. It begins with increasing our understanding so we may be effective advocates and allies.
These structured, 3½-day dialogues provide selected participants the opportunity to explore issues related to race or sexual orientation in a safe environment where all voices can be heard in a climate of civility and respect. They can help improve the campus culture, build an inclusive and welcoming community, and improve inter-office relations for faculty and staff alike.

Two dialogue opportunities are being offered for fall:
October: Dialogue on Race
Thurs., Oct. 22
Fri., Oct. 23
Mon., Oct. 26
Tues., Oct. 27 (9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.)
November: Dialogue on Sexual Orientation
Mon., Nov. 2
Wed., Nov. 4
Wed., Nov. 11
Fri., Nov. 13 (9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.)
9:00 A.M. – 4:00 P.M. (each day,except as noted)

Steps of the IGD Model:
Stage 1: Creating a Shared Meaning of Dialogue
Stage 2: Identity, Social Relations and Conflict
Stage 3: Issues of Equity, Fairness and Inclusion: “Hot Topics”
Stage 4: Alliances and Empowerment

Registration Process: Please express your interest in participating by responding to this Survey Monkey Link.  Respond by: Oct 16 (race dialogue) or Oct. 26 (sex. orient. dialogue)
*Note: These dialogues require general parity (i.e., 50/50) in representation among participants based on the selected social identity for the dialogue (people of color/white; LGBT/straight). Ultimate selection for the dialogues will be based on efforts to achieve this parity.

Yvonne Chaka Chaka “Princess of Africa” at IUPUI

Yvonne Chaka Chaka – internationally famous South African singer, songwriter, Chaka_Headshotentrepreneur, and humanitarian – is dubbed the “Princess of Africa” by her fans, including Nelson Mandela and Desmond Tutu.
She’ll be coming to Indianapolis October 12 and 13, sponsored by SOHO, a locally-based NGO that works in Swaziland, as well as various IUPUI units. Chaka Chaka will be speaking at IUPUI with Gail Masondo, author and life recovery coach, on: INDABA: Empowering Women and Youth in Africa & the U.S.

Monday, October 12th
IUPUI Campus Center, room 450

  • 1:30 – 2:45pm: Yvonne Chaka and Gail Masondo in Conversation
  • 2:45 – 4:00pm: Game-Changers Panel with Campus and Community Partners: What Can I Do?
    Ongoing Social Involvement and Resource Fair in CE 4th floor atriumAll events are free and open to the public. Learn more at: http://go.iu.edu/chaka

Hourglass Is Back

For those of you who have been wishing for a return of Hourglass, it’s back! And this time, indianapolis-museum-of-art-dusk-david-pixelparableit will be held in BIG TENT at the Indianapolis Museum of Art 11/7 and 11/28!  And what’s BIG TENT, no less than a 40 foot diameter, 360 degree audio and visual environment, completely surrounding you in music and video.

We are very excited about this and hope you’ll mark the calendar with these dates.

A sixty-minute continuous arc of live and electronic music encouraging attendees to live in the moment with a community in motion. With Robin Cox -violin/composer, Shawn Goodman -bass clarinet, video by Ben Smith, and movement facilitated by Stephanie Nugent.  www.hourglass-music.com,  www.thebigtent.org

11/7/15 at 4pm
Indianapolis Museum of Art, in the Toby Theater (as part of the Community Day “Secrets” event)

11/28/15 at 6pm
Indianapolis Museum of Art, in the Deer Zinc Pavilion (as part of the IMA’s “Silent Night” event)