Dr. Albert Schweitzer of Lambaréné and the United States of America: Philanthropy, Networks and Medicine in the 20th-Century

Albert SchweitzerDr. Hines Mabika, “Dr. Albert Schweitzer of Lambaréné and the United States of America: Philanthropy, Networks and Medicine in the 20th-Century”

Date: 13 August 2015
Time: 12-1pm
Location: IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute (4th floor of the IUPUI University Library, Room UL 4115P)
Free Registration (see below)

In 1949, the German-born Dr. Albert Schweitzer traveled to the United States. Famous for establishing a hospital in Lambaréné (Gabon) in the African rainforest, Life magazine had recently named him “The Greatest Man in the World.” And, in just a few years, he would receive the Nobel Prize. This trip to the United States was vital to Schweitzer’s larger project of building an international network of philanthropy that could sustain his work in Africa. Dr. Mabika’s talk will explore these transnational relationships and connections, revealing networks of individuals and institutions that included the Unitarian Church, prestigious universities, and pharmaceutical companies which provided him and his hospital with medicines.

Dr. Hines Mabika is Senior Research Associate of the Faculty of Medicine at Bern University, Switzerland. He has taught the history of medicine, colonial and postcolonial historiographies, and health network management. He holds a PhD in History from the University of Aix-en-Provence, France and an MBA in Health Network Management from Paul Cezanne University, France. He has served on the Faculties of Medicine at the University of Aix-Marseille, France and the University of Lausanne, Switzerland as well as the Faculty of Humanities at the University of Basel and University of Lausanne, Switzerland.

The Genetic Portrait Project: Herron Professor documents people’s perceptions of genetic research through photographs

Stefan Petranek

Stefan Petranek

Stefan Petranek, assistant professor of photography and intermedia at IUPUI’s Herron School of Art and Design, has taken an unusual approach to collecting people’s thoughts on science. With a marker and poster board in hand, Petranek asks individuals from a diverse range of backgrounds to consider “how the future will be affected by genetic research.” He then photographs his volunteers holding their message. In the last four years, Petranek has photographed over 400 individuals creating a noteworthy catalogue of responses that reflect the diversity of ethical concerns and technological promise this expansive field of science offers society.

As researchers’ ability to manipulate DNA for a wide array of biological issues, from human health to agricultural production advance, the influence of DNA-based technologies on our daily lives has grown exponentially. Yet there is little research which tracks Americans’ perceptions of these technologies. The Genetic Portrait Project grew out of Petranek’s ongoing artwork about the pyscho-social implications of a genetically advanced world and his interest in how others were grappling with the same issues. The project represents the first-ever visual documentary of individuals’ perceptions on science.

Petranek has photographed several high profile individuals for the project including Dr. Eric Green, Director of the National Human Genomic Research Institute at NIH, and internationally known artist, Mark Dion. He has also photographed individuals from a variety of backgrounds, including soliciting people off the streets from cities like Indianapolis, Boston, and Portland, OR to participate. Recently, Petranek has focused on creating interactive initiatives at genetic and bioethics conferences. In 2014, he photographed attendees at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) Annual Meeting, the world’s largest genetics conference. His photographs have been exhibited nationally and were recently published in Frontline Genomic Magazine’s March issue. To see more portraits you can visit Petranek’s website and the Project’s Facebook page.

In the near future, Petranek plans to create a website that will allow people to participate autonomously, creating an international repository of photographic portraits dedicated to documenting thoughts on genetics at this moment in history.

Professor Publishes Second Volume of Authoritative Biography

Ray-Bradbury-UnboundFully established in the slick magazines, award-winning, and on the brink of placing Fahrenheit 451 in the American canon, Ray Bradbury entered the autumn of 1953 as a literary figure transcending fantasy and science fiction. In Ray Bradbury Unbound, Jonathan R. Eller continues the story begun in his acclaimed Becoming Ray Bradbury, following the beloved writer’s evolution from a short story master to a multi-media creative force and outspoken visionary.

Drawn into screenwriting by the chance to adapt Moby Dick for film, Bradbury soon established himself in Hollywood’s vast and overlapping film and television empires. The work swallowed up creative energy once devoted to literary pursuits and often left Bradbury frustrated with studio executives.

Yet his successes endowed him with the gravitas to emerge as a much sought after cultural commentator. His passionate advocacy in Life and other media outlets validated the U.S. space program’s mission — a favor repaid when NASA’s astronauts gathered to meet Bradbury during his 1967 visit to Houston. Over time, his public addresses and interviews allowed him to assume the role of a dreamer of futures voicing opinions on technology, the moon landing, and humanity’s ultimate destiny.

Eller draws on many years of interviews with Bradbury as well as an unprecedented access to personal papers and private collections to portray the origins and outcomes of Bradbury’s countless creative endeavors. The result is the definitive story of how a great American author helped shape his times.

“A thorough documentation of Bradbury’s career. . . . This warm, informative biography depicts him as a thoughtful and disciplined writer who helped make science fiction a respected literary genre.”–Kirkus

“Eller captures the joy of creations that new forms allowed Bradbury, such as the intensely visual interpretation of Moby Dick that he wrote for director John Huston. . . . Fans who know Bradbury only for his fiction are likely to enjoy this diverse look at his work and creative process.”–Publishers Weekly

“Intimate, conscientious, and triumphant, a truly profound examination of Bradbury’s accomplishments and legacy. Highly recommended for all sf lovers and those with an appreciation for non-fiction and literature.”–Library Journal

“Engaging. . . . Eller’s second volume of Bradbury’s biography is ultimately a melancholy and cautionary tale.”–Washington Post

“Few contemporary authors have been written about as extensively as Ray Bradbury, but no one has surpassed Jonathan Eller. In his previous study, Becoming Ray Bradbury, he captured the odd nature of Bradbury’s imagination perfectly in the context of his life and age — keeping a myriad of influences and ambitions in perspective. With the publication of Ray Bradbury Unbound, Eller not only confirms his position as the great comprehensive Bradbury scholar. He has also written what may be the best single account of a major science fiction author’s rise to fame and achievement.”–Dana Gioia, author of Pity the Beautiful and former chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts

Jonathan R. Eller is a Chancellor’s Professor of English at Indiana University-Purdue University in Indianapolis, the senior textual editor of the Institute for American Thought, and director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at IUPUI. Becoming Ray Bradbury was a runner-up for the 2011 Locus Award for best nonfiction book in the science fiction and fantasy field.

John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Offers Fellowships to Assist Research and Artistic Creation

Application Deadline: September 19, 2015

TJohn Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Logo courtesy of GF.orghe foundation offers fellowships to further the development of scholars and artists by assisting them to engage in research in any field of knowledge and creation in any of the arts, under the freest possible conditions and irrespective of race, color, or creed. The foundation provides fellowships for advanced professionals in all fields (natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, creative arts) except the performing arts. The foundation selects its fellows on the basis of two separate competitions, one for the United States and Canada, the other for Latin America and the Caribbean.

The foundation understands advanced professionals to be those who as writers, scholars, or scientists have a significant record of publication, or as artists, playwrights, filmmakers, photographers, composers, or the like, have a significant record of exhibition or performance of their work.

The foundation only supports individuals. It does not make grants to institutions or organizations.

The amounts of the grants will be adjusted to the needs of the fellows, considering their other resources and the purpose and scope of their plans. Appointments are ordinarily made for one year, and in no instance for a period shorter than six consecutive months.

Applicants should be: New Faculty/New Investigator/PhD/M.D./Other Professional

The Application deadline is September 19, 2015

Application information can be found here.

Talking About Freedoms without Freaking Out

An IUPUI discussion series powered by Spirit & Place, a legacy project of The Polis iupuiCenter, part of IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, with support from the IUPUI Office of Community Engagement, Indiana Humanities, IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law, Center for Interfaith Cooperation, and The Center for Civic Literacy.

Where do individual rights begin and end? Which religious liberties are protected by the Constitution? Who decides what is “right” when our ideals about religious freedom, freedom of speech, and freedom from discrimination clash? How do we get past media sound bites and sensational opinions to really talk about our freedoms without freaking out? Explore which freedoms the First Amendment does – and does not – protect in our summer discussion series.

June 19, 12-1 p.m.
Hate Speech and the First Amendment: Values in Conflict
Scottish Rite Cathedral – FREE
At what point, if at all, should so-called “hate speech” become illegal? During the monthly luncheon of the League of Women Voters ‎of Indianapolis, hear attorney and civic leader Don Knebel discuss hate speech and the First Amendment.

June 24, 6:00 – 7:30 p.m. (reception to follow)
Can We Talk about RFRA without Talking Past One Another?
IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law Wynne Courtroom – FREE (register at mckinney.iu.edu)
It’s fair to say that the controversy over RFRA raised more heat than light. This panel aims to model thoughtful conversation on the constitutional and philosophical questions raised by the RFRA debate. Hear from executive director of the ACLU of Indiana Jane Henegar, IU McKinney Professor of Law John Hill, and attorney and IBJ columnist Peter Rusthoven. Moderated by IU McKinney Professor of Law Robert Katz. 1.5 hours of CLE credit available.

July 13, 5-7 p.m.
Trivia Night
Sun King Brewery – FREE
We’re redefining the meaning of “bar exam” with a night of First Amendment trivia and conversation at Sun King. Grab a beer and your thinking cap and join Indiana Humanities and Spirit & Place for quiz night! Open to anyone 21+, there will be prizes for the night’s sharpest legal eagles.

More info at www.spiritandplace.org.

Herron’s summer exhibitions range from photography to painting to sculpture and video

Herron School of Art and Design’s 2015 summer exhibitions will feature works by five herron_posterartists in a range of media from photography to painting to sculpture and video.

A reception in Eskenazi Hall on July 10 from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. will open the galleries, which are free and open to the public. The exhibitions continue through Jul 31.

Michelle Given lives and works in Indianapolis and has taught at Murray State University as well as Indiana University. Her work in this show includes interior spaces, landscapes and cityscapes, and video.

Stacey M. Holloway, Herron alumna (B.F.A. 2006) and former faculty member,is an assistant professor of sculpture at the University of Alabama, Birmingham. Her cache of poignant yet whimsical dioramas sold out at a recent gallery show in New York, so she has promised to make new works for this exhibition.

Valerie Eickmeier, dean of Herron, will exhibit selected works created during her recent sabbatical that meld real experiences and observations with imagined and reinterpreted images.

These paintings are based on changing sequences in nature as well as contemplation of the underlying forces that create change. In the Marsh Gallery, recent works by Marianne Glick will be on display. The civic leader and philanthropist began painting in 2004 as she searched for a creative outlet to replace gardening during the winter. She describes herself as an abstract expressionist who works mostly in watercolor and acrylic. The Basile Gallery will feature works by R. Stephen Lehman. A prosthodontist by
profession, Lehman began his love of photography in college shooting campus parties. He likens his seriousness about the medium to that of legendary cellist Pablo Casals,
who was once asked why, at 93, he continued to practice three hours a day. Casals replied, “I’m beginning to notice some improvement.”

Parking Information
Park courtesy of The Great Frame Up Indianapolis in the visitor section of the Sports Complex Garage (west of Herron’s Eskenazi Hall), or park on the upper floors of the
Riverwalk Garage (south of the Sports Complex Garage) until 6:00 p.m. Park on any floor after 6:00 p.m. Bring your parking ticket to the Herron Galleries for validation.

IU Alumni Association honors six volunteers for their service

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — During its annual Alumni Leaders Conference on June 4 to 6, the thIndiana University Alumni Association will honor five individuals for their service and volunteer leadership to the IUAA and acknowledge a sixth person who received an award in May.

Four alumni volunteers will receive the IUAA President’s Award, established in 1993 to pay tribute to their service to the organization. It is the highest award given by the IU Alumni Association to a volunteer leader. One volunteer received his President’s Award during the Asia-Pacific Alumni Conference in Bali in May.

The IUAA also will present the Gertrude Rich Award, honoring the memory of the wife of Claude Rich, director of the IUAA from 1948 to 1968. It is given to a spouse or partner of an alumni leader who has exemplified the spirit of Gertrude Rich in making outstanding contributions to the IUAA.

The 2015 recipients of the IUAA President’s Award are Pam Berke, BS’92; Tin S. “Philip” Chua, MBA’88; Kimberly J. Davis, MS’78; Michael J. Garber, BFA’97; and Nancy L. Hamblin, BS’78, MS’82.

Also being presented at the Alumni Leaders Conference is the Gertrude Rich Award, which will be awarded to Gwendolyn May-Barlow.

Pam Berke

Berke, of Centennial, Colo., has a long history of service to the Colorado Chapter of the IU Alumni Association. She has held several offices in the chapter, including secretary for more than 10 years. She is credited with helping to shape the current board structure. Even after stepping down, she has continued to be a major part of the chapter and one of the main contributors to its events. She has served as the chapter’s representative to the IUAA Executive Council, as an IU student recruiter and as an assistant for Kelley School of Business events.

Tin S. “Philip” Chua

In the past few years, Chua, as president of the Singapore chapter of the IU Alumni Association, has contributed to its significant growth and to the development of regional chapters. In 2013, he organized and led his team to host an alumni dinner for President Michael A. McRobbie and Provost Lauren Robel for more than 170 people. He has served as an executive career coach and participated in the Marshall Goldsmith training in 2014. He is a dedicated student recruiter. He has facilitated and strengthened institutional partnerships for IU that have benefited the Kelley School of Business, Jacobs School of Music and Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. His President’s Award was bestowed during his attendance at the recent Asia-Pacific Alumni Conference in Bali.

Kimberly J. Davis

Davis’ skills as an educator, writer, presenter and video producer have served her well in her association with the IU Alumni Association. She has served on the IUAA Executive Council and has a long affiliation with the IU GLBT Alumni Association, serving on the board twice and as president from 2001 to 2005. Still on the advisory board for the GLBT Student Support Services Office, Davis, of Bloomington, Ind., has mentored countless youth. She has participated on numerous panels regarding a wide range of GLBT topics. She received the GLBTAA Distinguished Alumni Award in 2014 and the GLBT Spirit Award in 2004.

Michael J. Garber

Garber, of Carmel, Ind., has been a diligent volunteer for the IU Alumni Association for several years, representing the Herron School of Art and Design on the association’s Executive Council. He has served on the Herron Alumni Association board as a member, secretary/treasurer and president, and he still holds honorary membership on the board. He has been involved with the annual IUPUI Alumni Holiday Night at the Children’s Museum and has offered insight for Herron alumni programs. He donates his time and talent as a designer to help advance the mission of the Herron Alumni Association.

Nancy L. Hamblin

Hamblin, of Munster, Ind., has gone above and beyond in her volunteer service to the IUAA. She has served two terms on the IU Alumni Association Executive Council and has been on the IUAA Board of Managers as a member, vice chair, chair-elect, chair and past chair. She has served the IUAA Lakeshore Region chapter as a board member and scholarship chair. In addition, she has served on the IU Northwest Chancellor’s Board of Advisors, its executive committee and its philanthropy committee. She also has served on the IU School of Education Board of Visitors and volunteered with the IUAA Student Alumni Association.

Gwendolyn May-Barlow

The 2015 recipient of the Gertrude Rich Award is Gwendolyn May-Barlow of Chicago. She is an IU advocate, encouraging the best and brightest of her students at the City College of Chicago to investigate IU for their college experience. May-Barlow participated fully during the term of her husband, Michael Barlow, BFA’85, as IU Alumni Association chairman in 2010-11. She is an IUAA life member and served as a host for a 2013 Hoosier Travelers trip, “Treasures of Southern Africa.”

The IU Alumni Association is dedicated to serving the university and its diverse alumni, students and friends. As one of the nation’s largest alumni organizations, serving more than 600,000 graduates worldwide, the IUAA provides many programs and services to its members, nonmember alumni and the university. For more information, call 800-824-3044.

An interactive discussion looks at landscape painting as a mirror of life’s relationships

INDIANAPOLIS — Landscape painting has long provided humans with an artistic form for The Mirror of Landscape Advertcontemplating the relationship between nature, society and culture.

In an interactive discussion this week, New York-based artist Rebecca Allan and Jason M. Kelly, associate professor of history and director of the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Arts and Humanities Institute, will engage the audience in a conversation about the role of landscape painting in mediating our relationship with the environment and with each other.

The Mirror of Landscape” discussion takes place at 7 p.m. Thursday, June 4, at the DeBoest Lecture Hall, Indianapolis Museum of Art, 4000 Michigan Road.

Tickets are free and available online.

The discussion will explore five paintings, created between 1750 and 2015. The event will end in a visit to the Indianapolis Museum of Art’s Pont-Aven gallery to examine Paul Gauguin’s “The Flageolet Player on the Cliff.”

This event is presented by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the Indianapolis Museum of Art and the Rivers of the Anthropocene project.

Herron grad’s personal blog of ‘Things Organized Neatly’ takes international award

INDIANAPOLIS — “Let me organize your things,” said Austin Radcliffe, and with those five 476770_w296words the Herron School of Art and Design graduate accepted the 2015 People’s Voice Webby Award for Personal Blog/Website during the 19th Annual Webby Awards on May 18.

Presented by the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences, the Webby Awards honors excellence on the Internet, in the categories of websites, advertising and media, online film and video, mobile sites and apps, and social. This year’s 344 winners were chosen from nearly 13,000 entries from all 50 states and more than 60 countries.

Radcliffe’s award-winning website, “Things Organized Neatly,” includes images of just that — things organized neatly — created and curated by him.

His latest creation, “Springs Organized Neatly,” was created specifically in celebration of his Webby award; the award logo and trophy are springs. The photo was shot in collaboration with Brooke Shanesy.

“Images on my blog come from artists, mainly photographers, all over the world,” Radcliffe said. “I have featured approximately one photo every day for the last five years, so I couldn’t have done it all myself. The site has become a documentation of the trend/style of organizing things neatly.”

Other posts include:

A child’s make-believe super hero costume
Nicholas Jacobsen’s objects left behind in an old plumbing company.
Robert Wilson’s neatly organized cup and saucers for the launch of a new line of ceramics.
Jim Golden’s hair barrettes.
Renee Altov’s disassembled 1980s Mitsubishi Colt.

During the star-studded awards ceremony in New York, Radcliffe and other Webby winners received their Webby statues, a silver spring, and acknowledged their wins in five-word acceptance speeches, a Webby tradition.

“It is very exciting to be recognized by such a prestigious Internet award, for a blog project I started while at Herron,” Radcliffe said. “The awards ceremony was surreal and definitely memorable. I don’t know exactly what it will lead to, though I have already gotten a few new emails from creative agencies who want to work together.”

A resident of Cincinnati, Radcliffe graduated from Herron, on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus, in 2012 with a major in fine art and art history. His organized things have earned him an invitation to work with Tate Galleries in London, a book deal and more than 350,000 Tumblr followers.

Heineman Foundation Seed Money for Start-up and New Projects

Brief Description:
The purpose of the Foundation is to provide seed money to start-up projects and new 227604_w296projects within existing organizations for a maximum of three to five years. The Foundation’s general areas of interest are the following:
· Programs that enable economically challenged women to enter and remain in the workplace
· Environmental research that will help prevent, reduce and/or eliminate water degradation
· Live music performance for education and outreach
· Research into prevention and treatment of childhood illnesses
· Programs that enable youth to think, create, and communicate effectively
· Programs that support and promote high achievement in music, science, and literature

Award Amount:
Grants are funded once a year, following the November board meeting. Multi-year grants are not given. The average range of donations is $20,000 to $50,000, per annum.

Eligibility:
The Foundation seeks projects in proximity to their directors. Although applications from other states are not excluded, those applicants (Indiana included) should be aware that their chances to receive funding are remote.

Limitation: One per Indiana University
Do not accept multiple submissions per year from an organization.

To apply for IU Internal competition:
For consideration as an institutional nominee, submit the following documents electronically to limited submission, limsub@iu.edu, by July 1, 2015 for internal coordination. To expedite the review process, we request that investigators who intend to submit a proposal send an email 1 week before the internal deadline with the intended investigator names/affiliations and proposal title to limsub@iu.edu with the subject line: L0954 Notice of Intent.

1. A summary of the project for which you are requesting funding, limited to 400 words.
2. Your project’s budget, and how many years the project has existed.
3. Abbreviated CV, not exceeding 3 pages, or a biosketch for the PI

IUPUI applicants must copy Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, on submissions.

IU Internal Deadline: 7/1/2015
Foundation Application Deadline: 9/1/2015

Limited Submission URL: http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=3543