Forum: U.S. Rep. Susan Brooks, Gary Mayor Karen Freeman-Wilson featured at Women in Leadership

INDIANAPOLIS — U.S. Rep. Susan Brooks and Gary Mayor Karen Freeman-Wilson will beSusan Brooks, official portrait,113th Congress the featured speakers at the Hazelett Women in Leadership Forum Nov. 23 at the Indiana Statehouse.

They will address the topic of women’s leadership in government, discussing what skills women bring to government and what perspectives they offer.

The forum was created by Ambassador Randall L. Tobias, the Randall L. Tobias Foundation, the IU Tobias Center for Leadership Excellence, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and the IUPUI Office for Women. Gary Mayor Karen-Freeman-Wilson

Participants are asked to register for the forum, which is free and open to the public. It begins with a reception at 5 p.m. in the Rotunda, followed by the presentations at 6 p.m. in the North Atrium.

“This program grows out of a desire to honor and hear from individuals who are successful leaders,” said Carol Madison, executive director of the Tobias Center. “Our speakers are individuals who exemplify excellence in leadership and work to support the advancement of women in leadership roles.

“To that end, the IU Tobias Center, the IUPUI Office for Women and IUPUI Chancellor Nasser H. Paydar invite the community, corporate leaders, students and scholars to share in a learning experience focused on women leaders in all walks of life,” Madison said. “Honorees offer insights into knowledge about leadership in the modern workplace, including their reflections on the role of gender, work/life balance and effective communication.”

Brooks represents the 5th District of Indiana, which spans eight counties in Central Indiana. When elected, she became the first Republican congresswoman from Indiana since the 1950s.

Brooks served as deputy mayor of Indianapolis under Mayor Steve Goldsmith and was appointed U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Indiana in 2001 by President George W. Bush. She has also held the position of senior vice president and general counsel for Ivy Tech Community College, with a focus on statewide workforce-development strategies.

On Dec. 31, 2011, Freeman-Wilson became the first woman to lead Gary and the first African-American female mayor in Indiana.

Previously, she was the Indiana attorney general, focusing her efforts on youth, seniors and abused patients in nursing homes. She was one of the first attorneys general in the country to combat gas price-gouging and to ensure that tobacco-settlement dollars were directed toward smoking cessation and health care. Freeman-Wilson has also served as the executive director of the Indiana Civil Rights Commission.

The Hazelett Forum was established to honor the late Susie Hazelett, former executive director of the Randall L. Tobias Foundation, who was instrumental in helping to establish the IU Tobias Center for Leadership Excellence.

The Tobias Center focuses on research and programs related to the study of leadership across all sectors, including corporate, public service, education, religion, medicine and nonprofit organizations. Its focus on multiple sectors and on both the practice and theory of leadership distinguish its agenda among leadership programs nationwide.


The need for conversations around race and sexual orientation remains timely, as recent uAzQoo77_400x400events demonstrate that while progress is being made, much more must be done to realize full inclusion, equality and justice. It begins with increasing our understanding so we may be effective advocates and allies.
These structured, 3½-day dialogues provide selected participants the opportunity to explore issues related to race or sexual orientation in a safe environment where all voices can be heard in a climate of civility and respect. They can help improve the campus culture, build an inclusive and welcoming community, and improve inter-office relations for faculty and staff alike.

Two dialogue opportunities are being offered for fall:
October: Dialogue on Race
Thurs., Oct. 22
Fri., Oct. 23
Mon., Oct. 26
Tues., Oct. 27 (9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.)
November: Dialogue on Sexual Orientation
Mon., Nov. 2
Wed., Nov. 4
Wed., Nov. 11
Fri., Nov. 13 (9:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.)
9:00 A.M. – 4:00 P.M. (each day,except as noted)

Steps of the IGD Model:
Stage 1: Creating a Shared Meaning of Dialogue
Stage 2: Identity, Social Relations and Conflict
Stage 3: Issues of Equity, Fairness and Inclusion: “Hot Topics”
Stage 4: Alliances and Empowerment

Registration Process: Please express your interest in participating by responding to this Survey Monkey Link.  Respond by: Oct 16 (race dialogue) or Oct. 26 (sex. orient. dialogue)
*Note: These dialogues require general parity (i.e., 50/50) in representation among participants based on the selected social identity for the dialogue (people of color/white; LGBT/straight). Ultimate selection for the dialogues will be based on efforts to achieve this parity.

Perspectives on the Sand Creek Massacre A Public Program by Ari Kelman and Norma Gourneau

September 23, 2015
7:00 pm
Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art
500 W Washington St., Indianapolis, IN
Free Admission

The Eiteljorg Museum and the IUPUI Graduate Program in Public History present a thprogram on the 1864 massacre of Arapahoe and Cheyenne people at Sand Creek, Colorado Territory. This program offers an exciting and unique opportunity to embrace multiple voices and to help the public understand the history and memory and interpretation of this dark and pivotal event.

Dr. Kelman is the McCabe Greer Professor of History at Penn State University. He is the author of A Misplaced Massacre: Struggling Over the Memory of Sand Creek and the recipient of the Avery O. Craven Award, the Bancroft Prize, the Tom Watson Brown Book Award and the Robert M. Utley Prize, all in 2014.

Norma Gourneau is a Northern Cheyenne, a descendant of a survivor of the massacre, and an active participant in commemorating Sand Creek. She is Superintendant, Wind River Agency, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Fort Washak- ie, Wyoming.

Sponsored by the Eiteljorg Museum, the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, the Herron School of Art & Design, the IUPUI Department of Anthropology, the IUPUI American Studies Program, and the IUPUI Museum Studies Program.

For more information, contact the IUPUI Public History Program Office at 317.278.5983

IUPUI to host Innovation to Enterprise Forum and Showcase

The IUPUI Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and the Indiana University Research and Technology Corp. will host the 2014 IUPUI Innovation to Enterprise Forum and Showcase: Funding Innovation on Thursday, Nov. 20.

The event will take place from 2 to 4:30 p.m. in the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Campus Center Theater, on the lower level of the center, 420 University Blvd.

The forum will bring together researchers, entrepreneurs, investors and executives from IUPUI and the Indianapolis business community to explore the challenges and opportunities of translating the fruits of academic research into products.

Joseph Trebley, the head of startup support and promotion at the IURTC, will moderate a panel discussion on “Alternatives for Funding New Ventures.” More funding options are available for startup businesses now than ever before. New services have emerged to fill the gap created as banks and conventional venture capital firms have pulled away from riskier early-stage investments.

Panelists are Nick Carter, Kevin Hitchen, Polina Osherov and Jacob Schpok.

Nick Carter, founder of Husk Foods – Carter is a serial entrepreneur – founder of over half a dozen businesses – and is the acting CEO of two startups and an active partner or board member in four other established companies. Born a farm boy, he has a firm understanding of hard work, starting his first business at 16. Carter is the author of “Twelve Seconds,” which teaches entrepreneurs to get their small business off the ground.

Kevin Hitchen, founder of Localstake – Hitchen and his two partners co-founded Localstake to provide growing businesses a new solution for raising capital. Since its launch in 2013, the online investment marketplace for investing in private businesses has been featured in national publications such as TechCrunch, Yahoo Finance and Investopedia. Entrepreneur highlighted Localstake in its Reinvention 2013 article on “Indy’s Innovators.”

Polina Osherov, co-founder of Pattern – Osherov is co-founder of the nonprofit fashion industry networking and advocacy group Pattern and the editor-in-chief of Pattern Magazine, an award-winning, internationally distributed publication about fashion, design and creativity in Central Indiana. She is also a commercial photographer, working with corporate clients, advertising agencies and marketing companies.

Jacob Schpok, executive director for the lieutenant governor’s Office of Small Business and Enterprise – The newly created office was established to ensure Indiana works for entrepreneurs. Under his new role as executive director, Schpok continues to serve as state director of the Indiana Small Business Development Center, which last year helped Indiana businesses raise $70 million in capital and create over 1,600 full-time jobs.

The forum and showcase event is free and open to the public, but RSVPs are requested.

Randa Jarrar, Award-Winning Novelist, Coming to IUPUI

A Map of HomeAs part of the Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here Symposium, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute in collaboration with the IUPUI Library and the Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series invites you to join us on the evening of November 17 for a presentation by Randa Jarrar.

Time: 7:00-8:30 pm
Date: November 17, 2014
Location: Basile Auditorium, Eskenazi Hall (Herron School of Art and Design)
Tickets are free, but registration is required.

Randa Jarrar is an award-winning novelist, short story writer, essayist, and translator. In 2010, a collaborative project between the Hay Festival, Beirut UNESCO’s World Book Capital 2009 celebrations, Banipal magazine and the British Council recognized her as a member of the Beirut39 — 39 of the world’s most promising Arab writers under the age of 39.

Jarrar grew up in Kuwait and Egypt, and moved to the US after the first Gulf War.  Her first novel, A Map of Home, has been published in half a dozen languages and won a Hopwood Award, an Arab-American Book Award, and was named one of the best novels of 2008 by the Barnes and Noble Review.

Her work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The Utne Reader,, Guernica, The Rumpus, The Oxford American, Ploughshares, Five Chapters, and others. She has received fellowships from the Civitella Ranieri Foundation, Hedgebrook, Caravansarai, and Eastern Frontier.

About Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here at IUPUI

On March 5, 2007, in the middle of the Iraq war, a car bomb killed dozens and injured over a hundred people.  It also devastated al-Mutanabbi Street, a busy avenue of cafés and bookstores that had served as a meeting place for generations of writers and thinkers.  In response to the attack, San Francisco bookseller Beau Beausoleil rallied a community of international artists and writers to produce “Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here,” a collection of letterpress-printed broadsides (poster-like works on paper), artists’ books (unique works of art in book form) and an anthology of writing focused on expressing solidarity with Iraqi booksellers, writers and readers.

“Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here” includes 260 artists’ books; a publication titled “Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here: Poets and Writers Respond to the March 5, 2007, Bombing of Baghdad’s ‘Street of the Booksellers,'” plus 130 broadsides — one for every person killed or injured in the bombing.  Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will serve as one of only three repositories in the world to hold the complete collection.  It will also sponsor three biennial conferences to explore the themes and implications of the collection through papers, panels, posters and presentations with international scholars, artists and writers from a range of disciplines.


Leibman Forum to tackle legal and cultural issues surrounding ‘The Art of the Steal’

Was the $25 billion art collection of Albert C. Barnes “stolen” decades after his death, as some say, or was it simply “moved in the public interest”?

Art and legal pundits and interested others can judge for themselves during a lively examination of the facts during the annual Jordan H. and Joan R. Leibman Forum on the Legal and Business Environment of Art on Friday, Nov. 1, at the IU McKinney School of Law.

This year’s forum, “Donor Intent vs. Public Interest,” examines the issues raised in the film “The Art of the Steal,” a documentary about the disposition of the Barnes collection. The program includes a screening of the film, followed by a panel discussion featuring legal, art and philanthropic experts.

“Donor Intent vs. Public Interest” takes place from 4 to 8 p.m. in Inlow Hall, 530 W. New York St. The film screening takes place at 4 p.m., followed by the panel discussion at 6 p.m., both in Wynne Courtroom. A reception will follow the discussion at 7:15 p.m. in the Atrium.

At his death in 1951, Barnes had amassed a matchless collection of modern and post-impressionist art. He also left a will with strict instructions for the collection to remain forever at an original location in a Philadelphia suburb. After a battle that included a lawsuit by one faction of Philadelphia residents and a countersuit by another, the collection was relocated to downtown Philadelphia in 2012.

The public debate over moving the collection was one of the most “significant, heated and widespread debates about art, culture and place in Philadelphia” around the turn of the 21st century, said Laura Holzman, a forum panelist.

Holzman, assistant professor of art history and museum studies at the Herron School of Art and Design and the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, is working on a book project about civil discourse and visual culture that includes a study of the discourse about moving the Barnes collection.

“The use of extreme language (like describing the relocated collection as ‘stolen’) is significant because it demonstrates the fervor behind people’s beliefs about what was best for the collection and its publics,” Holzman said. “It also suggests that debates about the ethics of relocation were steeped in concerns about cultural capital, or who has ownership of the art.”

Other forum speakers are:

  • Kenan Farrell, attorney and adjunct professor teaching art and museum law at IU McKinney School of Law.
  • Kathryn Haigh, deputy director for collections and exhibitions at the Indianapolis Museum of Art.
  • Robert A. Katz, professor of law at IU McKinney School of Law and professor of philanthropic studies at IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy.

An additional free screening of “The Art of the Steal” will take place from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 29, in Room 375, Inlow Hall. Online registration is suggested.

The Jordan H. and Joan R. Leibman Forum was established at IUPUI in 2004 to examine issues on the legal and business environment of the arts. It is co-sponsored by the IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law, the IU Herron School of Art and Design and the IU Kelley School of Business Indianapolis.

The forum is free of change, but registration is required online. Indiana continuing legal education credit of 1.4 hour is available free of charge.

For questions, contact Beth Young at