Hourglass Is Back

For those of you who have been wishing for a return of Hourglass, it’s back! And this time, indianapolis-museum-of-art-dusk-david-pixelparableit will be held in BIG TENT at the Indianapolis Museum of Art 11/7 and 11/28!  And what’s BIG TENT, no less than a 40 foot diameter, 360 degree audio and visual environment, completely surrounding you in music and video.

We are very excited about this and hope you’ll mark the calendar with these dates.

A sixty-minute continuous arc of live and electronic music encouraging attendees to live in the moment with a community in motion. With Robin Cox -violin/composer, Shawn Goodman -bass clarinet, video by Ben Smith, and movement facilitated by Stephanie Nugent.  www.hourglass-music.com,  www.thebigtent.org

11/7/15 at 4pm
Indianapolis Museum of Art, in the Toby Theater (as part of the Community Day “Secrets” event)

11/28/15 at 6pm
Indianapolis Museum of Art, in the Deer Zinc Pavilion (as part of the IMA’s “Silent Night” event)

More Ask an Expert: Tuesdays on Monument Circle!

Ask an Expert with Gabe FilippeliIs it Tuesday? Is it lunchtime? Then come down to Monument Circle. Each week, you will get to meet university experts and ask them any question you want about their area of expertise. In exchange, our experts will ask you about your expertise. It’s always fun, and you never know what you’re going to learn.

Our upcoming Ask an Expert events are:

  • Art Therapy with Juliet King (15 September)
  • Christianity and Globalization with Joseph Tucker Edmonds (22 September)
  • Art and Anthropology with Fiona McDonald (29 September)
  • Women in Politics with Kristy Sheeler (6 October)
  • Science Fiction and Philosophy with Jason Eberl (13 October)

“Ask an Expert” was designed by the IAHI and the Kinetic Project. We are currently offering this program as a collaboration with Big Car and its SPARK: Monument Circle project.

Herron School of Art and Design seniors to create First Friday pop-up gallery in semitrailers

INDIANAPOLIS — Herron School of Art and Design painting majors Amy Applegate, Josh herron_posterHaines, Brian Johnson, Andrey Sichuga and Shannon White are putting together a pop-up gallery in Fountain Square for First Friday.

When the students present their senior show “Grant Illusions” in the parking lot of Wildwood Market, 1015 Virginia Ave., on May 1, it will be because they not only produced the artistic works displayed, but they also pulled sponsors and the entire community together to make the large-scale event possible.

Show sponsor Celadon Trucking agreed early on to loan and deliver multiple semitractor-trailers to the site.

Visitors to the exhibit will find that each of the Herron seniors has a solo show in a separate semitrailer. The show also includes a communal area that will feature collaborative and individual performances and a film screening.

The organizers promise the show will have something for everyone. Additional sponsors include B’s Po Boys, ESL Spectrum, Fountain Square Brewery, IMOCA, Indy Restoration, Keep Indianapolis Beautiful, New Day Meadery, Southeast Neighborhood Development and The Glick Foundation.

IUPUI Honors Scholars to showcase research, service-learning accomplishments

INDIANAPOLIS — Student pursuits in undergraduate research, international study and honorsservice learning will take the spotlight next week during Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis’ annual presentation of accomplishments of high-ability students.

The Fifth Annual Honors College Student Showcase takes place from 3 to 5 p.m. Thursday, April 23, in the lower lobby of the IUPUI University Library, 755 W. Michigan St. The event is free and open to the public.

“The Honors College Showcase is one of my favorite events for the college,” said Honors College Dean Jane Luzar. “It not only demonstrates the range of activities our scholars pursue but also the passion and excellence our students devote to these efforts.”

Morgan Moran is among the 26 IUPUI Honors Scholars who, using posters, live performances, media and other creative presentations, will showcase their recent accomplishments in the areas of research, art, design, visual communication, business solutions, service learning and community engagement and international experiences.

Moran, a psychology major, spent a week doing crafts and other activities with children in an orphanage in Costa Rica. She has captured the excitement of that life-changing service-learning experience in a short video that she’ll present at the showcase.

The spring break trip to Costa Rica was a confidence-builder for Moran who, in addition to maintaining a rigorous academic schedule, spends three hours per week working with children at Riley Hospital for Children at IU Health, volunteering 300 hours of service since her freshman year at IUPUI.

She looks forward to sharing video footage and still photographs from her international experience.

Moran and other students say Honors College projects and programming have allowed them to build relationships with people from different walks of life, have provided funds and opportunities for study abroad, and have increased their campus engagement.

Showcase presenters include:

Dorothy Slover, art education sophomore, who will display a collection of books, drawings, paintings and other original art. Most of her work has been independent art exploration. But when she begins her student teaching in the fall, she will build lesson plans around her creations, starting with art books like the ones in her showcase presentation.
Jeffery Joll, biomedical engineering junior, who has spent two years studying bone biology in an IU School of Medicine lab, first as an intern and now as a part-time research assistant. He will present a poster display of research that in the long term could lead to more successful therapy for people with brittle bone disease or osteoarthritis.

Exhibition: Dontrell: Think and Drink


On Monday, April 13 from 5:30-8:00 pm, Nathan Alan Davis and cast-members will kick off the 2015 “Think and Drink” series at Sun King Brewery. This event will be subtitled “Think and Drink: Brews, Beats, and Rhymes,” and will feature DJ Kyle Long and Tatjana Rebelle (host of Lingo and Vocab). This event will feature some of the top beat poets and spoken word artists who will perform along with attendees and Sun King employees to create and spit their own rhymes. DJ Kyle Long will be spinning an eclectic fusion of international music throughout the evening. Donations will be taken at the door to benefit the Starfish Initiative.

Dontrell: Talkback

Immediately following the April 12th performance of Dontrell, Who Kissed the SeaLogo of Phoenix Theatre, the Phoenix Theatre and the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute will co-host a talkback session to discuss some of the “big ideas” that emerge from the play, including the influence of historical events in shaping our experience, the importance of family in molding our identity, and the role of free will in determining our life’s journey.

This conversation will be moderated by Dr. Ronda Henry Anthony, Associate Professor of English and Africana Studies and Public Scholar of African American Studies and Undergraduate Research in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. She is the author of Searching for the New Black Man: Black Masculinity and Women’s Bodies, published by the University Press of Mississippi in 2013. She writes on African American literature, gender, and race.

Tickets for the April 12th performance of Dontrell can be purchased here.

INconversation with Nathan Alan Davis

Join us, on April 9th, for an INconversation with playwright Nathan Alan Davis, Nathan Alan Davis.  Photo courtesy of inside.iub.eduwhose play “Dontrell, Who Kissed the Sea” will be featured at the Phoenix Theater April 9-26. Nathan received his MFA in playwriting from Indiana University in 2014 and is currently a Lila Acheson Wallace Fellow at Julliard.

The discussion, moderated by Modupe Labode, IUPUI’s Public Scholar of African American History and Museum Studies, will center around themes of memory, identity, African-American history, and the different ways we understand these ideas–through history, through theater and art, through material culture and family stories.

Nathan’s plays have also been produced, presented or developed at Baltimore Center Stage, Chicago Dramatists, San Diego Rep. and Source Festival (DC). Other honors include: Jerome Fellowship finalist, Heideman Award finalist and Bay Area Playwrights Festival finalist. Learn more.

INconversation is an Indiana Humanities program. This event has been supported by the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, and is held in partnership with the Phoenix Theater

IUPUI Welcomes Amy X Neuburg, Department of Music and Arts Technology Guest Artist Series

Amy X Neuburg

The third installment of the Department of Music and Arts Technology guest artist series is here! Amy X Neuburg is a really unique musician spanning a remarkable range of pursuits -a soprano of classical and rock vocal training, an electronic percussionist, and a composer of techno looping techniques and cabaret-style songs. There’s only one Amy X Neuburg.

And…The E/A ensemble (our student electro-acoustic ensemble) will premiere a work on stage with Amy!

Residency Schedule:

Monday 3/9 10:30am -11:50am, IUPUI, ICTC Building Room 071 A lecture/demonstration with sophomore and junior Music and Arts Technology majors

Monday 3/9 6pm – 7:30pm, IUPUI, ICTC Building Room 071 A lecture/demonstration for participants of Girls Rock

Tuesday 3/10 10:30am -11:50am, IUPUI, ICTC Building Room 061 A lecture/demonstration with freshman and senior Music and Arts Technology majors

Tuesday 3/10, 7:30pm, Basile Opera Center 4011 N Pennsylvania St. Free admission and free parking!
The IUPUI Department of Music and Arts Technology and The Indianapolis Opera co-present a concert by Amy X Neuburg  Tuesday 3/10, 7:30pm, Basile Opera Center 4011 N Pennsylvania St. Free admission and free parking!

Amy X Neuburg is a composer, vocalist and live electronics performer who has developed a unique career bridging the boundaries between classical, experimental and popular musics.  She will come to the IUPUI  campus from California on March 9th and 10th for lecture/demonstrations with Music and Arts Technology majors, as well as outreach into the community with a special workshop involving Girls Rock, and a concert co-sponsored with the Indianapolis Opera at the Basile Opera Center. This concert is free to both the IUPUI community and the public!

Amy X Neuburg has been developing her own brand of irreverently genre-crossing works for voice, live electronics and chamber ensembles for over 25 years, known for her innovative use of live looping technology with electronic percussion, her 4-octave vocal range and her colorful — often humorous — lyrics. One of the earliest performers to work with live digital looping, Amy has presented her solo “avant-cabaret” songs at such diverse venues as the Other Minds and Bang on a Can new music festivals, the Berlin International Poetry Festival, the Wellington and Christchurch Jazz Festivals (New Zealand), the Warsaw Philharmonic Hall, electronic music festivals, colleges, rock clubs and concert halls throughout the U.S. and abroad.

As composer, commissions for voices and chamber ensembles — often with looping electronics — include Robin Cox Ensemble, Present Music, Solstice vocal ensemble, Pacific Mozart Ensemble chorus, Squonk, and Del Sol String Quartet. Her acclaimed song cycle The Secret Language of Subways for voice, cello trio and electronics has played at Yerba Buena Center, the San Francisco Symphony After Hours, and the Los Angeles Philharmonic Left Coast Festival. She has also composed extensively for theater, visual media and modern dance.

A classically trained vocalist, Amy has been featured in contemporary operas and recordings including works by Robert Ashley, Culture Clash and Guillermo Galindo.

Amy received degrees in linguistics and voice from Oberlin College and Conservatory and an MFA in electronic music from Mills College. Her many grants and honors include Arts International, Meet the Composer, The U.S. Embassy New Zealand, SF Friends of Chamber Music, and the Alpert/Ucross prize.

Callithumpian Consort with Christian Wolff


Boston-based Callithumpian Consort

A concert of contemporary chamber music performed by the Boston-based Callithumpian Consort will occur on Thursday, April 2 at the Indiana Historical Society. Noted American composer Christian Wolff, who has composed a new work for the group’s spring 2015 tour, will be present to give a pre-concert lecture. Admission is free and open to the general public. The Consort, configured for this tour in a quartet of two pianos and two percussionists, will also perform works by Bela Bartok, Earl Brown, and Lee Weisert. The Callithumpian tour and Wolff lecture is made possible with funding from the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the Donald Tavel Arts and Technology Research Center at IUPUI, the New England Conservatory, and Georgia State University.

Founded by pianist and conductor Stephen Drury in the 1980s, the Callithumpian Consort is a professional ensemble producing concerts of contemporary music at the highest standard. Flexible in size and makeup, its repertoire includes the classics of the last 100 years and new works in the avant-garde and experimental traditions. It is grounded in the musical discoveries of John Cage, Karlheinz Stockhausen, John Zorn, Giacinto Scelsi, Morton Feldman, and Iannis Xenakis. With grants from the Fromm Foundation, Meet the Composer, the Ernst von Siemens Music Foundation and the French American Cultural Exchange, the Callithumpian Consort has commissioned new works from Christian Wolff, Tristan Murail, Chaya Czernowin Lee Hyla, Alvin Lucier and Lei Liang as well as a substantial number of younger composers. The Consort has also worked closely with John Cage, Steve Reich, Frederic Rzewski, Helmut Lachenmann, Michael Finnissy, Jonathan Harvey, John Zorn, John Luther Adams, Brian Ferneyhough, Jo Kondo, and many others. The Boston-based group’s 2015 spring tour will see them premiering a new Christian Wolff work in Boston with throughout the Eastern US, with a final concert in Indianapolis. Indianapolis-based percussionist Scott Deal, who is a professor of music at IUPUI, will be performing with the Consort throughout the tour.

American composer Christian Wolff (b. 1934) was a primary force in a musical movement historically known as the New York School, consisting of composers who revolutionized music in the 20th century. Along with John Cage, Morton Feldman, and Earle Brown, Wolff helped to change the way musicians across a broad spectrum of genres think about composition and performance. Most profoundly, Wolff has impacted how classical musicians interpret their own craft. A particular feature of his music is the various freedoms it allows performers at the time of performance as well as the variable results possible for any one particular piece, for which various new notations have been invented. He has received awards and grants from the American Academy and National Institute of Arts and Letters, the Ford Foundation, DAAD Berlin, the Asian Cultural Council, the Fromm Foundation, the Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts (the John Cage Award for music) and the Mellon Foundation. He is a member of the Akademie der Kuenste in Berlin and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 2004 he received an honorary Doctor of Arts degree from the California Institute of the Arts. Academically trained as a classicist, Wolff was professor of classics and music at Dartmouth College from 1971 to 1999.

Pianist and conductor Stephen Drury has performed throughout the world with a repertoire that stretches from Bach to Liszt to the music of today. He has appeared at Carnegie Hall, the Kennedy Center, the Barbican Centre and Queen Elizabeth Hall in London, the Cité de la Musique in Paris, and the Leipzig Gewandhaus, and from Arkansas to Seoul. A champion of contemporary music, he has taken the sound of dissonance into remote corners of Pakistan, Greenland and Montana. Drury has performed or recorded with the American Composers Orchestra, the Cologne Radio Symphony Orchestra, the Vienna Radio Orchestra, and the Brooklyn Philharmonic. His performances of music written in the last hundred years, ranging from the piano sonatas of Charles Ives to works by György Ligeti, Frederic Rzewski and John Cage have received the highest critical acclaim. Drury has worked closely with many of the leading composers of our time, including Cage, Ligeti, Rzewski, Steve Reich, Olivier Messiaen, John Zorn, Luciano Berio, Helmut Lachenmann, and Christian Wolff.

Yukiko Takagi received Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from the New England Conservatory where she studied with Veronica Jochum and Stephen Drury. While a student at the Conservatory she was selected to perform in several Honors programs and appeared regularly with the NEC Contemporary Ensemble. Ms. Takagi has performed with the orchestra of the Bologna Teatro Musicale, the John Zorn Ensemble, the Auros Group for New Music, Santa Cruz New Music Works, the Harvard Group for New Music and the Chameleon Arts Ensemble. She performs regularly with the Eliza Miller Dance Company and the Ruth Birnberg Dance Company and gives frequent duo-piano concerts with Stephen Drury. Ms. Takagi is a featured performer with the Callithumpian Consort. Her recording of Colin McPhee’s Balinese Ceremonial Dances was released by MusicMasters. At New England Conservatory, Ms. Takagi is a teacher and guest artist for NEC’s Summer Institute for Contemporary Piano Performance.

Lauded as having “consummate virtuosity” by The New York Times, Stuart Gerber has performed extensively throughout the US, Europe, Australia, and Mexico as a soloist an chamber musician. He is Associate Professor of Percussion at Georgia State University in Atlanta. As an active performer of new works, Stuart has been involved in a number of world-premiere performances. He gave the world premiere of Karlheinz Stockhausen’s last solo percussion work Himmels-Tür in Italy, and his percussion trio Mittwoch-Formel at the annual Stockhausen-Courses in Kürten, Germany. He has also given the US and Australian premieres of Stockhausen’s duo version of Nasenflügeltanz for percussion and synthesizer, and the US premiere of his solo percussion work Komet. Dr. Gerber has been the faculty percussionist for the Stockhausen-Courses since 2005 and has recorded a number of pieces for the Stockhausen Complete Edition released by the Stockhausen-Verlag. In addition to his work with Stockhausen, Stuart has worked with many other notable composers, such as Kaija Saariaho, Steve Reich, Tristan Murail, Frederic Rzewski, George Crumb, Tania Lèon, Michael Colgrass, Ricardo Zohn-Muldoon, and John Luther Adams.

Performer, composer and media artist Scott Deal engages new works of chamber music, computer interactivity, networked systems, electronics and percussion. His percussion performances have been described as “riveting” (Sequenza21), and executed with “phenomenal virtuosity” (Artsfuse). His recordings have been described as “soaring, shimmering explorations of resplendent mood and incredible scale”….”sublimely performed”, and his recent recording of Pulitzer Prize/Grammy Award-winning composer John Luther Adams’ Four Thousand Holes, was listed in New Yorker Magazine’s 2011 Top Ten Classical Picks. He has performed at venues worldwide, including Musicacoustica Beijing, Almeida Opera London, Arena Stage Washington, Supercomputing Global, Zerospace, SIGGRAPH, Chicago Calling, IEEE CloudCom, Ingenuity Festival, ICMC, NIME, SEAMUS, PASIC, SICK PUPPY, and with groups that include ART GRID, Another Language, Digital Worlds Institute, Callithumpian Consort, Percussion Group Cincinnati, and the Helsinki Computer Orchestra. He is the percussionist for the computer-acoustic trio Big Robot, who have performed to audiences worldwide. In 2011, Deal and composer Matthew Burtner won the coveted Internet2 IDEA Award for their co-creation of Auksalaq, a telematic opera called “an important realization of meaningful opera for today’s world”. Deal’s work has received funding from organizations that include Meet the Composer, Lilly Foundation New Frontiers, Indiana Arts Council, Clowes Foundation, IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, and the University of Alaska. He resides in Indianapolis, Indiana where he is a Professor of Music and Director of the Donald Louis Tavel Arts and Technology Research Center at Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI).

IUPUI student creates “Shake It Off” video for fun and a cause

Screenshot from YouTube

Screenshot from YouTube

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis students are dancing in a music video to Taylor Swift’s song “Shake It Off.” But they are doing more than dancing to the catchy beat. They are raising awareness about a social issue and challenging other college students to do the same.

The video was created by an IU School of Informatics and Computing at IUPUI freshman student Jacob Harris, who was inspired by videos of others dancing to Swift’s song. Harris is pursuing a Media Arts and Science degree.

“I saw the videos and kind of brainstormed a little bit,” Harris said. “I thought it would be really cool to do and to do it for a great cause.”

He settled on raising awareness about suicide prevention. In a message posted with the video, Harris provides the Web address for a suicide prevention website and a telephone number. He wrote, “If you are having thoughts of suicide, there is always help…You are loved and you are important no matter what. And if you still don’t think you are, you’re wrong. There are so many great things about life still ahead for you.”

Harris also challenged students at Indiana University Bloomington, Purdue University and Wabash College to produce their own “Shake It Off” video. He urged them to choose their own cause about which they could raise awareness.

Using University Library at IUPUI as a backdrop, Harris set up a video camera on a tripod. With the help of a roommate and two signs, Harris asked students as they passed the camera if they would dance for a few seconds in the video.

He had a box with an assortment of props, including wigs of various colors, a clown nose, a magic wand, a lime-green traffic vest, sunglasses and a pirate hat that dancers could wear, if they wished.

The fledging filmmaker learned that it is harder than one might think to get people to be in a video.

“About 80 percent of the students walking by wanted nothing to do with the video,” he said. “We had to beg some to do it. Some people wouldn’t dance alone on camera, so my roommate and I danced with them,” he said.

Two and a-half hours later, after a second shoot at the Campus Center and a little editing, the video was done.

“It was fun to do and it would be so cool if it could help save a life,” Harris said.