Video now available: ethics lecture “COPE as an Intervention for Palliative Home Care”

Were you unable to attend the November 6th Fairbanks Ethics Lecture? You can now view the video online. Please note that this video is for informational purposes only and is not for CE/CME credit.

Wednesday November 6, 2013, Methodist Petticrew Auditorium

Cosponsored by the RESPECT Center

Objectives:
  1. Describe the psychoeducational intervention called COPE and ethical implications.
  2. List the most commonly reported symptoms by cancer patients in hospice care as well as those with the highest intensity and the greatest distress.
  3. Describe the impact of the COPE intervention on palliative care patients.
About the Lecturer:

Dr. McMillan, a Distinguished University Professor, is the Lyall and Beatrice Thompson Professor of Oncology Quality of Life Nursing at the University of South Florida (USF) where she coordinates the Oncology Nursing Program in the masters and doctoral programs. Dr. McMillan’s major areas of research have been: a) symptom assessment and management in persons with cancer and b) quality of life of hospice patients with cancer and their family caregivers. She has supported that research with external funding of over $11 million. Dr. McMillan has developed several clinically relevant assessment tools including the Hospice Quality of Life Index, the Caregiver Quality of Life Index and the Constipation Assessment Scale among others. All of these have been used widely in this country and have been translated for use in other countries. Currently, Dr. McMillan is principal investigator on a clinical trials focusing on self care for symptom management in patients with cancer.

The Research in Palliative and End-of-Life Communication and Training (RESPECT) Center is a collaborative, interdisciplinary scientific community of researchers and clinicians working to advance the science of communication in palliative and end-of-life care across the lifespan. For more information please visit the website.

The Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics sponsors the Fairbanks Ethics Lecture Series as an educational outreach to physicians and staff of Indiana University Health hospitals and interested others in the central Indiana community.

For questions and comments, please contact Amy Chamness at achamnes@iuhealth.org, or (317) 962-1721. For additional information about the Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics, please visit the Fairbanks Center website.

Lecture: Mary A. Ott, “Adolescent Capacity and Informed Consent”

Fairbanks Ethics Lecture Series
Wednesday December 4th, 2013
12:30-1:30 p.m.
Methodist Petticrew Auditorium (Live-Broadcast: ROC Auditorium)
Objectives:
  1. Know the 4 components capacity to consent, and ways to assess consent
  2. Justify adolescent informed consent using developmental and ethical arguments
  3. Identify individual and situational characteristics that influence the development of capacity to consent
  4. Design clinical and research procedures to support adolescent capacity to consent
About the Lecturer:

Dr. Ott is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics in the Section of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine. She received her undergraduate degree from Princeton University, her M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, and her Master’s in Philosophy and Bioethics from Indiana University – Purdue University at Indianapolis. She completed her residency in Pediatrics and her fellowship in Adolescent Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. She is board certified in Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. At Riley Hospital for Children and in Indianapolis community health centers, Dr. Ott provides general adolescent care, adolescent sexual and reproductive health care and ethics consultation. She has consulted on adolescent health policies and programs both locally and nationally, particularly as they pertain to adolescent sexual and reproductive health, consent and confidentiality, and vulnerability. Dr. Ott is on the editorial advisory committee of the journal Perspectives in Sexual and Reproductive Health, and holds leadership positions in the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine (SAHM) and the Section of Bioethics for the Academy of Pediatrics.

Dr. Ott’s work in ethics is informed by a developmental understanding of adolescents’ unique vulnerabilities, balanced by recognition of their emerging capacities, and the need for clinical systems and research to support adolescents in ways they are vulnerable. Dr. Ott’s research focuses broadly on adolescent pregnancy and STI prevention and ethical issues related to vulnerable populations and sensitive topics. Her current research projects include program evaluations for HIV prevention and community-based pregnancy prevention for vulnerable, a quality improvement project examining how IRBs evaluate vulnerable populations research, and an assessment of adolescent decision-making capacity for research.

The Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics sponsors the Fairbanks Ethics Lecture Series as an educational outreach to physicians and staff of Indiana University Health hospitals and interested others in the central Indiana community. Lectures are free, open to all, and do not require pre-registration. Continuing education credit is offered to physicians, nurses, social workers, and chaplains at no charge, regardless of their institutional affiliation.

Please note: Lunch will not be provided. You may bring your lunch and eat during the broadcast in the MH Petticrew Auditorium. Food & Drinks are not permitted in the ROC Auditorium.

For questions and comments, please contact Amy Chamness at achamnes@iuhealth.org or (317)962-1721. For additional information about the Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics, please visit the Fairbanks website.

Lecture: Anne-Marie Duguet, “Protection of Genetic Information in Europe and in France”

Wednesday, December 4, 2013
3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Health Information Translational Science Building, Room 1130
410 West 10th St.

The IU Center for Bioethics will present “Protection of Genetic Information in Europe and in France. The speaker will be Anne-Marie Duguet, M.D., Ph.D, Senior Lecturer at the Medicine Faculty Toulouse Purpan (Paul Sabatier University) where she teaches medical law and bioethics. Among an impressive list of accomplishments, she is also a member of the advisory board of the European Journal of Health Law and the Secretary of the European Association for Health Law.

In 2010, she was appointed visiting professor for 3 years by the Dalian Medical University and the Hainan Medical University in China. In 2011, she was honored by the decoration of “the Palmes Academiques.”

Arrangements for Dr. Duguet’s visit are a collaborative effort between the IU Center for Bioethics, the Robert H. McKinney School of Law and the Fairbanks School of Public Health.

For more information or questions to Eva Jackson at 278-4034 or evajacks@iupui.edu

Laura Foster presents talk on patent law and Hoodia in Southern Africa

Co-sponsored by the Medical Humanities & Health Studies Program and the Hall Center for Law & Health
Friday December 6, 2013
12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
Cavanaugh Hall 003

Laura Foster, J.D., Ph.D. is Assistant Professor Gender Studies, Affiliate Faculty, Maurer School of Law, Indiana University.

In 1998 researchers with the South African Center for Scientific and Industrial Research (“CSIR”) isolated and patented certain chemical compositions within the Hoodia gordonii plant responsible for suppressing appetite. Hoodia gordonii suddenly emerged as a patented invention poised to be a blockbuster anti-obesity drug. At the same time, the plant became a symbol of South Africa as nation of innovation, and Indigenous San peoples publicly accused scientists of stealing their knowledge of the plant. Advancing a powerful global campaign, San peoples negotiated a benefit sharing agreement with CSIR giving them 6% of the potential revenue from future Hoodia sales. Hopes for Hoodia , however, ended in 2009 when Unilever terminated the project.

Drawing upon and contributing to feminist post-colonial science studies, this talk considers Hoodia gordonii as a boundary object that brings the divergent interests and stakes of various social actors together. Furthermore, it unpacks the black box of patent law to ask how both science and law work together to determine who is (or is not) considered an inventor and producer of science.

Free and open to the campus and public, but space is limited. Please RSVP to: medhum@iupui.edu.

EU ambassador to discuss EU-U.S. transatlantic trade agreement in IUPUI lecture

The head of the European Union’s delegation to the United States will speak at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis this month.

EU Ambassador Joao Vale de Almeida will deliver a guest lecture from 3:30 to 5 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 21, in the IUPUI Campus Center theater, on the lower level of the center at 450 University Blvd. The ambassador’s talk will focus on current negotiations for a transatlantic trade agreement between the European Union and the United States.

“The proposed trade agreement would bring together the two biggest economies and trading powers in the world,” said John McCormick, professor in the Department of Political Science at IUPUI. “Combined, the EU and U.S. economies account for almost half of global economic output and about a quarter of global trade.”

Indiana is the EU’s biggest trade partner after Canada, according to McCormick. During Vale de Almeida’s visit to Indiana, the ambassador will also hold meetings at Indiana Gov. Mike Pence’s office Nov. 22.

Before presenting his credentials as ambassador to President Barack Obama in 2010, Vale de Almeida served as the director general for external relations at the European Commission, the EU’s executive body. In this position, he helped formulate and execute the EU’s foreign policy and played a key role in preparing for the new European External Action Service introduced by the Treaty of Lisbon.

Vale de Almeida has held several positions with the European Commission, which he joined in 1982 after spending seven years as a journalist. He holds a degree in history from the University of Lisbon and has studied and received training in journalism and management in the United States, France, Japan and the United Kingdom.

The ambassador’s talk, sponsored by the Department of Political Science in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, is sponsoring the event, which is free of charge and open to the general public. Parking, fee applicable, is available in the Vermont Street garage, 1004 W. Vermont St., west of the IUPUI Campus Center.

IUPUI University Library joins with community partners to share perspectives on Muslim culture

Tuesday, November 12, 2013
4:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Lilly Auditorium, IUPUI University Library

Faculty, students and community members are invited to “Muslim Journeys, Human Journeys,” an exploration of the people, places, histories, beliefs and cultures of Muslims in the U.S. and beyond. IU School of Liberal Arts professor Edward Curtis will speak about key themes from a series of books highlighted by a current program of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

The NEH’s “Muslim Journeys” program engages the power of the humanities to promote understanding of and mutual respect for people with diverse histories, cultures and perspectives within the United States and abroad. Through the Muslim Journeys Bookshelf, NEH and the American Library Association are providing a collection of 25 books, three documentary films, a one-year subscription to Oxford Islamic Studies Online, and a DVD of short films titled “Islamic Art Spots” to a variety of libraries across the country, including University Library at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

Curtis is Millennium Chair of the School of Liberal Arts and professor of religious studies at IUPUI. He is the author or editor of several books, including Muslims in America: A short history, which was named one of the best 100 books of 2009 by Publishers Weekly. A former NEH Fellow at the National Humanities Center, Curtis has been awarded Carnegie, Fulbright and Mellon fellowships. He is also a founding co-editor of the Journal of Africana Religions.

The Ivy Tech Community College library and the Center for Interfaith Cooperation are co-sponsoring this event with the IUPUI University Library. Parking will be provided for community guests in the North Street garage at the corner of Michigan and Blake streets.

Author Sara Hacala addresses role of civility and Common Theme Project

Sara Hacala, author of Saving Civility: 52 Ways to Tame Rude, Crude, and Attitude for a Polite Planet, will be on campus to meet with students, faculty and staff Nov. 13 and 14 as a guest of the IUPUI Common Theme Project.

Hacala will present a lecture entitled “From Me to We: Discovering our Common Ground” to the students, faculty, and staff of IUPUI at 1:30 to 2:30 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 13th in 450 Campus Center. This event is also open to the public. There will be ample time for discussion and questions as a part of the event. Barns & Noble will hold a book signing (with books available for purchase) after the presentation.

Hacala will facilitate a workshop on “Our Civil Discourse – A Vital Element for our Human Sustainability” for faculty and staff from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 14, in 450 Campus Center. This workshop is co-sponsored by the IUPUI Office for Intergroup Dialogue and Civil Community and the Common Theme Project.

The IUPUI Common Theme, “Find your Voice: Hear My Voice,” invites IUPUI students, staff, faculty, and the community to engage in a two-year discussion and deeper exploration of civil discourse in the classroom, work place and public sphere. This theme will provide opportunities for rich conversation across the campus and our communities on communicating about diverse viewpoints in ways that validate our shared humanity and connection.

For more information about Hacala’s visit, contact E. Jane Luzar at ejluzar@iupui.edu.

Ethnomusicologist, conductor, and activist André de Quadros keynotes symposium on global health and music

Wednesday, November 13, 2013
12:30 – 1:30 p.m.
Lily Auditorium in University Library – UL0130

Professor André de Quadros, Boston University, will deliver the keynote address at the 2013 pre-conference symposium of the Society for Ethnomusicology. His presentation is titled “Music, the Arts, and Global Health–in Search of Sangam, its Theory, and Paradigms.”

Music and the other arts have the potential to mobilize poor communities and provide meaningful contexts for health education and empowerment. Artists have a social justice responsibility to work together with public health professions to explore the power of personal and community agency, self-knowledge, and social change in the face of widespread health concerns. André de Quadros will discuss music’s capacity, with other arts, to communicate in uniquely complex and subtle ways that offer significant potential for health.

Professor de Quadros has conducted research in over forty countries. His research and practitioner interests are in health literacy in sites of urban dispossession, incarceration, and conflict. He is a member of the Scientific Board of the International Network for Singing Hospitals, the International Advisory Board of the Asian Institute of Public Health, the Board of the International Federation for Choral Music, the Editorial Board of the peer-reviewed journal Arts and Health, and the steering committee of Conductors without Borders.

This lecture is open to the public. For more information about this talk, please see the flyer, or email medhum@iupui.edu.

Inaugural symposium, “The Life and Times of Madame C.J. Walker: The Historical Development of a Business Empire”

The Africana Studies Program at IUPUI and the Frederick Douglass Papers invites the public to attend the upcoming inaugural symposium that is part of the Madame C.J. Walker/Frederick Douglass Annual Lecture Series. This lecture series is designed to celebrate the brilliance, accomplishments and ingenuity of two African American global icons, namely Madame C.J. Walker who was the first African American female millionaire entrepreneur in America and Fredrick Douglass, a great orator, abolitionist, and political statesman. Our first public symposium will take place on Friday, December 6, 2013 at the Jewel Center from 8:00 AM until 4:30 PM. Please see the event flyer.

The theme of this year’s symposium is “The Life and Times of Madame C.J. Walker: The Historical Development of a Business Empire.” The events of the day are as follows:

  • Registration and continental breakfast is at 8:00 AM-9:00 AM
  • Welcome Remarks: 9:15 AM by Dr. Karen Dace, Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion
  • Welcome Remarks: 9:20 AM by Dr. Jack Kaufmann-McKivigan, Editor and Founder, The Frederick Douglass Papers, IUPUI
  • The first panel discussion starts around 9:30 AM on the theme of “The Life and Times of Madame C.J. Walker”
  • Our keynote speaker for noon is Dr. Juliet E.K. Walker, the foremost scholar and expert on Black business history in America and distinguished Professor of History at the University of Texas at Austin, who will discuss “African American Businesses in the Arc of History: Culture, Innovation and Black Business Success.”
  • Introduction of the Keynote Speaker: Dr. William Blomquist, Dean of the School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI
  • At 2:00 PM, Professor Bessie House-Soremekun will make a research presentation on “Lessons Learned from History: The 10 Personality Characteristics of African American Entrepreneurs and How to Achieve Them.”

The event is free and open to the public. If you are interested in attending, please RSVP to Dr. Bessie House Soremekun at beshouse@iupui.edu or cmorlan@iupui.edu.

IAHI Lecture: Jace Clayton, “Sounds Create Social Meaning”

The IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute is teaming up with our friends at We Are City to support another round of artists-in-residence in Indianapolis as part of the We Are City [SUMMIT] Series.

This November, artists Jace Clayton (a.k.a. DJ/rupture) and Rocio Rodriguez Salceda will use fashion design and participatory performance to explore how group affiliation interacts with civic memory in Indianapolis.

While in residence, Clayton will give a public lecture hosted by the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute and the Herron School of Art and Design. Tickets are free but space is limited.

Eskenazi Hall Room: HR 111 A – Basile Center Classroom
735 W. New York St. – Indianapolis
Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013
11:45 am-12:45 pm

Free Tickets: http://jaceclayton.eventbrite.com

 

About the Artists

Jace Clayton uses an interdisciplinary approach to focus on core concerns for how sound, memory, and public space interact, with an emphasis on low-income communities and the global South.

 

Rocio Rodriguez Salceda is an artist from Madrid who operates in the space between visual art, fashion design, and social practice.