EU ambassador to discuss EU-U.S. transatlantic trade agreement in IUPUI lecture

The head of the European Union’s delegation to the United States will speak at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis this month.

EU Ambassador Joao Vale de Almeida will deliver a guest lecture from 3:30 to 5 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 21, in the IUPUI Campus Center theater, on the lower level of the center at 450 University Blvd. The ambassador’s talk will focus on current negotiations for a transatlantic trade agreement between the European Union and the United States.

“The proposed trade agreement would bring together the two biggest economies and trading powers in the world,” said John McCormick, professor in the Department of Political Science at IUPUI. “Combined, the EU and U.S. economies account for almost half of global economic output and about a quarter of global trade.”

Indiana is the EU’s biggest trade partner after Canada, according to McCormick. During Vale de Almeida’s visit to Indiana, the ambassador will also hold meetings at Indiana Gov. Mike Pence’s office Nov. 22.

Before presenting his credentials as ambassador to President Barack Obama in 2010, Vale de Almeida served as the director general for external relations at the European Commission, the EU’s executive body. In this position, he helped formulate and execute the EU’s foreign policy and played a key role in preparing for the new European External Action Service introduced by the Treaty of Lisbon.

Vale de Almeida has held several positions with the European Commission, which he joined in 1982 after spending seven years as a journalist. He holds a degree in history from the University of Lisbon and has studied and received training in journalism and management in the United States, France, Japan and the United Kingdom.

The ambassador’s talk, sponsored by the Department of Political Science in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, is sponsoring the event, which is free of charge and open to the general public. Parking, fee applicable, is available in the Vermont Street garage, 1004 W. Vermont St., west of the IUPUI Campus Center.

IUPUI University Library joins with community partners to share perspectives on Muslim culture

Tuesday, November 12, 2013
4:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Lilly Auditorium, IUPUI University Library

Faculty, students and community members are invited to “Muslim Journeys, Human Journeys,” an exploration of the people, places, histories, beliefs and cultures of Muslims in the U.S. and beyond. IU School of Liberal Arts professor Edward Curtis will speak about key themes from a series of books highlighted by a current program of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

The NEH’s “Muslim Journeys” program engages the power of the humanities to promote understanding of and mutual respect for people with diverse histories, cultures and perspectives within the United States and abroad. Through the Muslim Journeys Bookshelf, NEH and the American Library Association are providing a collection of 25 books, three documentary films, a one-year subscription to Oxford Islamic Studies Online, and a DVD of short films titled “Islamic Art Spots” to a variety of libraries across the country, including University Library at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

Curtis is Millennium Chair of the School of Liberal Arts and professor of religious studies at IUPUI. He is the author or editor of several books, including Muslims in America: A short history, which was named one of the best 100 books of 2009 by Publishers Weekly. A former NEH Fellow at the National Humanities Center, Curtis has been awarded Carnegie, Fulbright and Mellon fellowships. He is also a founding co-editor of the Journal of Africana Religions.

The Ivy Tech Community College library and the Center for Interfaith Cooperation are co-sponsoring this event with the IUPUI University Library. Parking will be provided for community guests in the North Street garage at the corner of Michigan and Blake streets.

Author Sara Hacala addresses role of civility and Common Theme Project

Sara Hacala, author of Saving Civility: 52 Ways to Tame Rude, Crude, and Attitude for a Polite Planet, will be on campus to meet with students, faculty and staff Nov. 13 and 14 as a guest of the IUPUI Common Theme Project.

Hacala will present a lecture entitled “From Me to We: Discovering our Common Ground” to the students, faculty, and staff of IUPUI at 1:30 to 2:30 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 13th in 450 Campus Center. This event is also open to the public. There will be ample time for discussion and questions as a part of the event. Barns & Noble will hold a book signing (with books available for purchase) after the presentation.

Hacala will facilitate a workshop on “Our Civil Discourse – A Vital Element for our Human Sustainability” for faculty and staff from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 14, in 450 Campus Center. This workshop is co-sponsored by the IUPUI Office for Intergroup Dialogue and Civil Community and the Common Theme Project.

The IUPUI Common Theme, “Find your Voice: Hear My Voice,” invites IUPUI students, staff, faculty, and the community to engage in a two-year discussion and deeper exploration of civil discourse in the classroom, work place and public sphere. This theme will provide opportunities for rich conversation across the campus and our communities on communicating about diverse viewpoints in ways that validate our shared humanity and connection.

For more information about Hacala’s visit, contact E. Jane Luzar at ejluzar@iupui.edu.

Ethnomusicologist, conductor, and activist André de Quadros keynotes symposium on global health and music

Wednesday, November 13, 2013
12:30 – 1:30 p.m.
Lily Auditorium in University Library – UL0130

Professor André de Quadros, Boston University, will deliver the keynote address at the 2013 pre-conference symposium of the Society for Ethnomusicology. His presentation is titled “Music, the Arts, and Global Health–in Search of Sangam, its Theory, and Paradigms.”

Music and the other arts have the potential to mobilize poor communities and provide meaningful contexts for health education and empowerment. Artists have a social justice responsibility to work together with public health professions to explore the power of personal and community agency, self-knowledge, and social change in the face of widespread health concerns. André de Quadros will discuss music’s capacity, with other arts, to communicate in uniquely complex and subtle ways that offer significant potential for health.

Professor de Quadros has conducted research in over forty countries. His research and practitioner interests are in health literacy in sites of urban dispossession, incarceration, and conflict. He is a member of the Scientific Board of the International Network for Singing Hospitals, the International Advisory Board of the Asian Institute of Public Health, the Board of the International Federation for Choral Music, the Editorial Board of the peer-reviewed journal Arts and Health, and the steering committee of Conductors without Borders.

This lecture is open to the public. For more information about this talk, please see the flyer, or email medhum@iupui.edu.

Inaugural symposium, “The Life and Times of Madame C.J. Walker: The Historical Development of a Business Empire”

The Africana Studies Program at IUPUI and the Frederick Douglass Papers invites the public to attend the upcoming inaugural symposium that is part of the Madame C.J. Walker/Frederick Douglass Annual Lecture Series. This lecture series is designed to celebrate the brilliance, accomplishments and ingenuity of two African American global icons, namely Madame C.J. Walker who was the first African American female millionaire entrepreneur in America and Fredrick Douglass, a great orator, abolitionist, and political statesman. Our first public symposium will take place on Friday, December 6, 2013 at the Jewel Center from 8:00 AM until 4:30 PM. Please see the event flyer.

The theme of this year’s symposium is “The Life and Times of Madame C.J. Walker: The Historical Development of a Business Empire.” The events of the day are as follows:

  • Registration and continental breakfast is at 8:00 AM-9:00 AM
  • Welcome Remarks: 9:15 AM by Dr. Karen Dace, Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion
  • Welcome Remarks: 9:20 AM by Dr. Jack Kaufmann-McKivigan, Editor and Founder, The Frederick Douglass Papers, IUPUI
  • The first panel discussion starts around 9:30 AM on the theme of “The Life and Times of Madame C.J. Walker”
  • Our keynote speaker for noon is Dr. Juliet E.K. Walker, the foremost scholar and expert on Black business history in America and distinguished Professor of History at the University of Texas at Austin, who will discuss “African American Businesses in the Arc of History: Culture, Innovation and Black Business Success.”
  • Introduction of the Keynote Speaker: Dr. William Blomquist, Dean of the School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI
  • At 2:00 PM, Professor Bessie House-Soremekun will make a research presentation on “Lessons Learned from History: The 10 Personality Characteristics of African American Entrepreneurs and How to Achieve Them.”

The event is free and open to the public. If you are interested in attending, please RSVP to Dr. Bessie House Soremekun at beshouse@iupui.edu or cmorlan@iupui.edu.

IAHI Lecture: Jace Clayton, “Sounds Create Social Meaning”

The IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute is teaming up with our friends at We Are City to support another round of artists-in-residence in Indianapolis as part of the We Are City [SUMMIT] Series.

This November, artists Jace Clayton (a.k.a. DJ/rupture) and Rocio Rodriguez Salceda will use fashion design and participatory performance to explore how group affiliation interacts with civic memory in Indianapolis.

While in residence, Clayton will give a public lecture hosted by the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute and the Herron School of Art and Design. Tickets are free but space is limited.

Eskenazi Hall Room: HR 111 A – Basile Center Classroom
735 W. New York St. – Indianapolis
Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013
11:45 am-12:45 pm

Free Tickets: http://jaceclayton.eventbrite.com

 

About the Artists

Jace Clayton uses an interdisciplinary approach to focus on core concerns for how sound, memory, and public space interact, with an emphasis on low-income communities and the global South.

 

Rocio Rodriguez Salceda is an artist from Madrid who operates in the space between visual art, fashion design, and social practice.

President of Christian Theological Seminary to present talk on role of religion in medicine

Tuesday, October 29, 12:00 – 1:00 PM
Emerson Hall Auditorium, Room 304
2013-2014 Medical Humanities and Health Studies Seminar Series

Matt Boulton, President and Professor of Theology, Christian Theological Seminary, will deliver a presentation titled, “Your Faith Has Made You Well—Or Has It?: Spiritual and Religious Dimensions of Medical Care and Wellbeing.”

For many healthcare professionals and patients, religion and spirituality play important roles in how care and wellbeing are understood and experienced—and yet in many cases, our capacities for exploring these connections are overlooked, underdeveloped, or relegated to specialists.

For example, many healthcare professionals conceive and experience their work as a spiritual or religious vocation; likewise, many patients experience illness, decline, recovery, and wellbeing in religious and spiritual terms. What we require are accessible, inclusive, engaging strategies for exploring these dimensions of life and work. This talk will survey this territory, using some specific Jewish and Christian resources as case studies, but with an eye to other traditions as well.

For more information, please see the flyer here.

Presented by the Spirit of Medicine Program and the Medical Humanities and Health Studies Seminar Series

Distinguished IU Professor of Medicine to present talk on origins of echocardiography

Wednesday, October 30, 12:00 – 1:00PM
Emerson Hall Auditorium, 304

Harvey Feigenbaum, MD, Distinguished Professor of Medicine, IU School of Medicine, will present a talk titled, “History of Echocardiography: How to introduce something new in medicine.”

Echocardiography as we know it today began at Indiana University School of Medicine in the fall of 1963, exactly 50 years ago. This talk will document how this technology became the world’s leading cardiovascular imaging tool.

Dr Feigenbaum joined the faculty of the Indiana School of Medicine in 1962, working in electrophysiology and then cardiac catheterization and hemodynamics, but he is best recognized as the “Father of Echocardiography” for pioneering the use of cardiac ultrasound in the early 1960s. He trained most of the early researchers, held numerous echocardiographic courses and workshops, and wrote the first textbook which is now in its 7th edition. A founder of the American Society of Echocardiography, Dr. Feigenbaum served as its first president and was the first editor of its journal for 20 years.

For more information, see the flyer here.

Presented by the John Shaw Billings History of Medicine Society, the IU Student History of Medicine Organization, adn the Medical Humanities and Health Studies Program.

Please RSVP to medhum@iupui.edu

Cuba’s 2013 Venice Biennale representative to speak at Herron School of Art and Design

Artist Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons will appear at Herron School of Art and Design as the 2013 Jane Fortune Outstanding Women Visiting Artist Lecturer.

Her artist’s talk, titled “Global Journey,” is scheduled to take place on December 4 in the Basile Auditorium at 6:00 p.m., the same night the Undergraduate Student Exhibition opens in the Berkshire, Reese and Paul Galleries. Both events are free and open to the public.

Inclusion in the juried undergraduate show is an honor for the students whose work is chosen. In a typical year, the jury must select from more than 300 very strong submissions. The exhibition usually contains 60 works across a wide variety of media.

Also opening in the Basile and Marsh Galleries will be two exhibitions from the graduate Collaborative Practices course taught by Professor Andrew Winship and Basile Center Director Kathryn Armstrong.

The three exhibitions continue through December 19.

photo campos-pons

Photo of artist by Ricardo Gay Luger Courtesy of Maria Magdalena studio and Galleries.

Campos-Pons was born in Cuba in 1959. She is a faculty member at the School of The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. According to its website, “Her work of the last 20 years covers an extended range of visual language investigations…from the early 1980s focus on painting and the discussion of sexuality in the crossroads of Cuban mixed cultural heritage to incisive questioning, critique and insertion of the black body in the contemporary narratives of the present.” She represented Cuba in the 2013 Venice Biennale.

“Campos-Pons’s work is largely autobiographical but speaks to a much-needed dialogue about history, place and identity. She does this through a contemporary language that also provides universal access to discussing our current socio-political landscape,” said Herron’s Gallery Director Paula Katz.

It is the generosity of Jane Fortune—author, cultural editor, art historian, art collector and philanthropist—that brings Campos-Pons to Herron. “I want to make an impact on the community that surrounds me and help make the arts accessible to our residents,” she said. This is the sixth Jane Fortune Outstanding Women Visiting Artist Lecture, which has welcomed artists including Judy Chicago, Polly Apfelbaum and Judith Shea to Herron.

Lecture: Mathias Persson, “From Enlightenment to enlightenments: On the Revision of a Monolithic Concept”

Cavanaugh Hall, Room 438
12:00-1:15 pm

Professor Mathias Persson, Department of Economic History, University of Uppsala, Sweden, will present a lecture on Monday October 21, 2013. The topic of Professor Persson’s talk will be “From Enlightenment to enlightenments: On the Revision of a Monolithic Concept.”

Since the 1960s, the once predominant idea of a singular, iconoclastic Enlightenment anchored in the Parisian salons has gradually faded away and been replaced by a plurality of enlightenments, displaying various agendas and taking place in miscellaneous settings. This lecture will outline these developments and give examples of how the concept of enlightenment has been construed during this protracted process, which reflects wider societal and academic transformations and has parallels in other fields of historical research.