Evaluating Digital Scholarship in Public History

Image of Dr. Seth DenboEvaluating Digital Scholarship in Public History
October 12, 2015
IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute
IUPUI University Library, UL 4115P, 755 W. Michigan St.

As with so many aspects of our lives, the web and digital technologies have profoundly changed communication between public historians and their audiences. From mobile-enhanced gallery guides to crowd-sourced online exhibits of local history, digital tools and methods have changed historical practice. As a result, many departments are developing guidelines for professional credit for both public history and digital methodologies.

Please join the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the IU Bloomington Department of History, and the American Historical Association for a discussion of assessment of digital projects in the context of making history public and researching public history approaches using digital methodologies. Dr. Seth Denbo, Director of Scholarly Communication and Digital Initiatives, will join us in Indianapolis on October 12 to lead the conversation about these important issues.

The event is free, but we request that you register for the session HERE.

Ari Kelman Speaks at Herron School of Art and Design on “Battle Lines”

Cover art for "Battle Lines" taken from Amazon.comA collaboration between the award-winning historian Ari Kelman and the acclaimed graphic novelist Jonathan Fetter-Vorm, Battle Lines is a completely original graphic history of the Civil War. The novel traces an ambitious narrative that extends from the early rumblings of secession to the dark years of Reconstruction, employing bold graphic forms to illuminate the complex history of this period. Richly detailed and wildly inventive, its stories propel the reader to all manner of unlikely vantages as only the graphic form can: from the malaria-filled gut of a mosquito to the faded ink of a soldier’s pen, and from the barren farms of the home front to the front lines of an infantry charge.

Join us as at Herron School of Art and Design as Professor Ari Kelman shares the experiences of creating Battle Lines, and learn about how writers and artists/illustrators can form exciting collaborations, transforming the written word into unique and compelling visuals.

About the artist:
Ari Kelman is the McCabe Greer Professor of History at Penn State University, where he teaches a wide range of courses, including on the Civil War and Reconstruction, the politics of memory, environmental history, Native American history, and America in the 1960s. He is the author, most recently, of Battle Lines: A Graphic History of the Civil War (Hill and Wang, 2015), as well as A Misplaced Massacre: Struggling Over the Memory of Sand Creek (Harvard University Press, 2013), recipient of the Antoinette Forrester Downing Book Award, the Avery O. Craven Award, the Bancroft Prize, the Tom Watson Brown Book Award, and the Robert M. Utley Prize, and A River and Its City: The Nature of Landscape in New Orleans (University of California Press, 2003), which won the Abbott Lowell Cummings Prize.

Kelman’s essays and articles have appeared in Slate, The Christian Science Monitor, The Nation, The Times Literary Supplement, the Journal of Urban History, The Journal of American History, and many others. Kelman has also contributed to outreach endeavors aimed at K-12 educators, and to a variety of public history projects, including documentary films for the History Channel and PBS’s American Experience series. He has received numerous grants and fellowships, most notably from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Huntington Library.

5th Annual Patrick O’Meara International Lecture U.S.-China: Challenges and Opportunities

Wednesday, September 16, 4 p.m.
Whittenberger Auditorium
Indiana Memorial Union
IU Bloomingtoniu-logo

The Patrick O’Meara International Lecture  by The Honorable Jon M. Huntsman Jr.
The Lecturer
Governor Jon M. Huntsman Jr. began his career in public service as a staff assistant to President Ronald Reagan. He has since served four U.S. presidents in critical roles around the world, including Ambassador to Singapore, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Asia, U.S. Trade Ambassador, and most recently, U.S. Ambassador to China.

Twice elected as Utah’s governor, Jon Huntsman brought about strong economic reforms, tripled the state’s rainy day fund, and helped bring unemployment rates to historic lows. During his tenure, Utah was named the best managed state in America and the best state in which to do business.

He currently serves as the chairman of the Atlantic Council and co-founder and honorary co-chair of No Labels, as well as serving on the boards of Ford Motor Company, Caterpillar Corporation, Chevron Corporation, Huntsman Corporation, the U.S. Naval Academy Foundation, and the University of Pennsylvania.

The Lecture
Patrick O’Meara has been Indiana University’s ambassador to the world. As a faculty member in the Department of Political Science and the School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Director of the African Studies Program, Dean of International Programs, and IU’s first Vice President for International Affairs, O’Meara has greatly expanded the range and depth of international activities at IU. The Patrick O’Meara International Lecture celebrates O’Meara’s service to IU and continues his legacy of enriching IU’s international engagement by bringing international thinkers and scholars of note to the campus.

This event is free and open to the public.
No RSVP or tickets are required.

Live-streamed and archived video of the event will be available at https://broadcast.iu.edu/.
For more information, please contact the Office of the Vice President for International Affairs at ovpia@iu.edu.

Fairbanks Ethics Lecture Series Worthy to Serve the Suffering: Albert Schweitzer

When: Wednesday September 2nd, 2015
Time: 12:00-1:00 pm
Location: Methodist Petticrew Auditorium
**Please Note– Lunch will not be provided. You are welcome to bring your lunch & eat 379262_w296during the presentation.**

1. Outline the major contributions of Albert Schweitzer.
2. Describe the key elements of Schweitzer’s views on worthiness to serve the suffering.
3. Develop strategies to bring Albert Schweitzer’s insights to life in daily practice.

About the Lecturers:
Richard Gunderman is Chancellor’s Professor of Radiology, Pediatrics, Medical Education, Philosophy, Liberal Arts, Philanthropy, and Medical Humanities and Health Studies at Indiana University. He received his AB Summa Cum Laude from Wabash College, MD and PhD (Committee on Social Thought) with honors from the University of Chicago, and MPH from Indiana University. He was a Chancellor Scholar of the Federal Republic of Germany and received an honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters from Garrett Theological Seminary at Northwestern University. He is a nine-time recipient of the Indiana University Trustees Teaching Award, and in 2015 received the Indiana University School of Medicine’s inaugural Inspirational Educator Award. He was named the 2008 Outstanding Educator by the Radiological Society of North America, the 2011 American Roentgen Ray Society Berlin Scholar in Professionalism, and the 2012 Distinguished Educator of the American Roentgen Ray Society. In 2012, he received the Alpha Omega Alpha Robert J. Glaser Award for Teaching Excellence, the top teaching award from the Association of American Medical Colleges. In 2013, he was the Spinoza Professor at the University of Amsterdam. He serves on numerous boards, including the Kinsey Institute for the Study of Human Sexuality, Christian Theological Seminary, and Alpha Omega Alpha National Honor Medical Society. He is the author of over 500 articles and has published eight books, includingWe Make a Life by What We Give (Indiana University, 2008), Leadership in Healthcare(Springer, 2009), Achieving Excellence in Medical Education (2nd edition, Springer, 2011), X-ray Vision (Oxford University, 2013), and Essential Radiology (3rd edition, Thieme, 2014). He is also past president of the faculty at Indiana University School of Medicine, a correspondent for the Atlantic, and a columnist for The Conversation.
The Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics sponsors the Fairbanks Ethics Lecture Series as an educational outreach to physicians and staff of Indiana University Health hospitals and interested others in the central Indiana community. Lectures are free, open to all, and do not require pre-registration. Continuing education credit is offered to physicians, nurses, social workers, and chaplains at no charge, regardless of their institutional affiliation.
For additional information about the Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics, please visit our website at www.fairbankscenter.org.


Bradbury center to celebrate master storyteller’s birthday and legacy with August events

Photo taken from new.iupui.eduAugust 22nd marks the 95th anniversary of visionary science fiction and fantasy writer Ray Bradbury’s birth. The Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will hold three special events in August to celebrate the Midwestern-born author who went on to become one of the best-known storytellers of our time.

From Aug. 3 to 28, the center will present a free exhibit, “Miracles of Rare Device: Treasures of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies,” in the Cultural Arts Gallery on the first floor of the IUPUI Campus Center. Summer hours for the exhibition are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday until Aug. 19, when gallery hours extend from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday.

The exhibit will feature art, artifacts, books and rare magazines from Bradbury’s own collection, gifted to the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI in 2013 by the Bradbury Estate and by Donn Albright, Bradbury’s close friend and bibliographer.

“These new collections include the author’s papers, his working library, 40 years of his correspondence, his entire office, and a lifetime of awards and mementos,” said Jonathan R. Eller, Chancellor’s Professor of English and director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies.

“The August gallery show allows us to exhibit examples of these one-of-a-kind gifts for students and the broader Indianapolis community in ways that reflect Bradbury’s abiding international legacy as a champion of literacy, libraries, freedom of the imagination and the exploration of outer space.”

Eller and the IU School of Liberal Arts are working to expand the Bradbury archives and artifacts into a permanent public display, teaching and research resource on the IUPUI campus.

Two related public events will coincide with the exhibition’s run. At 6 p.m. Aug. 19, Eller will deliver the Second Annual Ray Bradbury Memorial Lecture in the Riley Meeting Room at Indianapolis Public Library’s Central Library. The lecture, “Ray Bradbury’s October Country,” reveals the timeless creativity and somewhat controversial publishing history of one of Bradbury’s most popular story collections on the 60th anniversary of its original publication.

At 5 p.m. Aug. 27, the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies will host a reception in the Campus Center Atrium outside the Cultural Arts Gallery, followed by Eller’s lecture on the collection’s amazing journey from California to IUPUI and the importance of Bradbury’s legacy in the 21st century. Both the lecture and reception are free and open to the public.

The Campus Center is at 420 University Blvd., between Michigan and New York streets. Visitor parking is available for a fee in the adjacent Vermont Street Garage and in the Sports Garage on New York Street.

Eller first met Ray Bradbury in 1989, developing a working friendship that lasted until Bradbury’s death in June 2012. Eller has authored several books, including “Becoming Ray Bradbury” and “Ray Bradbury Unbound” (University of Illinois Press). He also edits the Bradbury Center’s multivolume “Collected Stories of Ray Bradbury” (Kent State University Press).

A number of organizations are providing planning and resource support for the “Miracles of Rare Device” gallery exhibition, including the IU School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI’s Museum Studies Program, IUPUI’s Center for Digital Scholarship, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, and the Indiana Historical Society.

Dr. Albert Schweitzer of Lambaréné and the United States of America: Philanthropy, Networks and Medicine in the 20th-Century

Albert SchweitzerDr. Hines Mabika, “Dr. Albert Schweitzer of Lambaréné and the United States of America: Philanthropy, Networks and Medicine in the 20th-Century”

Date: 13 August 2015
Time: 12-1pm
Location: IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute (4th floor of the IUPUI University Library, Room UL 4115P)
Free Registration (see below)

In 1949, the German-born Dr. Albert Schweitzer traveled to the United States. Famous for establishing a hospital in Lambaréné (Gabon) in the African rainforest, Life magazine had recently named him “The Greatest Man in the World.” And, in just a few years, he would receive the Nobel Prize. This trip to the United States was vital to Schweitzer’s larger project of building an international network of philanthropy that could sustain his work in Africa. Dr. Mabika’s talk will explore these transnational relationships and connections, revealing networks of individuals and institutions that included the Unitarian Church, prestigious universities, and pharmaceutical companies which provided him and his hospital with medicines.

Dr. Hines Mabika is Senior Research Associate of the Faculty of Medicine at Bern University, Switzerland. He has taught the history of medicine, colonial and postcolonial historiographies, and health network management. He holds a PhD in History from the University of Aix-en-Provence, France and an MBA in Health Network Management from Paul Cezanne University, France. He has served on the Faculties of Medicine at the University of Aix-Marseille, France and the University of Lausanne, Switzerland as well as the Faculty of Humanities at the University of Basel and University of Lausanne, Switzerland.

The Mirror of Landscape: An Interactive Discussion with Rebecca Allan and Jason M. Kelly

The Mirror of Landscape AdvertDate: June 4, 2015
Time: 7 pm
Location: DeBoest Lecture Hall, Indianapolis Museum of Art
Tickets are free and available here

Landscape painting has long provided humans with an artistic form for contemplating the relationship between nature, society, and culture. It is a profoundly engaging and intellectually powerful mode of expression that has served a host of purposes over the last 300 years — from buttressing social hierarchy to criticizing injustice to highlighting scientific discovery to expressing human hopes and anxieties.

In this interactive discussion, New York based artist Rebecca Allan and Dr. Jason M. Kelly, Associate Professor of History and Director of the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, will engage the audience in a conversation about the role of landscape painting in mediating our relationship with the environment and with each other. We will explore five paintings, created between 1750 and 2015. The discussion will end in a visit to the IMA’s Pont-Aven gallery to examine Paul Gauguin’s Flageolet Player on the Cliff.

Presented by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the Indianapolis Museum of Art, and the Rivers of the Anthropocene Project.

Superintendents to discuss public education’s future at annual Cohen Lecture

INDIANAPOLIS — Superintendents from three Indiana school corporations, including the school of education'state’s two largest, will be part of a panel discussing the future of education during the second annual Michael R. Cohen Lecture on Meaning and Motivation in Education.

Presented by the Indiana University School of Education at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, the panel titled “The Future of Public Education” will be at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, April 23, at the Indianapolis Public Library Central Library branch, 40 E. St. Clair St. The event is free and open to the public.

The panelists are actively involved in the administration of public education and have been outspoken advocates on behalf of their schools and education in general. The panel includes Lewis Ferebee, superintendent of the Indianapolis Public Schools, the largest district in Indiana. Before joining IPS in September 2013, Ferebee was the chief of staff for the Durham Public Schools and regional superintendent for Guilford County Schools, both in North Carolina.

Joining Ferebee will be Rocky Killion, superintendent of the West Lafayette Community School Corp. since 2007 and best known for championing public education through the documentary he commissioned, “Rise Above the Mark.” Killion has spoken often in conjunction with film screenings about the challenges facing public education both economically and politically. Last year the Indiana Association of Public School Superintendents named him Superintendent of the Year.

Wendy Robinson, superintendent of Fort Wayne Community Schools, is also on the panel. Robinson is nationally recognized for expertise in urban education. In 2009, the National Alliance of Black School Educators presented her with the Superintendent of the Year award. She has led the state’s second-largest school district since 2003 and has been in the Fort Wayne schools for nearly four decades.

The discussion will be moderated by Scott Elliot, the founding bureau chief of Chalkbeat Indiana, a nonprofit news organization covering educational change in Indiana.

The Cohen Lecture began last year. It honors professor emeritus in science education Michael Cohen, faculty member at the School of Education from 1968 to 2003. Cohen was selected in 1984 as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, an honor bestowed upon members by their peers in recognition of meritorious efforts to advance science or its applications. He wrote an influential elementary school textbook called “Discover Science,” and his research has focused on children and adults’ concepts and misconceptions of science and the environment.

The lecture is co-sponsored by the Indiana Urban Schools Association, the Indiana Coalition on Public Education, and WFYI public radio and television in Indianapolis. More details and registration are available online.

Dr. Stephen Selka presents “Mapping the Moral in African Diaspora Tourism in Brazil”

Photo courtesy of Dr. Stephen Selka At 12:00pm on April, 30th the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute will host Dr. Stephen Selka.  His lecture will explore African diaspora tourism in Bahia, Brazil, particularly African American “pilgrimages” to the Afro-Catholic festival of Our Lady of the Good Death (or simply Boa Morte) celebrated every August by women of African descent involved with the Afro-Brazilian religion of Candomblé. Although recognized as part of the official heritage of Bahia, Boa Morte occupies a complicated position on the Afro-Brazilian moral landscape. To evangelical Christians, for example, Boa Morte and Candomblé are diabolical; from this perspective, Afro-Brazilian religion is something to leave behind. By contrast, to the extent that the festival of Boa Morte is understood as a celebration honoring the ancestors, it is particularly appealing to African Americans seeking to “recover” their ancestral past. Nevertheless, ancestors are understood to be dangerous and morally unpredictable in Candomblé; therefore Boa Morte is something morally ambiguous for many Candomblé practitioners, contrary to what most African American visitors might expect. Accordingly, this talk focuses on the contested links between heritage, personhood, and morality that are enacted at the festival of Boa Morte.

Stephen Selka is Associate Professor of Religious Studies and American Studies at Indiana University Bloomington. A cultural anthropologist, he researches religion, politics, and cultural heritage tourism in Afro-Brazilian communities in northeastern Brazil, where he has conducted ethnographic fieldwork since 1999. His first book, Religion and the Politics of Ethnic Identity in Bahia, Brazil (University Press of Florida, 2007), explores the various ways that Afro-Brazilians in both Christian and African-derived religious communities construct their ethnic identities and struggle against racism.

This public program is part of the Religion and Ethics Roundtables series of the IU Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics, and Society. Religion and Ethics Roundtables highlight the work of scholars at IUB, IUPUI, and beyond, with the goal of engaging the IU community and the public in dialogue about important issues at the intersection of religion, ethics, and society.

Dontrell: Talkback

Immediately following the April 12th performance of Dontrell, Who Kissed the SeaLogo of Phoenix Theatre, the Phoenix Theatre and the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute will co-host a talkback session to discuss some of the “big ideas” that emerge from the play, including the influence of historical events in shaping our experience, the importance of family in molding our identity, and the role of free will in determining our life’s journey.

This conversation will be moderated by Dr. Ronda Henry Anthony, Associate Professor of English and Africana Studies and Public Scholar of African American Studies and Undergraduate Research in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. She is the author of Searching for the New Black Man: Black Masculinity and Women’s Bodies, published by the University Press of Mississippi in 2013. She writes on African American literature, gender, and race.

Tickets for the April 12th performance of Dontrell can be purchased here.