Ronda Henry, “Barack Obama, Gender, and Pop Culture”

Ronda HenryJanuary 27, 2015 | 12:00-1:00
Location: IUPUI University Library, Room 4115P
Free tickets available below

Barack Obama’s Dreams From My Father (1994) used women’s bodies to establish a socially and culturally popular “brand” upon which he could build his political career.  Women function as signs of a non-threatening black masculine identity constructed to counter contemporary images of black masculinity associated with anger, aggressiveness, criminality, and the influence of the hip hop thug.  While 50 Cent, Kanye West, Jay Z and other hip-hop moguls can use many of the “negative” associations attached to black masculinity to generate power, Obama had to block or disallow their easy application to his own body to gain wide acceptance.

Dr. Ronda Henry is Associate Professor of English and Africana Studies and the Director of the Olaniyan Scholars Program.  She is the author of Searching for the New Black Man: Black Masculinity and Women’s Bodies, published by the University Press of Mississippi in 2013.  She writes on African American literature, gender, and race.

 

Lecture: Andrea Jain, “Selling Yoga: From Counterculture to Pop Culture”

Andrea JainJanuary 21, 2015 | 12:00-1:00
Location: IUPUI University Library, Room 4115P
Free tickets available below
Premodern and early modern yoga comprise techniques with a wide range of aims, from turning inward in quest of the true self, to turning outward for divine union, to channeling bodily energy in pursuit of sexual pleasure. Early modern yoga also encompassed countercultural beliefs and practices. In contrast, today, modern yoga aims at the enhancement of the mind-body complex but does so according to contemporary dominant metaphysical, health, and fitness paradigms. Consequently, yoga is now a part of popular culture. In Selling Yoga, Andrea R. Jain explores the popularization of yoga in the context of late-twentieth-century consumer culture. She departs from conventional approaches by undermining essentialist definitions of yoga as well as assumptions that yoga underwent a linear trajectory of increasing popularization. While some studies trivialize popularized yoga systems by reducing them to the mere commodification or corruption of what is perceived as an otherwise fixed, authentic system, Jain suggests that this dichotomy oversimplifies the history of yoga as well as its meanings for contemporary practitioners.By discussing a wide array of modern yoga types, from Iyengar Yoga to Bikram Yoga, Jain argues that popularized yoga cannot be dismissedthat it has a variety of religious meanings and functions. Yoga brands destabilize the basic utility of yoga commodities and assign to them new meanings that represent the fulfillment of self-developmental needs often deemed sacred in contemporary consumer culture.Dr. Andrea R. Jain is Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and author of Selling Yoga: From Counterculture to Pop Culture (Oxford, 2014).

2015 Spring Colloquium Series Presentation

Nate William, Ph.D. Candidate IU School of Education, IUPUI

Nate William

Please join us for the 2015 Spring Colloquium Series Presentation, hosted by the Center for Urban and Multicultural Education (CUME), and the School of Education. You will have the opportunity to experience a series of innovative research presentations by Ph.D. students, colleagues and community members. Join us for creative yet critical conversations on research that’s relevant to today’s society.  We thank all of those who attended our last sessions and look forward to seeing you at this one. Please mark this time on your calendar in support of our students and colleagues.

Invited Presenter: Mr. Nate William, Ph.D. Candidate, IU School of Education, IUPUI

Racial disparities in school discipline: A function of Systemic Racism?

The primary focus of my research centers on the overrepresentation of Black students in discipline, in particular, the exploration of how, if at all, the “school-to-prison pipeline” acts a function of systemic racism. Specifically, my research draws from critical scholarship to examine how teachers’ and administrators’ dispositions, their biases and beliefs, and philosophies of education and discipline, intersect with macro level social systems to contribute or interrupt the school-to-prison pipeline and/or act as means of protecting whiteness. Using an embedded multi-case study (Yin, 2013) of four middle schools differing on dimensions of disproportionality and school locale, I analyze isolated and intersections of subunits of inquiry using a conceptual framework comprised of color-blind racism, post-colonialism, and critical race theory . Subunits of this inquiry include classroom dynamics, the disposition of teachers, their philosophies of education and discipline, discipline techniques, the referral process, and the overall discipline policy. Working in combination with my conceptual framework I will examine the subunits of this inquiry from three data points 1) ethnographic observations, 2) interviews, and 3) school level referral rates.

Mitchell Douglas’s Sabbatical Lecture Examines a Pivotal Time in Rock History

Mitchell Douglass

Mitchell Douglass

The Rolling Stones concert at Altamont Speedway in December 1969 was marred by an alcohol-fueled security force of Hells Angels and the gang’s murder of a Berkeley teen. This year, Dec. 6, marked the 35th anniversary of the Altamont free concert. While Meredith Hunter’s killer, Hells Angel Alan Passaro, is long gone, Hunter’s story has never been fully explored. Mitchell Douglas, assistant professor of English at IUPUI, will explore the events of that night through lyric and persona poetry. Douglas will present his sabbatical talk December 9, 2014 to discuss his process for creating poems based on historical events, writing persona poems in the voices of historical figures, and how research can be an integral part of a creative project.

About the Liberal Arts Sabbatical Series Lectures

The Sabbatical Speaker Series was established to provide a venue for sharing research completed by Liberal Arts faculty while on sabbatical leaves. It is a sampling of the diverse work and excellence of IUPUI faculty, and an opportunity to come together for an hour of intellectual exploration with students, alumni, faculty, staff, retirees and friends from the community.

About the speaker

Mitchell Douglas is an Associate Professor of Creative Writing and Literature at the IUPUI School of Liberal Arts. His areas of academic interest include the Black Arts Movement, ethnic poetry collectives, and art for social change. He received the Lexi Rudnitsky Editor’s Choice Award and has been a finalist for the NAACP Image Award (Outstanding Literary Work-Poetry), thee Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, the Wick Poetry Prize, the Crab Orchard Series in Poetry First Book Award for his debut book, Cooling Board: A Long-Playing Poem, and was a Pushcart Prize Nominee in 2006. Douglas is also a founding member of the Affrilachian Poets, a Cave Canem fellow, and Poetry Editor for PLUCK!: the Journal of Affrilachian Arts & Culture. Mitchell L. H. Douglas’s second book of poems, \blak\ \al-fə bet\, is available from amazon.com.

Dennis Bingham’s Sabbatical Lecture Shows Cinema in a New Light

Dennis Bingham

Dennis Bingham

Professor Bingham’s presentation of Life, Death and All That Jazz: Bob Fosse and the Hollywood Renaissance of the 1970s on December 5, 2014 will explore the film style of the director-choreographer Bob Fosse (1927-1987), examining Fosse’s heretofore unacknowledged role in the “Hollywood Renaissance” of the 1970s. Bingham artfully examines how Fosse changed Hollywood cinema and American culture in ways that, though not always positive, have been lasting and pervasive. The talk focuses on Fosse’s first two films, Sweet Charity (1969) and especially, Cabaret (1972). These musicals feature unmotivated protagonists and discontinuous editing styles redolent of avant-garde and European Art Cinema. In their tendency toward ambivalence and ambiguity they deconstruct their traditionally optimistic genre, resulting in a uniquely revisionist form of the film musical.

In addition to being a director and choreographer for both film and musical theater, Fosse was also a dancer, screenwriter, and actor. He won an unprecedented eight Tony Awards for choreography, as well as one for direction. He was nominated for an Academy Award four times, winning one. Fosse’s first film, Sweet Charity, starring Shirley MacLaine, is an adaptation of the Broadway musical he had directed and choreographed. His second film, Cabaret, won eight Academy Awards, including Best Director, which he won over Francis Ford Coppola for The Godfather starring Marlon Brando, as well as Oscars for both Liza Minnelli and Joel Grey for their roles.

About the Liberal Arts Sabbatical Series Lectures

The Sabbatical Speaker Series was established to provide a venue for sharing research completed by Liberal Arts faculty while on sabbatical leaves. It is a sampling of the diverse work and excellence of IUPUI faculty, and an opportunity to come together for an hour of intellectual exploration with students, alumni, faculty, staff, retirees and friends from the community.

About the speaker

The academic interests of Dr. Dennis Bingham, professor of English and director of the film studies program, include film theory, gender theory, film biography and stardom and acting. In 2011, Professor Bingham was a finalist for the Theatre Library Association Richard Wall Memorial Award for “Whose Lives Are They Anyway: The Biopic as Contemporary Film Genre” published by Rutgers University Press. He has published numerous articles and entries on Clint Eastwood and Biopics on Oxford Bibliographies Online.

Michael Eric Dyson headlines event to honor outstanding IU School of Education alumni

Michael Eric Dyson

Michael Eric Dyson

Scholar of African American, religion and cultural studies Michael Eric Dyson is the keynote speaker for the third annual “Celebration of Transformational Educators” event presented by the IU School of Education at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

The event, at 6:30 p.m. Nov. 20 at the Madame Walker Theater, 617 Indiana Ave., in Indianapolis, is free and open to the public.

Dyson is a well-regarded public intellectual who appears regularly on national television and radio and has published numerous academic works. The Chronicle of Higher Education calls him “one of the youngest stars in the firmament of black intellectuals” and “one of the most important voices of his generation.”

Dyson will keynote the annual awards ceremony for the IU School of Education at IUPUI, which recognizes outstanding early-career alumni who have conducted their work in an urban setting. A committee selects honorees from a pool of nominees. Each honoree receives a $1,000 award to advance his or her work.

The Steward Speaker Series is co-sponsoring the event as a part of its ongoing effort to bring some of the country’s top African American leaders and luminaries to Indianapolis to share their thoughts and work. The IUPUI Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion is a contributor to this event.

“We are very pleased to have a speaker of Dr. Dyson’s caliber to shine a positive spotlight on the work of our outstanding alumni who are, indeed, transformational educators,” said Pat Rogan, executive associate dean of the IU School of Education at IUPUI. “His message is sure to inspire.”

Dyson is the Ida B. Wells-Barnett University Professor at DePaul University. He has taught at Chicago Theological Seminary, Brown University, the University of North Carolina and Columbia University. He received his Bachelor of Arts in philosophy, magna cum laude, from Carson-Newman College, and his Master of Arts and Ph.D. degrees in religion from Princeton University. He has provided commentary on American culture for “Nightline,” “Charlie Rose,” “Good Morning America,” “Today” and “Oprah.” He has also been heard on every major show on National Public Radio. He has written for numerous academic publications, including Cultural Critique, Cultural Studies, DePaul Law Review, The Leadership Quarterly, New Art Examiner, JAC: A Journal of Composition Theory, Transition, Social Text, Religion and Literature, Theology Today, Union Seminary Quarterly Review, Princeton Seminary Bulletin and Black Sacred Music.

Dyson’s 1993 debut book, “Reflecting Black: African-American Culture Criticism” won the Gustavus Myers Center for Human Rights Award in 1994. His critically acclaimed follow-up, 1994’s “Making Malcolm: The Myth and Meaning of Malcolm X,” was named “Notable Book of 1994″ by both The New York Times and The Philadelphia Inquirer. Dyson is also author of the acclaimed “Between God and Gangsta Rap: Bearing Witness to Black Culture,” named a “Best Bet” by USA Today, and the national best-seller “Race Rules: Navigating the Color Line.” In January 2000, the Free Press published Dyson’s “I May Not Get There With You: The True Martin Luther King, Jr.”

He has also written for many popular publications, including The New York Times, Chicago Tribune, The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Vibe magazine and Rolling Stone. Time, U.S. News and World Report, USA Today, Current Biography, The New Yorker, The Chronicle of Higher Education and Essence have profiled him. Dyson has lectured across the nation and throughout the world in countless colleges, universities and public auditoriums. He won the 1992 Award of Excellence for Magazines from the National Association of Black Journalists.

While the event is free, seating is limited. RSVP online by Nov. 17 to ensure your space.

Last Lecture Series Call for 2015 Nominations

headerLessons for Life from a Lifetime of Learning

The Last Lecture Series offers the university community the opportunity to hear reflections on life’s lessons and meaning from a current or retired IUPUI colleague of exceptional merit. The featured speaker shares the wisdom he or she has gained through academic pursuits and life experiences; distilling a life of inquiry, reflection, and service into advice for successive generations.

The 2015 Last Lecture is planned for Friday, March 27, 2015 at 2:00 p.m. in the IUPUI Campus Center Theatre. Nominations are now being accepted for the 2015 speaker. All current and retired IUPUI based faculty, administrators, and staff members are eligible for nomination.  All IUPUI faculty, retired faculty, staff and students are invited to submit nominations by midnight on November 23, 2014. Nominators should click on the link below to submit a brief description of the nominee along with a short justification why his or her nominee deserves consideration.

A committee of the IUPUI Senior Academy will consider all nominations and select a pool of candidates by mid-December. In January, selected nominees will be invited to submit a synopsis of their proposed presentation.

Click here to submit your nomination
Click here to view the Call for Nominations
For additional information, contact Academic Affairs by filling out our contact form here.

The Last Lecture Series is sponsored by IUPUI Senior Academy, IUPUI administration, and Indiana University Foundation.

Deborah Butterfield will present on opening night of undergraduate student exhibitions

Deborah Butterfield, Cascade, 2014 Image courtesy Deborah Butterfield

Deborah Butterfield, Cascade, 2014
Image courtesy Deborah Butterfield

Iconic artist Deborah Butterfield partly credits her birthdate on the 75th running of the Kentucky Derby as inspiration for her life size, sculptural horses. Each of her in-demand and internationally collected works takes three to five years to make. Butterfield will appear at Herron as the 2014 Jane Fortune Outstanding Women Visiting Artist lecturer on November 12 at 6:00 p.m., in the Basile Auditorium of Eskenazi Hall.

It is the generosity of Jane Fortune—author, cultural editor, art historian, art collector and philanthropist—that brings Butterfield to Herron. “I want to make an impact on the community that surrounds me and help make the arts accessible to our residents,” Fortune said. This is the seventh lecture in the series, which has welcomed artists including Judy Chicago, Polly Apfelbaum, Judith Shea and Maria Magdalena Campos Pons to Indianapolis.

Butterfield appears in conjunction with the opening of the Undergraduate Student Exhibition, which this year will take place in both Eskenazi Hall’s Berkshire, Reese and Paul galleries and in various spaces of the Eskenazi Fine Arts Center. Shuttle service will be available between buildings. This year’s jurist will be Dr. Patricia Y. Paik, curator of contemporary art at the Indianapolis Museum of Art. In a typical year, the jurist must select from more than 300 strong submissions across a wide variety of media. The exhibition continues through November 29.

Also opening will be On the Blink, a show of photography, video, performance and installation works by Photography and Intermedia seniors.

New to the mix this year will be a graduate studio crawl. With more than 60 master’s degree students—in two buildings—the studio crawl will give students and visitors alike a chance to peek behind the curtain of spaces that are normally not seen by other students or the public.

In the Marsh Gallery, the FACE Pets Show, a group exhibition, continues with works available for purchase to benefit the Foundation Against Companion Animal Euthanasia. In the Basile Gallery, view selections from a rare collection of artists books and broadsides representing the free exchange of ideas in the wake of a 2007 car bombing in the center of Bagdad on al-Mutanabbi Street. These shows continue through November 19.

Triangulating Data: Using Linguistic Analysis of Interview Data to Better Understand Nurse-Patient Interaction

Shelley Staples  Assistant Professor English/HEAV

Shelley Staples
Purdue University

Shelley Staples, Assistant Professor of Second Language Studies/ESL at Purdue University, will be presenting a brown bag presentation for The International Center for Intercultural Communication on Thursday October 30th, 2014. Dr. Staples’ research examines differences in the language used by international and U.S. nurses in their interactions with patients using techniques that, taken together, offer a rich understanding of nurse-patient interaction:
• Specialized quantitative and qualitative linguistic analysis
• Assessments of interactional effectiveness
• Interviews with nurses
This presentation will be of particular interest to those who wish to learn more about Corpus Linguistics, a new quantitative linguistic methodology.
Open to the public
No RSVP required

Daniel Grant, 2014 Jordan H. and Joan R. Leibman Forum on the Legal and Business Environment of Art

Image courtesy Daniel Grant

Image courtesy Daniel Grant

Daniel Grant, whose frequent reporting on the visual arts appears in ARTnews Magazine, Huffington Post and The Wall Street Journal, will speak at Herron School of Art and Design in Eskenazi Hall’s Basile Auditorium on November 5 at 6:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Grant will present What Collectors Want: The Business, Law and Art of Art Sales as
the 2014 speaker for the Jordan H. and Joan R. Leibman Forum on the Legal and Business Environment of Art. His talk will focus on how artists may communicate—in person, in writings and online—with collectors, dealers and curators in ways that will help lead to exhibitions and sales.

“The key is to for artists to be entrepreneurial,” said Grant, “looking for ways to advance their own careers rather than relying upon someone else. For many up-and-coming artists, the goal is to get into a gallery. That is not necessarily synonymous with selling one’s work or supporting oneself from those sales. It is easy to get lost in the idea that a gallery equals prestige, art world acceptance and a ready group of buyers.

Grant has quoted studies that have shown a high percentage of artists are able to support themselves through their art and related skills—often flying in the face of preconceived notions about an arts education. What’s more, these studies have revealed artists to be happier with their lives than many others in higher-paying professions, at least in part because of their autonomous decision-making.

“A growing number of artists are looking at galleries as just one part—or, perhaps, not even a part at all—of their plans to show and sell work,” he said. “These artists are aware that they can speak for their art better than any third party and that, in fact, many collectors are eager to speak with the artists directly rather than with a gallery owner.”

Grant is the author of books including The Business of Being an Artist, Selling Art Without Galleries, and The Fine Artist’s Career Guide. He will take questions from the audience on all facets of being an artist or acquiring art. His books will be available for sale and autograph during the reception following the lecture.

The Leibman Lecture is a joint project of IU’s Kelley School of Business, the Robert
H. McKinney School of Law and Herron School of Art and Design—all on the campus of IUPUI. Past Leibman Lecture topics have ranged from The Art of The Steal
and The Monuments Men to U.S. Department of Treasury engraving practices and
wearable intellectual property.

Parking: Limited parking is available in the Sports Complex Garage just west of Herron. Park in the visitor side of the garage and bring your ticket to the Herron Galleries for validation, compliments of The Great Frame Up.