Triangulating Data: Using Linguistic Analysis of Interview Data to Better Understand Nurse-Patient Interaction

Shelley Staples  Assistant Professor English/HEAV

Shelley Staples
Purdue University

Shelley Staples, Assistant Professor of Second Language Studies/ESL at Purdue University, will be presenting a brown bag presentation for The International Center for Intercultural Communication on Thursday October 30th, 2014. Dr. Staples’ research examines differences in the language used by international and U.S. nurses in their interactions with patients using techniques that, taken together, offer a rich understanding of nurse-patient interaction:
• Specialized quantitative and qualitative linguistic analysis
• Assessments of interactional effectiveness
• Interviews with nurses
This presentation will be of particular interest to those who wish to learn more about Corpus Linguistics, a new quantitative linguistic methodology.
Open to the public
No RSVP required

Daniel Grant, 2014 Jordan H. and Joan R. Leibman Forum on the Legal and Business Environment of Art

Image courtesy Daniel Grant

Image courtesy Daniel Grant

Daniel Grant, whose frequent reporting on the visual arts appears in ARTnews Magazine, Huffington Post and The Wall Street Journal, will speak at Herron School of Art and Design in Eskenazi Hall’s Basile Auditorium on November 5 at 6:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Grant will present What Collectors Want: The Business, Law and Art of Art Sales as
the 2014 speaker for the Jordan H. and Joan R. Leibman Forum on the Legal and Business Environment of Art. His talk will focus on how artists may communicate—in person, in writings and online—with collectors, dealers and curators in ways that will help lead to exhibitions and sales.

“The key is to for artists to be entrepreneurial,” said Grant, “looking for ways to advance their own careers rather than relying upon someone else. For many up-and-coming artists, the goal is to get into a gallery. That is not necessarily synonymous with selling one’s work or supporting oneself from those sales. It is easy to get lost in the idea that a gallery equals prestige, art world acceptance and a ready group of buyers.

Grant has quoted studies that have shown a high percentage of artists are able to support themselves through their art and related skills—often flying in the face of preconceived notions about an arts education. What’s more, these studies have revealed artists to be happier with their lives than many others in higher-paying professions, at least in part because of their autonomous decision-making.

“A growing number of artists are looking at galleries as just one part—or, perhaps, not even a part at all—of their plans to show and sell work,” he said. “These artists are aware that they can speak for their art better than any third party and that, in fact, many collectors are eager to speak with the artists directly rather than with a gallery owner.”

Grant is the author of books including The Business of Being an Artist, Selling Art Without Galleries, and The Fine Artist’s Career Guide. He will take questions from the audience on all facets of being an artist or acquiring art. His books will be available for sale and autograph during the reception following the lecture.

The Leibman Lecture is a joint project of IU’s Kelley School of Business, the Robert
H. McKinney
School of Law and Herron School of Art and Design—all on the campus of IUPUI. Past Leibman Lecture topics have ranged from The Art of The Steal
and The Monuments Men to U.S. Department of Treasury engraving practices and
wearable intellectual property.

Parking: Limited parking is available in the Sports Complex Garage just west of Herron. Park in the visitor side of the garage and bring your ticket to the Herron Galleries for validation, compliments of The Great Frame Up.

Mike O’Connor presents “Two Santas: The Intellectual Roots of Conservative Tax Cutting”

A Commercial Republic Book Cover

Date: October 8, 2014
Time: 12:00-1:00
Location: IUPUI University Library 4115S (IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute)

“Tax-cutting is such a prominent concern among conservatives today that one could understandably believe it to be central to the meaning of conservatism. Yet this is not the case: during the middle of the twentieth century, conservatives were defined economically less by their hostility to taxes than by their commitment to balancing the federal budget. The shift between these two positions is largely the result of the influence of ‘supply-side’ economics, an intellectual orientation that arose in the 1970s as a response to a very specific set of economic circumstances. Once some conservatives noticed a political constituency for this position, however, their call to relieve the burden of taxes on the citizenry began to harden into an ideological position. The talk will explain the genesis of supply-side economics in the ‘stagflation’ of the 1970s and its conversion from an economic to a political doctrine in subsequent decades.”

Mike O’Connor is the author of A Commercial Republic: America’s Enduring Debate over Democratic Capitalism (Kansas, 2014). He has also published articles in Contemporary Pragmatism and The Sixties. O’Connor teaches at Georgia State University in Atlanta, and holds a Ph.D. in American studies from the University of Texas at Austin. He was one of the original bloggers at the U.S. Intellectual History website, and served as a founding officer of the Society for U.S. Intellectual History.

2014 Barlow Lecture in the Humanities explores ‘The Future History of the Book’

imagesINDIANAPOLIS — Is there a need to fear the death of the book in this age of digital readers?

This is the question that will guide the 2014 John D. Barlow Lecture in the Humanities at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis on Oct. 29. The event is free and open to the public.

Kathleen Fitzpatrick, director of scholarly communication of the Modern Language Association and visiting research professor of English at New York University, will present the lecture, “The Future History of the Book: Time, Attention, Convention.”

The lecture will begin at 6 p.m. in the IUPUI Campus Center Theater, 420 University Blvd. A reception precedes the lecture in the Campus Center Theater Atrium at 5 p.m. The theater is located on the building’s lower level.

Anxieties abound regarding the ostensible obsolescence of the book. Exploring whether the book is in fact becoming obsolete, and what it might mean if it were, requires thinking distinctly about the specific material form of the book — the codex, that is, stacks of paper bound on one edge with front and back covers — and about the content it has long carried.

Fitzpatrick asks, if the form were to change — becoming digital, for instance — would our interactions with the content still make the book a viable vector for the cultural interactions the codex has supported? Would it be possible for us to find the powerful identification with the electronic book that we long have had with the codex book? And what might need to happen in order to effect such a transfer of our affections?

“We’re very glad to welcome Dr. Fitzpatrick to Indianapolis to present this year’s Barlow Lecture,” said William Blomquist, dean of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. “This is a thought-provoking topic, and she is the ideal person to discuss it.”

Fitzpatrick is the author of two books, “Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy” (NYU Press 2011) and “The Anxiety of Obsolescence: The American Novel in the Age of Television” (Vanderbilt University Press 2006). In 2006, she co-founded the digital scholarly network MediaCommons, a community network for scholars, students and practitioners in media studies that promotes the exploration of new publishing forms. Fitzpatrick’s articles have appeared in the Journal of Electronic Publishing, PMLA, Contemporary Literature and Cinema Journal.

The IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI hosts the Barlow Lecture in the Humanities in honor of Liberal Arts Dean and Professor Emeritus John D. Barlow.

To RSVP, email LibaRSVP@iupui.edu with “Barlow” in the subject line. Visitor parking is available in the Vermont Street Garage, attached to the Campus Center, for a fee.

Rev. Harold Good to speak on peace in Northern Ireland and Indianapolis roots

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The Rev. Harold Good

INDIANAPOLIS — The Rev. Harold Good, an internationally renowned peacemaker, will be at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis on Sept. 10 to speak about Indianapolis and the road to peace in Northern Ireland.

As former president of the Methodist Church in Ireland, Good played a key role in Northern Ireland’s peacemaking process.

The lecture, at 1 p.m. in the Lilly Auditorium of University Library, is free and open to the public.

“Rev. Good is in a unique position to speak about issues of peace, justice and reconciliation,” said Robert White, chair of the Department of Sociology in the IU School of Liberal Arts. “Along with the late Father Alec Reid, Rev. Good was one of two members of the clergy trusted enough by paramilitaries that he was asked to witness the final decommissioning of weapons of the Provisional Irish Republican Army in 2005.”

A native of Ireland, Good spent several years in Indianapolis as a student and pastor before returning to Ireland in the 1970s.

Good has demonstrated a lifetime commitment to peace, justice and reconciliation. During his time as Methodist Church leader, Good joined Northern Ireland’s other main church leaders to press for peace and engage in talks with U.K. Prime Minister Tony Blair. Known for his ministry on the streets of Northern Ireland, Good displayed both physical and spiritual courage in working to reconcile the Protestant and Catholic communities, and urging the end to violent action and reaction.

The lecture is sponsored by the IUPUI Common Theme on Civil Discourse, the Office of International Affairs, the Sociology Department of the IU School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI Honors College, and the Methodist Church of Indiana and Christian Theological Seminary.

“In the Shadow of Terror: Providing Healthcare on the Northern Cameroon-Nigeria Border ”

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Dr. Ellen Einterz, Director of the Kolofata District Hospital and Chief Medical Officer for the Kolofata Health District

Over the past several years, northeastern Nigeria has been wracked by violence promulgated by a group of extremists whose stated aim is to topple the status quo and establish a universal caliphate based on Islamic law. Thousands have died, and at least a million left homeless since the carnage began. Border areas in neighboring countries, including Cameroon, have been touched by the climate of terror, military reaction, and the flight of refugees.

Since 1990, Dr. Ellen Einterz, an IU graduate, has lived on the border between Cameroon and Nigeria’s Borno State. She is the Director of the Kolofata District Hospital and Chief Medical Officer for the Kolofata Health District. In her talk, she will briefly explore the conflict in its historical and present day context and provide an account of her recent personal experience as a physician in the exceptionally poor corner of Africa being rocked by this tragedy.

This lecture is presented by Medical Humanities & Health Studies and the IUPUI Global Health Student Interest Group and generous support from The IUPUI Office of International Affairs, The Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, and the Africana Studies Program in the School of Liberal Arts.

Claire Potter on Academics and the University of Facebook

DATE: 13 October 2014
TIME:
11:00-12:00
LOCATION:
IUPUI Campus Center, Room 268
Tickets are free, but registration is required.

Dr. Claire Potter, “The University of Facebook”

What role does social media play in our careers as activist academics who are, to paraphrase psychologist Sherry Turkle, increasingly “alone together?” Social media is playing a crucial role in weaving together networks of academics across the oundaries of region, institutional status, and field. Conversations on Facebook simulate the comfort zone of the faculty lounge or the cocktail party after a Dr. Claire Potterdistinguished lecture. People share gossip, humor and express political views that merge with their scholarly interests.  But if crowd-sourcing a syllabus has the enormous advantage of staying in minute-by-minute contact with colleagues, what are the rules? And, if one’s house is no longer easily separated from one’s work space, under what conditions do we need to imagine our utterances on social media as occurring in the workplace too? Do academics have a lot to learn from teenagers?

About Dr. Claire Potter

Dr. Claire Bond Potter has been Professor of History at The New School for Public Engagement since 2012. She has a BA in English Literature from Yale University and a Ph.D. in History from New York University.

Dr. Potter is the author of War on Crime: Bandits, G-Men and the Politics of Mass Culture (Rutgers University Press, 1998) and an editor, with Renee Romano, of Doing Recent History: On Privacy, Copyright, Video Games, Institutional Review Boards, Activist Scholarship, and History That Talks Back (University of Georgia Press, 2012).  She is currently writing a political history of anti-pornography campaigns, Beyond Pornography: Feminism, the Reagan Revolution and the Politics of Gender Violence, and a collection of essays on academia in the digital age, Digital U: Why Crowdsourcing, Social Media, Word Press and Google Hangouts Could Save the Historical Profession.

Since 2007 Dr. Potter has written at Tenured Radical, a blog that moved to The Chronicle of Higher Education in July 2011.

With Renee Romano of Oberlin College, Dr. Potter edits a book series, Since 1970: Histories of Contemporary America, for the University of Georgia Press. Dr. Potter also serves on the editorial board of the Journal of the History of Sexuality and is a co-director of OutHistory.org, re-launching its new website in October 2013.

Bradbury lecture celebrates master storyteller’s birthday and legacy

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Center for Ray Bradbury Studies Director Jonathan Eller with science fiction and fantasy magazines with Ray Bradbury stories, part of the Bradbury-Albright Collection.

INDIANAPOLIS — Professor Jonathan Eller, director of IUPUI’s Center for Ray Bradbury Studies and Chancellor’s Professor of English, will present the inaugural Bradbury Lecture at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 20.

The lecture, in the West Reading Room of the Indianapolis Central Library, 40 E. St. Clair St., is free and open to the public.

“Ray Bradbury in the Twenty-First Century” draws on the unique and extensive archives of the Bradbury Center, which is home to the iconic author’s papers, his working library, and a lifetime of his awards and mementos. These materials, recent gifts of the Bradbury family and the author’s longtime friend and bibliographer, Donn Albright, are part of the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

“Everybody knows a Ray Bradbury story,” Eller said. “Generations of school children and college students have read his work in hundreds of anthologies and textbooks; teachers and librarians continue to value his stories and his poetic, metaphor-rich style.”

Bradbury’s stories have a unique staying power in American culture.

“He published more than 400 stories,” Eller said. “And he wove them into such modern classics as ‘The Martian Chronicles,’ ‘The Illustrated Man,’ ‘The Golden Apples of the Sun,’ ‘The October Country,’ and two enduring titles that emerged from his Midwestern childhood: ‘Dandelion Wine’ and ‘Something Wicked This Way Comes.’ ‘Fahrenheit 451,’ his classic cautionary tale of censorship and book burning, remains a perennial bestseller more than 60 years after publication.”

Eller’s illustrated presentation will focus on two intriguing questions: How did Ray Bradbury, a child of the Great Depression who never attended college, become one of the best-known American writers of his time? And why does this master storyteller of the 20th century remain a powerful cultural influence today?

The inaugural Bradbury Lecture falls during the author’s birthday week, and Eller plans to schedule subsequent lectures each August as Bradbury’s centennial year — 2020 — rapidly approaches.

Eller said, “He was born in 1920, when the Martian Canals of Percival Lowell and Edgar Rice Burroughs were still high in the American imagination; he passed away in 2012, just as the Curiosity Rover was about to land on Mars, at a site named in Ray Bradbury’s honor.” The center’s holdings include artifacts that have orbited the Earth, and Eller’s lecture will also assess the author’s lasting impact on the American space program.

The timing of the first Bradbury Lecture is especially significant. “Ray Bradbury Unbound,” the second volume of Eller’s three-volume study of Bradbury’s life and career, will be published by the University of Illinois Press in early September. At the same time, Kent State University Press will publish volume two of the Bradbury Center’s “Collected Stories of Ray Bradbury,” a series that recovers the seldom-seen original versions of Bradbury’s earliest published stories.

The Bradbury Lecture also kicks off a campaign to expand the Bradbury Center at IUPUI so that students, researchers and the general public can have better access to the archives and artifacts belonging to one of America’s premier storytellers.

The Bradbury Lecture is presented by the Indianapolis Public Library in conjunction with the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies. Parking for the Indianapolis Central Library is available via Pennsylvania Street in the library garage for a fee.

For more information about the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies, call 317-274-2173 or visit the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies’ website.

E.O. Wilson and Katherine Hayles “What Makes us Human?”

Entanglements Lecture Series
E.O. Wilson and Katherine Hayles, “What Makes us Human?”
October 8, 2014 | 7:00-8:45
Indianapolis Central Library, Clowes Auditorium
Click here for free tickets

When did we become human? Are human and animal societies that much different? Do we already live in an age of cyborgs?

E.O. Wilson and Katherine Hayles visit Indianapolis as part of the new IAHI Entanglements Lecture Series.  Entanglements brings together scientists, humanists, and artists to discuss “big questions” that affect all of us.

At our inaugural event, E.O. Wilson, two-time Pulitzer Prize winning biologist, will join Katherine Hayles, specialist in the culture of cyborgs and virtual bodies, in a conversation that will take us on a journey to answer one of humanity’s most fundamental questions: “What makes us human?”

Over the course of this evening, Wilson and Hayles will discuss the evolution of human consciousness, the relationship between biology, society, culture, and technology, and the future of humanity.  This will be an event that changes the way you think about yourself and your world.

EO WilsonDr. E.O. Wilson is Professor Emeritus and Honorary Curator in Entomology at Harvard University.  He is a two time Pulitzer Prize winner, a National Medal of Science awardee, a Crafoord Prize recipient (given by the Academy in fields of science it does not cover by the Nobel Prize), and a TED Prize Winner.  In fact, he has received over 100 awards throughout his career. He is the author of numerous books, including Sociobiology, The Ants, The Diversity of Life, Consilience, The Social Conquest of Earth, and Letters to a Young Scientist.  During his career he has explored the biggest questions through the littlest creatures — ants. He is a prominent environmental advocate, and in March 2014, the government of Mozambique opened the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Laboratory in Gorongosa National Park — a tribute to Wilson’s worldwide impact.

Katherine HaylesDr. Katherine Hayles is Professor of Literature at Duke University.  Her book, How We Became Posthuman, published in 1999, was named one of the best 25 books of 1999 by The Village Voice and received the Rene Wellek Prize for Best Book in Literary Theory.  She is the author of multiple books, including The Cosmic Web, Chaos Bound, Writing Machines, How We Think, and My Mother Was a Computer.  A recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, two NEH Fellowships, a Rockefeller Residential Fellowship, and a National Humanities Center Fellowship, Dr. Hayles  is a leading social and literary critic with interests in cyborg anthropology, digital humanities, electronic literature, science and technology, science fiction, and critical theory.

The Entanglements Lecture Series is made possible through the generous support of the Efroymson Family Fund, the IU School of Dentistry, and the Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute.

This event is a collaboration between the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, Indiana Humanities, and the Spirit and Place Festival.

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Notre Dame historian and professor to discuss ‘The Bible Then and Now’ in public talk

Dr. Mark Noll

Dr. Mark Noll, Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame

INDIANAPOLIS — Noted historian and National Endowment for the Humanities medal recipient Mark Noll will deliver a public talk Thursday, Aug. 7, as part of the IUPUI Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture’s The Bible and American Life Conference.

Noll will present “The Bible Then and Now” at 7:30 p.m. at Christ Church Cathedral, 125 Monument Circle in downtown Indianapolis. Registration is not required for this keynote talk, which is open to the entire Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus as well as the general public.

Noll is the Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. His numerous books include “The New Shape of World Christianity: How American Experience Reflects Global Faith” (InterVarsity Press, 2009); “God and Race in American Politics: A Short History” (Princeton University Press, 2008); and “The Civil War as a Theological Crisis” (University of North Carolina Press, 2006). He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; in 2006 he received the National Endowment for the Humanities medal at a White House ceremony.

The Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture is part of the Indiana University School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. The Bible and American Life Conference, taking place Wednesday through Friday at Sheraton Indianapolis City Centre, is the second stage of a project that seeks to provide the first large-scale investigation of the Bible in American life.

Earlier this year, the center released the first part of the project: a report based on a national survey of American Bible reading. Among its many findings, the study discovered:

•    There is a 50/50 split among Americans who read any form of scripture in the past year and those who did not.

•    Among those who read any form of scripture in the past year, 95 percent named the Bible as the scripture they read.

•    Despite the proliferation of Bible translations, the King James Version is the top choice — and by a wide margin — of Bible readers.

•    The strongest correlation with Bible reading is race, with African Americans reading the Bible at considerably higher rates than others.

•    Bible readers consult scripture for personal prayer and devotion three times more to learn about culture war issues such as abortion, homosexuality, war or poverty.
A conference schedule and registration information are available online.