Keira Amstutz, William Blomquist, John Dichtl, Valerie Eickmeier, Jonathan Elmer, and David Lawrence discuss “The Future of the Arts & Humanities”

March 5, 2015 | 12:00-1:30
Indiana Humanities
1500 North Delaware Street

Are the arts and humanities in crisis?  What do financial cuts ultimately mean for arts and humanities institutions and their publics?  What role should governments play in supporting the arts and humanities?  What does the future look like for arts and humanities in this country and around the world?  What functions do the arts and humanities provide in sustaining a democratic society?

This roundtable will discuss these and many other questions in this can’t-miss event featuring several of central Indiana’s leaders in the arts and humanities.

Keira Amstutz is the President and CEO of Indiana Humanities.

Dr. William Blomquist is the Dean of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Dr. John Dichtl is the Executive Director of the National Council on Public History and an Adjunct Assistant Professor in History in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Dr. Valerie Eickmeier is the Dean of the Herron School of Art and Design.

Dr. Jonathan Elmer is the Director of the College of Arts and Humanities Institute and a Professor of English at IU Bloomington.

David Lawrence is the President and CEO of the Arts Council of Indianapolis.

This event is co-sponsored by Indiana Humanities

Laura Holzman, Modupe Labode, and Mary Price to discuss “The Value and Values of Public Scholarship”

Indiana Humanities LogoFebruary 24, 2015 | 12:00-1:30
IUPUI University Library, Room 4115P
755 W. Michigan St.

The 21st-century research university is no ivory tower.  It is a vibrant space that cultivates creativity and experiment — a space that encourages and supports multiple ways of knowing and doing.  Public scholarship is an essential pillar of the 21st-century university, building bridges and partnerships between the institution and the many publics with which its members engage.  This roundtable will engage with the following questions. What is public scholarship? What roles does it play in research, creative activity, and teaching?  What misconceptions do people have about public scholarship? How should universities evaluate public scholarship in promotion and tenure? How does one become a public scholar?

Dr. Laura Holzman is an Assistant Professor and Public Scholar of Curatorial Practices and Visual Art in Art History in the Herron School of Art and Design and in Museum Studies in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Dr. Modupe Labode is an Assistant Professor and Public Scholar of African American History and Museums in History and Museum Studies in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Dr. Mary Price is the Faculty Development Director in the IUPUI Center for Service and Learning and an Associate Faculty member in Anthropology in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

This event is co-sponsored by Indiana Humanities

Indianapolis police chief, Marion County prosecutor to discuss at IUPUI events surrounding deaths of black men in Ferguson and Staten Island

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Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department Chief Richard Hite

Marion County Prosecutor Terry Curry

Marion County Prosecutor Terry Curry

Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department Chief Richard Hite, Marion County Prosecutor Terry Curry and other local officials will participate in a panel discussion at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis about events surrounding the deaths of two black men last year in Ferguson, Mo., and Staten Island, New York.

With thoughts and emotions in IUPUI students still stirred by those events, the Office for Intergroup Dialogue and Civil Community and the Office of Student Involvement at IUPUI arranged the discussion to address the question: Could Indianapolis be next?

The panel discussion will take place from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Feb. 18 in the Campus Center Theatre, 420 University Blvd., said Alice Hoenigman Jones, a learning and program development consultant in the Office for Intergroup Dialogue and Civil Community. The event, planned in collaboration with Martin University, is free and open to the public.

Indianapolis City-Council President Maggie Lewis and Indianapolis deputy mayor and Republican mayoral candidate Olgen Williams also will participate in the discussion. An African American clergy member and an individual whose family suffered gun violence have been invited to participate. Those attending the discussion will have the opportunity to ask questions.

In Ferguson, Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager, was shot and killed on Aug. 9, by Darren Wilson, a white police officer. The shooting prompted protests that roiled the area for weeks. In November, the St. Louis County prosecutor announced that a grand jury decided not to indict the officer. The announcement set off another wave of protests.

In Staten Island, on July 17, Eric Garner died after a police officer put him in a chokehold. In December, a Staten Island grand jury dismissed all potential charges against the police officer.

The panel discussion follows a town hall and a march that were held last fall at IUPUI that demonstrated widespread interest in the issues surrounding the deaths in Ferguson and New York.

For more information about the event, contact Alice Hoenigman Jones.

The Future of the Arts and Humanities Roundtable: Keira Amstutz, William Blomquist, John Dichtl, Valerie Eickmeier, Jonathan Elmer, David Lawrence

Indiana Humanities LogoMarch 5, 2015 | 12:00-1:30
Location: Indiana Humanities, 1500 N. Delaware
Free tickets available soon (boxed lunches available for purchase)

Are the arts and humanities in crisis? What do financial cuts ultimately mean for arts and humanities institutions and their publics? What role should governments play in supporting the arts and humanities? What does the future look like for arts and humanities in this country and around the world? What functions do the arts and humanities provide in sustaining a democratic society?

This roundtable will discuss these and many other questions in this can’t-miss event featuring several of central Indiana’s leaders in the arts and humanities.

Keira Amstutz is the President and CEO of Indiana Humanities.

Dr. William Blomquist is the Dean of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Dr. John Dichtl is the Executive Director of the National Council on Public History and an Adjunct Assistant Professor in History in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Dr. Valerie Eickmeier is the Dean of the Herron School of Art and Design.

Dr. Jonathan Elmer is the Director of the College of Arts and Humanities Institute and a Professor of English at IU Bloomington.

David Lawrence is the President and CEO of the Arts Council of Indianapolis.

The Value and Values of Public Scholarship: Laura Holzman, Modupe Labode, Mary Price

Indiana Humanities LogoFebruary 24, 2015 | 12:00-1:30
Location: IUPUI University Library, Room 4115P
Free tickets available below

This event is co-sponsored by Indiana Humanities

The 21st-century research university is no ivory tower. It is a vibrant space that cultivates creativity and experiment — a space that encourages and supports multiple ways of knowing and doing. Public scholarship is an essential pillar of the 21st-century university, building bridges and partnerships between the institution and the many publics with which its members engage. This roundtable will engage with the following questions. What is public scholarship? What roles does it play in research, creative activity, and teaching? What misconceptions do people have about public scholarship? How should universities evaluate public scholarship in promotion and tenure? How does one become a public scholar?

Dr. Laura Holzman is an Assistant Professor and Public Scholar of Curatorial Practices and Visual Art in Art History in the Herron School of Art and Design and in Museum Studies in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Dr. Modupe Labode is an Assistant Professor and Public Scholar of African American History and Museums in History and Museum Studies in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Dr. Mary Price is the Faculty Development Director in the IUPUI Center for Service and Learning and an Associate Faculty member in Anthropology in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Ebola: “Over There”…Now “Over Here” An Urgent Conversation About Ethics, Law, Public Health, and Practice

Ebola Virus

Ebola Virus

The initial outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease (EBV) in West Africa presented many ethical, legal, logistical and clinical challenges for first responders, clinicians, politicians and researchers. These challenges have been magnified now that EBV has crossed the Atlantic transforming the public conversation from a worrisome public health challenge over there, to one we need to address over here. A group of experts in the ethical, legal, public health and clinical care implications will discuss several key issues facing patients, practitioners and the public. Following short presentations, an open dialogue will allow for exchange of perspectives.

Discussants:
Eric M. Meslin, PhD-
Director, Indiana University Center for Bioethics, Associate Dean and Professor of Bioethics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Professor of Law and Bioethics, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law
Chad Priest, JD, MSN, RN- Assistant Dean for Operations & Community Partnerships, Indiana University School of Nursing, Co-Director, Disaster Medicine Fellowship, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine
Ross D. Silverman, JD, MPH- Professor and Acting Chair, Department of Health Policy & Management Indiana University, Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health Professor of Public Health & Law, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law
Nicolas P. Terry, LL.M.- Hall Render Professor of Law & Director, Hall Center for Law and Health, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law

Co-sponsored by the Indiana University Center for Bioethics, Fairbanks School of Public Health, School of Nursing, and Robert H. McKinney School of Law

Philosophy and the (Non – Academic) Professions : A Panel Discussion

UntitledThursday, 25 Sept., 4:30pm
IUPUI Campus Center, Rm. 307

Bring Plenty of Questions!

Is there any connection between philosophy (or, more generally, the humanities) and the (non-academic) professions? Can one enrich the other? Is philosophy (or the humanities) of any value to professionals? Our panelists will talk about these and related questions!

Panelists:

Jan Frazier (Management Consultant)
Jack Hope (Operator, Hope Plumbing Co.)
Emily Krueger (Manager, Foundation Partnerships, Best Friends Animal Society)
Richard Ranucci (Attorney at Law)
Patrick F. Sullivan (Principal Consultant, JBW Group International)

For more information contact Prof. John Tilley, IUPUI Dept. of Philosophy, by email or by phone at 274-4690.

2014 Tobias Leadership Conference

Indiana University’s ninth annual Tobias Leadership Conference will take place from April 24-26 at the Alexander Hotel in downtown Indianapolis. The Conference brings together scholars and practitioners from the entire spectrum of leadership including corporate leadership, not-for-profit leadership, religious leadership, educational leadership, medical leadership, and political leadership. The Conference will feature papers, panels, and speakers from all academic disciplines. The registration fee of $195 includes all conference sessions, the Thursday evening reception and book fair, two lunches, Friday’s gala dinner, and two continental breakfasts. There is a $45 student rate that does not include meals. Plenary speakers include:

  • Data-Smart Leadership – Stephen Goldsmith, Professor of Government, Director of Data-Smart City Solutions at Harvard Kennedy School
  • Frankenstein’s Leadership Monster – Richard Gunderman, Chancellor’s Professor, Professor of Radiology, Pediatrics, Medical Education, Philosphy, Liberal Arts, Philanthropy, and in the Honors College at Indiana University
  • Spirituality and Leadership Effectiveness – George Houston, Center for Creative Leadership
  • Effective Leadership in Japan, the Case of Shibusawa Eiichi – Gil Latz, Associate Vice Chancellor for International Affairs, Professor of Geography and Philanthropy, IUPUI
  • A Conversation with Russ Mawby, 25 year CEO and Chairman Emeritus of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation – Russ Mawby and Gene Tempel, Founding Dean, Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy
  • Put Your Whole Self in: Leadership Beyond the Rules – Sandy Eisenberg Sasso, Rabbi Emerita, Director, Religion, Spirituality and the Arts Initiative, Butler University
  • Why Culture Matters – Jeff Smulyan, Chairman of the Board, President and CEO, Emmis Communications
  • Made for Each Other: Leading with Collaboration and Creativity – Jim Walker, Executive Director, Big Car Collaborative
  • Responsible Leadership: Stewardship for the Future – Sandra Waddock, Gilligan Chair of Strategy, Carroll School of Business, Boston College
  • Changing Minds in the Army: Why it is so Difficult and What to do About It – Leonard Wong, Research Professor, United States Army War College

To register, and to view the entire Conference program, please visit the conference website.

IU McKinney School of Law symposium to address Indiana water issues

Water access and water quality challenges associated with Indiana’s riverways and watersheds are the focus of Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law’s seventh annual spring symposium on the environment, energy and natural resources.

The symposium, “Indiana Rivers: Water Access, Water Quality & Water’s Future,” will take place at 9:30 a.m. Friday, Feb. 28, in the Wynne Courtroom of Inlow Hall, 530 W. New York St.

Carol Comer, general counsel for the Indiana Department of Environmental Management, will present “Indiana’s Water Priorities” as the keynote luncheon address at noon.

Recent events in West Virginia — where more than 300,000 people lost access to basic drinking water following a chemical release into the Elk River — and in Indiana — where almost two-thirds of assessed state waters have been designated as “impaired” under the Clean Water Act — show that even the most complex and carefully managed regulatory system can still fail, and that more can be done to address challenges to Indiana’s water system.

In addition to Comer’s address, panels of experts and leaders at the symposium will:

  • Describe the state of water access and water quality law and challenges in Indiana.
  • Examine recent efforts to protect water quality affected by coal combustion.
  • Assess the measures that exist to prevent an Elk River-type disaster in Indiana.
  • Explore water access and water quality as an Environmental Justice Concern.

Expert panelists include the co-director of Advocates for Environmental Human Rights in New Orleans; the managing principal of Beveridge & Diamond, P.C., in Washington, D.C.; the water and ag policy director for Hoosier Environmental Council; the conservation director of Sierra Club’s Hoosier Chapter; and the executive director of the Conservation Law Center in Bloomington.

Speakers from the Indiana House of Representatives, the Indiana Senate, Earthjustice, Prairie Rivers Network, the U.S. Attorney’s Office, the Office of Utility Consumer Counselor, IU Maurer School of Law at IU Bloomington and the McKinney School of Law will also participate.

A detailed listing of symposium panelists and topics for discussion is available online.

Online registration is available for high school and university students, faculty, staff and non-profit employees; and for other attendees. The cost is $75 for attorneys registering for 6 hours of CLE credit; $25 general admission.

For questions, please contact: enlaw@iu.edu.