Ebola: “Over There”…Now “Over Here” An Urgent Conversation About Ethics, Law, Public Health, and Practice

Ebola Virus

Ebola Virus

The initial outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease (EBV) in West Africa presented many ethical, legal, logistical and clinical challenges for first responders, clinicians, politicians and researchers. These challenges have been magnified now that EBV has crossed the Atlantic transforming the public conversation from a worrisome public health challenge over there, to one we need to address over here. A group of experts in the ethical, legal, public health and clinical care implications will discuss several key issues facing patients, practitioners and the public. Following short presentations, an open dialogue will allow for exchange of perspectives.

Discussants:

·         Eric M. Meslin, PhD

Director, Indiana University Center for Bioethics

Associate Dean and Professor of Bioethics, Indiana University School of Medicine

Professor of Law and Bioethics, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law

Chad Priest, JD, MSN, RN

Assistant Dean for Operations & Community Partnerships, Indiana University School of Nursing

Co-Director, Disaster Medicine Fellowship

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine

Ross D. Silverman, JD, MPH

Professor and Acting Chair, Department of Health Policy & Management Indiana University

Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health Professor of Public Health & Law, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law

Nicolas P. Terry, LL.M.

Hall Render Professor of Law & Director, Hall Center for Law and Health, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law

 

When: October 24, 2014, 1:30-3:30pm

Where: IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law, Room 375

Co-sponsored by the Indiana University Center for Bioethics, Fairbanks School of Public Health, School of Nursing, and Robert H. McKinney School of Law

Philosophy and the (Non – Academic) Professions : A Panel Discussion

UntitledIUPUI Campus Center,

Rm. 307

Thursday, 25 Sept., 4:30pm

Bring Plenty of Questions!

Is there any connection between philosophy (or, more generally, the humanities) and the (non-academic) professions? Can one enrich the other? Is philosophy (or the humanities) of any value to professionals? Our panelists will talk about these and related questions!

Panelists:

Jan Frazier (Management Consultant)

Jack Hope (Operator, Hope Plumbing Co.)

Emily Krueger (Manager, Foundation Partnerships, Best Friends Animal Society)

Richard Ranucci (Attorney at Law)

Patrick F. Sullivan (Principal Consultant, JBW Group International)

For more information contact:

Prof. John Tilley, IUPUI Dept. of Philosophy, 274-4690, jtilley@iupui.edu

2014 Tobias Leadership Conference

Indiana University’s ninth annual Tobias Leadership Conference will take place from April 24-26 at the Alexander Hotel in downtown Indianapolis. The Conference brings together scholars and practitioners from the entire spectrum of leadership including corporate leadership, not-for-profit leadership, religious leadership, educational leadership, medical leadership, and political leadership. The Conference will feature papers, panels, and speakers from all academic disciplines. The registration fee of $195 includes all conference sessions, the Thursday evening reception and book fair, two lunches, Friday’s gala dinner, and two continental breakfasts. There is a $45 student rate that does not include meals. Plenary speakers include:

  • Data-Smart Leadership – Stephen Goldsmith, Professor of Government, Director of Data-Smart City Solutions at Harvard Kennedy School
  • Frankenstein’s Leadership Monster – Richard Gunderman, Chancellor’s Professor, Professor of Radiology, Pediatrics, Medical Education, Philosphy, Liberal Arts, Philanthropy, and in the Honors College at Indiana University
  • Spirituality and Leadership Effectiveness – George Houston, Center for Creative Leadership
  • Effective Leadership in Japan, the Case of Shibusawa Eiichi – Gil Latz, Associate Vice Chancellor for International Affairs, Professor of Geography and Philanthropy, IUPUI
  • A Conversation with Russ Mawby, 25 year CEO and Chairman Emeritus of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation – Russ Mawby and Gene Tempel, Founding Dean, Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy
  • Put Your Whole Self in: Leadership Beyond the Rules – Sandy Eisenberg Sasso, Rabbi Emerita, Director, Religion, Spirituality and the Arts Initiative, Butler University
  • Why Culture Matters – Jeff Smulyan, Chairman of the Board, President and CEO, Emmis Communications
  • Made for Each Other: Leading with Collaboration and Creativity – Jim Walker, Executive Director, Big Car Collaborative
  • Responsible Leadership: Stewardship for the Future – Sandra Waddock, Gilligan Chair of Strategy, Carroll School of Business, Boston College
  • Changing Minds in the Army: Why it is so Difficult and What to do About It – Leonard Wong, Research Professor, United States Army War College

To register, and to view the entire Conference program, please visit the conference website.

IU McKinney School of Law symposium to address Indiana water issues

Water access and water quality challenges associated with Indiana’s riverways and watersheds are the focus of Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law’s seventh annual spring symposium on the environment, energy and natural resources.

The symposium, “Indiana Rivers: Water Access, Water Quality & Water’s Future,” will take place at 9:30 a.m. Friday, Feb. 28, in the Wynne Courtroom of Inlow Hall, 530 W. New York St.

Carol Comer, general counsel for the Indiana Department of Environmental Management, will present “Indiana’s Water Priorities” as the keynote luncheon address at noon.

Recent events in West Virginia — where more than 300,000 people lost access to basic drinking water following a chemical release into the Elk River — and in Indiana — where almost two-thirds of assessed state waters have been designated as “impaired” under the Clean Water Act — show that even the most complex and carefully managed regulatory system can still fail, and that more can be done to address challenges to Indiana’s water system.

In addition to Comer’s address, panels of experts and leaders at the symposium will:

  • Describe the state of water access and water quality law and challenges in Indiana.
  • Examine recent efforts to protect water quality affected by coal combustion.
  • Assess the measures that exist to prevent an Elk River-type disaster in Indiana.
  • Explore water access and water quality as an Environmental Justice Concern.

Expert panelists include the co-director of Advocates for Environmental Human Rights in New Orleans; the managing principal of Beveridge & Diamond, P.C., in Washington, D.C.; the water and ag policy director for Hoosier Environmental Council; the conservation director of Sierra Club’s Hoosier Chapter; and the executive director of the Conservation Law Center in Bloomington.

Speakers from the Indiana House of Representatives, the Indiana Senate, Earthjustice, Prairie Rivers Network, the U.S. Attorney’s Office, the Office of Utility Consumer Counselor, IU Maurer School of Law at IU Bloomington and the McKinney School of Law will also participate.

A detailed listing of symposium panelists and topics for discussion is available online.

Online registration is available for high school and university students, faculty, staff and non-profit employees; and for other attendees. The cost is $75 for attorneys registering for 6 hours of CLE credit; $25 general admission.

For questions, please contact: enlaw@iu.edu.

McDonald Merrill Ketcham Award Lecture: “Are Physicians Fiduciaries for Their Patients?”

Thursday February 20, 2014
12:45 – 3:45 p.m.
Wynn Courtroom, Inlow Hall

Maxwell J. Mehlman, J.D., will present “Are Physicians Fiduciaries for Their Patients?” from 12:45 to 1:45 p.m. A panel discussion, then reception will follow the lecture.

A fiduciary is a legal or ethical relationship of trust between two or more parties. The patient-physician relationship would seem to be a classic example of a fiduciary relationship given the need for ill-informed patients lacking bargaining power to trust their physicians, but many scholars and judges have questioned this assumption. The lecture examines the reasons for their skepticism and argues that they are misguided. Mehlman argues that regarding doctors as fiduciaries for their patients not only is essential for the patients’ well-being, but necessary to preserve the physicians’ status as learned professionals in the face of increasing pressure to act contrary to their patients’ interests.

A speaker’s reception will be held from 2:45 to 3:45 in the Inlow Hall atrium. This event is part of the McDonald Merrill Ketcham Award Lecture series presented by the Hall Center for Law and Health at the IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law.

This is a free event, but registration is required.

Panel Discussion following Professor’s Mehlman’s lecture:

  • Mary Ott, M.D., M.A., Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine
  • Joshua Perry, J.D., M.T.S., Assistant Professor of Business Law and Ethics and a Life Sciences Research Fellow, Indiana University Kelley School of Business
  • Mark Rothstein, J.D., Herbert F. Boehl Chair of Law and Medicine, University of Louisville Louis D. Brandeis School of Law, and Director of the Institute for Bioethics, Health Policy, and Law, University of Louisville School of Medicine

Mehlman is a Distinguished University Professor and Petersilge Professor of Law at the Case Western Reserve School of Law and and professor of biomedical ethics at Case Western Reserve School of Medicine. He is also director of the Law-Medicine Center at the Case Western Reserve University. Panel discussion participants are Mary Ott, M.D.,associate professor of pediatrics at the IU School of Medicine; Joshua Perry, J.D., assistant professor of business law and ethics and a life sciences research fellow at the IU Kelley School of Business at Bloomington and Mark Rothstein, J.D., Herbert F. Boehl Chair of Law and Medicine and director of the Institute for Bioethics, Health Policy, and Law at the University of Louisville.

Taylor Symposium marks 25th year by exploring “Politics. Race. Place.”

The 25th Joseph T. Taylor Symposium, hosted by the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, will focus on how 25 years of demographic and social change has shaped Indianapolis while exploring the topic, “Politics. Race. Place.”

The symposium will take place from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 25, at the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd.

Registration deadline is Feb. 18, but guests are encouraged to register early to reserve a seat.

A schedule and registration are available on the School of Liberal Arts website. To register by phone or for more information, call 812-855-4224 or 800-933-9330, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, or email iuconfs@indiana.edu. Symposium attendance is free and open to the general public, but conference registration is required. Lunch is available for a fee: Single luncheon tickets are $40 each or $35 if purchased by Feb. 3. Single sponsor tickets are $75, and patron tables of 10 are $550.

Leading local practitioners, politicians, policy-makers and researchers will come together with symposium attendees to examine how shifting demographics and an increasingly diverse population have contributed to the direction of the city and its future path.

The event begins with a conversation between William Blomquist, professor of political science and dean of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, and Rozelle Boyd, retired president of the Indianapolis City County Council, discussing “Understanding the Evolving Indianapolis Electorate.”

“The Taylor Symposium has been a signature event drawing campus and community together for a remarkable 25 years now,” said William Blomquist, dean of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. “I’m looking forward to this year’s symposium in particular, talking about political change in our city over the past quarter-century with Rozelle Boyd, and listening to the other participants—it’s a terrific line-up.”

Panel discussions follow on the topics of “White Flight and the Politics of Place” and ” Building a Multicultural Community.”

Panelists and moderators include:

  • Amos Brown, director of strategic research, 100.9 Radio Now.
  • Patricia Castaneda, cultural consultant, SosaGroup.
  • Olgen Williams, deputy mayor of Indianapolis.
  • David Coats, associate director, The Polis Center.
  • Terri Morris Downs, executive director, Immigrant Welcome Center.
  • Johnny Goldfinger, associate professor of political science, director of prelaw studies, Marian University.
  • Lun Kham Pieper, attorney at law.
  • John Ketzenberger, president, Indiana Fiscal Policy Institute.

Byron D’Andra Orey, professor and chair of political science at Jackson State University, will deliver the keynote address, “Contemporary Topics in the Study of Race and Politics,” during the symposium luncheon. Luncheon activities also include IUPUI Chancellor Charles R. Bantz’s presentation of the Joseph T. Taylor Excellence in Diversity Award and a performance by the Indianapolis improv group ComedySportz.

In the days leading up the event members of the campus community and visitors will also be able to share their views on race and politics in Indianapolis on the IUPUI Democracy Plaza walls.

LEU continuing credits are available to Indiana’s library professionals for select workshops and, pending approval, CLE credits to attorneys for this event.

For questions about the educational credits or event program, contact Lauralee Wikkerink, lstel@iupui.edu or 317-278-1839.

For the past quarter century, the Joseph T. Taylor Symposium has tackled issues of concern to Indianapolis residents. The symposium is named for the late Joseph T. Taylor, the first dean of the School of Liberal Arts. Taylor is remembered for his commitment to dialogue and diversity. The 2014 symposium is presented by the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI in partnership with the Department of Political Science and the Polis Center, with support from the Spirit & Place Festival, IUPUI Democracy Plaza, and the IUPUI Common Theme Project.

Expert panel considers future of higher education

Tuesday Nov. 26th, 2013
11:30 AM – 1:30 PM
Scottish Rite Cathedral, Indianapolis, IN

The Indy Chamber and Indianapolis Rotary Club are co-sponsoring a luncheon panel exploring the world of education and what’s to come.

Moderator:

Jamie Merisotis, President and CEO Lumina Foundation

Panelists:

Dr. Kathleen F. Lee, Chancellor Ivy Tech Community College‒Central Indiana

Robert L. Manuel, Ph.D., President University of Indianapolis

Nasser Paydar, Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer IUPUI

Dr. Dennis A. Trinkle, Provost and Chief Academic Officer Harrison College

To register for the luncheon, please visit the Indy Chamber event site.

Trayvon Martin case sparks public IUPUI Dialogue Series

The Florida case involving the 2012 fatal shooting of an unarmed African American youth and the gunman’s acquittal in July proved a social tinder box for racial issues in America.

Diversity leaders on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus have organized a series of public meetings, four dialogue sessions and two town hall meetings built around the high-profile case.

The leaders say the very strands of discord sparked by the Martin case make it a great learning tool. Their hopes are the six meetings will encourage people, particularly students, to engage in civil discourse when faced with hot-button issues.

“It is easy to engage civilly on conversations over matters for which we agree,” said Daniel Griffith, director of the IUPUI Intergroup Dialogue Group, one of the series co-sponsors. “The need for civil discourse is especially important for conversations over matters for which there is significant disagreement and strong emotion. Without civil discourse, where conversation becomes strident and negative, the opportunity for learning and the chance for increasing understanding and finding common ground will be lost.”

The public meetings, titled “A Dialogue Series on Race, Politics and the Pursuit of Justice: America After Trayvon Martin,” kick off with a town hall meeting from 6 to 9 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 24, in the auditorium of Hine Hall, formerly the University Place Conference Center, 850 W. Michigan St.

According to Wayne Hilson, the interim director of the IUPUI Multicultural Success Center and director of Multicultural Academic Relations, the series is a prime example of the spirit of the IUPUI 2013-15 Common Theme, “Find Your Voice and Hear My Voice.”

“People seem to have increasing difficulty speaking to one another about serious matters in a civilized manner,” Hilson said. “We think it’s vital that our young people learn how to engage in productive, positive discourse, even on issues that can be divisive or uncomfortable.”

Hilson and the other organizers are hopeful that participants from various ethnic and racial backgrounds will attend and not just those who might empathize more with Martin because of their own racial or ethnic backgrounds.

“This is for everyone,” Hilson said. “Any true dialogue begins with a willingness to come and learn some things. These meetings will be a safe place to share one’s opinion regardless of what side of the fence you are on.”

The IUPUI Multicultural Success Center, the IUPUI Intergroup Dialogue Group and various academic units are co-sponsors of the series.

Following are the dates, times, locations and topics of the sessions:

  • Oct. 31, Dialogue Session 1: “Legal Aspects + Implications of the Trayvon Martin Case,” featuring IU McKinney School of Law faculty and legal experts from the greater Indianapolis community, 6 to 8 p.m., Room 132, Hine Hall
  • Nov. 7, Dialogue Session 2: “The Impact of Social Injustice: The History and Impact of Profiling,” featuring faculty from the Department of Africana Studies in the School of Liberal Arts, 6 to 8 p.m., Room 132, Hine Hall.
  • Nov. 12, Dialogue Session 3: “Being Stopped by the Police or Others: Managing Confrontation, Avoiding Conflict,” featuring IU Police Department officers and representatives from the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department, 6 to 8 p.m., Presidents Room, The Tower, formerly the University Place Hotel.
  • Nov. 21, Dialogue Session 4: “Cultivating Positive Change on Campus and in the Classroom,” featuring faculty from the Department of Psychology in the Purdue School of Science and the IU School of Education, 6 to 8 p.m., Room 132, Hine Hall.
  • Dec. 5, Town Hall Meeting: Closing session, 6 to 9 p.m., Hine Hall Auditorium.

Call to Action Film Series and Panel: “Slavery by Another Name”

Wednesday, October 23, 2013
6:00-8:30 pm
Inlow Hall (IH), IUPUI
530 W. New York St.
Indianapolis, IN 46202

Slavery by Another Name is a 90-minute PBS documentary that challenges one of Americans’ most cherished assumptions: the belief that slavery in this country ended with the Emancipation Proclamation. Most Americans do not realize that the constitutions of Indiana and the United States to this day legalize slavery. This is program is the first in a series.

To RSVP for this free event, visit the website.

You are invited to stay after the screening of this thought-provoking documentary for a probing panel discussion.

Panelists include:
  • Subini Ancy Annamma, IU School of Education at IUPUI Assistant Professor of Special Education John Bartlett, State Representative
  • Ken Falk, Legal Director, ACLU-IN Attorney
  • Lahny Silva, IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law Professor
  • Rev. Byron Vaughn, President of Prisoners Reformed United, Inc.
  • Rebecca Zeitlow, University of Dayton Professor
Invited guests from the IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law
  • Karen Bravo, Professor and Associate Dean for International Affairs
  • George E. Edwards, C.M. Gray Professor of Law

Presented by Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law; Indiana University School of Education at IUPUI; and Indianapolis Urban League.

For more information, contact Carlton Waterhouse, School of Law, 317-274-8055, or Chalmer Thompson, School of Education,chathomp@iupui.edu.

genesis presents biennial literary editors panel

On Thursday, October 3, 2013, genesis, the art and literary magazine of IUPUI, is proud to present our biennial literary editors panel to be held in room CE 309 at 4:30 PM. Join us to learn about literary editing, publishing, and writing through a panel discussion and Q&A session with these professionals in the field:

Katie Moulton serves as Editor of Indiana Review. Her fiction and nonfiction have recently appeared in Quarterly West, Ninth Letter, Post Road, Devil’s Lake, and others. In her life before the IU MFA, she was a music and culture critic for Village Voice Media and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

Chad Redden is the author of Thursday (Plain Wrap Press, 2013). He is the creator and editor of NAP, an online literary press. Chad has worked in editing and layout design for other literary magazines such as genesis, Quarter, and POP SERIAL. He lives in Indianapolis. Links to some of his work can be found at lablablabs.net.

Barbara Shoup is the author of seven novels and the co-author of Novel Ideas: Contemporary Authors Share the Creative Process and Story Matters. Her short fiction, poetry, essays, and interviews have appeared in numerous small magazines, as well as in The Writer and The New York Times Travel Section. She is the Executive Director of the Indiana Writers Center.

For more information, visit the genesis website.