Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars Fellowships

Woodrow-Wilson-International-Center-for-ScholarsThrough an international competition, the Center offers residential fellowships. Fellows conduct research and write in their areas of interest, while interacting with policymakers in Washington and Wilson Center staff. The center accepts non-advocacy, policy-relevant, fellowship proposals that address key challenges of past, present, and future issues confronting the United States and the world.  The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars aims to unite the world of ideas to the world of policy by supporting preeminent scholarship and linking that scholarship to issues of concern to officials in Washington. The Wilson Center invites scholars, practitioners, journalists, and public intellectuals to take part in its flagship fellowship program and to take advantage of the opportunity to engage actively in the center’s national mission. Fellows will be affiliated with one of the Wilson Center programs/projects and are encouraged to interact with policy makers in Washington, D.C. as well as with Wilson Center staff who are working on similar research and topics.

The center awards approximately 20-22 residential fellowships annually. The center tries to ensure that the stipend provided under the fellowship, together with the fellow’s other sources of funding (e.g., grants secured by the applicant and sabbatical allowances), approximate a fellow’s regular salary. Stipends provided in recent years have ranged from $26,000 to $85,000 (the maximum possible). Stipends include round trip travel for fellows. If spouses and/or dependent children will reside with the fellow for the entire fellowship period, money for their travel will also be included in the stipend. In addition to stipends, the center provides 75 percent of health insurance premiums for fellows who elect center coverage and for their accompanying family members. Fellows are expected to be in residence for the entire U.S. academic year (early September through May, i.e., nine months), although a few fellowships are occasionally awarded for shorter periods with a minimum of four months.

http://www.wilsoncenter.org/fellowship-application-guidelines

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Faculty Colloquium on Excellence in Teaching (FACET)

IU LogoThe Faculty Colloquium on Excellence in Teaching (FACET) and the Mack Center for Inquiry on the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning are pleased to announce a partnership that will offer travel grants to faculty presenting SoTL work at a conference.

Applications for funding of faculty travel to conferences, as presenters, will be evaluated and awards made twice a year. Grants are for allowable costs as delineated by IU Travel Management up to $750. Faculty are encouraged to combine this funding with other sources.

The fall application deadline is July 1st for travel that will be completed by the following January. The spring application deadline is December 1st for travel that will be completed before the start of the next academic school year.

Please visit the website for more information on the application process https://facet.indiana.edu/events-programs/travel-grants.shtml

New IU ethics consortium announces funding for research projects

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — The Indiana University Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics and Society is offering funding for research proposals from IU faculty that explore the theme of wonder, especially as it intersects with nature and the environment.

The IU Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics and Society is an interdisciplinary association of scholars, academic programs and research centers from the eight campuses of Indiana University. The consortium was launched in January 2014 to leverage IU’s strengths in the interdisciplinary study of religion and advance research in key thematic areas.

This is the first call for research proposals from the new consortium. The research proposals are part of the first phase of a two-year thematic initiative — “Wonder and the Natural World” — sponsored by the consortium.

rachel carsonThe approaching 50th anniversary of Rachel Carson’s book “The Sense of Wonder” in 2015 makes the IU consortium’s theme especially timely, said Lisa Sideris, associate professor of religious studies in the College of Arts and Sciences at IU Bloomington, who is also the inaugural director of the consortium.

“Wonder has played a key role in the environmental movement since that movement’s inception,” Sideris said. “We’re seeking proposals that ‘push the envelope’ in exploring the intersecting themes of wonder and nature, such as war and nature (‘shock and awe’), children’s natural spirituality, cinematic or fictional representations of wonder, even areas such as genetic engineering and wonder in artificial environments, like theme parks.”

Funding of up to $5,000 for individuals and up to $10,000 for teams is available. Full-time, tenure-track IU faculty members from any IU campus are eligible to apply, with proposals that cut across disciplines, units or campuses especially welcome.

The deadline for proposals is Sept. 1, 2014. Funding awards will be announced at the end of October. Recipients will present their preliminary findings and works-in-progress at a daylong symposium at IU Bloomington in May 2015.

The full call for proposals may be found online on the Department of Religious Studies website. Proposals should be emailed to Abby Gitlitz at agitlitz@indiana.edu. For additional information on the consortium or the funding awards, contact Sideris at lsideris@indiana.edu.

New Frontiers grants in the Arts and Humanities awarded to IU faculty

Thirty-two faculty members from six IU campuses have been awarded grants for their projects in arts and humanities through Indiana University’s 2013-14 New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities program.

In 2014, New Frontiers enters its 10th year of supporting IU faculty in the arts and humanities. Initially funded by the Lilly Endowment Inc. starting in 2004, funding for New Frontiers was continued by IU President Michael A. McRobbie in 2010. The program is overseen and administered by IU’s Office of the Vice President for Research.

Over the past 10 years, the New Frontiers program has awarded funding to more than 680 IU faculty members. In the current round, funded projects include solo art installations, photography exhibitions, electronic music compositions, a book-length manuscript on painting in the 21st century and a symposium on the intersection between intellectual property and the arts.

“We’re very pleased to be able to continue to fund such a rich array of arts and humanities projects,” Vice President for Research Jorge José said. “The New Frontiers program is a unique opportunity for our faculty members, and we are very appreciative of President McRobbie’s commitment to supporting outstanding scholarship and creative activity in the arts and humanities.”

Currently, the New Frontiers program offers three types of grants: major awards of up to $50,000 (New Frontiers); smaller awards of up to $20,000 for workshops, symposia or small conferences (New Currents); and fellowships of up to $3,000 to support faculty travel (Exploratory Travel Fellowships).

The 2013-14 New Frontiers grant recipients are:
New Frontiers Grants
  • Blane De St. Croix, Henry Radford Hope School of Fine Arts, IU Bloomington: “‘Dead Ice’ Production/Exhibition”
  • Jennifer Fleissner, English, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Maladies of the Will: Literature as a Symptomatology of Modernity”
  • Laura Foster, gender studies, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Re-inventing Hoodia: Patent Law, Benefit Sharing and Identity in Southern Africa”
  • John Gibson, Jacobs School of Music, IU Bloomington: “In Flight: a Composition for Chorus and Electronics”
  • Halina Goldberg, Jacobs School of Music, IU Bloomington: “Digital Scholarly Companion to ‘In Mrs. Goldberg’s Kitchen’
  • Jeffrey Hass, Jacobs School of Music, IU Bloomington: “Contemporary Dance-Based Multimedia Work With Original Computer Music”
  • Susan Hyatt, anthropology, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI: “Between the National and the Local: The British Community Development Projects and the Creation of New Knowledge”
  • Herbert Timothy Lovelace, Maurer School of Law, IU Bloomington: “The World Is On Our Side: The Black Freedom Movement and the U.S. Origins of the U.N. Race Convention”
  • Robert Meyer-Lee, English, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, IU South Bend: “Valuing Middle English Literature Across the Divide: Literary Value in Chaucer, Langland, Audelay and Lydgate”
  • Osamu Nakagawa, Henry Radford Hope School of Fine Arts, IU Bloomington: “Memorial: Tracing the Past”
  • Jean Robertson and Craig McDaniel, Herron School of Art and Design, IUPUI: “Rethinking Painting in the 21st Century”
  • Meredith Setser, Herron School of Art and Design, IUPUI: “Agricultura Aesthetics”
  • Erich Holt Stem, music, School of Arts and Letters, IU Southeast: “America By: A Symphony Tour”
  • Eva White, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, IU Kokomo: “Who Is Irish? Roddy Doyle’s Hyphenated Identities”
  • Jeffrey Wolin, Henry Radford Hope School of Fine Arts, and Andrew Lumsdaine, School of Informatics and Computing, IU Bloomington: “The Art of Plenoptics: A Collaboration”
New Currents Grants
  • Konstantin Dierks, history, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Symposium: Globalization of the United States, 1789-1861”
  • Mark David Janis, Maurer School of Law, IU Bloomington: “Intellectual Property and the Performing Arts Symposium”
  • John Kaufman-McKivigan, history, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI: “Frederick Douglass’s The Heroic Slave and the American Revolutionary Tradition: A Scholarly Symposium”
Exploratory Travel Fellowships
  • Julie Belz, English, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI: “Re-conceptualizing Intercultural Communicative Competence”
  • Dennis Bingham, English, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI: “Bob Fosse and the Revisionist Film Musical”
  • Matthew Bradley, political science, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, IU Kokomo: “Politics and Motivating the Next Generation of Public Servants”
  • Alisa Clapp-Intyre, English, IU East: “Reclaiming Children’s Voices: British Children’s Nineteenth-Century Diaries”
  • Melissa Dinverno, Spanish and Portuguese, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Rewriting Lorca: Modernism, Publication, Folklore and (Trans)nationalisms in 1920-1930s Spain”
  • David Dzubay, Jacobs School of Music, IU Bloomington: “New Work for Berlin Piano Percussion”
  • Amit Hagar, history and philosophy of science, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Thou Shalt Not Commute: A Finitist Outlook on Probability in Statistical Physics”
  • Chu He, English, College of Liberal Arts and Science, IU South Bend: “Narrating Trauma in Jennifer Johnston’s ‘O Ananias, Azarias, and Miseal’ and Mary Beckett’s ‘A Belfast Woman’”
  • Elizabeth Lloyd, history and philosophy of science, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Regional Climate Models, ‘Value Added,’ and ‘Model Robustness’”
  • Micheline Nilsen, history, College of Liberal Arts and Science, IU South Bend: “From Turnips to Lawn Chairs: Allotment Gardens in Europe, 1920-1975”
  • Kathleen O’Connell, Herron School of Art and Design, IUPUI: “Illustration Master Class 2014 at Amherst College”
  • Margaret Ryznar, McKinney School of Law, IUPUI: “The Ethics and Philosophy of Child Support as a Human Right”
  • Marietta Simpson, Jacobs School of Music, IU Bloomington: “Mosaic Melodies of the Diaspora”
  • Estella Vieira, Spanish and Portuguese, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Female Figures in Fernando Pessoa”

Harpo Foundation 2014 emerging artists fellowship

The Chicago-based Harpo Foundation was established in 2006 to support under-recognized artists. The foundation seeks to stimulate creative inquiry and encourage new modes of thinking about art.

The foundation’s Emerging Artist Fellowship at the Santa Fe Art Institute was established in 2013 to provide an annual opportunity to an emerging visual artist who is at least 25 years old and who needs time and space to explore ideas and start new projects. Artist fellows will receive a one-month residency at the Santa Fe Art Institute, which includes a well-appointed room with private bath, well-lit studio space, and a $500 travel stipend.

Founded in 1985, the Santa Fe Art Institute provides a unique opportunity for emerging artists to pursue creative projects without interruption. SFAI supports over fifty residents per year and offers a cohesive, arts-focused environment that creates the ideal working conditions for resident artists. Living and studio space is located within a nearly 17,000-square-foot complex designed by renowned Mexican architect Ricardo Legoretta. The unique SFAI environment allows residents to be as interactive or private as they wish. There are no requirements on the work produced during an artist’s time at SFAI.

One fellowship is awarded annually to an emerging artist who demonstrates strong artistic ability and promise, as well as an evolving practice at a pivotal moment in his or her development.

For complete program guidelines, information about previous fellowship recipients, and applications instructions, see the Harpo Foundation Web site.

2014 Smith Richardson fellowship on international and foreign studies

Dearline: June 15, 2014.

The Smith Richardson Foundation is pleased to announce its annual Strategy and Policy Fellows grant competition to support young scholars and policy thinkers on American foreign policy, international relations, international security, military policy, and diplomatic and military history.

The purpose of the program is to strengthen the U.S. community of scholars and researchers conducting policy analysis in these fields.

The Foundation will award at least three research grants of $60,000 each to enable the recipients to research and write a book. Within the academic community, this program supports junior or adjunct faculty, research associates, and post-docs who are engaged in policy-relevant research and writing. Within the think tank community, the program supports members of the rising generation of policy thinkers who are focused on U.S. strategic and foreign policy issues.

Applicants must be an employee or affiliate of either an academic institution or a think tank.

Please note that the Fellowship program will only consider single-author book projects. It will not consider collaborative projects (e.g., edited or multi-author books, conference volumes or reports, or a collection of previously published articles, chapters or essays.)

For information regarding the application procedure and the required proposal format, please e-mail: strategyfellows@srf.org

Smith Richardson Foundation, Inc.

60 Jesup Road

Westport, CT 06880

 

2014-2015 fellowship in clinical ethics

2014-2015 Ethics Fellowship Applications Open

Applications are available for the 2014-2015 Clinical Ethics Fellowship sponsored by the Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics. The application deadline is April 30, 2014.

This nine-month, part time fellowship focuses on training health care professionals in clinical ethics, including ethics consultation, hospital ethics committee work, and ethics research. Graduates will become capable members of the ethics community. The target audience for the fellowship includes physicians, nurses, chaplains, and social workers. Other members of the community (e.g. attorneys or members of administrative staffs) may also apply.

Application to the fellowship is competitive. The application process includes submission of a written application (which includes several brief narrative essays), a letter of support from the applicant’s immediate supervisor, one letter of recommendation, and interviews with Fairbanks Center staff.

For an application and additional information go to the Fairbanks Center website or contact Robin Bandy, JD, MA, Fairbanks Center Program Manager, at 317-962-9260, or rbandy@iuhealth.org .

NEH summer stipends – limited submission

IU Internal Deadline: 6/16/2014

NEH Proposal Deadline: 9/30/2014

Limited Submission website.

Brief Description:

From NEH website: Updated guidelines will be posted at least two months in advance of the deadline listed. In the meantime, please use the guidelines for the previous deadline, to get a sense of what is involved in assembling an application.

Summer Stipends support individuals pursuing advanced research that is of value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Recipients usually produce articles, monographs, books, digital materials, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly resources. Summer Stipends support continuous full-time work on a humanities project for a period of two months. Summer Stipends support projects at any stage of development.

The Summer Stipends program welcomes projects that respond to NEH’s Bridging Cultures initiative. Such projects could focus on cultures internationally or within the United States. International projects might seek to enlarge Americans’ understanding of other places and times, as well as other perspectives and intellectual traditions. American projects might explore the great variety of cultural influences on, and myriad subcultures within, American society. These projects might also investigate how Americans have approached and attempted to surmount seemingly unbridgeable cultural divides, or examine the ideals of civility and civic discourse that have informed this quest. In connection with a focus on civic discourse, projects might explore the role of women in America’s civic life as well as the civic role of women in other cultures and regions of the world.

Award Amount:

Summer Stipends provide $6,000 for two consecutive months of full-time research and writing. Recipients must work full-time on their projects for these two months and may hold other research grants supporting the same project during this time. Summer Stipends normally support work carried out during the summer months, but arrangements can be made for other times of the year. NEH Summer Stipends do not require cost sharing and do not include indirect costs.

Eligibility:

· Only individual applicants are eligible to apply for Summer Stipends.

· All applicants must have completed their formal education by the application deadline. While applicants need not have advanced degrees, individuals currently enrolled in a degree-granting program are ineligible to apply.

· Individuals who have held or been awarded a major fellowship or research grant or its equivalent within the three academic years prior to the deadline are ineligible. See Program details.

· Individuals who have received Summer Stipends may apply to support a new stage of their projects.

· See Program details for more specific information.

Limitation:

INTERNAL COMPETITION NECESSARY: TWO FACULTY MEMBERS PER CAMPUS

Only two faculty members teaching full-time at colleges and universities may be nominated by their institutions (campus) to apply for a Summer Stipend.

APPLICANTS EXEMPT FROM NOMINATION / NO INTERNAL COMPETITION NEEDED

The following individuals may apply online without a nomination or internal competition:

· independent scholars not affiliated with a college or university;

· college or university staff members who are not faculty members and will not be teaching during the academic year preceding the award tenure

· emeritus faculty; and

· adjunct faculty, part-time faculty, and applicants with academic appointments that terminate by the summer of the award tenure.

To apply for IU Internal competition:

IUPUI: For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, by June 16, 2014 for internal competition.

1. Provide a 1-2 page summary that includes the following: (limitation does not include references)

· Project Title

· Project Director Name and Credentials

· Research and contribution: Describe the intellectual significance of the proposed project, including its value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Provide an overview of the project, explaining the basic ideas, problems, or questions examined by the study. Explain how the project will complement, challenge, or expand relevant studies in the field.

· Methods and work plan: Describe your method(s) and clarify the part or stage of the project that will be supported by the Summer Stipend. Provide a work plan, describing what you will accomplish during the award period. Your work plan must be based on a full-time commitment to the project; part-time work is not allowed. If you do not anticipate finishing the entire project during the award period, discuss your plan for doing so. For book projects, explain how the final project will be organized. If possible, provide a brief chapter outline. For digital projects, describe the technologies that will be used and developed, and how the scholarship will be presented to benefit audiences in the humanities.

· Final product and dissemination: Describe the intended audience and the intended results of the project. If relevant, explain how the results will be disseminated and why these means are appropriate to the subject matter and audience.

2. A Letter from the Chair or Dean

3. 1-2 page abbreviated CV which includes:

· Current and Past Positions

· Education: List degrees, dates awarded, and titles of theses or dissertations

· Awards and Honors: Include dates. If you have received support from NEH, indicate the dates of these grants and any resulting publications.

· Publications: Include full citations for publications and presentations

· Other Relevant Professional Activities & Accomplishments

2015 NACBS-Huntington Library Fellowship

Applications due 15 November 2014

The North American Conference on British Studies (NACBS), in collaboration with the Huntington Library, offers annually the NACBS-Huntington Library Fellowship to aid in dissertation research in British Studies using the collections of the library. The amount of the fellowship is $3000. A requirement for holding the fellowship is that the time of tenure be spent in residence at the Huntington Library. The time of residence varies but may be as brief as one month. Applicants must be U. S. or Canadian citizens or permanent residents and enrolled in a Ph.D. program in a U.S. or Canadian institution.

Nominations and applications for the 2015 award are invited. Please note that the applications are due on November 15, 2014. Applications should consist of a curriculum vitae, two supporting letters (one from the applicant’s dissertation advisor), and a description of the dissertation research project. The letter should include a description of the materials to be consulted at the Huntington and the reason that these are essential sources for the dissertation.

A copy of the application package should be sent to each member of the Huntington Library Fellowship Committee. Letters should be placed in sealed envelopes, signed across the flap and given to the applicant for inclusion in the application package. Applications must be postmarked by November 15, 2014. Awards will be announced by January 30, 2015. For full guidelines, visit the fellowship website.

Applicants for the NACBS fellowship are also welcome to apply to supplement that award with a short-term award from the Huntington Library itself under the terms of its own fellowship competition, the closing date for which is also November 15, 2014.

Kress Foundation invites applications for scholarly European art projects

History of Art Grants Program
  • Supports scholarly projects that will enhance the understanding and appreciation of European art and architecture.
  • Grants are awarded to non-profit institutions with 501(c) 3 status, based in the United States, including supporting foundations of European institutions.
  • These are competitive grants. Please see ‘Past Grants’ and ‘Annual Reports’ for past awards and typical levels of funding and review our Grants FAQs for answers to common application questions.
  • In addition to submitting printed materials, applicants must include a CD containing a complete set of the application materials. The materials on the CD must be presented as a single PDF document.
  • Application Deadlines*: January 15, April 1, and October 1

The History of Art program supports scholarly projects that will enhance the appreciation and understanding of European art and architecture. Grants are awarded to projects that create and disseminate specialized knowledge, including archival projects, development and dissemination of scholarly databases, documentation projects, museum exhibitions and publications, photographic campaigns, scholarly catalogues and publications, and technical and scientific studies.

Grants are also awarded for activities that permit art historians to share their expertise through international exchanges, professional meetings, conferences, symposia, consultations, the presentation of research, and other professional events.

For full application guidelines, visit the Kress Foundation website.