OVPIA-funded Exchanges and Internal Grant Programs

Applications are now being accepted for OVPIA-funded exchanges and internal grant ryanprograms. These competitive funding opportunities help IU faculty members advance their research and teaching through international engagement, a key objective of the IU International Strategic Plan.

  • Short-Term Exchange Programs for the 2016-2017 academic year (deadline: November 13, 2015); exchange positions will be offered in Brazil, China, Costa Rica, Germany, Japan, Poland, Russia, South Korea, Thailand, and Turkey.
  • Gateway-China and Gateway-India Seed Grants (deadline: minimum of 8 weeks prior to event); this seed grant competition will be expanded to include events at our new Gateway-Europe in Berlin after it opens on November 2, 2015.
  • International Short-Term Visitors Grants (deadline: minimum 8 weeks prior to event)
  • Language Learning Grants (deadline: minimum of 8 weeks prior to start of program)
  • Overseas Conference Grants (deadlines: October 1, 2015; January 12, April 1, and July 15, 2016)
  • Overseas Study Program Development Grants (deadlines: November 1, 2015 and February 2, 2016)

Please note that the Gateway, Short-Term Visitors, and Overseas Conference grant programs continue to have a matching fund requirement from the home campus, school, or department.

Announcing the Indiana University Grand Challenges Program

We are publishing today on the Vice President for Research website the Request for iu-logoProposals for the first round of Grand Challenge Initiatives and related FAQs.

IU’s Bicentennial Strategic Plan, adopted in 2015, calls on the university to tackle “major and large-scale problems” facing humanity that can “only be addressed by multidisciplinary teams of the best researchers.”

IU is taking up the challenge. With the exceptional commitment of President Michael A. McRobbie and the leadership of the university, the Indianapolis and Bloomington campuses, the School of Medicine, and the IU Foundation, the university has identified $300 million of existing and anticipated funding that can be invested in Grand Challenges over the next five years.

This is the most significant investment in IU’s research infrastructure in the university’s history. It will fund up to five Grand Challenge Initiatives and support the hiring of as many as 175 new faculty and of hundreds of new graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. But most importantly, it will enable IU to expand its efforts to address some of the most critical issues facing local communities and the State of Indiana, as well as the nation and the world.

The RFP provides detailed information about the goals of IU’s Grand Challenges program and the process by which the first initiatives will be determined. There is also a set of FAQs that will provide additional information.

The Grand Challenges program reflects an approach to research and its funding that is new to many of us, and calls on us to think, collaborate, and work in ways that may seem equally novel. Precisely because of its scope and novelty, in many ways the Grand Challenges program is a work in progress. I welcome your feedback (and appreciate your patience), and I hope you will let us know if there are ways we can make the program more effective or efficient.

There are many people and offices that stand ready to assist in the preparation of Grand Challeges proposals. Please don’t hesitate to let my colleagues and me know how we can help. We look forward to working with you to make the most of this significant investment — of time, talent, and funding — in the future of IU and of the communities in which we live and work.

Getty Library Research Grants

The Getty Foundation logoThe deadline to apply for this grant is October 15, 2015

Getty Library Research Grants provide partial, short-term support for costs relating to travel and living expenses for scholars whose research requires use of specific collections housed in the Getty Research Institute. A Library Research Grant is not a prerequisite for obtaining access to the Research Library.

Library Research Grants are intended for scholars of all nationalities and at any level who demonstrate a compelling need to use materials housed in the Research Library, and whose place of residence is more than eighty miles from the Getty Center. Projects must relate to specific items in the library collection. (To search the collections, please consult the Research Library’s Search Tools and Databases.)

Library Research Grants are intended to provide partial support for costs relating to travel and living expenses. Grants range from $500 to $2,500, depending on the distance traveled. The research period may range from several days to a maximum of three months. These terms apply as of August 2015 and are subject to future changes. Additional information about the terms of these grants is available here.

Application Availability and Deadline:
Complete application materials are now accepted through an online application process only. The next deadline for these grants is October 15, 2015.

Applicants are notified of the Research Institute’s decision approximately six weeks to two months following the deadline.

Special Information on the Photo Archive:
The grant selection committee welcomes applications for researchers wishing to consult the Getty Research Institute’s unique resources, including the Photo Archive. Two million photographs of works of art and architecture in the Photo Archive provide opportunities for original pictorial research in the fine arts, including the history of photography. For more information, visit the Photo Archive Web page.

How To Apply:
Applicants are required to complete and submit the online Library Research Grant application form (which includes uploading a Project Proposal; Curriculum Vitae; Selected Bibliography of Research Library Collections you wish to consult; and Proposed Estimated Travel Costs) by 5:00 p.m. PDT, October 15, 2015. Two letters of recommendation are also required for this application.

For the best user experience, The Getty Foundation strongly recommends the use of the Google Chrome browser. You may also use Firefox or Safari. The Internet Explorer 11 (IE) browser is not fully compatible with the portal.

Indiana University recognizes 10 years of New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities funding

Over 450 artists, scholars share the creative experience through their collective body of work: books, artwork, film, dance and more.unnamed

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — One of Indiana University’s most prominent efforts to strengthen its long-standing commitment to excellence in the arts and humanities has been the university’s New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities seed funding program. Initiated in 2004 with the generous support a Lilly Endowment Inc. grant to promote excellence in Indiana, and subsequently renewed by IU President Michael A. McRobbie, New Frontiers has provided over $9.4 million to artists and humanities scholars at IU’s eight campuses.

Now, IU’s Office of the Vice President for Research, which manages the New Frontiers program, and IU Communications in the Office of the Vice President for Engagement have created a multimedia retrospective that looks at the work of nearly 50 of those New Frontiers grant recipients, and at the broader, positive impacts of the program.

“New Frontiers both reflects and has contributed significantly to maintaining the vital role of the arts and humanities here at Indiana University,” said IU Vice President for Research Fred H. Cate.

“Over the past decade we at IU, throughout the state of Indiana and quite literally around the world have been the beneficiaries of the fruits of that commitment — from operas and gallery shows, to award-winning books and internationally recognized art installations,” Cate said. “This retrospective is an effort not just to summarize the New Frontiers program but also to highlight the extraordinary achievements of our artists and scholars.”

The New Frontiers program is designed to assist artists and humanities scholars in one of four ways:

Produce innovative works of scholarship and creative activities.
Provide the seed funding needed for them to venture into new trajectories of work.
Fund academic events hosting major distinguished thinkers.
Support national and international travel in pursuit of new, innovative projects.

The retrospective offers a variety of photographs, images and audio and video files, along with hyperlinks to numerous New Frontiers grant winners and their works. In total, more than 450 IU faculty members have been supported by New Frontiers funding; the retrospective identifies how those scholars and artists were able to better support students, earn additional external funding and successfully conduct community outreach while also producing innovative works of art and scholarship.

In December 2014, IU’s Board of Trustees adopted President Michael A. McRobbie’s Bicentennial Strategic Plan for Indiana University, which included a third five-year investment of $5 million for the New Frontiers seed funding program, allowing for grants to continue to be offered through 2019.

Cummins Foundation joins other industry partners and IUPUI to support IT program for IPS high school students

Students at Arsenal Technical High School, part of Indianapolis Public Schools (IPS), are CumminsSignWeb-750-340x246receiving an investment from Fortune 160 company, Cummins Inc (NYSE: CMI). To improve learning opportunities for students from low-income and minority families and provide more pathways to good jobs, the company is investing its resources as well as the skills of its employees.

The IU School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) announced today Cummins Inc. is donating funding and encouraging its employees to contribute their time and talents to the Informatics: Diversity-Enhanced Workforce initiative, or iDEW.

Launching this fall, iDEW will help students from Arsenal Technical, IPS’ Pike High School and the private Providence Cristo Rey learn information technology (IT) skills necessary for two or four-year college degrees and careers in the IT industry.

The iDEW program has broad support from area Cummins invests in iDEW initiative
businesses, with the global power leader Cummins being the most recent investor. As part of the partnership, Cummins employees can use four or more hours of their work time to mentor and tutor iDEW students.

“Cummins employees are excited to support iDEW and help students in Indianapolis’ Near Eastside reach their full potential in education and beyond,” said Mary Chandler, Cummins’ Executive Director of Corporate Responsibility. “Cummins is grateful for the opportunity to partner with IUPUI and other industry partners committed to helping students in our community gain skills that lead to good jobs.”

iDEW is a year-round program that introduces students to computing, informatics, and other IT concepts, the real-world application of those concepts, and career opportunities in the IT industry, which according to one IU executive is lacking in both diversity and quantity of qualified applicants.

“There are over 1.4 million unfilled jobs in the IT industry, and the number continues to grow,” said Mathew Palakal, executive associate dean of the IU School of Informatics and Computing at IUPUI. “These jobs are high-paying and available all over the United States. We feel a sense of responsibility in assisting with the preparation of the workforce of the future by providing them with the necessary skills to secure these jobs.”

To prepare graduates for those future careers, iDEW will focus on students’ reading, writing, and interpersonal communication skills in addition to building their self-esteem, confidence, and ability to work on teams.

Leading those sessions, which range from basic programming to creating websites and mobile applications to understanding the data behind DNA, will be Informatics and Computing faculty working with high school teachers. Lending a hand will be volunteers from industry experts like Cummins.

Headquartered in Columbus, Ind., with a growing presence in Indianapolis, Cummins designs, manufactures, and distributes engines, filtration, and power generation products. In 2016, Cummins’ Distribution Business will open a downtown Indianapolis office, increasing the number of employees in the city to approximately 250. Corporate Responsibility is a core value at Cummins, and employees are encouraged to serve and improve the communities in which they live, with partners and programs like the iDEW initiative through the School of Informatics and Computing at IUPUI.

Five new centers awarded Signature Centers Initiative grants

INDIANAPOLIS — One team of scientists is searching for an innovative repair strategy for human spinal cord and brain injuries. Another is looking for cures for the “wasting away,” imagesexperienced by patients with cancer, congestive heart failure, AIDS and other underlying diseases.

Both are the recipients of a grant from the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis to establish their research centers as viable units whose work will translate into better understanding of disease and the development of better cures and treatments.

The two groups are among five research center teams awarded development funding in Round 8 of the IUPUI Signature Centers initiative Program.

“This is the eighth year that we have been running this internal grant program, and I congratulate the new centers that have been selected for funding,” Kody Varahramyan, IUPUI vice chancellor for research, said.

“The Signature Centers Initiative has become a key cornerstone of the IUPUI research enterprise, playing an important role in enhancing research and scholarly activity, while fostering the development of research centers that are addressing important national and global needs, and contributing to economic and social well-being,” Varahramyan said.

Two of the five centers selected in the latest round have received Category A (three-year) funding:

Center for Spinal Cord and Brain Injury Research, Xiao-Ming Xu, director, IU School of Medicine. Focus: To understand molecular mechanisms underlying traumatic spinal cord and brain injuries and to develop innovative repair strategies that can be translated to clinical treatments of these diseases in a timely and responsive fashion.

Indiana Center for AIDS Research, Samir Gupta, director, IU School of Medicine. Focus: To develop internal infrastructure to facilitate novel collaborations among researchers that will lead to improving access to care for all HIV/AIDS patients; and improving retention in care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy especially for racial and sexual minorities.

The other three centers have received Category B (one-year) funding for planning purposes:

Center for Aerial Unmanned Systems Imaging, Dan Johnson, director, IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. Focus: non-military applications of unmanned aerial systems (drone) technology such as remote imaging for water quality, mosquito habitat mapping, disaster preparation and precision agriculture; and the utilization and analysis of data collected with unmanned aerial systems.

Institute for Product Lifecycle Innovation, Hazim El-Mounayri, director, Purdue School of Engineering and Technology. Focus: the promotion and management of product lifecycle practice in advanced manufacturing and life science applications in order for American industries to remain competitive in the global market; to serve as a test bed and vehicle for the rapid implementation of advanced product liability tests, digital manufacturing and designing.

Center for Cachexia Research Innovation and Therapy, Teresa Zimmers, director, IU School of Medicine. Focus: U.S. multi-investigator cachexia (involuntary weight loss) research center will support development of interdisciplinary, multi-investigator collaborations through meetings, a research retreat and the development of a regional consortium with Ohio State University; and center will invest in a thematic research program on cardiopulmonary effects in tobacco-associated cancer cachexias.

The IUPUI Signature Centers Initiative fosters the development of centers that are unique to IUPUI and that can lead the way in world-class research and creative activities, and make a difference in the lives of people. The initiative provides each selected center with initial funding for a period of one to three years. The centers are re-evaluated at the end of three years and if approved, receive a five-year designation as an IUPUI Signature Center.

John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Offers Fellowships to Assist Research and Artistic Creation

Application Deadline: September 19, 2015

TJohn Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Logo courtesy of GF.orghe foundation offers fellowships to further the development of scholars and artists by assisting them to engage in research in any field of knowledge and creation in any of the arts, under the freest possible conditions and irrespective of race, color, or creed. The foundation provides fellowships for advanced professionals in all fields (natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, creative arts) except the performing arts. The foundation selects its fellows on the basis of two separate competitions, one for the United States and Canada, the other for Latin America and the Caribbean.

The foundation understands advanced professionals to be those who as writers, scholars, or scientists have a significant record of publication, or as artists, playwrights, filmmakers, photographers, composers, or the like, have a significant record of exhibition or performance of their work.

The foundation only supports individuals. It does not make grants to institutions or organizations.

The amounts of the grants will be adjusted to the needs of the fellows, considering their other resources and the purpose and scope of their plans. Appointments are ordinarily made for one year, and in no instance for a period shorter than six consecutive months.

Applicants should be: New Faculty/New Investigator/PhD/M.D./Other Professional

The Application deadline is September 19, 2015

Application information can be found here.

Heineman Foundation Seed Money for Start-up and New Projects

Brief Description:
The purpose of the Foundation is to provide seed money to start-up projects and new 227604_w296projects within existing organizations for a maximum of three to five years. The Foundation’s general areas of interest are the following:
· Programs that enable economically challenged women to enter and remain in the workplace
· Environmental research that will help prevent, reduce and/or eliminate water degradation
· Live music performance for education and outreach
· Research into prevention and treatment of childhood illnesses
· Programs that enable youth to think, create, and communicate effectively
· Programs that support and promote high achievement in music, science, and literature

Award Amount:
Grants are funded once a year, following the November board meeting. Multi-year grants are not given. The average range of donations is $20,000 to $50,000, per annum.

The Foundation seeks projects in proximity to their directors. Although applications from other states are not excluded, those applicants (Indiana included) should be aware that their chances to receive funding are remote.

Limitation: One per Indiana University
Do not accept multiple submissions per year from an organization.

To apply for IU Internal competition:
For consideration as an institutional nominee, submit the following documents electronically to limited submission, limsub@iu.edu, by July 1, 2015 for internal coordination. To expedite the review process, we request that investigators who intend to submit a proposal send an email 1 week before the internal deadline with the intended investigator names/affiliations and proposal title to limsub@iu.edu with the subject line: L0954 Notice of Intent.

1. A summary of the project for which you are requesting funding, limited to 400 words.
2. Your project’s budget, and how many years the project has existed.
3. Abbreviated CV, not exceeding 3 pages, or a biosketch for the PI

IUPUI applicants must copy Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, on submissions.

IU Internal Deadline: 7/1/2015
Foundation Application Deadline: 9/1/2015

Limited Submission URL: http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=3543

Stanczykiewicz named director of The Fund Raising School at IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy

INDIANAPOLIS — Bill Stanczykiewicz has been appointed director of The Fund Raising School-mnibrd05-11-2014sp1d00120140510img-inibrd09-03-2013s11sq7a2m and senior lecturer in philanthropic studies at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, located on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus.

Stanczykiewicz currently is president and CEO of the Indiana Youth Institute, a statewide nonprofit that promotes healthy youth development and academic achievement by providing capacity-building professional development, technical assistance and funding for educators, youth workers and other community leaders.

“Bill is a proven chief executive, a seasoned fundraiser and a passionate spokesperson for the unique value The Fund Raising School brings to each nonprofit it serves,” said Amir Pasic, dean of the school. “As we address the training needs of those who lead society’s vital organizations, we are fortunate to have him lead this effort and join the leadership of the IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy.”

Stanczykiewicz will forge The Fund Raising School’s future as it begins its fifth decade of service to fundraisers, volunteers and nonprofit leaders. Dedicated to teaching ethical fundraising for more than 40 years, The Fund Raising School has taught on six continents and has a global network of more than 43,000 alumni.

“The Fund Raising School is the nation’s premier resource for teaching practical skills and useful strategies that strengthen fund development for a diverse range of nonprofit organizations,” Stanczykiewicz said. “I look forward to continued expansion of The Fund Raising School’s extraordinary impact as part of the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy’s unique and comprehensive efforts to improve philanthropy and the world.”

As director, Stanczykiewicz will oversee the professional development program’s 10-course, research-based curriculum and its team of more than 50 faculty members whose expertise and hands-on experience bridge the academic and professional perspectives.

Emerging Voices: You Are A Writer

Emerging Voices is a literary fellowship that aims to provide new writers, who lack access, thwith the tools they will need to launch a professional writing career. The eight-month fellowship includes:

PROFESSIONAL MENTORSHIP: Emerging Voices Mentors are carefully chosen from PEN Center USA’s membership and from professional writers based in Los Angeles. The Mentor-Fellow relationship is expected to challenge the fellow’s work and compel significant creative progress. Over the course of the fellowship, Emerging Voices Fellows and Mentors should meet three times in person, and be in contact at least once a month. In these three meetings, Mentors will offer written feedback on the Emerging Voices Fellows’ work in progress. Authors who have been mentors in the past include Ron Carlson, Harryette Mullen, Chris Abani, Ramona Ausubel, Meghan Daum, and Sherman Alexie.

CLASSES AT THE UCLA EXTENSION WRITERS’ PROGRAM: Participants will attend two free courses (a 12-week writing course and a one-day workshop) at UCLA Extension, donated by the Writers’ Program. Program Manager will assist the Emerging Voices Fellows with course selection.

AUTHOR EVENINGS: Every Monday, fellows will meet with a visiting author, editor or publisher and ask questions about craft. Fellows must read each visiting author’s book before the evening. A schedule of Author Evenings will be distributed at the first Emerging Voices orientation meeting. Authors who have participated in the past have included Jonathan Lethem, Percival Everett, Maggie Nelson, Cynthia Bond, Aimee Bender, Jerry Stahl, and Bruce Bauman, senior editor of the literary magazine Black Clock.

MASTER CLASSES: After completing the UCLA Extension Writers’ Program courses, Emerging Voices Fellows will enroll in a Master Class. The Master Class is a genre-specific workshop with a professional writer that affords fellows the opportunity to exchange feedback on their works in progress. Previous Master Class Instructors have included Diana Wagman, Alex Espinoza , and Paul Mandelbaum.

VOLUNTEER PROJECT: All Emerging Voices Fellows are expected to complete a 25-hour volunteer project that is relevant to the literary community. A few of the organizations that have participated included WriteGirl, 826LA, Cedars-Sinai Hospital, and STARS – San Diego Youth Services.

VOICE INSTRUCTION CLASS: The Fellowship will provide a one-day workshop with Dave Thomas, a professional voice actor. The Emerging Voices Fellows will read their work in a recording studio and receive instruction on reading their work publicly.

PUBLIC READINGS: Fellows will participate in three public readings, The Welcome Party, Tongue & Groove Salon, and the Final Reading. Fellows have read in various venues and events including the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, Silver Lake Jubilee, Skylight Bookstore, The Standard, Downtown LA. and Hotel Café. For the past five years, the fellowship has culminated in a Final Reading held in Hammer Museum’s Billy Wilder Theater, showcasing the progress each fellow has made in his or her work.

STIPEND: The fellowship includes a $1,000 stipend, given in $500 increments.

Participants need not be published, but the fellowship is directed toward poets and writers of fiction and creative nonfiction with clear ideas of what they hope to accomplish through their writing.

Deadline for applications: August 10, 2015
The Emerging Voices Fellowship runs from January to July.

Download the application here.