NSF Cultivating Cultures for Ethical STEM (CCE STEM)

NationalScienceFoundationIU Internal Deadline: 11/12/2014
NSF Proposal Deadline: 2/17/2015
Brief Description:
Accepts proposals for innovative research projects to foster ethical STEM research in all of the fields of science and engineering that NSF supports, including within interdisciplinary, inter-institutional and international contexts. CCE STEM research projects will use basic research to produce knowledge about what constitutes responsible or irresponsible, just or unjust scientific practices and sociotechnical systems, and how to best instill students with this knowledge.
Proposed research should seek to provide answers to the following: What constitutes ethical STEM research and practice? Which cultural and institutional contexts promote ethical STEM research and practice and why?’ Factors one might consider include: honor codes, professional ethics codes and licensing requirements, an ethic of service and/or service learning, life-long learning requirements, curricula or membership in organizations (e.g. Engineers without Borders) that stress social responsibility or humanitarian goals, institutions that serve under-represented groups, institutions where academic and research integrity are cultivated at multiple levels, institutions that cultivate ethics across the curriculum, or programs that promote group work, or do not grade. Do certain labs have a culture of academic integrity? What practices contribute to the establishment and maintenance of ethical cultures and how can these practices be transferred, extended to, or integrated into other research and learning settings?
Successful proposals will include a comparative dimension, either 1) between or within institutional settings that differ along the factors suggested or other factors, or 2) Institutional Transformation (IT) awards, where the comparison is over time– before and after an intervention. For IT, investigators are expected to gather and report baseline data in the first annual report. (See the reporting section of this solicitation for additional reporting requirements for both types of awards).
Award Amount:
·         The anticipated funding amount each year is $3,050,000 for an estimated 6-8 Standard Grants. The maximum award duration is 5 years.
·         Estimated program budget, number of awards and average award size/duration are subject to the availability of funds.
·         Cost Sharing Requirements: Inclusion of voluntary committed cost sharing is prohibited.
Eligibility:
NSF expects project teams to include persons with appropriate expertise. This might include expertise in the domain or domains of science or engineering on which the project focuses, in ethics, values, evaluation, and pedagogy.
Limitation: One per University
To apply for IU Internal competition:
For consideration as an institutional nominee, submit the following documents electronically to limited submission, limsub@iu.edu, by November 12, 2014 for internal coordination. Although not required, it is recommended that you contact Donna Carter at limsub.iu.edu indicating your interest in this program to help expedite the review process.
·         1-2 page Project Narrative (limitation does not include references)
·         A Letter of Nomination from Chair or Dean
·         Abbreviated CV for the PI (not to exceed 3 pages)
IUPUI applicants must copy Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, on submissions.

Enduring Questions Course Development Grants

NEH LogoThe National Endowment for the Humanities offers grants of up to $38,000 to support the development of a new course that will foster intellectual community through the study of an enduring question.

Deadline: September 11, 2014

For more information about Enduring Questions, please visit http://www.neh.gov/grants/education/enduring-questions.

Program Details

What is good government? What is friendship? Are there universals in human nature? What are the origins of the universe?

Enduring Questions grants support the development by up to four faculty members of a new course on a fundamental concern of human life that is addressed by the humanities. This question-driven course encourages undergraduates and teachers to join together in a deep and sustained program of reading in order to encounter influential ideas, works, and thinkers over the centuries and into the present day.

Enduring questions persist across historical eras, societies, and regions of the world; they inform intellectual, ethical, artistic, and religious traditions; they engage thoughtful people from all walks of life; they transcend time and place and yet are immediate and present in our lives. Enduring questions have more than one plausible or compelling answer, allow for dialogue across generations, and inspire genuine intellectual pluralism.

An Enduring Questions course may be taught by faculty from any department or discipline in the humanities or by faculty outside the humanities (for example, astronomy, biology, economics, law, mathematics, medicine, or psychology), as long as humanities sources are central to the course.

Recent Projects

  • Macomb Community College, Elliot Meyrowitz: “NEH Enduring Questions Course on Just War”
  • University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Padma Viswanathan: “NEH Enduring Questions Course on Literature and Morality”
  • Middlebury College, Timothy Billings: “NEH Enduring Questions Course on Translation”
  • University of North Georgia, Renee Bricker, Donna Gessell, Michael Proulx, and George Wrisley: “NEH Enduring Questions Course on Peace”

Questions?

Consult the grant guidelines and frequently asked questions online.

Contact us:
enduringquestions@neh.gov
(202) 606-8380

Learn More
NEH Grant Programs and Deadlines

NEH Division of Education Programs

About NEH

Open Society Foundations Invites Applications for Social Justice Photography Projects

logoThe Open Society Documentary Photography Project is accepting applications for photography projects that can be used as tools for social change.

The foundation’s Audience Engagement program supports projects that address a pressing social justice or human rights problems and provide concrete ways for photographers, organizations, and their target audiences to create positive social impact. Projects that inspire audiences visually, create meaningful interactions with an existing body of photographic work, and use photography as the basis for programming that moves people beyond the act of looking and directly involves them in activities or processes that lead to social change are encouraged.

Beginning this year, the program offers two tracks of support for individuals at different phases of their audience engagement projects:

1) Project Development: Grantees will receive funding to attend an Open Society–organized retreat in December 2014. The event will be designed in collaboration with Creative Capital’s Professional Development Program, whose nationally recognized workshops provide participants with essential practical tools and strategies to help them move their project and career goals forward. Attendees will become part of a larger Audience Engagement grant cohort, with opportunities to connect both during the conference and after.

2) Project Implementation: Grantees will receive grants of up to $30,000 to execute (or continue executing) their projects as well as attend the December retreat.

Proposed projects should include partnerships between photographers and organizations recognized as tax exempt under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Each project partner should have the skills and track record to realize the project and must commit time and resources to implement it.

See the Open Society Foundations Web site for eligibility and application guidelines.

Conference Fund

The Office of Academic Affairs is pleased to announce matching support for academic conferences or symposia organized by faculty members or professional staff and convened in Indianapolis [preferably at IUPUI] between July 1, 2014, and June 30, 2015. Those events that bring external audiences to IUPUI will be given preference. Awards will be made up to $1,500, if matched equally by the school or department.

Requests must predate the conference or symposium by at least one month. The Office of Academic Affairs will review submissions and make awards. Successful applicants will acknowledge IUPUI support in all publicity and in any publications resulting from the conference or symposium.

Brief proposals (not exceeding two pages) should be submitted with the completed application form, and should include:

  • topic, objectives, and description of the conference or symposium
  • venue
  • summary (up to one paragraph) of the background of each prospective and/or confirmed speaker or key participant
  • expected outcomes of the conference (impacts across the IUPUI campus, press releases, proceedings, publications)
  • budget: categories include honoraria, food, lodging, travel, and supplies (awardees should consult with Research and Sponsored Programs to determine allowable expenses for receptions or social events)

Please submit IUPUI Conference Fund applications to Melissa Lavitt, Ph.D., Senior Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs [mlavitt@iupui.edu] in the Office of Academic Affairs, AO126.

The IUPUI Conference Fund Proposal Form for 2014-2015 is available here.

Mack Center Call for Fellowship Applications

facet-full-logoThe Mack Center enhances teaching by advancing the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL). Administered by FACET, the center stimulates inquiry in SoTL, promotes the results of those inquiries, and fosters educational excellence at Indiana University and internationally.

The Mack Center:
Supports SoTL research by Mack Fellows and other faculty to develop highly effective, evidence-based strategies for enhancing teaching and learning; sponsors conferences, workshops, and publications that develop faculty members’ and graduate students’ teaching skills and share knowledge about SoTL; nurtures the growth of university, state, and global communities of teacher-scholars; and collaborates with people and programs worldwide–including FACET initiatives such as the Future Faculty Teaching Fellows Summer Institute and journals–to advance the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.

FELLOWSHIPS

Become a Mack Fellow
Each year the Mack Center selects a group of fellows to conduct ambitious research in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning and to participate in our community of SoTL scholars.

Mack Fellows receive $1000 in initial research funds and $1000 after they complete their project and submit a paper to a scholarly journal.

For the complete call for submissions, follow this link: https://facet.indiana.edu/about/mack-center/call-for-mack-fellow.pdf

If you need additional information, contact, Beth Kern, at (574) 520-4352 or bkern@iusb.edu

FACET
755 W. Michigan Street, UL 1180, Indianapolis, IN 46202
https://facet.indiana.edu/

What matters. Where it matters.
Indiana University

Grant Writing Workshop: IU New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities Grant Program

DATE: September 3, 2014
TIME: 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM
LOCATION: IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, Conference Room, University Library 4th Floor

This session will provide participants with an overview of the IU New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities Grant Program. It will offer information on how to apply and, more importantly, on how to develop a competitive proposal. Faculty recipients and members of the New Frontiers grants advisory groups will be present to answer questions.

Register here:

Museums, Libraries, and Cultural Organizations: Planning Grants

neh_at_logoNEH’s Division of Public Programs supports activities that engage millions of Americans in understanding significant humanities works and ideas. At the center of every NEH-funded public humanities project is a core set of humanities ideas developed by scholars, matched to imaginative formats that bring those ideas to life for people of all ages and all walks of life. Projects must be analytical and deeply grounded in humanities scholarship in a discipline such as history, religion, anthropology, jurisprudence, or art history. NEH is a national funding agency, so the projects we support must demonstrate the potential to attract a broad, general audience. We welcome humanities projects tailored to particular groups, such as families, youth (including K-12 students), teachers, seniors, at-risk communities, and veterans, but they should also strive to cultivate a more inclusive audience.

Museums, Libraries, and Cultural Organizations grants provide support for museums, libraries, historic places, and other organizations that produce public programs in the humanities.

Grants support the following formats:

  • exhibitions at museums, libraries, and other venues;
  • interpretations of historic places, sites, or regions; and
  • book/film discussion programs; living history presentations; and other face-to-face programs at libraries, community centers, and other public venues.

NEH encourages projects that explore humanities ideas through multiple formats. Proposed projects might include complementary components that deepen an audience’s understanding of a subject: for example, a museum exhibition might be accompanied by a website, mobile app, or discussion programs.

Planning grants support the early stages of project development, including consultation with scholars, refinement of humanities themes, preliminary design, testing, and audience evaluation.

Program Statistics

In the last five competitions the Museums, Libraries, and Cultural Organizations: Planning Grants program received an average of 64 applications. The program made an average of six awards per competition, for a funding ratio of 9 percent.

The number of applications to an NEH grant program can vary widely from competition to competition, as can the funding ratio. Information about the average number of applications and awards in recent competitions is meant only to provide historical context for the current competition. Information on the number of applications and awards in individual competitions is available from publicpgms@neh.gov.

 

Division of Public Programs

Receipt Deadline August 13, 2014 for Projects Beginning April 2015

Questions?

Contact the staff of NEH’s Division of Public Programs at 202-606-8269 or publicpgms@neh.gov. Hearing-impaired applicants can contact NEH via TDD at 1-866-372-2930.

Learning Environments Grant

ctlThrough the awarding of small grants, the Learning Environments Grant (LEG) supports the creation of innovative, engaging formal and informal learning environments that meet the needs of both faculty and students.

Proposals will be ranked on the following criterion:

1. The project must have a demonstrable positive impact on learning
2. The number of students who will benefit
3. The project must enable new/critical academic experiences for faculty and/or students
4. The creativity of projects
5. The project provides opportunities for faculty-student/student-student interaction
6. Availability of any additional needed funds
7. Plans/funds should be in place for repairs and maintenance of all items purchased

*Areas renovated within the past 10 years are not eligible to receive this grant.

Submission:

Should you have any questions about the online submission process please call the Center for Teaching and Learning at (317) 274-1300 or email thectl@iupui.edu. Proposals are due Friday, October 17

Past Projects

2013–2014

  • Classroom Furniture – ES 2104 ($12,416)
  • Classroom Furniture – BS 2006 ($12,416)
  • Building the Flipped Classroom: Designing a Collaborative Workspace for Active Learning - ET 329 ($25,000)
  • School of Education Multipurpose Learning Spaces – ES First Floor ($25,000)
  • I-Learn (Informatics – Learn, Engage, Apply, Reflect, Network): A Collaborative Space for Informatics – IT 592 ($25,000)
  • Creating a small class/meeting/study room for the Economics graduate programs – CA 536A ($8,700)

2012–2013

  • Leadership Learning Lab: Enhancing Technology for Collaborative Teaching and Learning / ET 327OLS ($22,389)
  • Geography Learning Lab and Seminar Room / CA 209 Renovation ($24,939)
  • Renovation for Laboratory Classes / SL 008 ($25,109)
  • Engaging the World Through the Global Crossroads Classroom / ES 2132 ($25,000)
  • Designing Spaces for Project and Problem Based Learning for Art Education and Community Arts Programs / Herron 147 and 151 ($23,240)
  • Cavanaugh Hall Classroom Furniture / CA 215 ($24,696)

2011–2012

  • Classroom Furniture – LD 002 ($12,519.12)
  • Classroom Furniture – LD 004 ($12,190.72)
  • Scale Up Classroom in Psychology ($25,000)
  • Literacy Studies (Cavanaugh 347/349) ($25,000)
  • “PhyLS” – A Physics Learning Space ($13,939.83)
  • Taking 2110 into the 21st Century ($25,000)
  • Creating a technology-enhanced collaborative learning space for IUPUC Students ($25,000)
  • Musculoskeletal Learning Lab (PE0005) $15,895.08)

2010–2011

  • Classroom Furniture – ET 302, 304 ($25,000)
  • Classroom Furniture – ET 308 ($10,470.68)
  • SHRS Student Learning and Research Facilitation Lab ($24,991.50)
  • ES 2101 Classroom redesign and technology upgrade ($25,000)
  • CSL & OSE Enhanced Learning Space – BS 2010A ($25,000)
  • Cavanaugh 435 – An environment for global and civically engaged learning ($25,000)

2009–2010 Projects

  • PETM Multipurpose Learning Lab ($21,700)
  • Biology Resource Center ($25,000)
  • University Library International Newsroom ($25,000)
  • E&T Student Council ($16,212.45)
  • Spanish Resource Center ($19,000)
  • Informatics MARLA Lab ($25,000)

2008–2009 Projects

  • Psychology Resource Center ($20,875)
  • University Library International Newsroom/University Library Reference Area ($20,000)
  • School of Liberal Arts and Science Multipurpose/Performance Auditorium ($25,000)
  • Community Learning Network/Union Building Learning Spaces ($22,000)
  • New furnishings for room BS 3006 ($23,315)
  • New furnishings for room LD020 ($18,333)

Eligibility

Schools and departments at IUPUI and IUPUC are eligible for the LEG.  Registered student groups may also apply.

Full details can be found here

NEH/DFG Bilateral Digital Humanities Program

dfg_logo_schriftzug_blau_orgneh_at_logoThe National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) in the United States and the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft e.V., DFG) are working together to offer support for projects that contribute to developing and implementing digital infrastructures and services for humanities research.

In order to encourage new approaches and develop innovative methods in any field of the humanities, these grants provide funding for up to three years in any of the following areas:

  • developing innovative methods—as well as standards and best practices—for building and merging digital collections that are significant and of major current interest, for use in humanities research;
  • developing and implementing generic tools, methods, and techniques for accessing and processing digital resources relevant to humanities research;
  • creating new digital modes of scholarly communication and publishing that facilitate international cooperation and dissemination of humanities scholarship; and
  • developing models for effectively managing digital data generated in humanities research projects (for example, texts, audio files, photographs, 3D objects) and exemplifying those models in case studies.

Collaboration between U.S. and German partners is a key requirement for this grant category. Each application must be sponsored by at least one eligible German individual or institution, and at least one U.S. institution (see Section III, Eligibility, below), and there must be a project director from each country. The partners will collaborate to write a single application package. The U.S. partner will submit the package to NEH via Grants.gov, and the German partner will submit it to DFG via regular postal service and preferably also by e-mail.

Program Statistics

In the first four competitions the NEH/DFG Bilateral Digital Humanities Program received an average of nineteen applications per year. The program made an average of five awards per year, for a funding ratio of 27 percent.

The potential applicant pool for this program is limited, since applications require international cooperation between German and US institutions.

The number of applications to an NEH grant program can vary widely year to year, as can the funding ratio. Information about the average number of applications and awards in recent competitions is meant only to provide historical context for the current competition. Information on the number of applications and awards in individual competitions is available from odh@neh.gov.

Receipt Deadline September 25, 2014 for Projects Beginning May 2015

Questions?

If you have questions about the program, contact the Office of Digital Humanities staff at odh@neh.gov. Applicants wishing to speak to a staff member by telephone should provide in the e-mail message a telephone number and a preferred time to call.