Funding | NEH Preservation Assistance Grants for Smaller Institutions

National Endowment For The Humanitites Logo

IUPUI Internal Deadline: 3/2/2016
NEH Application Deadline: 5/3/2016

Visit the website for complete guidelines.

Brief Description:
Updated guidelines will be posted at least two months in advance of the NEH deadline. In the meantime, please use the guidelines for the previous deadline to get a sense of what is involved in assembling an application.

Preservation Assistance Grants help small and mid-sized institutions – such as libraries, museums, historical societies, archival repositories, cultural organizations, town and county records offices, and colleges and universities – improve their ability to preserve and care for their significant humanities collections. These may include special collections of books and journals, archives and manuscripts, prints and photographs, moving images, sound recordings, architectural and cartographic records, decorative and fine art objects, textiles, archaeological and ethnographic artifacts, furniture, historical objects, and digital materials.

Preservation Assistance Grants may be used for purposes like these:

  • General preservation assessments
  • Consultations with professionals to address a specific preservation issue, need, or problem
  • Purchase of storage furniture and preservation supplies
  • Purchase of environmental monitoring equipment for humanities collections

Education and training

Award Amount:

  • Grants of up to $6,000 will be awarded.
  • All grants are awarded for a period of eighteen months, although a grantee may complete a project in a shorter period of time.

Cost sharing is not required in this program. If eligible expenses are more than $6,000, an applicant may cover the difference and show this as cost sharing in the project’s budget.

Eligibility:
Applicants must demonstrate that they:

  • care for and have custody of the humanities collections that are the focus of the application;
  • have at least one staff member or the full-time equivalent, whether paid or unpaid; and
  • make their collections open and available for the purpose of education, research, and/or public programming, as evidenced by the number of days on which the institution is open to the public, the capacity to support access and use, and the availability of staff for this purpose.

Individuals are not eligible to apply.

Limitation: One per campus
Only one application for a Preservation Assistance Grant may be submitted annually by an institution, although distinct collecting entities of a larger organization may apply in the same year, such as the library and museum of a university or two historic sites within a historical society.

To apply for IU Internal competition:
For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, by March 2, 2016 for internal competition.

1. Provide a one-paragraph abstract (up to one thousand characters) describing the nature of the collections that are the focus of the project, their significance to the humanities, and the specific goal(s) and activities that the grant would support.
2. 1-3 page Project Narrative (limitation does not include references) that:
State the specific activity or activities that the grant would support and the goals of the proposed project.

  • Describe the collections that are the focus of the project, emphasizing their significance to the humanities.
  • Discuss how this project fits into the institution’s overall preservation needs or plans. Describe the current condition of collections and the environment in which they are stored. Explain how the proposed activities build on previous preservation efforts and how the project fits into future preservation plans. In addition, explain how the project would increase your institution’s ability to improve collection care beyond the period of the grant.
  • Outline the steps of the project, the sequence in which they will occur, and indicate who is responsible for which activities.

3.  A Letter from the Chair or Dean
4. 2-3 page abbreviated CV for the PI

Although not required, it is recommended that you contact Etta before the internal deadline indicating your interest in this program to help expedite the review process.

This message is sent on behalf of the Vice Chancellor for Research. These limited submission notices are distributed to deans, associate deans for research, certain members of upper administration, and all others who subscribe. Visit the IU Limited Submission website to view a list of other limited submission opportunities (http://research.iu.edu/limited_sub.shtml).

Funding | Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities

Office of Digital HumanitiesNational Endowment For The Humanities Logo
Receipt Deadline March 15, 2016 for Projects Beginning October 2016
Visit official website.

Brief Summary

These NEH grants support national or regional (multistate) training programs for scholars and advanced graduate students to broaden and extend their knowledge of digital humanities. Through these programs, NEH seeks to increase the number of humanities scholars using digital technology in their research and to broadly disseminate knowledge about advanced technology tools and methodologies relevant to the humanities.

The projects may be a single opportunity or offered multiple times to different audiences. Institutes may be as short as a few days and held at multiple locations or as long as six weeks at a single site. For example, training opportunities could be offered before or after regularly occurring scholarly meetings, during the summer months, or during appropriate times of the academic year. The duration of a program should allow for full and thorough treatment of the topic.

Today, complex data—its form, manipulation, and interpretation—are as important to humanities study as more traditional research materials. Datasets, for example, may represent digitized historical records, high-quality image data, or even multimedia collections, all of which are increasing in number due to the availability and affordability of mass data storage devices and international initiatives to create digital content. Moreover, extensive networking capabilities, sophisticated analytical tools, and new collaboration platforms are simultaneously providing and improving interactive access to and analysis of these data as well as a multitude of other resources. The Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities program seeks to enable humanities scholars in the United States to incorporate advances like these into their scholarship and teaching.

Important Information

The Grants.gov application package for this program is now available.

Program Statistics

In the last five competitions the Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities program received an average of seventeen applications per year. The program made an average of four awards per year, for a funding ratio of 24 percent.

The potential applicant pool for this program is limited, since applications require a high degree of institutional commitment to the project and often require the availability of facilities such as participant housing and computer laboratories. On the one hand, this results in a small number of applications each year. On the other hand, the quality of the applications tends to be high, so that many applicants have historically received funding.

The number of applications to an NEH grant program can vary widely year to year, as can the funding ratio. Information about the average number of applications and awards in recent competitions is meant only to provide historical context for the current competition. Information on the number of applications and awards in individual competitions is available from odh@neh.gov.

Questions?

Contact the NEH Office of Digital Humanities via e‑mail at odh@neh.gov. Applicants wishing to speak to a staff member by telephone should provide in an e-mail message a telephone number and a preferred time to call. Hearing-impaired applicants can contact NEH via TDD at 1-866-372-2930.

Funding | Paris Institute for Advanced Study Call for applications

The Paris Institute for Advanced Study welcomes applications from high level international RFIEA Imagescholars and scientists in the fields of the humanities, the social sciences and related fields for periods of five or nine months, during the academic year 2017-2018.

Visit the official website here.

Deadline for applications: Tuesday, March 1st, 2016, 3:00pm (Paris, France time)

Applicants may request residencies for one of the following periods:

September 1st, 2017 to January 31st, 2018 (5 months)
October 1st, 2017 to June 30th, 2018 (9 months)
February 1st to June 30th, 2018 (5 months)

CONDITIONS OF ELIGIBILITY

Researchers from all countries are eligible.
Applicants who have spent more than a total of 12 months in France during the 3 years prior to the application are not eligible.

This call for applications is open to:

Senior university professors or researchers holding a permanent position in a university or research institution and having a minimum of 10 years of full time research experience after their PhD (at the time of the application).
Junior scholars having the status of postdoctoral researcher or holding a position in a university or research institution, and having a minimum of 2 and maximum of 9 years of research experience after the PhD (at the time of the application).

CALENDAR

• Opening of the online application system: January 15th, 2016
• Application deadline: Tuesday, March 1st, 2016, 3:00 pm (Paris, France time)
• Preselection: Mid-March 2016
• Final selection: June 2016
• Publication of results: End of June 2016
• Starting dates of the fellowships: September 1st 2017; October 1st 2017; February 1st 2018.

IAHI Grant Programs Workshop (February 8)

IAHI Grant Workshop LogoThis session will provide participants with an overview of the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Grant Program. It will offer information on how to apply and, more importantly, on how to develop a competitive proposal. Faculty recipients and members of the grants’ advisory groups will be present to answer questions.

Date: February 8, 2016
Time: 5:00-6:30
Location: IAHI, IUPUI University Library, UL 4115P, 755 W. Michigan St.

This event is free, but please register here:

Internal Funding | IU Collaborative Research Grants 2015-16 Request for Proposals

Indiana University Collaborative Research Grants program is accepting proposals Indiana University-logothrough February 15, 2016. The full Request for Proposals is available online, but allow me to highlight a few elements of the program.

The IUCRG program is designed to encourage new faculty collaborations across traditional disciplinary, campus, school, or departmental boundaries. We seek proposals from teams of faculty from different disciplines, campuses, schools, or departments.

The IUCRG program is particularly targeted toward collaborations focused on new, innovative, or potentially transformative research that is fundamentally shaped by the collaborative nature of the team – partners doing things together that could not be undertaken without the partnership.

IUCRG funding is intended as seed funding to help develop pilot data or proof-of-concept evidence that will serve as the basis for future proposals for external funding. We seek proposals that represent a first, defined stage in a larger research trajectory that will attract external funding for subsequent stages.

The IUCRG program is open to projects in a variety of disciplines: Biological/Life Sciences (non-medical); Physical Sciences (physics, chemistry, astronomy, chemistry, geology/Earth sciences); Engineering; Computer Science and Informatics; Health and Medical Sciences; Social and Behavioral Sciences. (Teams including faculty in the arts and humanities are welcome to apply, but projects focused within the arts and humanities should be directed toward IU’s New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities program.)

Please visit the full Request for Proposals for more information, and contact Faith Hawkins(fhawkins@iu.edu or IUCRG@iu.edu) if you have questions.

Press Release: Five finalists selected for IU Grand Challenges research program

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Five teams have been selected to submit full proposals for IU Vice President of Research Fred Cate Imagefunding through the Indiana University Grand Challenges Program, the most ambitious research program in the university’s history.

The program, launched in September, will invest up to $300 million over five years to address some of the most urgent challenges facing Indiana and the world.

The finalists were selected from 21 teams of IU faculty members that submitted preliminary proposals in November. Applicants represented 20 schools on five IU campuses across the state.

“The Grand Challenges program offers a unique and exciting opportunity for IU to lead the way in developing responses to our society’s most complex and important problems,” said IU President Michael A. McRobbie. “The number of faculty members who participated in the preliminary proposals we received strongly reflects our faculty’s commitment to transformative, innovative and interdisciplinary research that benefits the people of Indiana, the nation and the world.”

The selected preliminary proposals and their team leaders are:

  • “Health Equity in Indiana and Beyond,” David Burr, Distinguished Professor and associate vice chancellor for research at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, and Michael Reece, professor and associate dean at the IU School of Public Health-Bloomington.
  • “Preparing for Change: Sustaining Nature’s Assets, Public Health and Human Well-Being,” Ellen Ketterson, Distinguished Professor in the IU Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences’ Department of Biology.
  • “Shaping Our Future: Knowledge, Science and Governance for Sustainable Water Resources,” Todd Royer, associate professor in the IU School of Public and Environmental Affairs in Bloomington.
  • “Transforming Environmental Protection and Health for Indiana and Beyond,” Joseph Shaw, associate professor in the IU School of Public and Environmental Affairs in Bloomington.
  • “Precision Medicine Initiative,” Anantha Shekhar, associate vice president for clinical affairs at IU and executive associate dean for research at the IU School of Medicine on the IUPUI campus.

All preliminary proposals were evaluated by a faculty review committee, which recommended a subset for further consideration to McRobbie, who named the five selected for development into full proposals.

IU Vice President for Research Fred Cate, whose office is overseeing the Grand Challenges Program, noted that all five proposals selected for further development focused on medicine or the environmental science and policy, which are recognized strengths of IU.

“While we received proposals from a wide variety of fields, these five proposals impressed the reviewers as not only strong in their own right but as addressing issues of particular importance to the people and economy of Indiana,” Cate said. “Moreover, these proposals draw effectively on a wide range of strengths at IU, including not only health care and environmental science, but basic sciences, information technology, and public policy and management.”

Over the next four months, Cate said, members of the Office of the Vice President for Research and other campus and university offices will work with the teams to develop the strongest proposals possible.

In addition to substantial financial support, the IU Grand Challenges Program will also provide up to 30 new faculty positions, as well as support for faculty startup needs, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, equipment and facilities for each funded proposal.

Full proposals from the finalists are due April 18, and McRobbie is expected to announce the one or two to be funded in June. More information on each proposal is available at the Grand Challenges Program website.

RESEARCH NOTICE| ArtPlace National Creative PlaceMaking Fund – Limited Submission

Limited Submission: http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=3697Indiana University-logo

IU Internal Deadline: 1/20/2016

Registration Deadline: 2/16/2016

ArtPlace Application Deadline: 3/2/2016

Brief Description:

The National Creative Placemaking Fund invests in planning and development projects where arts and culture play a central role. ArtPlace actively seeks to build a portfolio of funded projects that is a microcosm of the varied creative placemaking strategies used across the United States through this program. Since 2011, the National Creative Placemaking Fund has invested in 227 projects across 152 communities of all sizes in 43 states and the District of Columbia.
If you are thinking about a project that:

1. Focuses on a neighborhood or other geographic community

2. Is looking to work on a community challenge related to agriculture/food; economic development; education/youth; environment/energy; health; housing, immigration; public safety; transportation; or workforce development

3. Has a way that artists, arts organizations, and/or arts activities can help address that challenge

4. Will have a way of knowing whether the project has made progress on the challenge then you should think about submitting an application.

Award Amount:

The National Creative Placemaking Fund generally provides support between $50,000 and $500,000 for individual projects. There is no required match. Despite not requiring a match, ArtPlace values its investments’ ability to leverage additional federal, regional, and local public/private funding.

Limitation: One per Indiana University

Applicants may only submit one application per year (determined by EIN).

To apply for IU Internal competition:

For consideration as an institutional nominee, submit the following documents electronically to limited submission, limsub@iu.edu, by Jan 20, 2016 for internal coordination. To expedite the review process, we request that investigators who intend to submit a proposal send an email 1 week before the internal deadline with the proposal title to limsub@iu.edu with the subject line: L1016 Notice of Intent.

Project information that includes:

1. Project Title

  • a description of the community where the project will take place. Image describing the community to someone who knows nothing about it. [900 characters including spaces]
  • the community planning and development challenge/opportunity that this project will address? [900 characters including spaces]
  • how the will project deploy arts and culture to address this planning and development challenge or opportunity? [900 characters including spaces]
  • what will be different in this community when this project is completed? [900 characters including spaces]
  •  no more than 1/2 page of any other pertinent information that you’d like to include.

2. Abbreviated CV, not exceeding 3 pages, or a biosketch for the PI

IUPUI applicants must copy Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, on submissions.

RESEARCH NOTICE| NEA Art Works & Challenge America – Limited Submission

Internal Campus Deadline: 1/20/2016Indiana University-logo

Art Works – NEA Feb deadline
http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=3692
NEA Application Deadline: 2/18/2016


Art Works – NEA July deadline

http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=3693
NEA Application Deadline: 7/14/2016

Challenge America Fast-Track
http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=3694
NEA Application Deadline: 4/14/2016

For Complete Guidelines: https://www.arts.gov/grants/apply-grant/grants-organizations

ARTWORKS Brief Description:

The guiding principle of “Art Works” is at the center of everything we do at the NEA. “Art Works” refers to three things: the works of art themselves, the ways art works on audiences, and the fact that art is work for the artists and arts professionals who make up the field. Art works by enhancing the value of individuals and communities, by connecting us to each other and to something greater than ourselves, and by empowering creativity and innovation in our society and economy. The arts exist for beauty itself, but they also are an inexhaustible source of meaning and inspiration. The NEA welcomes projects that:

  • Are likely to prove transformative with the potential for meaningful change, whether in the development or enhancement of new or existing art forms, new approaches to the creation or presentation of art, or new ways of engaging the public with art;
  •  Are distinctive, offering fresh insights and new value for their fields and/or the public through unconventional solutions; and
  • Have the potential to be shared and/or emulated, or are likely to lead to other advances in the field.

See the website to determine a specific discipline’s deadline (Feb or July).

ARTWORKS Award Amount:

  • Grants generally will range from $10,000 to $100,000. No grants will be made below $10,000. Grants of $100,000 or more will be made only in rare instances, and only for projects that the Arts Endowment determines demonstrate exceptional national or regional significance and impact. In the past few years, well over half of the agency’s grants have been for amounts less than $25,000.
  • All grants require a nonfederal match of at least 1 to 1. For example, if an organization receives a $10,000 grant, the total eligible project costs must be at least $20,000 and the organization must provide at least $10,000 toward the project from nonfederal sources.

Grants awarded under these guidelines generally may cover a period of performance of up to two years. The two-year period is intended to allow an applicant sufficient time to plan, execute, and close out its project, not to repeat a one-year project for a second year.

CHALLENGE AMERICA Brief Description:

The Challenge America category offers support primarily to small and mid-sized organizations for projects that extend the reach of the arts to underserved populations — those whose opportunities to experience the arts are limited by geography, ethnicity, economics, or disability. Age alone (e.g., youth, seniors) does not qualify a group as underserved; at least one of the underserved characteristics noted above also must be present. Grants are available for professional arts programming and for projects that emphasize the potential of the arts in community development. This category encourages and supports the following objective:

  • Engagement: Engaging the public with diverse and excellent art. CHALLENGE AMERICA Award Amount:
  • All Fast-Track grants are for $10,000.
  • All grants require a nonfederal match of at least 1 to 1. For example, if an organization receives a $10,000 grant, the total eligible project costs must be at least $20,000 and the organization must provide at least $10,000 toward the project from nonfederal sources.
  • Grants awarded under these guidelines generally may cover a period of support of up to two years. The two-year period is intended to allow an applicant sufficient time to plan, execute, and close out its project, not to repeat a one-year project for a second year.

Grants generally are smaller in scope and shorter in duration than other projects supported under these guidelines. It is anticipated that most projects – including planning and close-out time – will be substantially shorter.

Limitation: One per Campus

An organization may submit only one application under these FY 2017 Art Works guidelines, with few exceptions:

  • One each for a parent organization that comprises separately identifiable and independent components such as the IU Art Museum, Traditional Arts Indiana, WFIU and WTIU.
  • One from each campus as the lead for a distinctly different project.

This shared limitation of one per campus applies to L0406 Challenge America Fast-Track (4/14/2016 deadline) AND L0468a&b Art Works (both 2/18/2016 and 7/14/2016 deadlines).

To apply for IU Internal competition:

For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, by January 20, 2016 for internal competition. To expedite the review process, we request that investigators who intend to submit a proposal send an email 1 week before the internal deadline with the intended investigator names and affiliations and proposal title to your campus representative with the subject line: NEA Notice of Intent.

  • 1-2 page Project Narrative (limitation does not include references) listing the discipline of interest at the top.
  • A letter of support from Chair or Dean (letter must include IU units which will be contributing required match)
  • Abbreviated CV, not exceeding 3 pages, or a biosketch for the PI

Research Notice| NEA Art Works: Creativity Connects – Limited Submission

Limited Submission URL: http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=3695Indiana University-logo

IU Campus Internal Deadline: 1/20/2016
NEA Application Deadline: 3/3/2016

URL For Guidelines: https://www.arts.gov/grants/apply-grant/grants-organizations

Brief Description:
Creativity Connects is an initiative that will show how the arts are central to the country’s creativity ecosystem, investigate how support systems for the arts have changed, explore how the arts connect with other industries, and invest in innovative projects to spark new ideas for the arts field.

A key component to the Creativity Connects initiative is a pilot grant opportunity in the Art Works category to support partnerships between arts organizations and organizations from non-arts sectors that include, but are not limited to, business, education, environment, faith, finance, food, health, law, science, and technology.

Art Works: Creativity Connects grants will seek to benefit the arts and non-arts sectors by:

  • Demonstrating the value of working with the arts.
  • Supporting the infrastructure for the arts to work in new ways with new sectors.
  • Building bridges that create new relationships and constituencies.
  • Creating innovative partnership projects to advance common goals.

Award Amount:

  • All grants require a nonfederal match of at least 1 to 1. For example, if an organization receives a $20,000 grant, the total eligible project costs must be at least $40,000 and the official applicant organization must provide at least $20,000 toward the project from nonfederal sources.
  • Grants generally will range from $20,000 to $100,000. No grants will be made below $20,000. Grants of $100,000 or more will be made only in rare instances, and only for projects that we determine demonstrate exceptional national or regional significance and impact.
  • The National Endowment for the Arts’ support of a project can start no sooner than January 1, 2017. Grants awarded under these guidelines generally may cover a period of performance of up to two years.

Eligibility:

Art Works: Creativity Connects grants require a partnership between an arts organization and an organization from a non-arts sector. An arts organization must serve as the official applicant and have a non-arts partner confirmed at the time of application.

Limitation: One per campus

  • An organization may submit only one application for an Art Works: Creativity Connects grant.
  • An organization that submits an application to Art Works: Creativity Connects is still eligible to submit an application to other National Endowment for the Arts funding opportunities including other areas of Art Works (L0468a & L0468b) and Challenge America (L0406). In each case, the request must be for a distinctly different project.

To apply for IU Internal competition:

For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, by January 20, 2016 for internal competition. To expedite the review process, we request that investigators who intend to submit a proposal send an email 1 week before the internal deadline with the intended investigator names and affiliations and proposal title to your campus representative with the subject line: L1015 Notice of Intent.

  •  1-2 page Project Narrative (limitation does not include references)
  •  A letter of support from Chair or Dean (letter must include IU units which will be contributing required match)
  • Abbreviated CV, not exceeding 3 pages, or a biosketch for the PI

Reminder| IU Collaborative Research Grants program: Informational Sessions at IUPUI and IUSM, January 8th, 2016

As you may be aware, the 2015-16 IU Collaborative Research Grants program Request for Proposals is available on-line (http://research.iu.edu/funding_collaborative.shtml). The IUCRG program is Indiana University-logodesigned to foster new collaborations among faculty members working on research that will significantly advance a field or break new ground in the sciences, social sciences, and behavioral sciences.

Over the past five years, we have awarded just over $5 million to 65 teams composed of 222 IU faculty members. Teams of researchers from different disciplines, departments, schools or campuses who have not previously worked together in the proposal’s subject matter are eligible to submit proposals, which are due on Monday, February 15th, 2016.

We will be hosting two information workshops on Friday, January 8th. Please join us to learn more about the program and to garner some advice for writing a successful proposal.

The sessions will be held as follows:

10:30 – 11:30 am, IUPUI University Library, Room 1126
2:00 – 3:00 pm, IUSM Research 2, Room E101, 950 West Walnut Street(adjacent to Walther Hall)