Al-Mutanabbi Street Project

al-mutanabbi streetThe Herron Art Library—a full-service branch of the University Library—has recently been selected to house a unique collection of artists’ books.

On March 5th 2007, in the middle of the Iraq war, a car bomb exploded in Baghdad, destroying a busy avenue of cafés and bookstores that had served as a meeting place for generations of middle-eastern writers and thinkers. In response to the attack, a San Francisco bookseller, Beau Beausoleil, rallied a community of international artists and writers to produce a collection of letterpress-printed broadsides (poster-like works on paper), artists’ books (unique works of art in book form), and an anthology of writing, all focused on expressing solidarity with Iraqi booksellers, writers and readers. The coalition calls itself Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here.

The coalition has agreed to donate a complete run of the Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here collection to the Herron Art Library. Valued at over $250,000, the Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here collection includes 260 artists’ books; a publication entitled Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here: Poets and Writers Respond to the March 5th, 2007, Bombing of Baghdad’s “Street of the Booksellers”, plus 130 broadsides—one for every person killed or injured in the bombing of al-Mutanabbi Street. The Herron Art Library will be one of only three libraries worldwide to be a permanent home to the collection, and the only library in the U.S.

Along with the collection, the library is hosting a conference this fall on the IUPUI campus and a show featuring some of the collection in August at the Harrison Center for the Arts. For more information on the collection, please go to this website.

Let’s Talk About It: Muslim Journeys book discussion series at Ivy Tech

The community is invited to join a book club hosted by Ivy Tech and co-sponsored by IUPUI and the Center for Interfaith Cooperation. Everyone is welcome. The topic is “Connected Histories,” one of the five themes of the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Muslim Journeys Bookshelf.

Learn more about the people, places, history, faith and cultures of Muslims in the United States and around the world through a special program at the Julia M. Carson Learning Resource Center (LRC) titled Let’s Talk About It: Muslim Journeys, a reading and discussion series. The LRC is proud to present the series with the help of grants from the American Library Association and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

In this series, attendees are welcome to read one or more of the following featured books and then attend the discussions which take place at the LRC (2725 N. Illinois Street, Indianapolis). The LRC has extra copies of each book available for checkout. Each book discussion will take place from 4:00pm – 5:30 p.m. on the following dates:

  • DECEMBER 4: When Asia Was the World: Traveling Merchants, Scholars, Warriors, and Monks Who Created the “Riches of the East” by Stewart Gordon
  • JANUARY 15: The House of Wisdom: How Arabic Science Saved Ancient Knowledge and Gave Us the Renaissance by Jim Al-Khalili
  • FEBRUARY 12: The Ornament of the World by Maria Rosa Menocal
  • MARCH 19: Leo Africanus by Amin Maalouf, translated by Peter Sluglett
  • APRIL 9: Islamic Art film screening and art exhibit. This event is co-sponsored by IUPUI and the Center for Interfaith Cooperation and will be held at the Indiana Interchurch Center (1100 West 42nd Street, Indianapolis).

Extra copies of the books are available through the Ivy Tech library. For more on the books themselves and the theme of connected histories, please see the following website. To pre-register for one or more of the above events, please visit the event website.

 

‘Woman President’ authors examine factors that have kept women out of the White House

In Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis professor Kristina Horn Sheeler and Colorado State University professor Karrin Vasby Anderson examine the 2008 candidacies of Clinton and Palin, and presidential campaigns of other women, along with campaign public addresses, political journalism and punditry, political humor, and television and movie depictions of female presidents. The authors uncover a political and popular culture backlash against women that has kept the White House a man’s place.

“When media depictions of female candidates are based on sexist stereotypes, or worse yet, pornographic and misogynistic framing, we have not just a political culture that discredits political women, but a larger cultural undercurrent that demonstrates a backlash against the gains women have made in the last decade,” Sheeler said.

Sheeler is an associate professor and chair of the Department of Communication Studies in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. Anderson is an associate professor of communication studies at Colorado State University in Fort Collins. The duo also co-authored “Governing Codes: Gender, Metaphor, and Political Identity.”

In “Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture,” Sheeler and Anderson provide a discussion of U.S. presidentiality as a unique rhetorical role. Within that framework, they review women’s historical and contemporary presidential bids, placing special emphasis on the 2008 campaign. They also consider how presidentiality is framed in candidate oratory, campaign journalism, film and television, digital media and political parody.

“Everyone seeking a more complete understanding of the presidency, campaign rhetoric, gender studies and the role of the media in the portrayal of women in the White House and in coverage of women in campaigns, including the election of 2008, will find the scholarship and analysis in this book of value,” said Janet M. Martin, author of “The Presidency and Women: Promise, Performance and Illusion in the White House” and professor of government at Bowdoin College.

“Examining women’s historical and recent presidential campaigns, television and movie depictions of women presidents, and the 2008 Clinton and Palin candidacies, Sheeler and Anderson reveal the hegemonic power wielded by an essentialist white masculinity. Their argument is uncompromising and compelling, controversial and persuasive; their book engages and challenges readers across the disciplines,” said MaryAnne Borrelli, author of” The Politics of the President’s Wife” and professor of government at Connecticut College.

Sheeler’s and Anderson’s book, published by Texas A & M University Press, hit bookstore shelves last month.

Gerard Magliocca presents new book: “American Founding Son”

Faculty Book Talks at IU McKinney School of Law
September 10, 2013
5:00-7:00 pm
Wynne Courtroom and Atrium, Inlow Hall, 530 W. New York Street, Indianapolis, IN.

American Founding Son: John Bingham and the Invention of the Fourteenth Amendment, by Gerard Magliocca

Professor Gerard Magliocca, a Samuel R. Rosen Professor of Law at IU McKinney School of Law presents his new book from New York University Press. John Bingham was the architect of the rebirth of the United States following the Civil War. A leading antislavery lawyer and congressman from Ohio, Bingham wrote the most important part of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution, which guarantees fundamental rights and equality to all Americans. He was also at the center of two of the greatest trials in history, giving the closing argument in the military prosecution of John Wilkes Booth’s co-conspirators for the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and in the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson. And more than any other man, Bingham played the key role in shaping the Union’s policy towards the occupied ex-Confederate States, with consequences that still haunt our politics.

American Founding Son provides the most complete portrait yet of this remarkable statesman. Drawing on his personal letters and speeches, the book traces Bingham’s life from his humble roots in Pennsylvania through his career as a leader of the Republican Party. Magliocca argues that Bingham and his congressional colleagues transformed the Constitution that the Founding Fathers created, and did so with the same ingenuity that their forbears used to create a more perfect union in the 1780s. In this book, Magliocca restores Bingham to his rightful place as one of our great leaders.

Lecture: 5:00 pm. Reception & book signing: 6:00 pm. CLE: 1.0 hour of Indiana CLE credit (pending approval). No fee, but registration required.

Contact: Shaun Dankoski at sldanko@iupui.edu

New book by John McCormick makes the case for ‘Why Europe Matters’

The news coming out of Europe in recent years has not been good: high unemployment, recession, austerity, threatened bank collapses, and speculation that the bold experiment of the euro might be on the verge of collapse. But an IUPUI professor of political science argues that the pessimism is misplaced and it is well past time to get the debate back on a productive track.

In his new book, Why Europe Matters: The Case for the European Union (Palgrave Macmillan), John McCormick argues that the European Union is widely misunderstood — on both sides of the Atlantic — and that the debate has for too long been dominated by critics known as euroskeptics.

“Many of their arguments are based on myths and misrepresentations about what the EU does, rather than on a fair and informed assessment,” McCormick said. “They say that the EU is undemocratic, that it is expensive, that it is unresponsive, that it means more — not less — regulation, that it is unpopular, and that it reduces the sovereignty and independence of its state members.”

But while the EU is far from perfect, McCormick said, euroskeptics have exploited confusion and misunderstandings to make its problems seem much worse than they are.

McCormick, professor of political science in the School of Liberal Arts, has been studying and writing about the EU for more than 20 years. A citizen of both the U.S. and the U.K., he was awarded a Jean Monnet Chair in European Union politics from the EU in 2010, and he just spent several months in Europe as Fulbright-Schuman chair at the College of Europe in Belgium.

There has been a rising tide of euroskepticism since the early 1990s, he said, which has moved into high gear since the sovereign debt crisis broke in Greece in 2009.

“The euro suffered from the perfect storm of fallout from the global financial crisis, problems in the design of the euro, a failure by several of its member states to respect the eurozone rules on budget deficits and some foot-dragging by EU governments reluctant to bail out countries that misbehaved,” he said.

The euro crisis zone has created a depressed mood for much of Europe, McCormick said, which has led to several rough years for the EU.

“But people have tended to forget all the good and positive things that have come out of the EU, and more people need to step up and speak up to balance the debate,” he said. “That’s why I wrote the book. I’ve been a longtime supporter of the EU, still believe strongly in what it does, and thought it was time that someone made the case for Europe in the face of all the myths being generated by its critics.”

McCormick why europe matters

John McCormick, Why Europe Matters. The Case for the European Union (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013)

McCormick argues that the EU has helped bring a lasting peace to Europe (for which it was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize last year); has created new jobs and opportunities; has helped Europeans learn more about what they have in common; and has helped individual member states work together in being a substantial global actor and wield the kind of influence they could not if working alone.

“The EU has a population of more than half a billion,” he said. “It is the wealthiest marketplace in the world, is the biggest trading power in the world, is the biggest source of (and magnet for) foreign direct investment and has shown that it is possible to wield influence without relying on military power.”

McCormick’s book “Why Europe Matters,” argues that the European Union is widely misunderstood on both sides of the Atlantic.

During the time McCormick has been researching and sharing his extensive knowledge of the European Union with IUPUI students, he’s helped bring the Euroculture program to IUPUI, and for 20 years ran a Model EU for students around the Midwest. McCormick has also been a prolific writer, with 13 books to his name.

Included in his publications are textbooks designed to help students understand the complex issues surrounding the European Union. His book Understanding the European Union will soon be coming out in a sixth edition and has been translated into Polish, Romanian, Slovak, Ukrainian, Croatian and Macedonian.

Unlike previous books that focused on an academic audience, “Why Europe Matters” was written for a general audience. McCormick wanted a book that was accessible for readers, feeling that the scholarly research on the EU and its academic nature was contributing little to the debates on the topic.

“I didn’t think that another academic tome would contribute as much to the debate as a book that tried to reach a broader audience by making some of the academic research more accessible and relevant to the debate about the EU,” McCormick said. “And even though the book is about Europe, Americans also stand to benefit by learning more about how the EU works and how its approaches and values are distinctive.”

(The above article was written by Josh Flynn and originally appeared in Inside IUPUI)

IUPUI professor pens book making systematic, positive case for the European Union

In “Why Europe Matters: The Case for the European Union,” IUPUI professor John McCormick makes a clear and unequivocal case for how the European Union, in spite of its problems, has made Europe a more peaceful and prosperous place.

McCormick, who teaches political science in the School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, debunks the prevailing myths surrounding the European Union and puts forward a compelling case for the benefits of European integration. In his new book, McCormick shows how the EU gives Europeans a greater role on the world stage, as well as more peaceful and productive ways of living and doing business.

“’Why Europe Matters’ will inform and enlighten Euro enthusiasts and skeptics alike (and) could not have been more timely for the new debate about Britain’s role in a changing union,” said John Palmer, former European editor of The Guardian and founding political director of the European Policy Centre.

McCormick’s book is “a must-read for citizens, professionals, students and policy-makers alike by one of the most respected authorities on European affairs,” said Alexander Stubb, Finland’s minister for European affairs and foreign trade.

In a stark challenge to skeptics and critics, McCormick “shows that the story of European Union has been, above all, one of progress in mutual understanding between peoples, of the benefits of cooperation and of the pooling of sovereignty between nations, and of a growing solidarity and cohesion in practice that could provide a model too for those looking for a more peaceful and cooperative form of organization on a global scale,” said Jacques Delors, former president of the European Commission.

Palgrave Macmillan published “Why Europe Matters” on June 28. For more information, or to request a review copy, commission an article or interview McCormick, contact Louise Crawford at l.crawford@palgrave.com.