Susan Sutton study abroad program awardees announced

A Department of World Languages and Cultures faculty member in the IU School of Liberal Arts and an academic advisor in the Kelley School of Business were chosen as the 2014 recipients of the Susan Buck Sutton awards. The IUPUI Office of International Affairs presents the awards to a campus faculty member and a staff member who made significant contributions to study abroad programs at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

Claudia Grossman, a senior lecturer and interim director of the Max Kade German-American Center, and Eric Raider, a Kelley School of Business academic advisor, were presented their awards at the IUPUI International Festival on Feb. 27.

The award is named in honor of Susan Buck Sutton, who was the first associate vice chancellor for international affairs at IUPUI.

Selection of award recipients is based on efforts to promote a campus climate where students are encouraged to study abroad and new programs are developed and supported.

Grossman’s efforts were noted in a nominating letter that said, “It is hard to imagine today’s international landscape at IUPUI were it not for the extraordinary creativity and investment of time and energy that Claudia Grossman has spent over the last two decades on making study abroad a reality for many students and faculty across several schools on this campus.”

A list of Grossman’s accomplishments in the area of study abroad were cited, including study abroad program development, creation and instruction of courses connected with study abroad, program direction, student advising and publications related to study abroad.

Raider’s work to expand the undergraduate study abroad program at the business school was cited, with one nominator saying, “Eric took the reins of the Kelley undergraduate program and has not looked back. It is evident that Eric is passionate about study abroad and has already made a lasting impact on our programs in Kelley.”

Inaugural poet Richard Blanco highlights reading series

The Spring 2014 Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis features President Barack Obama’s second inaugural poet as a guest speaker.

The series kicks off with fiction writer and essayist Jacinda Townsend as guest reader on Thursday, Feb. 27. It concludes with a reading by 2013 inaugural poet Richard Blanco on Thursday, April 10.

Townsend will read from her works at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 27 in the Lilly Auditorium of University Library, 755 W. Michigan St. Townsend’s work is published in literary journals such as African Voices, Carve Magazine, The Maryland Review, Obsidian II, Passages North, Phoebe and Xavier Review, and anthologized in “Surreal South” and “Telling Stories: Fiction by Kentucky Feminists.” Her nonfiction appears in two different series of “Chicken Soup for the Soul.”

Townsend, who teaches writing fiction at Indiana University Bloomington, took her first creative writing class at Harvard and began registering for writing workshops while studying at Duke Law School. In 1999 she was a part of the prestigious Iowa Writer’s Workshop.

Blanco’s reading will take place at 7:30 p.m. April 10 in the Basile Auditorium of the Herron School of Art and Design, 735 W. New York St.

In 2013, Blanco served as the fifth inaugural poet of the United States, reading “One Today” during Obama’s second inauguration. He is the youngest poet and the first Latino, immigrant and openly gay writer to hold the honor. Following the Boston Marathon bombing, he wrote “Boston Strong” and read the piece at a benefit concert for bombing victims, as well as a Red Sox baseball game. He published the poem in a limited edition “Boston Strong” chapbook and donated the proceeds to those most affected by the bombing.

Reiberg events are free and open to the public. The Rufus & Louise Reiberg Series is sponsored by the Department of English in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Founded in 1997 in honor of former IUPUI Department of English chair and Professor Emeritus Rufus Reiberg and his wife, Louise, the annual Reiberg Reading series brings nationally and regionally known writers to the IUPUI campus to present their work.

Other spring Reiberg events include:

  • 15th Annual International Women’s Day Celebration, March 12; 6:30 p.m. reception, 7 p.m. performers, University Library Lilly Auditorium. This event features poetry, music, and visual art to honor the creativity of women around the world.
  • Bonderman Workshop, featuring poet Rochelle Hurt, 4 p.m. March 25, location to be announced. Hurt, winner of the 2013 Richard Peterson Poetry Prize from Crab Orchard Review, recently published a novel in poems, “The Rusted City.”

For more information about the series, contact Terry Kirts at tkirts@iupui.edu or 317-274-8929.

Elee Wood to speak on experiencing objects in U.S. museums

The School of Liberal Arts Sabbatical Speaker Series
Campus Center, Room 268
Friday January 31, 2014
4:30 PM – 5:30 p.m.

Professor Elee Wood, Museum Studies, will present a talk entitled “Around the Country in 52 Museums: Finding the Objects of Experience.”

Everyday objects remind us about stories from our lives. Explore how museums can build these connections to transform visitor experiences.

RSVP: libarsvp@iupui.edu with Elee Wood talk in the subject line.

David Bell to speak on HIV and social organization

The School of Liberal Arts Sabbatical Speaker Series
Campus Center, Room 307
Tuesday January 28, 2014
4:30 – 5:30 p.m.

Professor David Bell, Sociology, will present a lecture entitled “The Social Organization of HIV: Who is Protecting Whom?” His talk focuses on three studies of sexual relationships showing how people are successfully or unsuccessfully–but often unknowingly–protecting themselves and others against HIV.

RSVP: libarsvp@iupui.edu with David Bell talk in the subject line.

Taylor Symposium marks 25th year by exploring “Politics. Race. Place.”

The 25th Joseph T. Taylor Symposium, hosted by the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, will focus on how 25 years of demographic and social change has shaped Indianapolis while exploring the topic, “Politics. Race. Place.”

The symposium will take place from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 25, at the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd.

Registration deadline is Feb. 18, but guests are encouraged to register early to reserve a seat.

A schedule and registration are available on the School of Liberal Arts website. To register by phone or for more information, call 812-855-4224 or 800-933-9330, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, or email iuconfs@indiana.edu. Symposium attendance is free and open to the general public, but conference registration is required. Lunch is available for a fee: Single luncheon tickets are $40 each or $35 if purchased by Feb. 3. Single sponsor tickets are $75, and patron tables of 10 are $550.

Leading local practitioners, politicians, policy-makers and researchers will come together with symposium attendees to examine how shifting demographics and an increasingly diverse population have contributed to the direction of the city and its future path.

The event begins with a conversation between William Blomquist, professor of political science and dean of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, and Rozelle Boyd, retired president of the Indianapolis City County Council, discussing “Understanding the Evolving Indianapolis Electorate.”

“The Taylor Symposium has been a signature event drawing campus and community together for a remarkable 25 years now,” said William Blomquist, dean of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. “I’m looking forward to this year’s symposium in particular, talking about political change in our city over the past quarter-century with Rozelle Boyd, and listening to the other participants—it’s a terrific line-up.”

Panel discussions follow on the topics of “White Flight and the Politics of Place” and ” Building a Multicultural Community.”

Panelists and moderators include:

  • Amos Brown, director of strategic research, 100.9 Radio Now.
  • Patricia Castaneda, cultural consultant, SosaGroup.
  • Olgen Williams, deputy mayor of Indianapolis.
  • David Coats, associate director, The Polis Center.
  • Terri Morris Downs, executive director, Immigrant Welcome Center.
  • Johnny Goldfinger, associate professor of political science, director of prelaw studies, Marian University.
  • Lun Kham Pieper, attorney at law.
  • John Ketzenberger, president, Indiana Fiscal Policy Institute.

Byron D’Andra Orey, professor and chair of political science at Jackson State University, will deliver the keynote address, “Contemporary Topics in the Study of Race and Politics,” during the symposium luncheon. Luncheon activities also include IUPUI Chancellor Charles R. Bantz’s presentation of the Joseph T. Taylor Excellence in Diversity Award and a performance by the Indianapolis improv group ComedySportz.

In the days leading up the event members of the campus community and visitors will also be able to share their views on race and politics in Indianapolis on the IUPUI Democracy Plaza walls.

LEU continuing credits are available to Indiana’s library professionals for select workshops and, pending approval, CLE credits to attorneys for this event.

For questions about the educational credits or event program, contact Lauralee Wikkerink, lstel@iupui.edu or 317-278-1839.

For the past quarter century, the Joseph T. Taylor Symposium has tackled issues of concern to Indianapolis residents. The symposium is named for the late Joseph T. Taylor, the first dean of the School of Liberal Arts. Taylor is remembered for his commitment to dialogue and diversity. The 2014 symposium is presented by the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI in partnership with the Department of Political Science and the Polis Center, with support from the Spirit & Place Festival, IUPUI Democracy Plaza, and the IUPUI Common Theme Project.

Deadline extended: applications for Liberal Arts scholarships

Student applications for Liberal Arts school-wide scholarships – deadline extended from Jan. 15 to Jan. 27, 8:00 AM.

Letters of recommendation remain due Feb. 1, 5:00 p.m. to CA401 or CA243D or via email to samsMgr@iupui.edu or aajones@iupui.edu.

Department specific scholarships and awards have deadlines from Jan. 15-Feb. 25.

All department/programs scholarships and awards must submit recipient information by March 1. The website is now being updated.

This extension allows time for faculty to identify students who may be strong candidates for project-based scholarships that require a faculty mentor, such as:

Mary F. Crisler Scholarship (research project – $3,000 each; up to 5 projects can receive funding), The Loretta Lunsford Scholarship (educational project – $3000 each; up to 10 projects can receive funding) and

Ray Russo Faculty/Student Technology Award (technology in the classroom project – $500, 1 recipient).

This applies to other scholarships on the School of Liberal Arts school-wide scholarships website.

University center founders honored at Walker/Douglass lecture series

Two founders of university centers focused on African American business ventures were honored for their contributions during an Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis lecture series named for historic businesswoman Madam C.J. Walker.

Juliet E.K. Walker, a pioneer scholar of black business history in America, received the first Madame C.J. Walker Lifetime Achievement Award during the inaugural Madame C.J. Walker/Frederick Douglass Annual Lecture Series on Dec. 6 at the Jewel Center in Indianapolis.

Juliet Walker is the founder of the Center for Black Business History, Entrepreneurship and Technology at the University of Texas at Austin, where she has been a professor of history since 2001.

Bessie House-Soremekun, director of Africana studies in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, received the Global African American Activist Ambassador Award.

House-Soremekun is founding executive director of the Center for Global Entrepreneurship and Sustainable Development, part of the School of Liberal Arts. The center’s mission is to build entrepreneurial capacity and sustainable development initiatives in America and African countries.

Juliet Walker, who earned her Ph.D. in American history from the University of Chicago, is considered the foremost scholar in black business history in America. Her development of that field is linked to the publication of her book, “Free Frank: A Black Pioneer on the Antebellum Frontier.” Her book, “The History of Black Business in America: Capitalism, Race, Entrepreneurship,” was the first comprehensive study of African American businesses.

“It is entirely befitting for Professor Walker to receive this prestigious award … for the first woman to establish a major field in black entrepreneurship to (receive the inaugural) award named after the first female self-made millionaire in the United States,” said Walker’s letter of nomination.

photo house-soremekun

Bessie House-Soremekun

The Walker/Douglass lecture series was co-hosted and co-created by the Africana Studies Program, an academic unit of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, under the leadership of House-Soremekun, and the Frederick Douglass Papers in in the Institute for American Thought in the School of Liberal Arts, led by Professor John Kaufman-McKivigan.

The theme for this year’s event was “The Life and Times of Madame C.J. Walker: The Historical Development of a Business Empire.” Madam Walker was a self-made African American millionaire, having made a fortune from beauty and hair-care businesses before her death in 1919. Juliet Walker was the luncheon keynote speaker for the event.

The Activist Ambassador Award acknowledges House-Soremekun, also professor of political science and Africana studies at IUPUI, for investing in multicultural networking; exhibiting hope and faith for a brighter future for African-Americans; and bridge building to ensure the African-American community is enlightened and enhanced.

“The presentation of this award is emblematic of the impact that Dr. House-Soremekun has made both at home and abroad,” said David A. Scott Sr., who presented the award to House-Soremekun on behalf of the African American Restoration Movement of Indianapolis and the Globe Changers Movement.

Final Faculty Reading: Celebrating the Careers of Anne Williams and Jim Powell, Senior Lecturers, Department of English

Thursday December 5, 2013
5:00 – 8:00 p.m.
Cavanaugh Hall 508
425 University Boulevard

Celebrating the Careers of Anne Williams and Jim Powell, Senior Lecturers, Department of English.

Light refreshments will be served. Sponsored by the Department of English in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

For more information, please contact Professor Thorington Springer jtspring@iupui.edu.

‘Woman President’ authors examine factors that have kept women out of the White House

In Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis professor Kristina Horn Sheeler and Colorado State University professor Karrin Vasby Anderson examine the 2008 candidacies of Clinton and Palin, and presidential campaigns of other women, along with campaign public addresses, political journalism and punditry, political humor, and television and movie depictions of female presidents. The authors uncover a political and popular culture backlash against women that has kept the White House a man’s place.

“When media depictions of female candidates are based on sexist stereotypes, or worse yet, pornographic and misogynistic framing, we have not just a political culture that discredits political women, but a larger cultural undercurrent that demonstrates a backlash against the gains women have made in the last decade,” Sheeler said.

Sheeler is an associate professor and chair of the Department of Communication Studies in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. Anderson is an associate professor of communication studies at Colorado State University in Fort Collins. The duo also co-authored “Governing Codes: Gender, Metaphor, and Political Identity.”

In “Woman President: Confronting Postfeminist Political Culture,” Sheeler and Anderson provide a discussion of U.S. presidentiality as a unique rhetorical role. Within that framework, they review women’s historical and contemporary presidential bids, placing special emphasis on the 2008 campaign. They also consider how presidentiality is framed in candidate oratory, campaign journalism, film and television, digital media and political parody.

“Everyone seeking a more complete understanding of the presidency, campaign rhetoric, gender studies and the role of the media in the portrayal of women in the White House and in coverage of women in campaigns, including the election of 2008, will find the scholarship and analysis in this book of value,” said Janet M. Martin, author of “The Presidency and Women: Promise, Performance and Illusion in the White House” and professor of government at Bowdoin College.

“Examining women’s historical and recent presidential campaigns, television and movie depictions of women presidents, and the 2008 Clinton and Palin candidacies, Sheeler and Anderson reveal the hegemonic power wielded by an essentialist white masculinity. Their argument is uncompromising and compelling, controversial and persuasive; their book engages and challenges readers across the disciplines,” said MaryAnne Borrelli, author of” The Politics of the President’s Wife” and professor of government at Connecticut College.

Sheeler’s and Anderson’s book, published by Texas A & M University Press, hit bookstore shelves last month.

Call for nominations: Madame C.J. Walker Lifetime Achievement Award

Deadline: Monday, November 24, 2013 at 5:00 P.M.

The Africana Studies Program and Frederick Douglass Papers at Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis invite nominations forthe inaugural Madame C.J. Walker Lifetime Achievement Award, the first of which will be presented at the upcoming Madame C.J. Walker/Frederick Douglass Annual Lecture Series that will take place on December 6, 2013. This award is named in honor of the phenomenal Madame C.J. Walker, who is credited with being the first female self-made millionaire in the United States as a result of her creative genius, hard work and ingenuity in creating a hair-care business in Indianapolis, Indiana.

The above programs invite nominations for senior scholars who currently hold the rank of Associate or Full Professor. In particular,  nominations are sought for an individual who has served as a dedicated pioneer and innovative scholar in the fields of History, Black Business History, African or African American Entrepreneurship, Business and Marketing, Sociology, Women’s Studies, African Studies, African American Studies, Anthropology, or other related disciplines.

According the Call for Nominations: “We seek to honor a scholar who has served as an intellectual front-runner and scholar extraordinaire in uncovering the contributions, historical narratives, and real world experiences of African or African American entrepreneurs as they created various products and services to enhance the economic marketplace and promote economic development in their communities and nations. We seek to honor a scholar who has dedicated his/her lifetime to the relentless pursuit of knowledge and all that this embodies to create a large body of research and publications which has been considered by his/her peers to be of the highest quality. We seek scholars who have made indelible impacts on the academy both in terms of the sheer volume of their publications as well as the depth of their research. We seek to honor scholars who have performed original, innovative work to illuminate the historical and contemporary activities, accomplishments, and manifestations of entrepreneurial endeavors in order to demonstrate how it has impacted the survival mechanisms of African or African American entrepreneurs either on the continent of Africa or in the African Diaspora with regard to the promulgation of various principles of self-help and economic self-sufficiency.”

Please, email all letters of nomination along with a resume of the nominee to Dr. Bessie House-Soremekun, the Director of Africana Studies at Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis at beshouse@iupui.edu.