Liberal Arts Sabbatical Series returns to IUPUI for 2015-16 school year

INDIANAPOLIS—Professors in the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue iu-logoUniversity Indianapolis will discuss their sabbatical projects throughout the 2015-16 school year. Topics include the process of creating the forged writings of Madeleine Hachard, growing up during the Nigerian civil war, and using online resources to teach drama.

The series is free and open to the public. The lectures will take place from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. in the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd., Room 268.

Friday, Oct. 9:Jing Wang, world languages and cultures, “Revealing Textbook Writers’ Perspectives.” Well-written textbooks are language instructors’ best friends; yet poorly prepared ones can burden instructors. This study interviews textbook writers to examine popular beginning and intermediate Chinese language textbooks used in the U.S. Study results reveal theoretical frameworks used by the textbook writers and consequently provide key information on textbook selection and language instruction—in Chinese and beyond.

Tuesday, Oct. 27: Daniella Kostroun, history, “The Invention of Madeleine Hachard and Other Discoveries About the 1727 Ursuline Mission to New Orleans.” Madeleine Hachard is considered Louisiana’s first female author, but the writings attributed to her are forgeries. Learn about the discovery of evidence documenting the fraud behind Hachard’s alleged writings as well as new insights about the pioneering Ursulines once we move beyond the “myth” of Hachard.

Friday, Nov. 13: David Craig, religious studies, “Religious Freedom and the Politics of Public Accommodations.” Given the controversy around Indiana’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act, how should we think about corporate religious freedom and public accommodations? Shifting the focus from individuals’ religious beliefs to organizations’ mission integrity may create more common ground.

Tuesday, Feb. 2: Una Osili, economics/philanthropic studies, “War and Human Capital: Growing Up During the Nigerian Civil War.” Civil conflict is an obstacle to development in the developing world. The Nigerian Civil War was the first modern civil war in sub Saharan Africa. Four decades later, this study documents the war’s significant, long-run economic impact. Those exposed to the war as children and adolescents exhibit reduced adult stature, as well as adverse education, health and marriage outcomes.

Friday, Feb. 12: Brian McDonald, English, “A Dramatic Difference! Enhancing the Teaching and Learning of Drama With Online Tools.” Canvas, IUPUI’s new online teaching and learning environment, has user-friendly features that enhance faculty opportunities and student experiences. How can these capabilities be used to develop assignments that integrate both the textual and performative aspects of dramatic literature?

Wednesday, March 16: Anne Royalty, economics, “What Happens When Physicians Work Together?” Multi-specialty physician practices are increasingly common. These integrated settings may make it easier to coordinate patient care for patients seeing more than one doctor in the practice. Do practices that include general practitioners and specialists improve health outcomes or eliminate wasteful spending?

Visitor parking is available for a fee in the Vermont Street Garage.

For more information or to RSVP, email

New IUPUI certificate program addresses need for translation professionals

INDIANAPOLIS — The current demand for skilled language translators far outweighs the 480965_w296supply available, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics has indicated that employment of interpreters and translators is projected to grow 46 percent from 2012 to 2022, much faster than the average for all occupations.

A new certificate offered by the Department of World Languages and Cultures in the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will prepare students for these careers. Applications for the new Graduate Certificate in Translation Studies are now being accepted. The post-graduate program begins in fall 2016.

“The new certificate program will help prepare the workforce needed for the numerous requests for the growing limited English proficiency populations in Indiana and in the U.S. by providing quality translations through emerging technologies,” said professor Enrica Ardemagni, director of the Graduate Certificate in Translation Studies.

Globalization of business, law and trade relations and changing U.S. demographics have increased demand for translation skills in many fields, especially educational, medical, legal and technical. Translation studies is the interdisciplinary study of the theory, description and application of translation, interpretation and localization. It is recognized as an academic discipline that includes the application of theory and practice to specific fields of translation.

Academically well-prepared and highly motivated individuals with advanced language proficiency in English and French, German and/or Spanish who are interested in the study of translation are invited to apply for the new IUPUI certificate program. A baccalaureate degree in a language from an accredited institution is required for admission; however, other degrees will be taken into consideration based on completion of prerequisites in preparation for graduate-level study. The application deadline is Feb. 1.

A minimum of 18 credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree is required to complete coursework for the IU Graduate Certificate in Translation Studies, which also includes advanced courses in interpreting (Spanish only). A required internship will give students hands-on practice to ensure command of the lexical precision and detailed understanding of contexts or terminologies as well as a nuanced sense of the purpose of language and its designated audience.

“We are proud to add this new certificate program to our program offerings in the IU School of Liberal Arts,” Dean Thomas J. Davis said. “These students will work with faculty in the Department of World Languages and Cultures as well as in other departments and the community to hone their translation skills, as well as to offer a much-needed service to the growing limited-English-proficiency populations of the state. These future translators will comprise the next generation of professionals who will ensure access to needed services; they will, as well, broaden the scope of research that can be done in several languages through exemplary translated works.”

The graduate certificate will be officially announced on International Translation Day at IUPUI. The event takes place from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Sept. 30 at the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd. Bolivian author Maria Cristina Botelho will make a special presentation and deliver a bilingual reading from her book “Memoria de las Mariposas.”

Langsam/Oswalt Lecturer Summer Fellowship for Full-Time Non-Tenure Track Teaching Faculty

The Langsam/Oswalt Faculty Award award supports a summer fellowship for non-tenureiu-logo track, full-time teaching faculty to allow them to take a summer “sabbatical” from teaching to pursue professional development activities. This award is for $6,000, and can be used for summer salary (including required withholdings).

*****NOTE: The timeline on this award application has been moved to December to give departments time to change summer teaching schedules, as necessary.

Applications may be by individuals or by departments/programs and must detail proposed professional development activity that supports their teaching mission. Activities supported by this award include those that lead to scholarly dissemination of knowledge about teaching, curriculum development projects, and other activities of long-term professional benefit to the teacher and the unit, including related travel and/or conference expenses as well as library and equipment acquisitions. A committee appointed by the Dean of the School of Liberal Arts shall determine the recipient of the Fellowship based on the merit of the proposal.

Candidates must be non-tenure track, full time teaching faculty of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and have worked in this capacity for a minimum of three years. Visiting faculty are not eligible for this Fellowship. This Fellowship can be received in conjunction with other funding.

Submit the following:

  • A maximum of a three-page proposal detailing the activity and at least one letter of support. The entire proposal may not exceed more than 5 pages.
  • A current CV (does not count in page limit).

Submit all required documents, electronically, to Candice L. Smith, by 5:00 p.m. on Monday, November 23, 2015.

Three IU projects receive $690,000 in latest round of National Endowment for the Humanities funding

INDIANAPOLIS — The National Endowment for the Humanities has awarded $690,000 to unnamedthree Indiana University research and learning projects.

The NEH grants will fund a summer training program for university and college faculty interested in exploring the cultures of African and African diaspora cities; a workshop series on applying digital methods to issues in Native American and Indigenous studies; and the Santayana Edition’s ongoing publication of writings of American philosopher George Santayana.

The three IU projects — two on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus and one at Indiana University Bloomington — are among 212 projects sharing $36.6 million in recent NEH funding.

“The grant projects represent the very best of humanities scholarship and programming,” NEH Chairman William Adams said. “NEH is proud to support programs that illuminate the great ideas and events of our past, broaden access to our nation’s many cultural resources, and open up for us new ways of understanding the world in which we live.”

The IUPUI projects, both housed in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, are:

“The Digital Native American and Indigenous Studies Project,” $249,817 for a series of three workshops on teaching new digital methods and exploring issues of digital cultural heritage in Native American studies, to be directed by IUPUI assistant professor of history Jennifer Guiliano. Yale University, Arizona State University and IUPUI will in turn host a three-day workshop for 35 participants.
“The Works of George Santayana,” directed by associate professor of philosophy Martin Coleman, which involves the preparation for print and digital publication of American philosopher George Santayana’s “Three Philosophical Poets” (Vol. 8), “Winds of Doctrine” (Vol. 9) and “Scepticism and Animal Faith” (Vol. 8) and the beginning of work on “Realm of Being,” (Vol. 16). A three-year grant of $225,000 and $23,623 in matching funds to the Santayana Edition will provide salaries for an editor and graduate student interns who will contribute to the production of the printed and electronic texts.

Indiana University Bloomington received $191,592 for “Arts of Survival: Recasting Lives in African Cities,” a three-week seminar for 25 college and university faculty who will study the arts and culture of Accra, Lagos, Nairobi, New Orleans and Port-au-Prince. The project is led by Eileen Julien, director of IU’s Institute for Advanced Study.

Organizers believe the IUPUI Native American studies project is the first workshop specifically focused on digital humanities that encourages participants in the development of a more systematic approach to integrating digital technologies within and throughout academic institutions, cultural organizations and tribal communities.

“While tremendous work has been done around the preservation and access of analog materials within Native American communities, there has been much less attention paid to the ways in which digital objects, practices and methods function within Native communities and through Native American studies scholarship,” Guiliano said.

The international reputation and broad appeal of Santayana justifies the Santayana Edition’s aim of preserving and disseminating Santayana’s thought in reliable and accurate texts. This will be published as “The Works of George Santayana” so readers can research, evaluate and appreciate Santayana’s role in shaping American letters, Coleman said.

Talking About Freedoms without Freaking Out

An IUPUI discussion series powered by Spirit & Place, a legacy project of The Polis iupuiCenter, part of IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, with support from the IUPUI Office of Community Engagement, Indiana Humanities, IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law, Center for Interfaith Cooperation, and The Center for Civic Literacy.

Where do individual rights begin and end? Which religious liberties are protected by the Constitution? Who decides what is “right” when our ideals about religious freedom, freedom of speech, and freedom from discrimination clash? How do we get past media sound bites and sensational opinions to really talk about our freedoms without freaking out? Explore which freedoms the First Amendment does – and does not – protect in our summer discussion series.

June 19, 12-1 p.m.
Hate Speech and the First Amendment: Values in Conflict
Scottish Rite Cathedral – FREE
At what point, if at all, should so-called “hate speech” become illegal? During the monthly luncheon of the League of Women Voters ‎of Indianapolis, hear attorney and civic leader Don Knebel discuss hate speech and the First Amendment.

June 24, 6:00 – 7:30 p.m. (reception to follow)
Can We Talk about RFRA without Talking Past One Another?
IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law Wynne Courtroom – FREE (register at
It’s fair to say that the controversy over RFRA raised more heat than light. This panel aims to model thoughtful conversation on the constitutional and philosophical questions raised by the RFRA debate. Hear from executive director of the ACLU of Indiana Jane Henegar, IU McKinney Professor of Law John Hill, and attorney and IBJ columnist Peter Rusthoven. Moderated by IU McKinney Professor of Law Robert Katz. 1.5 hours of CLE credit available.

July 13, 5-7 p.m.
Trivia Night
Sun King Brewery – FREE
We’re redefining the meaning of “bar exam” with a night of First Amendment trivia and conversation at Sun King. Grab a beer and your thinking cap and join Indiana Humanities and Spirit & Place for quiz night! Open to anyone 21+, there will be prizes for the night’s sharpest legal eagles.

More info at

Book by IUPUI professor puts Native American mascot imagery into historical context

INDIANAPOLIS — Twenty-first-century efforts to legitimize Native American athletic team Guiliano-225x300names and mascots miscast tribal history, argues the author of a book examining the history of Native American imagery in college sports and exposing its ties to a crisis of identity among white, middle-class men.

Under pressure from the NCAA, Native Americans and others, many colleges have dropped their use of Native American team names and mascots. The NCAA has granted waivers to a few schools, including Florida State University, which has the support of the Florida Seminole Tribe for its use of the Seminole nickname.

“There were no Native American tribes involved in the creation of these identities, so why would colleges go to them for approval now?” said Jennifer Guiliano, assistant professor of history at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and author of “Indian Spectacle: College Mascots and the Anxiety of Modern America.”

Contrary to popular thought, mascots do not represent the history of particular tribes, but rather they commingle native identities across historical periods and tribal lines, the professor said.

Guiliano said “Indian Spectacle” points out that “none of the mascots were created with accurate tribal representation.”

Representations of Indians became “tied to mascotry in the 1920s when the University of Illinois — in an attempt to create a half-time spectacle for its band performance — merges with Indian representation,” said Guiliano, who teaches in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Looking at the history of the creation and spread of Native American mascots and imagery, one finds middle-class men who are facing identity issues, Guiliano said.

In the face of challenges to their identity — immigration, urbanization and industrialization — white middle-class men in the 1920s and 1930s used Native American culture and imagery to reduce their anxiety about who they were and what mattered, according to Guiliano, who as a youth attended University of Illinois games and watched Chief Illiniwek perform. Competitive sports provided an arena in which men could legitimately act out their anxieties and celebrate their identity by cheering on misguided, narrow perceptions of Native Americans as inherently violent, she said.

“Because it was a moment when they couldn’t test their masculinity on the battlefield — America wasn’t fighting a war — the sort of battle on the football field became a replacement on how you could prove your masculinity,” Guiliano said. Men who weren’t good enough to play chose to be in the band or to be ardent fans, and they adopted the Indian identity to alleviate their anxiety over societal changes, according to the professor.

Italian Film Festival returns to IUPUI for fourth year

INDIANAPOLIS — The Italian Film Festival returns to Indianapolis for a fourth year April 24 Italian Film Festivalwith a slate of six films running through May 3.

Indianapolis is one of 12 cities around the nation hosting the Italian Film Festival USA. The festival is a collaboration between the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and the Department of World Languages and Cultures in the School of Liberal Arts and is sponsored by the National Italian American Foundation, Istituto Italiano di Cultura and the Italian Heritage Society of Indiana, as well as other local corporate and individual sponsors.

All films are presented with English subtitles and are free and open to the public.

The films will be shown in the Lilly Auditorium on the lower level of the IUPUI University Library, 755 W. Michigan St.

The schedule for the festival is as follows:

“La Sedia della Felicità” (“The Chair of Happiness”), comedy, 6 p.m. Friday, April 24: A treasure hidden in a chair; a cosmetologist and a tattoo artist who fall in love while looking for the treasure; a mysterious priest looming over them like a threat. Rivals at first, then allies, the three of them become the protagonists of an incredible adventure.

“Un Ragazzo d’Oro” (“A Golden Boy”), drama, 3 p.m. Saturday, April 25: Davide, son of a screenwriter, is an advertising copywriter whose dream is to pen something beautiful. But he suffers from anxiety and lack of satisfaction. When his father suddenly dies, Davide returns home to Rome where he meets a beautiful editor who wants to publish the book that Davide’s father had allegedly been writing.

“Song’e Napule,” (“Song of Napoli”), comedy, 3 p.m. Sunday, April 26: Paco is a refined but unemployed pianist. His mother lands him a job with the police, but his total ineptitude relegates him to a judiciary warehouse. Then one day Police Commissioner Cammarota, who is on the trail of the faceless yet dangerous killer known as O’Fantasma, arrives. He needs a pianist to infiltrate the Lollo Love band, which will perform at the wedding of the daughter of the mafia boss of Somma Vesuviana.

“La Mafia Uccide Solo d’Estate” (“The Mafia Kills Only in Summer”), comedy, 6 p.m. Friday, May 1: A story told through the eyes of Arturo, who grows up in Palermo, a fascinating yet terrifying city ruled by the mafia. It is, in fact, a love story about Arturo’s attempts to win the heart of his beloved Flora, who he considers a princess and with whom he has fallen head over heels in love since elementary school. As this tender and amusing story unfolds, Sicily’s most tragic events from the ’70s to the ’90s take place.

“Anime Nere” (“Black Souls”), drama, 3 p.m. Saturday, May 2: The story of three brothers — the sons of shepherds with ties to the ‘ndrangheta — and their divided souls. Luigi, the youngest, is an international drug dealer. Rocco, Milanese by adoption, is to all appearances a middle-class businessman, thanks to his brother’s ill-gotten gains. Luciano, the eldest, harbors a pathological fantasy of pre-industrial Calabria. After a trivial argument, Luciano’s 20-year-old son Leo carries out an act of intimidation against a bar protected by a rival clan — the spark that lights the fire.

“Il Capitale Umano” (“Human Capital”), drama, 3 p.m. Sunday, May 3: A winter night, on a suburban road, a cyclist is hit by a SUV. What exactly happened? The only sure thing is that this accident will change the destiny of two families, that of Giovanni Bernaschi, a top finance executive, and that of Dino Ossola, an ambitious real estate developer who is on the verge of bankruptcy. Liberally based on the book of the same name by Stephen Amidon.

Bodenhamer publishes new book on mapping and the humanities

The Polis Center’s Executive Director David Bodenhamer shares his expertise in spatial 9780253015600_medhumanities in a recently published book, Deep Maps and Spatial Humanities. Part of the IU Press Series on Spatial Humanities, the book appeared in February 2015 and features essays that investigate deep mapping and the spatial narratives that stem from it.

A deep map is a detailed, multimedia depiction of a place and all that exists within it. Whereas traditional maps serve as statements, deep maps serve as conversations. They use Geographic Information Systems as one tool among many digital technologies to enhance an understanding of space and place. Deep mapping encompasses platform, process, and product, with all three expressions embracing the multiple forms of evidence used by humanists and social scientists. This highly innovative approach to questions of space and place aims to make technology more amenable to the needs of scholars and to facilitate a more robust, visual, and interactive spatial narrative [more about Deep Maps and Spatial Narratives]. Each essay in the volume examines deep mapping as a means of exploring the complex problems of society and culture through new creative spaces that are visual, structurally open, multimedia, and multi-layered.

Contributors to the volume come from a variety of disciplines, including GIScience, computer science, history, religious studies, and geography. “What makes deep mapping exciting as an approach is that it draws upon the insights of many disciplines to help us understand how space and culture influence each other—and it uses new technical means to facilitate this understanding,” said Bodenhamer. “We no longer are confined to the flat map but now can use dynamic virtual spaces to explore our data, develop new questions, and enrich our perspective on how society and culture have evolved.”

In addition to his leadership of the Polis Center, Bodenhamer is Professor of History at the IU School of Liberal Arts and editor of IJHAC: A Journal of the Digital Humanities(Edinburgh University Press). In addition to his international reputation as a leader in the spatial humanities, he also is a well-published scholar in American legal and constitutional history. He is joined as editor of this volume by John Corrigan is the Lucius Moody Bristol Distinguished Professor of Religion and Professor of History at Florida State University and Trevor M. Harris is Eberly Professor of Geography at West Virginia University. The three scholars also serve as founding directors of the Virtual Center for Spatial Humanities; they jointly led an international NEH Advanced Institute on Spatial Narratives and Deep maps that was held at IUPUI in June 2012.

The book is now available for purchase at IU Press and other vendors.

IUPUI University Library to cohost Digital Public Library of America’s national conference

With 90-plus digitized collections of unique and historically important materials accessible to any user via the Web, the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis University Library is gaining recognition as a national leader in digital scholarship.image courtesy of

That leadership role will expand this month as the library co-hosts the Digital Public Library of America’s national conference.

The conference, DPLAfest 2015 takes place April 17 and 18 in Indianapolis.

As co-hosts, IUPUI University Library, the Indianapolis Public Library, the Indiana State Library and the Indiana Historical Society are helping to organize and staff the event and will serve as meeting sites for conference workshops, presentations and discussions. The four local groups had submitted a proposal to host the conference, which 300 people from across the country are currently registered to attend.

“We are excited to be given the opportunity to share the city of Indianapolis with members of the Digital Public Library of America and showcase some of the work that we have done in preserving the history of Indianapolis,” said Jennifer A. Johnson, digital scholarship outreach librarian in the University Library Center for Digital Scholarship.

With its community partners, the IUPUI University Library has created over 90 digital collections, covering topics in local history such as Crispus Attucks High School, poet James Whitcomb Riley and Indiana artists.

The Digital Public Library of America offers open online access to almost 9 million items through partnerships with national-caliber content providers such as the HathiTrust and the Library of Congress, plus a network of member archives, museums, cultural heritage centers and libraries such as the IUPUI University Library, all of whom operate under state-based DPLA service hubs. As such, the two-year-old DPLA is a goldmine for researchers around the globe, making the riches of America’s libraries and museums freely available online to the worldwide public.

“For example, a basketball fan in Texas could view Oscar Robertson’s high school scrapbook about the 1954-55 Crispus Attucks state championship team by searching the Crispus Attucks Museum digital collection,” Johnson said.

The DPLAfest conference offers a mix of interactive workshops and hands-on activities, as well as presentations and discussions for a range of professionals including librarians, archivists, museum staff, developers, technologists, publishers and authors, teachers, students and others.

While the conference will feature several national speakers, the IUPUI and Bloomington campuses will be represented in a wide range of presentations.  Presenters include:

David Lewis, Kristi Palmer and Jenny Johnson, IUPUI University Library.

Andrea Copeland, IUPUI School of Informatics and Computing.

Jason Kelly, IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute.

Lea Shaver, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law.

Benjamin Keele, Ruth Lilly Law Library.

Robert McDonald, Indiana University associate dean for library technologies.

Dirk Herr-Hoyman, Indiana University Bloomington, HathiTrust Research Center operations manager.

Crispus Attucks 1955 championship basketball team reunites to dedicate new court

1955 Crispus Attucks Anniversary CelebrationSixty years ago this spring, while there was still overt public school segregation in Indianapolis, the Crispus Attucks High School basketball team won the Indiana state basketball championship.  More than just a basketball game, the event was a milestone for the African American community in Indianapolis and for the city.  As you may know, the 1955 Crispus Attucks team included Hall of Famer Oscar Robertson along with several other great players.

What you may not know is that the students who attended Crispus Attucks and lived in this part of town used to play pick-up basketball on an unpaved field, nicknamed the “Dust Bowl”, the site of which is on the IUPUI campus between Michigan Street and Lockefield Gardens.  Recently, IUPUI built a basketball court on that site and our students now play there for fun and recreation.
On April 1st, marking the 60th anniversary of the Crispus Attucks championship, the new basketball court on the old “Dust Bowl” site will be dedicated. This will be followed by a reunion and panel discussion with the players from the 1955 championship team, including Oscar Robertson.
Sponsored by Sports Journalism at the School of Liberal Arts, the National Sports Journalism Center, the Department of Tourism, Conventions, and Event Management, and the IUPUI Division of Student Affairs.