Archive for School of Liberal Arts

Indiana history journal examines public art and controversy

IMH

Art, race and space fill the most recent issue of the Indiana Magazine of History. In an issue guest-edited by Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis public historian Modupe Labode, leading scholars of public art and urban life show how art can reveal fault lines in modern society.

The March 2014 issue features four articles reflecting on the artwork that prompted IUPUI’s recent symposium, “Art, Race and Space”: artist Fred Wilson’s proposed “E Pluribus Unum” sculpture, which re-imagined a new identity for the freed slave portrayed on the Soldiers and Sailors Monument in downtown Indianapolis. Wilson’s work, commissioned for the city’s Cultural Trail, was ultimately canceled after long and intense public controversy.

In her introduction to this special issue, Labode, who helped organize the original symposium, revisits the contentious history of Wilson’s proposal. She reviews the public struggles over the freedman image and its placement in the city center, and the tensions of race, class and public space discussed by symposium members. Wilson himself follows with a discussion of monuments and memorials that have inspired his work and comments on some of his installations for museums in New York City and Savannah, Ga.

Art historian Bridget Cooks looks at Wilson’s work in light of the conflicting ideals of preservation and activism. Geographers Owen Dwyer and Matthew McCourt examine the history of the Indianapolis Cultural Trail and consider the relationship of the public spaces and public art along its eight miles.

Two articles examine other public artworks that have spoken to and created public controversy outside Indiana. Art historian Renée Ater studies the public outcry that followed the commissioning by Rocky Mount, N.C., of a statue of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Historian Erika Doss discusses a Duluth, Minn., public memorial to three young black men who were lynched in that city in 1920, arguing that such public art can “generate profound responses of renewal and reconciliation.”

The Indiana Magazine of History is published quarterly by the history department of Indiana University Bloomington. For general information on the articles or to order a copy of the issue, contact the editorial office at 812-855-4139.

IUPUI faculty and students help FBI identify cultural artifacts

larry zimmerman

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis anthropology and museum studies faculty and students are assisting the FBI in identifying and preserving cultural artifacts found in the home of a Rush County, Ind., man.

The FBI and its multidisciplinary team are working on repatriating items of cultural patrimony.

Larry J. Zimmerman, professor of anthropology and museum studies; Holly Cusack-McVeigh, assistant professor of anthropology and museum studies; and Charmayne “Charli” Champion-Shaw, director of the Office of America Indian Programs at IUPUI, are among the art, cultural and museum experts working as consultants at the site about 35 miles southeast of Indianapolis.

“Our job is to assist the FBI in the identification of artifacts, help as liaisons with Native Americans and take care of the artifacts in keeping with best museum practices and FBI evidential procedures,” Zimmerman said. Zimmerman also holds the title of Public Scholar of Native American Representation, a shared position with the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art.

Students and alumni of museum studies classes taught by Cusack-McVeigh, also Public Scholar of Collections and Community Curation, are helping to handle the artifacts as they are registered, photographed and packaged.

The IUPUI faculty and students participated in an FBI briefing April 1 and a press conference April 2 about the matter. At this time, the IUPUI professors and students are not available for additional media interviews.

“The Education of Auma Obama,” a film by Branwen Okpako: screening and discussion with filmmaker

branwen okpako
Wednesday, April 23, 2014
6:00 – 9:00 p.m.
University Library, Lily Auditorium
755 W. Michigan St., Indianapolis, IN 46202

Admission free Reception with light refreshments to follow

Branwen Okpako is a highly talented and successful Nigerian-Welsh documentary filmmaker, who now lives and works in Berlin, Germany, where in 1999 she received a degree in Film Directing from the prestigious German Film and Television Academy in Berlin. Since 1995 she has produced several videos, mixed media installations, and films. Her work has been selected to be shown at film festivals in Europe, Great Britain, Africa, North America, and the Middle East. In addition to her work as a filmmaker, Okpako offers seminars, workshops, and projects in film studies and filmmaking and lectures at universities in the US, Canada, Europe, and other parts of the world. Topics of her presentations include: Intersections of Race, Gender, and Otherness in Film; Black Identity in German Cinema; Migration and Multiculturalism in Contemporary Europe; The Art of Filmmaking; The Theory and Practice of Screenplay Writing, to name just a few.

For her 2000/2001 film, Dreckfresser (Dirt for Dinner), Okpako received, among others, the German Next-Generation-First-Steps Award for Best Documentary Film. For her 2002 film, Sehe ich was du nicht siehst? (Do I see what you do not see?), she received the D-motion special prize for the city of Halle, Germany. Her most acclaimed film, The Education of Auma Obama, (Die Geschichte der Auma Obama) has brought Okpako much attention. The film is a captivating and intimate portrait of the U.S. president’s older half-sister, who embodies a post-colonial, feminist identity. Dr. Auma Obama studied German at the University of Heidelberg from 1981 to 1987 before continuing with graduate studies at the University of Bayreuth, earning a PhD in 1996. Her dissertation was on the conception of labor in Germany and its literary reflections. For The Education of Auma Obama, Okpako received the 2012 African Movie Academy Award for Best Diaspora Documentary, the Festival Founders Award for Best Documentary at the Pan African Film Festival in Los Angeles (both in 2012), and the Viewers Choice Award at the Africa International Film Festival (2011).

Her most recent project, Fluch der Medea (The Curse of Medea), a docu-drama about the life of the late German writer Christa Wolf, was shown at the Berlin Film Festival in 2014.

Okpako is currently a visiting professor of German at Earlham College in Richmond, Indiana. This event is co-sponsored by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and the IUPUI Max Kade German-American Center, with additional support from the Department of World Languages and Cultures and the German Program. For additional information contact: Jason M. Kelly, Director, IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, iahi@iupui.edu, (317) 274-1689 Claudia Grossmann, Interim Director, IUPUI Max Kade German-American Center,cgrossma@iupui.edu, (317) 274-3943

“Solving the Mystery of Australia’s African coins”: a conversation with members of the Past Masters team

African coin
Monday April 7, 2014
12:00 – 1:30 p.m.
IUPUI ES2132 Global Crossroads
902 W. New York Street, Indianapolis

In 1944, five coins from the medieval Sultanate of Kilwa in present day Tanzania were found on the north Australian coast. These rare coins have only been found outside of East Africa on two occasions (one in the ruins of Great Zimbabwe and another in Oman). How they travelled 8,000km to a remote island in north-east Arnhem Land was the subject of a multidisciplinary expedition in July 2013. Come and learn what was discovered by the Past Masters and also the next steps in unravelling the mystery.

Dr. Ian McIntosh is an adjunct professor of anthropology in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and author of many publications on the Yolngu of north-east Arnhem Land.

Michael Hermes, an expert in Indigenous cultural resource management, specializes in training Aboriginal cultural heritage officers.

Dr. Tim Stone is a specialist on the geomorphology of the northern Australian coastline with 30 years of experience with Aboriginal Australians and is best known for his work on what constitutes an archaeological site.

For more information, contact Ian McIntosh at imcintos@iupui.edu or 317 2743776

Health Communication Ph.D. launched

SLA at IUPUI logo

The Department of Communication Studies in the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis is now accepting applications for its newest post-graduate degree: a doctorate in health communication.

The new degree program opens in fall 2014. Academically well-prepared and highly motivated individuals interested in the study of health communication are invited to apply. A master’s degree is required for admission. The application deadline is Feb. 1.

Health communication is defined as the study and use of communication strategies to inform and influence decisions that affect health issues such as individual access to and use of health information; the dissemination of public health messages; consumer education on health issues; patient-health professional relationships; and health disparities. It is increasingly being recognized as a necessary element of efforts to improve both personal and public health.

The new degree program will help prepare the workforce needed for an ever-changing health care environment in which communication is becoming more vital to building relationships between patients and health care providers; encouraging people to adopt healthy behaviors; promoting public health initiatives; and helping society as a whole adapt to emerging technologies, according to Professor Jennifer Bute, director of graduate studies for the Department of Communication Studies.

“Health communication scholars and professionals are uniquely suited to aid not only their academic departments, but also the medical profession and the broader community in recognizing the critical role that communication plays in achieving health-related goals,” Bute said. “From supporting lifestyle changes to encouraging adherence to treatment plans to navigating changing health policies, communication is at the very heart of today’s most pressing health issues.”

A minimum of 90 credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree is required to complete coursework for the IU advanced degree in health communication. Credit hours required include coursework in communication theory and research methods, along with seminars in content areas such as health provider-consumer communication, intercultural communication and group communication. Students will also complete comprehensive exams and perform research in the field.

Students in the doctoral program will have opportunities to obtain competency for teaching and research in various areas, including health interpersonal relationships, intercultural health and mediated communication in health care such as health campaign development. Students will also participate in research on health and medical communication issues and develop skills necessary to translate research on clinical problems in practice.

Employment opportunities for degree recipients will include positions in academia as well as health care.

“We are proud to add this new Ph.D. program to our degree offerings in the IU School of Liberal Arts,” Dean William Blomquist said. “These doctoral students will work with faculty in the Department of Communication Studies and in other departments and schools across the IUPUI campus to improve research and practice in the growing and vital field of health communication. The graduates from this program will comprise the next generation of scholars helping to make health care, disease prevention and risk management in the United States and around the world more effective.”

International Women’s Day celebration

intl womens day logo
Friday March 21, 2014
6:30 p.m.
Lily Auditorium, University Library

This year International Women’s Day Celebration is scheduled for Thursday, 3/21, in the IUPUI University Library, Lilly Auditorium. It will open with a reception at 6:30 p.m., featuring local activists and a buffet of international eats, followed by a reading of Polish poet Agnieszka Kuciak’s rollicking _Distant Lands: An Anthology of Poets Who Don’t Exist_, a tour de force roster of made-up poets, performed by Andy Buchenot, Brandon Butcher, Stacey Emley, Chris Forhan, Gabe Harley, Terry Kirts, Keith Leonard, Jane Schultz, Susan Shepherd, Erica Swanfeldt Stout, Ben Van Wyke, and Jacqui Weeks.

If you’re interested in participating in the multicultural, multilingual open mike, contact Kelli Vorndran (klvorndr@umail.iu.edu) to reserve a slot. Reminder: Perform up to one page or poetry or a half page of prose–must be written by a woman. If you want to do a poem by a woman poet in another language, provide an English translation.

Susan Sutton study abroad program awardees announced

Eric Raider and Claudia Grossman

A Department of World Languages and Cultures faculty member in the IU School of Liberal Arts and an academic advisor in the Kelley School of Business were chosen as the 2014 recipients of the Susan Buck Sutton awards. The IUPUI Office of International Affairs presents the awards to a campus faculty member and a staff member who made significant contributions to study abroad programs at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

Claudia Grossman, a senior lecturer and interim director of the Max Kade German-American Center, and Eric Raider, a Kelley School of Business academic advisor, were presented their awards at the IUPUI International Festival on Feb. 27.

The award is named in honor of Susan Buck Sutton, who was the first associate vice chancellor for international affairs at IUPUI.

Selection of award recipients is based on efforts to promote a campus climate where students are encouraged to study abroad and new programs are developed and supported.

Grossman’s efforts were noted in a nominating letter that said, “It is hard to imagine today’s international landscape at IUPUI were it not for the extraordinary creativity and investment of time and energy that Claudia Grossman has spent over the last two decades on making study abroad a reality for many students and faculty across several schools on this campus.”

A list of Grossman’s accomplishments in the area of study abroad were cited, including study abroad program development, creation and instruction of courses connected with study abroad, program direction, student advising and publications related to study abroad.

Raider’s work to expand the undergraduate study abroad program at the business school was cited, with one nominator saying, “Eric took the reins of the Kelley undergraduate program and has not looked back. It is evident that Eric is passionate about study abroad and has already made a lasting impact on our programs in Kelley.”

Inaugural poet Richard Blanco highlights reading series

photo blanco

The Spring 2014 Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis features President Barack Obama’s second inaugural poet as a guest speaker.

The series kicks off with fiction writer and essayist Jacinda Townsend as guest reader on Thursday, Feb. 27. It concludes with a reading by 2013 inaugural poet Richard Blanco on Thursday, April 10.

Townsend will read from her works at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 27 in the Lilly Auditorium of University Library, 755 W. Michigan St. Townsend’s work is published in literary journals such as African Voices, Carve Magazine, The Maryland Review, Obsidian II, Passages North, Phoebe and Xavier Review, and anthologized in “Surreal South” and “Telling Stories: Fiction by Kentucky Feminists.” Her nonfiction appears in two different series of “Chicken Soup for the Soul.”

Townsend, who teaches writing fiction at Indiana University Bloomington, took her first creative writing class at Harvard and began registering for writing workshops while studying at Duke Law School. In 1999 she was a part of the prestigious Iowa Writer’s Workshop.

Blanco’s reading will take place at 7:30 p.m. April 10 in the Basile Auditorium of the Herron School of Art and Design, 735 W. New York St.

In 2013, Blanco served as the fifth inaugural poet of the United States, reading “One Today” during Obama’s second inauguration. He is the youngest poet and the first Latino, immigrant and openly gay writer to hold the honor. Following the Boston Marathon bombing, he wrote “Boston Strong” and read the piece at a benefit concert for bombing victims, as well as a Red Sox baseball game. He published the poem in a limited edition “Boston Strong” chapbook and donated the proceeds to those most affected by the bombing.

Reiberg events are free and open to the public. The Rufus & Louise Reiberg Series is sponsored by the Department of English in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Founded in 1997 in honor of former IUPUI Department of English chair and Professor Emeritus Rufus Reiberg and his wife, Louise, the annual Reiberg Reading series brings nationally and regionally known writers to the IUPUI campus to present their work.

Other spring Reiberg events include:

  • 15th Annual International Women’s Day Celebration, March 12; 6:30 p.m. reception, 7 p.m. performers, University Library Lilly Auditorium. This event features poetry, music, and visual art to honor the creativity of women around the world.
  • Bonderman Workshop, featuring poet Rochelle Hurt, 4 p.m. March 25, location to be announced. Hurt, winner of the 2013 Richard Peterson Poetry Prize from Crab Orchard Review, recently published a novel in poems, “The Rusted City.”

For more information about the series, contact Terry Kirts at tkirts@iupui.edu or 317-274-8929.

Elee Wood to speak on experiencing objects in U.S. museums

photo elee wood
The School of Liberal Arts Sabbatical Speaker Series
Campus Center, Room 268
Friday January 31, 2014
4:30 PM – 5:30 p.m.

Professor Elee Wood, Museum Studies, will present a talk entitled “Around the Country in 52 Museums: Finding the Objects of Experience.”

Everyday objects remind us about stories from our lives. Explore how museums can build these connections to transform visitor experiences.

RSVP: libarsvp@iupui.edu with Elee Wood talk in the subject line.

David Bell to speak on HIV and social organization

photo david bell
The School of Liberal Arts Sabbatical Speaker Series
Campus Center, Room 307
Tuesday January 28, 2014
4:30 – 5:30 p.m.

Professor David Bell, Sociology, will present a lecture entitled “The Social Organization of HIV: Who is Protecting Whom?” His talk focuses on three studies of sexual relationships showing how people are successfully or unsuccessfully–but often unknowingly–protecting themselves and others against HIV.

RSVP: libarsvp@iupui.edu with David Bell talk in the subject line.