Reiberg Reading Series: Amy Quan Barry

Amy Quan Barry FlyerThe IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and the IUPUI Department of English present the Reiberg Reading Series featuring Amy Quan Barry

Date: November 5, 2015
Time: 7:30 pm
Location: Lilly Auditorium, IUPUI Library; 755 W. Michigan St.
Click here for free tickets

Amy Quan Barry is the author of the four poetry collections Asylum, Controvertibles, Water Puppets, and most recently Loose Strife. Her poems have appeared in The New Yorker, The Missouri Review, Ploughshares, The Kenyon Review, and other literary publications. She is the recipient of the Agnes Lynch Starrett Prize (for Asylum). Her third book, Water Puppets, won the AWP Donald Hall Prize for Poetry and was a PEN/Open Book finalist. She has received NEA Fellowships in both fiction and poetry. Her novel, She Weeps Each Time You’re Born, tells the tumultuous history of modern Vietnam as experienced by a young girl born under mysterious circumstances a few years before the country’s reunification.

Support for the Reiberg Reading Series comes from the Reiberg family, IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, the IUPUI University Library, the IUPUI Office of Academic Affairs, and IUPUI Division of Undergraduate Education.

Reiberg Reading Series: Dan Wakefield

Dan WakefieldThe IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and the IUPUI Department of English present the Reiberg Reading Series featuring Dan Wakefield

Date: November 4, 2015
Time: 7:30 pm
Location: IUPUI University Library, Lilly Auditorium, 755 W. Michigan St.
Get your free tickets here

A native of Indianapolis, Dan Wakefield is a novelist, journalist and screenwriter whose books include Revolt in the South, Going All The Way, New York in the Fifties, The Hijacking of Jesus: How the Religious Right Distorts Christianity and Promotes Prejudice and Hate, and many more. His best-selling novels Going All The Way and Starting Over were produced as feature films. He has recently edited If This Isn’t Nice, What Is?: Advice to the Young, a selection of commencement speeches by Kurt Vonnegut, a longtime friend.

Wakefield has been the recipient of a Neiman Fellowship in Journalism, the Bernard DeVoto Fellowship to the Bread Loaf Writers Conference, a Rockefeller Grant for Creative Writing, and an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. He has taught in the writing programs at Boston University, the University of Massachusetts at Boston, Emerson College, The Iowa Writers Workshop, and is presently Writer in Residence at Florida International University in Miami. He has been a staff writer for The Nation, a Contributing Editor of The Atlantic Monthly, a Contributing Writer for GQ, a Contributing Editor of The Yoga Journal, and is on the advisory board of Image: A Journal of The Arts and Religion.

In 2015, NUVO awarded Wakefield the Lifetime Achievement Cultural Vision Award.

Sponsored by the Reiberg family, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the IUPUI Department of English, IUPUI University Library, IUPUI University College, IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, IU School of Informatics, IUPUI Office of Academic Affairs, and IUPUI Division of Undergraduate Education.

IUPUI professor Edward Curtis to edit new book series on Africana religions

INDIANAPOLIS — Pennsylvania State University Press has named Edward Curtis, Millennium Chair of the Liberal Arts and professor of religious studies in the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, the co-editor of a new book series.

Curtis, co-founder of the Journal of Africana Religions, says that the book series will adopt the journal’s global vision of both African and African diasporic religions.

“Like the journal, the book series will emphasize the translocal nature of Africana religions across national, regional and hemispheric boundaries,” Curtis said. The journal is also published by Pennsylvania State University Press.

The IUPUI professor will co-edit the book series with Sylvester A. Johnson, associate professor of African American studies and religious studies at Northwestern University. Johnson is also the co-founder of the Journal of Africana Religions.

Curtis sees the book series as yet another sign of the growing interest in Africana religions and their global reach.

“National and colonial-drawn boundaries have too long shaped the formation of knowledge about black people and their religious commitments,” the IUPUI professor said. “This book series will help to nurture a community of scholars dedicated to analyzing the entire Africana world in all its richness.”

The series’ editorial board includes Afe Adogame of Princeton Theological Seminary, Sylviane Diouf of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Paul Christopher Johnson of the University of Michigan, Elizabeth Pérez of Dartmouth College, Elisha P. Renne of the University of Michigan and Judith Weisenfeld of Princeton University.

“We want to publish academic monographs in addition to books designed for classroom use about Africana religious experiences, identities, beliefs, aesthetics, ethics and institutions,” co-editor Sylvester Johnson said. “And we welcome a variety of methods, including archival, theoretical, literary, sociological and ethnographic approaches.”

Liberal Arts Sabbatical Series returns to IUPUI for 2015-16 school year

INDIANAPOLIS—Professors in the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue iu-logoUniversity Indianapolis will discuss their sabbatical projects throughout the 2015-16 school year. Topics include the process of creating the forged writings of Madeleine Hachard, growing up during the Nigerian civil war, and using online resources to teach drama.

The series is free and open to the public. The lectures will take place from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. in the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd., Room 268.

Friday, Oct. 9:Jing Wang, world languages and cultures, “Revealing Textbook Writers’ Perspectives.” Well-written textbooks are language instructors’ best friends; yet poorly prepared ones can burden instructors. This study interviews textbook writers to examine popular beginning and intermediate Chinese language textbooks used in the U.S. Study results reveal theoretical frameworks used by the textbook writers and consequently provide key information on textbook selection and language instruction—in Chinese and beyond.

Tuesday, Oct. 27: Daniella Kostroun, history, “The Invention of Madeleine Hachard and Other Discoveries About the 1727 Ursuline Mission to New Orleans.” Madeleine Hachard is considered Louisiana’s first female author, but the writings attributed to her are forgeries. Learn about the discovery of evidence documenting the fraud behind Hachard’s alleged writings as well as new insights about the pioneering Ursulines once we move beyond the “myth” of Hachard.

Friday, Nov. 13: David Craig, religious studies, “Religious Freedom and the Politics of Public Accommodations.” Given the controversy around Indiana’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act, how should we think about corporate religious freedom and public accommodations? Shifting the focus from individuals’ religious beliefs to organizations’ mission integrity may create more common ground.

Tuesday, Feb. 2: Una Osili, economics/philanthropic studies, “War and Human Capital: Growing Up During the Nigerian Civil War.” Civil conflict is an obstacle to development in the developing world. The Nigerian Civil War was the first modern civil war in sub Saharan Africa. Four decades later, this study documents the war’s significant, long-run economic impact. Those exposed to the war as children and adolescents exhibit reduced adult stature, as well as adverse education, health and marriage outcomes.

Friday, Feb. 12: Brian McDonald, English, “A Dramatic Difference! Enhancing the Teaching and Learning of Drama With Online Tools.” Canvas, IUPUI’s new online teaching and learning environment, has user-friendly features that enhance faculty opportunities and student experiences. How can these capabilities be used to develop assignments that integrate both the textual and performative aspects of dramatic literature?

Wednesday, March 16: Anne Royalty, economics, “What Happens When Physicians Work Together?” Multi-specialty physician practices are increasingly common. These integrated settings may make it easier to coordinate patient care for patients seeing more than one doctor in the practice. Do practices that include general practitioners and specialists improve health outcomes or eliminate wasteful spending?

Visitor parking is available for a fee in the Vermont Street Garage.

For more information or to RSVP, email

New IUPUI certificate program addresses need for translation professionals

INDIANAPOLIS — The current demand for skilled language translators far outweighs the 480965_w296supply available, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics has indicated that employment of interpreters and translators is projected to grow 46 percent from 2012 to 2022, much faster than the average for all occupations.

A new certificate offered by the Department of World Languages and Cultures in the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will prepare students for these careers. Applications for the new Graduate Certificate in Translation Studies are now being accepted. The post-graduate program begins in fall 2016.

“The new certificate program will help prepare the workforce needed for the numerous requests for the growing limited English proficiency populations in Indiana and in the U.S. by providing quality translations through emerging technologies,” said professor Enrica Ardemagni, director of the Graduate Certificate in Translation Studies.

Globalization of business, law and trade relations and changing U.S. demographics have increased demand for translation skills in many fields, especially educational, medical, legal and technical. Translation studies is the interdisciplinary study of the theory, description and application of translation, interpretation and localization. It is recognized as an academic discipline that includes the application of theory and practice to specific fields of translation.

Academically well-prepared and highly motivated individuals with advanced language proficiency in English and French, German and/or Spanish who are interested in the study of translation are invited to apply for the new IUPUI certificate program. A baccalaureate degree in a language from an accredited institution is required for admission; however, other degrees will be taken into consideration based on completion of prerequisites in preparation for graduate-level study. The application deadline is Feb. 1.

A minimum of 18 credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree is required to complete coursework for the IU Graduate Certificate in Translation Studies, which also includes advanced courses in interpreting (Spanish only). A required internship will give students hands-on practice to ensure command of the lexical precision and detailed understanding of contexts or terminologies as well as a nuanced sense of the purpose of language and its designated audience.

“We are proud to add this new certificate program to our program offerings in the IU School of Liberal Arts,” Dean Thomas J. Davis said. “These students will work with faculty in the Department of World Languages and Cultures as well as in other departments and the community to hone their translation skills, as well as to offer a much-needed service to the growing limited-English-proficiency populations of the state. These future translators will comprise the next generation of professionals who will ensure access to needed services; they will, as well, broaden the scope of research that can be done in several languages through exemplary translated works.”

The graduate certificate will be officially announced on International Translation Day at IUPUI. The event takes place from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Sept. 30 at the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd. Bolivian author Maria Cristina Botelho will make a special presentation and deliver a bilingual reading from her book “Memoria de las Mariposas.”

Langsam/Oswalt Lecturer Summer Fellowship for Full-Time Non-Tenure Track Teaching Faculty

The Langsam/Oswalt Faculty Award award supports a summer fellowship for non-tenureiu-logo track, full-time teaching faculty to allow them to take a summer “sabbatical” from teaching to pursue professional development activities. This award is for $6,000, and can be used for summer salary (including required withholdings).

*****NOTE: The timeline on this award application has been moved to December to give departments time to change summer teaching schedules, as necessary.

Applications may be by individuals or by departments/programs and must detail proposed professional development activity that supports their teaching mission. Activities supported by this award include those that lead to scholarly dissemination of knowledge about teaching, curriculum development projects, and other activities of long-term professional benefit to the teacher and the unit, including related travel and/or conference expenses as well as library and equipment acquisitions. A committee appointed by the Dean of the School of Liberal Arts shall determine the recipient of the Fellowship based on the merit of the proposal.

Candidates must be non-tenure track, full time teaching faculty of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and have worked in this capacity for a minimum of three years. Visiting faculty are not eligible for this Fellowship. This Fellowship can be received in conjunction with other funding.

Submit the following:

  • A maximum of a three-page proposal detailing the activity and at least one letter of support. The entire proposal may not exceed more than 5 pages.
  • A current CV (does not count in page limit).

Submit all required documents, electronically, to Candice L. Smith, by 5:00 p.m. on Monday, November 23, 2015.

Three IU projects receive $690,000 in latest round of National Endowment for the Humanities funding

INDIANAPOLIS — The National Endowment for the Humanities has awarded $690,000 to unnamedthree Indiana University research and learning projects.

The NEH grants will fund a summer training program for university and college faculty interested in exploring the cultures of African and African diaspora cities; a workshop series on applying digital methods to issues in Native American and Indigenous studies; and the Santayana Edition’s ongoing publication of writings of American philosopher George Santayana.

The three IU projects — two on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus and one at Indiana University Bloomington — are among 212 projects sharing $36.6 million in recent NEH funding.

“The grant projects represent the very best of humanities scholarship and programming,” NEH Chairman William Adams said. “NEH is proud to support programs that illuminate the great ideas and events of our past, broaden access to our nation’s many cultural resources, and open up for us new ways of understanding the world in which we live.”

The IUPUI projects, both housed in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, are:

“The Digital Native American and Indigenous Studies Project,” $249,817 for a series of three workshops on teaching new digital methods and exploring issues of digital cultural heritage in Native American studies, to be directed by IUPUI assistant professor of history Jennifer Guiliano. Yale University, Arizona State University and IUPUI will in turn host a three-day workshop for 35 participants.
“The Works of George Santayana,” directed by associate professor of philosophy Martin Coleman, which involves the preparation for print and digital publication of American philosopher George Santayana’s “Three Philosophical Poets” (Vol. 8), “Winds of Doctrine” (Vol. 9) and “Scepticism and Animal Faith” (Vol. 8) and the beginning of work on “Realm of Being,” (Vol. 16). A three-year grant of $225,000 and $23,623 in matching funds to the Santayana Edition will provide salaries for an editor and graduate student interns who will contribute to the production of the printed and electronic texts.

Indiana University Bloomington received $191,592 for “Arts of Survival: Recasting Lives in African Cities,” a three-week seminar for 25 college and university faculty who will study the arts and culture of Accra, Lagos, Nairobi, New Orleans and Port-au-Prince. The project is led by Eileen Julien, director of IU’s Institute for Advanced Study.

Organizers believe the IUPUI Native American studies project is the first workshop specifically focused on digital humanities that encourages participants in the development of a more systematic approach to integrating digital technologies within and throughout academic institutions, cultural organizations and tribal communities.

“While tremendous work has been done around the preservation and access of analog materials within Native American communities, there has been much less attention paid to the ways in which digital objects, practices and methods function within Native communities and through Native American studies scholarship,” Guiliano said.

The international reputation and broad appeal of Santayana justifies the Santayana Edition’s aim of preserving and disseminating Santayana’s thought in reliable and accurate texts. This will be published as “The Works of George Santayana” so readers can research, evaluate and appreciate Santayana’s role in shaping American letters, Coleman said.

Talking About Freedoms without Freaking Out

An IUPUI discussion series powered by Spirit & Place, a legacy project of The Polis iupuiCenter, part of IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, with support from the IUPUI Office of Community Engagement, Indiana Humanities, IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law, Center for Interfaith Cooperation, and The Center for Civic Literacy.

Where do individual rights begin and end? Which religious liberties are protected by the Constitution? Who decides what is “right” when our ideals about religious freedom, freedom of speech, and freedom from discrimination clash? How do we get past media sound bites and sensational opinions to really talk about our freedoms without freaking out? Explore which freedoms the First Amendment does – and does not – protect in our summer discussion series.

June 19, 12-1 p.m.
Hate Speech and the First Amendment: Values in Conflict
Scottish Rite Cathedral – FREE
At what point, if at all, should so-called “hate speech” become illegal? During the monthly luncheon of the League of Women Voters ‎of Indianapolis, hear attorney and civic leader Don Knebel discuss hate speech and the First Amendment.

June 24, 6:00 – 7:30 p.m. (reception to follow)
Can We Talk about RFRA without Talking Past One Another?
IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law Wynne Courtroom – FREE (register at
It’s fair to say that the controversy over RFRA raised more heat than light. This panel aims to model thoughtful conversation on the constitutional and philosophical questions raised by the RFRA debate. Hear from executive director of the ACLU of Indiana Jane Henegar, IU McKinney Professor of Law John Hill, and attorney and IBJ columnist Peter Rusthoven. Moderated by IU McKinney Professor of Law Robert Katz. 1.5 hours of CLE credit available.

July 13, 5-7 p.m.
Trivia Night
Sun King Brewery – FREE
We’re redefining the meaning of “bar exam” with a night of First Amendment trivia and conversation at Sun King. Grab a beer and your thinking cap and join Indiana Humanities and Spirit & Place for quiz night! Open to anyone 21+, there will be prizes for the night’s sharpest legal eagles.

More info at