NEH seminar offers K-12 teachers an opportunity for academic study of Muslim American identities

Edward E. Curtis IV

Edward E. Curtis IV

The academic study of Muslim American history and life is the focus of a summer seminar open to K-12 teachers.

Applications are now being accepted for a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar, “Muslim American Identities, Past and Present,” to be held July 12 to Aug. 1, 2015, in Indianapolis.

Sixteen teachers from across the country will be selected for the three-week seminar during which they will discuss the racial, ethnic, religious and gender identities of U.S. Muslims.

Directed by Edward E. Curtis IV, an award-winning scholar of Islam in America and holder of the Millennium Chair of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, the seminar will focus on the academic study of Muslim American identities, not the religious or spiritual beliefs or habits of the participating teachers.

Participants will study 30 primary source documents written by Muslim Americans, listen to distinguished guest lecturers Kambiz Ghanea Bassiri and Juliane Hammer, and visit two local mosques. They will also work on individual research projects on topics such as Muslim American slave narratives, Islamic hip-hop, Muslim American food cultures and Muslim American political engagement.

“My primary aim is to nurture an environment of deep intellectual engagement and active learning in which teachers try to answer a key question of our time: What does it mean to be both Muslim and American?” said Curtis, who is the author of “Muslims in America, among other books.

The seminar will meet almost daily in the Campus Center on the IUPUI campus. In addition to meeting rooms, the IUPUI Campus Center houses a bookstore, a credit union and a food court.

As one of seven campuses administered by Indiana University, IUPUI is known as Indiana’s premier urban research and health sciences campus. IUPUI has more than 30,000 students enrolled in 17 schools, which offer more than 250 degrees. IUPUI awards degrees from both Indiana and Purdue universities. The campus is near the heart of downtown Indianapolis. Several major cultural attractions and affordable restaurants are within walking distance or a brief bus ride.

All seminar participants receive a $2,700 stipend to help cover transportation, food, housing and other costs. Housing is available on campus. Teachers in public and private schools are encouraged to apply.

Funding for the summer seminar comes from the National Endowment for the Humanities, an independent federal agency that supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation.

Deadline for applications is March 2.

For additional information about the seminar, teachers should address their questions to Edward E. Curtis IV by phone at (317) 278-1683 or email: ecurtis4@iupui.edu

Curtis awarded for NEH Summer Seminar about Muslim American Identity

curtis-home

Edward E. Curtis IV

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) in Washington, D.C, has announced that Edward Curtis, Millennium Chair of the Liberal Arts and professor of religious studies, has been awarded $114,438 to conduct a national seminar for school teachers on “Muslim American Identities, Past and Present.”

The three-week seminar, which will take place on the IUPUI campus in the summer of 2015, will give sixteen school teachers from around the country the opportunity to explore the history and diverse cultures of Muslims in the United States.

Participants will study thirty primary source documents, hear from two visiting experts, make field trips to two local mosques, and use the resources of the IUPUI University Library to complete individual research projects.

“My primary goal,” said Curtis, “is to nurture an environment of deep intellectual engagement and active learning in which school teachers can answer a key question of our historical moment: what does it mean to be both Muslim and American?”

In order to answer that question, Curtis will emphasize the impact of gender, race, ethnicity, and religious interpretation in the making of Muslim American identities.

The Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture, which has offered numerous seminars and professional development opportunities for young scholars and school teachers, will support the logistical aspects of the program.

Funding for NEH Summer Seminars and Institutes is provided by the federal government, and grants are awarded through a rigorous and selective process of peer review.

“Understanding the rich diversity of Muslim American identities in a balanced and informed manner,” Curtis concluded, “can be a powerful means of bridging cultures inside the United States and beyond.”

 


New Gifts Endow Economics’ Robert Sandy Seminar Series

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERATwo gifts to the Department of Economics in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI have endowed the Robert Sandy Seminar Series, ensuring that economics students and faculty will continue to interact with some of the discipline’s brightest researchers.

The gifts were made by professor emeritus of economics Robert Sandy and economics alumnus David Driscoll.

The seminar series began as a means to make the economics department more visible, says Professor Emeritus Robert Sandy, who served as the economics department chair for 12 years before finishing his career as an administrator within the Indiana University President’s Office. “One way the seminar helped with the visibility of the department is we would invite faculty from nearby universities to give talks and then they would meet the department and see there were people here who were serious scholars. We built a reputation step-by-step through the seminar,” he says.

As an undergraduate student at IUPUI in the late 1970s, David Driscoll was in the department in its early years. He was aware of the growth of his undergrad program as he earned his master’s and then moved to Boston and began a career as an actuary.

Driscoll has made various gifts to IUPUI and the Economics Department, also helping fund the Robert Kirk New Economics Major Award. He says the Seminar Series is good for students who get to see how economists go about developing their ideas and researching their topics.

“It’s wonderful to imagine that over the past 30-some years the department has grown so much both in terms of the quantity and quality of the faculty, and that it’s expanded immensely in terms of teaching, the research it turns out, and its reputation,” Driscoll says. “To play a small part in helping facilitate that growth is something I’m very happy to have been able to do.”

“The department’s seminar series is aptly named for our colleague Bob Sandy who worked so effectively on behalf of the department to advance its research reputation,” said William Blomquist, dean of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. “We’re very grateful to Bob and to our alumnus David Driscoll for their generosity which ensures the series’ permanence as well as its prominence.”

Today the Robert Sandy Seminar Series features presentations on emerging topics of interest to department faculty and students as well as specialized sessions on specific economics questions. The 2013-2014 seminars kicked off with acclaimed economist Dan Hamermesh from the University of Texas Austin.

IUPUI faculty and graduate students also present their research, says Professor Henry Mak, the Seminar Series coordinator. All are encouraged to present work-in-progress and use the feedback that comes through the Seminar to enhance their research products.

“In addition to the seminars, usually we have individual meetings between the speaker and faculty and the speaker and grad students,” Mak says. “So the faculty members can benefit from interacting with the speaker and the students can also benefit because they can talk about their own research and get some feedback.”

“We were pretty close to off-the-charts when the seminar began-near the bottom of econ departments around the nation,” Sandy says. “[Ten years later] we were competitive with Ph.D. programs around the nation. The culture of the department changed. The seminar makes a huge difference and with my and David’s gifts, I hope the department can draw an even wider circle of influence.”

Humanities Intensive Learning and Teaching workshops

The Humanities Intensive Teaching and Learning (HILT) Institute will be held August 4-8, 2014 on the campus of the University of Maryland. We’ve got an exciting slate of classes taught by incredible instructors. Courses for 2014 include:

  • Project Development led by Simon Appleford, Clemson University and Jennifer Guiliano, MITH
  • Introduction to Web Development, Design, and Principles led by Jeremy Boggs, Scholars’ Lab, and Jeri Wierenga, George Mason University
  • Humanities Programming led by Wayne Graham, Scholars’ Lab, and Brandon Walsh, University of Virginia
  • Games in the Humanities Classroom led by Anastasia Salter, University of Baltimore
  • Large-Scale Text Analysis with R led by Matt Jockers, University of Nebraska
  • Network Analysis and Visualization led by Elijah Meeks, Stanford University
  • Born-Digital Forensics led by Kam Woods, University of North Carolina, and Porter Olsen, MITH
  • Crowdsourcing Cultural Heritage led by Ben Brumfield, Independent Developer, and Mia Ridge, Ph.D. Candidate, Open University
  • Critical Race and Gender in the Digital Humanities led by Jarah Moesh, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Maryland

The costs to attend HILT are: Non-student/Regular: $950 Student: $500 Group discounts are available by contacting dhinstitute@umd.edu

The Keynote Speaker for Humanities Intensive Learning + Teaching 2014 will be Tara McPherson. Tara McPherson is Associate Professor of Critical Studies at the University of Southern California’s School of Cinematic Arts. She is a core faculty member of the IMAP program, USC’s innovative practice based-Ph.D., and also an affiliated faculty member in the American Studies and Ethnicity Department. For more information on the Humanities Intensive  Learning and Teaching Institute, please visit the HILT website.

Call for applications: Newberry/NEH seminar, “Bridging National Borders in North America”

A National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar for College and University Faculty
Monday, June 2, 2014 to Friday, June 27, 2014
Deadline to apply: March 4, 2014

The Newberry Library’s Dr. William Scholl Center for American History and Culture will host a four-week summer 2014 NEH seminar for college and university faculty that will explore the history of North America’s border and borderlands, providing participants with a stipend of $3,300.

In keeping with the recent work in the field and the collection strengths of the Newberry Library, this seminar will take a broad geographic approach, framing borderlands as distinct places at particular moments in time where no single people or sovereignty imposed its will. The organizing theme is the process of border-making.

The seminar will examine three aspects of this theme: how nation-states claiming exclusive territorial sovereignty re-drew the continent’s map; the intersection and sometimes collision of these efforts with other ways of organizing space and people; and the social and political consequences of the enforcement of national territoriality.

Two questions will guide examinations of these developments: how did diverse peoples challenge national borders, or use or alter them for their own purposes? And, how does consideration of these topics recast our understanding of the national and intertwined histories of Mexico, the United States, and Canada?

Please visit the Newberry website for more information and how to apply. Contact Benjamin Johnson or the Scholl Center (scholl@newberry.org) for more information.

President of Christian Theological Seminary to present talk on role of religion in medicine

Tuesday, October 29, 12:00 – 1:00 PM
Emerson Hall Auditorium, Room 304
2013-2014 Medical Humanities and Health Studies Seminar Series

Matt Boulton, President and Professor of Theology, Christian Theological Seminary, will deliver a presentation titled, “Your Faith Has Made You Well—Or Has It?: Spiritual and Religious Dimensions of Medical Care and Wellbeing.”

For many healthcare professionals and patients, religion and spirituality play important roles in how care and wellbeing are understood and experienced—and yet in many cases, our capacities for exploring these connections are overlooked, underdeveloped, or relegated to specialists.

For example, many healthcare professionals conceive and experience their work as a spiritual or religious vocation; likewise, many patients experience illness, decline, recovery, and wellbeing in religious and spiritual terms. What we require are accessible, inclusive, engaging strategies for exploring these dimensions of life and work. This talk will survey this territory, using some specific Jewish and Christian resources as case studies, but with an eye to other traditions as well.

For more information, please see the flyer here.

Presented by the Spirit of Medicine Program and the Medical Humanities and Health Studies Seminar Series

Lecture: Nicholas Rattray, “Altered Bodies and Relocated Dreams: Understanding reintegration and care for student veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan”

Wednesday, September 18th, 2013
12:00-1:00 pm
Campus Center 309
Nicholas Rattray, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor, IUPUI Department of Anthropology
Presented by Medical Humanities and Health Studies Seminar Series
“Altered Bodies and Relocated Dreams: Understanding reintegration and care for student veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan”

This talk will explore issues of community reintegration for student veterans whose bodies have been altered by psychological and physical injuries. Drawing on long-term ethnographic research, I discuss the tensions that lie behind labels such as “reintegrated,” “disaffected,” and “disabled” and how they are negotiated in veterans’ everyday lives. In seeking to manage new embodiments and the tensions between care and the cultural dislocations of military service, many veterans have been forced to create new pathways that diverge from their prior plans — dreams both deferred and transformed.

Free and open to the campus and public, but space is limited. Please RSVP to: medhum@iupui.edu to save a spot.