Lecture: Anne-Marie Duguet, “Protection of Genetic Information in Europe and in France”

Wednesday, December 4, 2013
3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Health Information Translational Science Building, Room 1130
410 West 10th St.

The IU Center for Bioethics will present “Protection of Genetic Information in Europe and in France. The speaker will be Anne-Marie Duguet, M.D., Ph.D, Senior Lecturer at the Medicine Faculty Toulouse Purpan (Paul Sabatier University) where she teaches medical law and bioethics. Among an impressive list of accomplishments, she is also a member of the advisory board of the European Journal of Health Law and the Secretary of the European Association for Health Law.

In 2010, she was appointed visiting professor for 3 years by the Dalian Medical University and the Hainan Medical University in China. In 2011, she was honored by the decoration of “the Palmes Academiques.”

Arrangements for Dr. Duguet’s visit are a collaborative effort between the IU Center for Bioethics, the Robert H. McKinney School of Law and the Fairbanks School of Public Health.

For more information or questions to Eva Jackson at 278-4034 or evajacks@iupui.edu

Laura Foster presents talk on patent law and Hoodia in Southern Africa

Co-sponsored by the Medical Humanities & Health Studies Program and the Hall Center for Law & Health
Friday December 6, 2013
12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
Cavanaugh Hall 003

Laura Foster, J.D., Ph.D. is Assistant Professor Gender Studies, Affiliate Faculty, Maurer School of Law, Indiana University.

In 1998 researchers with the South African Center for Scientific and Industrial Research (“CSIR”) isolated and patented certain chemical compositions within the Hoodia gordonii plant responsible for suppressing appetite. Hoodia gordonii suddenly emerged as a patented invention poised to be a blockbuster anti-obesity drug. At the same time, the plant became a symbol of South Africa as nation of innovation, and Indigenous San peoples publicly accused scientists of stealing their knowledge of the plant. Advancing a powerful global campaign, San peoples negotiated a benefit sharing agreement with CSIR giving them 6% of the potential revenue from future Hoodia sales. Hopes for Hoodia , however, ended in 2009 when Unilever terminated the project.

Drawing upon and contributing to feminist post-colonial science studies, this talk considers Hoodia gordonii as a boundary object that brings the divergent interests and stakes of various social actors together. Furthermore, it unpacks the black box of patent law to ask how both science and law work together to determine who is (or is not) considered an inventor and producer of science.

Free and open to the campus and public, but space is limited. Please RSVP to: medhum@iupui.edu.

Ethnomusicologist, conductor, and activist André de Quadros keynotes symposium on global health and music

Wednesday, November 13, 2013
12:30 – 1:30 p.m.
Lily Auditorium in University Library – UL0130

Professor André de Quadros, Boston University, will deliver the keynote address at the 2013 pre-conference symposium of the Society for Ethnomusicology. His presentation is titled “Music, the Arts, and Global Health–in Search of Sangam, its Theory, and Paradigms.”

Music and the other arts have the potential to mobilize poor communities and provide meaningful contexts for health education and empowerment. Artists have a social justice responsibility to work together with public health professions to explore the power of personal and community agency, self-knowledge, and social change in the face of widespread health concerns. André de Quadros will discuss music’s capacity, with other arts, to communicate in uniquely complex and subtle ways that offer significant potential for health.

Professor de Quadros has conducted research in over forty countries. His research and practitioner interests are in health literacy in sites of urban dispossession, incarceration, and conflict. He is a member of the Scientific Board of the International Network for Singing Hospitals, the International Advisory Board of the Asian Institute of Public Health, the Board of the International Federation for Choral Music, the Editorial Board of the peer-reviewed journal Arts and Health, and the steering committee of Conductors without Borders.

This lecture is open to the public. For more information about this talk, please see the flyer, or email medhum@iupui.edu.

President of Christian Theological Seminary to present talk on role of religion in medicine

Tuesday, October 29, 12:00 – 1:00 PM
Emerson Hall Auditorium, Room 304
2013-2014 Medical Humanities and Health Studies Seminar Series

Matt Boulton, President and Professor of Theology, Christian Theological Seminary, will deliver a presentation titled, “Your Faith Has Made You Well—Or Has It?: Spiritual and Religious Dimensions of Medical Care and Wellbeing.”

For many healthcare professionals and patients, religion and spirituality play important roles in how care and wellbeing are understood and experienced—and yet in many cases, our capacities for exploring these connections are overlooked, underdeveloped, or relegated to specialists.

For example, many healthcare professionals conceive and experience their work as a spiritual or religious vocation; likewise, many patients experience illness, decline, recovery, and wellbeing in religious and spiritual terms. What we require are accessible, inclusive, engaging strategies for exploring these dimensions of life and work. This talk will survey this territory, using some specific Jewish and Christian resources as case studies, but with an eye to other traditions as well.

For more information, please see the flyer here.

Presented by the Spirit of Medicine Program and the Medical Humanities and Health Studies Seminar Series

Distinguished IU Professor of Medicine to present talk on origins of echocardiography

Wednesday, October 30, 12:00 – 1:00PM
Emerson Hall Auditorium, 304

Harvey Feigenbaum, MD, Distinguished Professor of Medicine, IU School of Medicine, will present a talk titled, “History of Echocardiography: How to introduce something new in medicine.”

Echocardiography as we know it today began at Indiana University School of Medicine in the fall of 1963, exactly 50 years ago. This talk will document how this technology became the world’s leading cardiovascular imaging tool.

Dr Feigenbaum joined the faculty of the Indiana School of Medicine in 1962, working in electrophysiology and then cardiac catheterization and hemodynamics, but he is best recognized as the “Father of Echocardiography” for pioneering the use of cardiac ultrasound in the early 1960s. He trained most of the early researchers, held numerous echocardiographic courses and workshops, and wrote the first textbook which is now in its 7th edition. A founder of the American Society of Echocardiography, Dr. Feigenbaum served as its first president and was the first editor of its journal for 20 years.

For more information, see the flyer here.

Presented by the John Shaw Billings History of Medicine Society, the IU Student History of Medicine Organization, adn the Medical Humanities and Health Studies Program.

Please RSVP to medhum@iupui.edu

Lecture: Nicholas Rattray, “Altered Bodies and Relocated Dreams: Understanding reintegration and care for student veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan”

Wednesday, September 18th, 2013
12:00-1:00 pm
Campus Center 309
Nicholas Rattray, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor, IUPUI Department of Anthropology
Presented by Medical Humanities and Health Studies Seminar Series
“Altered Bodies and Relocated Dreams: Understanding reintegration and care for student veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan”

This talk will explore issues of community reintegration for student veterans whose bodies have been altered by psychological and physical injuries. Drawing on long-term ethnographic research, I discuss the tensions that lie behind labels such as “reintegrated,” “disaffected,” and “disabled” and how they are negotiated in veterans’ everyday lives. In seeking to manage new embodiments and the tensions between care and the cultural dislocations of military service, many veterans have been forced to create new pathways that diverge from their prior plans — dreams both deferred and transformed.

Free and open to the campus and public, but space is limited. Please RSVP to: medhum@iupui.edu to save a spot.

IUPUI receives NEH grant for study of origins of HIV/AIDS

An international team of historians and anthropologists, including two Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis professors, will spend the next three years hunting down the origins of HIV/AIDS.

The National Endowment for the Humanities has awarded a $290,000, three-year grant to IUPUI for the project titled “An International Collaboration on the Political, Social, and Cultural History of the Emergence of HIV/AIDS.”

Under the leadership of IUPUI professor William H. Schneider, six humanities scholars assisted by three medical research consultants will study evidence supporting the most frequently offered explanations for the emergence of the global AIDS pandemic.

“It is a clear and a worthwhile goal: figuring out the origin of AIDS,” said Schneider, a historian of medicine who teaches in the history department and directs the medical humanities and health studies program, both part of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. “The emergence of new diseases, such as avian flu and swine flu, is one of the most important health concerns in recent decades.”

The new study could prove invaluable to those working in global health by providing information about how other new diseases emerge, the principal investigator said.

“It can offer a model for medical science and public health researchers who recognize that their studies need to account for the larger historical, political, economic, social and cultural relations and processes that shape disease emergence.”

Three prominent HIV/AIDS researchers — virologists Preston Marx and François Simon and epidemiologist Ernest Drucker — will serve as medical research consultants. The collaboration began 10 years ago and was recently assisted by the IUPUI Office of Vice Chancellor for Research, which provided $15,000 in seed money for the project.

Scientists widely agree that immune viruses have existed in the African simian population — chimps and monkeys — for tens of thousands of years. Some of these evolved and adapted into viruses that were devastating to the human population less than 100 years ago.

HIV/AIDS study collaborators and scientists during a planning workshop.

HIV/AIDS study collaborators and scientists during a planning workshop.

Through DNA sequencing, scientists have identified a dozen human immunodeficiency virus strains, two of which, HIV-1 and HIV-2, are responsible for the current AIDS pandemic among humans.

Because there were several adaptations, most scientists agree that the transfer was not a random incident, and they point to colonial rule of Africa as the circumstance permitting the adaptations.

The question is how and why?

Until now, explanations have focused on finding a “smoking gun,” i.e., the first case of human immunodeficiency virus. But that scholarship has lacked a critical humanities approach to the wide array of available field and archival resources.

Schneider’s team will address those shortcomings.

“This project is meant to place the medical, public health and biological dimensions of the origin of (HIV/AIDS) in its historical context in sub-Saharan Africa — bringing attention for the first time to the details of the specific social and cultural consequences of the introduction of (Western) medicine which was followed in short order by the appearance of the HIV epidemic,” Drucker said.

The research team will focus on the three most feasible explanations: changes in great ape and monkey hunting; social transformations during colonial rule including urbanization, prostitution and human mobility; and new medical interventions, specifically injection campaigns and blood transfusions, that facilitated transfer of viruses.

Schneider, an expert in the history of blood transfusions in Africa, along with Guillaume Lachenal of the University of Paris, will study the role of blood transfusions and vaccination campaigns, health interventions unheard of in Africa before colonial rule.

Ch.-Didier-Gondola_B

IUPUI professor Ch. Didier Gondola, chairman of the history department, is also a member of the research team.

IUPUI professor Ch. Didier Gondola, chairman of the history department, is also a member of the research team. He is an authority on the history of Brazzaville and Kinshasa, the two neighboring African cities considered to be the place where the HIV-1 epidemic began, which is responsible for 85 percent of today’s AIDS cases. Gondola will investigate the impact of equatorial African urbanization, migration and gender on the emergence of AIDS.

The team will conduct field research and consult several archives and colonial and medical service records in Africa and Europe. Beginning with an IUPUI meeting in February 2014, the scholars will meet periodically to review the research, which will conclude with the publication of a book in 2016.

The HIV/AIDS project was one of four Indiana awards among the 173 NEH grants announced in July for a total of $33 million.

Call for Applications: Spirit of Medicine Program

A reading and discussion program to begin in August 2013, led by Richard Gunderman, MD, PhD, and Emily Beckman, DMH.  The program will include monthly evening meetings to discuss seminal readings and meet with thought leaders in spirituality and medicine.  Participants will attend two lectures held in collaboration with The Medical Humanities & Health Studies Program and The Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics, presented by notable visiting scholars, with whom Spirit of Medicine participants will have the opportunity to engage in conversation. 

 
The Spirit of Medicine program will be accepting applications through June 1.  Applications should include contact information, details about educational background and current IUSM status (year in school and campus) in addition to a one page statement of interest explaining in detail why the applicant is interested in the program, and how participation might make a significant difference in the applicant’s future in medicine.
 

Please send completed applications, by June 1, to medhum@iupui.edu or mail to:Medical Humanities & Health Studies Program, IUPUI, 425 University Boulevard, Cavanaugh Hall Room 406, Indianapolis, IN 46202

Spring Events at the Indiana Medical History Museum

The Indiana Medical History Museum is hosting 2 talks this spring.

The first lecture will be Wednesday, February 27.  Norma Erickson will present “Lincoln Hospital, 1909-1915: A Study of Leadership in African-American Healthcare in Progressive Era Indianapolis.

“That’s Disgusting!  Estimating Time since Death from Human Decomposition” will be presented on Wednesday, April 17 by Stephen P.
Nawrocki.

RSVP to to Sarah Halter at education@imhm.org.