“In the Shadow of Terror: Providing Healthcare on the Northern Cameroon-Nigeria Border ”

2006094106Over the past several years, northeastern Nigeria has been wracked by violence promulgated by a group of extremists whose stated aim is to topple the status quo and establish a universal caliphate based on Islamic law. Thousands have died, and at least a million left homeless since the carnage began. Border areas in neighboring countries, including Cameroon, have been touched by the climate of terror, military reaction, and the flight of refugees.

Since 1990, Dr. Ellen Einterz, an IU graduate, has lived on the border between Cameroon and Nigeria’s Borno State. She is the Director of the Kolofata District Hospital and Chief Medical Officer for the Kolofata Health District. In her talk, she will briefly explore the conflict in its historical and present day context and provide an account of her recent personal experience as a physician in the exceptionally poor corner of Africa being rocked by this tragedy.

This lecture is presented by Medical Humanities & Health Studies and the IUPUI Global Health Student Interest Group and generous support from The IUPUI Office of International Affairs, The Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, and the Africana Studies Program in the School of Liberal Arts.

2014-2015 fellowship in clinical ethics

2014-2015 Ethics Fellowship Applications Open

Applications are available for the 2014-2015 Clinical Ethics Fellowship sponsored by the Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics. The application deadline is April 30, 2014.

This nine-month, part time fellowship focuses on training health care professionals in clinical ethics, including ethics consultation, hospital ethics committee work, and ethics research. Graduates will become capable members of the ethics community. The target audience for the fellowship includes physicians, nurses, chaplains, and social workers. Other members of the community (e.g. attorneys or members of administrative staffs) may also apply.

Application to the fellowship is competitive. The application process includes submission of a written application (which includes several brief narrative essays), a letter of support from the applicant’s immediate supervisor, one letter of recommendation, and interviews with Fairbanks Center staff.

For an application and additional information go to the Fairbanks Center website or contact Robin Bandy, JD, MA, Fairbanks Center Program Manager, at 317-962-9260, or rbandy@iuhealth.org .

“Faith and Medicine: Integration or Separation?” | Fairbanks Ethics Lecture Series

Dr. James Lynch Jr.Faith and Medicine: Integration or Separation?
Fairbanks Ethics Lecture Series
Presented by: Visiting Scholar James W. Lynch Jr, MD, FACP

When: Wednesday April 2, 2014
Time: 12:00-1:00 pm
Location: Riley Outpatient Center Auditorium

Co-sponsored by the MHHS Spirit of Medicine Program. Free CME/CE Credit Offered

Objectives:

  1. Articulate the various forces shaping how we think about the relationships between faith and medicine in the 21st century.
  2. Discuss how the term “professionalism” can be distorted to undermine compassion and empathy as parts of healthy physician-patient relationships.
  3. Describe the ways practitioners address their own spiritual beliefs (or lack thereof) in relation to patients and their beliefs.
  4. Identify how to address complexities that arise in discussing spiritual issues with patients or in choosing not to discuss them.

**Please Note– Lunch will not be provided.  Food and drinks are NOT permitted in the ROC Auditorium.**

About the Lecturer:

Dr. Lynch received his BA from the University of Virginia and MD from Eastern VA Medical School in 1984.  After internal medicine training at the University of Florida, he did his training in medical oncology at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda MD.  In 1991 he returned to the UFCOM and has served in multiple roles during this tenure including, course director in Oncology, program director for hematology/oncology, section chief of hematology/oncology at the VAMC and now serves as the Assistant Dean for Admissions.  He is a nationally recognized and  published expert in the diagnosis and treatment of lymphomas. He has received multiple teaching awards including clinical teacher of the year 4 times, the Hippocratic award three times, is a member of the College of Medicine Society of Teaching Scholars and in 2006 was honored by the University of Florida as one of 5 Distinguished Teaching Scholars.  He was co-founder with his wife of the Christian Study Center at the University of Florida and serves as its board president. He and his wife Laura, have 4 children and 3 grandchildren.

The Spirit of Medicine Reading and Discussion Program is funded by an IU Health Values Grant. This three-year program available to IU medical students includes monthly meetings to discuss seminar readings and opportunities to meet with thought leaders in spirituality and medicine.  Participants also attend lectures presented by notable visiting scholars and enjoy the opportunity to engage scholars in further conversations.

The Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics sponsors the Fairbanks Ethics Lecture Series as an educational outreach to physicians and staff of Indiana University Health hospitals and interested others in the central Indiana community.  Lectures are free, open to all, and do not require pre-registration.  Continuing education credit is offered to physicians, nurses, social workers, and chaplains at no charge, regardless of their institutional affiliation.

For questions and comments, please contact Amy Chamness at achamnes@iuhealth.org or (317)962-1721.  For additional information about the Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics, please visit our website at www.fairbankscenter.org.

Contact:

Amy R. Chamness-Douthit
Program Coordinator- Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics
Indiana University Health (www.iuhealth.org)
Noyes E-130|317.962.1721 (office)|317.962.9262 (fax)
(website) www.fairbankscenter.org

 

Virologist presents lecture on the emergence of the AIDS epidemics

Wednesday March 19, 2014
12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
Emerson Hall, Room 304
545 Barnhill Drive

Professor Preston Marx will deliver a presentation entitled, “Emergence of the AIDS Epidemics: Transition from SIV to HIV.”

The sudden emergence of the AIDS pandemic in the 20th century raised questions about AIDS origin(s), including the timing and root causes. Research led to understanding that HIV/AIDS is not one pandemic, but rather a combination of multiple epidemics and failed outbreaks, alongside the well known pandemic. The sources of all HIVs are simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) on the African continent. Finding SIV and the evolution of SIV to HIV will be presented, along with prevailing theories on why AIDS emerged in the 20th century.

Marx is Professor of Tropical Medicine and Chair of the Division of Microbiology at the Tulane National Primate Research Center of Tulane University. A virologist with over 40 years of experience in research on non-human primate models of AIDS vaccines and the origins of the AIDS epidemics, Dr. Marx’s research contributions include finding Simian Immunodeficiency Viruses (SIV’s) in sooty mangabeys in West Africa, showing this particular mangabey monkey sub-species as the source of HIV-2. Dr. Marx has conducted research projects in Sierra Leone, Gabon, Cameroon and the Republic of Congo. He recently published research in Science magazine showing that the SIV family of viruses is hundreds of thousands of years older than previously believed.

Co-sponsored by the Medical Humanities and Health Studies Program and the Indiana University School of Medicine Center for AIDS Research.

Pizza will be served. Questions? Please email ticarmic@iu.edu.

McDonald Merrill Ketcham Award Lecture: “Are Physicians Fiduciaries for Their Patients?”

Thursday February 20, 2014
12:45 – 3:45 p.m.
Wynn Courtroom, Inlow Hall

Maxwell J. Mehlman, J.D., will present “Are Physicians Fiduciaries for Their Patients?” from 12:45 to 1:45 p.m. A panel discussion, then reception will follow the lecture.

A fiduciary is a legal or ethical relationship of trust between two or more parties. The patient-physician relationship would seem to be a classic example of a fiduciary relationship given the need for ill-informed patients lacking bargaining power to trust their physicians, but many scholars and judges have questioned this assumption. The lecture examines the reasons for their skepticism and argues that they are misguided. Mehlman argues that regarding doctors as fiduciaries for their patients not only is essential for the patients’ well-being, but necessary to preserve the physicians’ status as learned professionals in the face of increasing pressure to act contrary to their patients’ interests.

A speaker’s reception will be held from 2:45 to 3:45 in the Inlow Hall atrium. This event is part of the McDonald Merrill Ketcham Award Lecture series presented by the Hall Center for Law and Health at the IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law.

This is a free event, but registration is required.

Panel Discussion following Professor’s Mehlman’s lecture:

  • Mary Ott, M.D., M.A., Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine
  • Joshua Perry, J.D., M.T.S., Assistant Professor of Business Law and Ethics and a Life Sciences Research Fellow, Indiana University Kelley School of Business
  • Mark Rothstein, J.D., Herbert F. Boehl Chair of Law and Medicine, University of Louisville Louis D. Brandeis School of Law, and Director of the Institute for Bioethics, Health Policy, and Law, University of Louisville School of Medicine

Mehlman is a Distinguished University Professor and Petersilge Professor of Law at the Case Western Reserve School of Law and and professor of biomedical ethics at Case Western Reserve School of Medicine. He is also director of the Law-Medicine Center at the Case Western Reserve University. Panel discussion participants are Mary Ott, M.D.,associate professor of pediatrics at the IU School of Medicine; Joshua Perry, J.D., assistant professor of business law and ethics and a life sciences research fellow at the IU Kelley School of Business at Bloomington and Mark Rothstein, J.D., Herbert F. Boehl Chair of Law and Medicine and director of the Institute for Bioethics, Health Policy, and Law at the University of Louisville.

“Visualizing Disease” explores pathological illustrations from 16th-19th century

Wednesday February 19, 2014
12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
Van Nuys Medical Science Bldg.
Room 122A

Domenico Bertoloni-Meli, Ph.D., Department of History and Philosophy of Science, Indiana University presents “Visualizing Disease: Pathological Illustrations from the 16th to the 19th Century.”

“Visualizing Disease” explores pathological illustrations from the 16th century to the first half of the 19th century, in the period from the first representations of remarkable cases to the first comprehensive treatises with color images of diseases affecting the entire human body. The talk will illustrate and discuss the lesions found in the dissected bodies of dead patients at postmortems, and skin diseases on live patients, which played an important role in the history of pathological illustrations more generally.

Presented by the Medical Humanities & Health Studies Seminar Series. Free and open to the public. Please RSVP to medhum@iupui.edu.

Medical Humanities and Health Studies present lecture on hoodia laws in South Africa

Thursday, February 6, 2014
12:00 Noon—1:00 p.m.
University Library, Room 1126

The Medical Humanities & Health Studies Program and the Hall Center for Law & Health are co-sponsoring a visit by Laura Foster, J.D., Ph.D. Her presentation is entitled “Re-inventing Hoodia: Patent Law and Benefit Sharing as Boundary Objects in Southern Africa.” Foster is Assistant Professor of Gender Studies and Affiliate Faculty, Maurer School of Law at Indiana University.

In 1998 researchers with the South African Center for Scientific and Industrial Research (“CSIR”) isolated and patented certain chemical compositions within the Hoodia gordonii plant responsible for suppressing appetite. Hoodia gordonii suddenly emerged as a patented invention poised to be a blockbuster anti-obesity drug. At the same time, the plant became a symbol of South Africa as nation of innovation, and Indigenous San peoples publicly accused scientists of stealing their knowledge of the plant.Advancing a powerful global campaign, San peoples negotiated a benefit sharing agreement with CSIR giving them 6% of the potential revenue from future Hoodia sales. Hopes for Hoodia, however, ended in 2009 when Unilever terminated the project.

Drawing upon and contributing to feminist post-colonial science studies, this talk considers Hoodia gordonii as a boundary object that brings the divergent interests and stakes of various social actors together. Furthermore, it unpacks the black box of patent law to ask how both science and law work together to determine who is (or is not) considered an inventor and producer of science.

Free and open to the campus and public, but space is limited. Please RSVP to: medhum@iupui.edu.

Fairbanks Ethics Lecture examines “medical improv”

Wednesday February 5, 2014
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Riley Outpatient Center Auditorium

Visiting Scholar Katie L. Watson will present deliver a presentation entitled, “Practicing for Practice: Medical Improv, Ethics, and Advanced Communication Skills.” Her talk is co-sponsored by the Kaye Woltman Endowed Visiting Lectureship at the IU School of Nursing.

Objectives:

  1. Identify how medical humanities and applied arts can contribute to improving clinicians’ communication skills, particularly in the emotionally charged, high stakes situations often encountered in clinical practice.
  2. Discuss the parallel between improv skills and skill necessary to resolve ethical conflicts.
  3. Identify how medical improv could enhance clinicians’ skills in the realms of cognition, patient communication, and professional teamwork.

Katie Watson is an assistant professor in the Medical Humanities & Bioethics Program at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, where she is a member of the ethics committee at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Editor of the medical humanities publication Atrium, and an award-winning teacher of bioethics, humanities, and law to medical students and MA students. Professor Watson graduated from NYU School of Law in 1992, and after years as a public interest lawyer she completed fellowships in clinical medical ethics at University of Chicago Medical School’s MacLean Center and in medical humanities at Northwestern. Professor Watson also has a background in theater—she is currently an adjunct faculty member at the training center of Chicago’s Second City theatre—and in 2002 she created what appears to be the country’s first medical school improv seminar designed to teach communication skills, a unique interdisciplinary adaptation she calls “medical improv.”

The Kaye Woltman Endowed Visiting Lectureship is made possible by a generous gift from the Woltman Family to the IU School of Nursing. This inaugural lectureship is part of an initiative to develop and implement best-practice models for enhanced healthcare provider communication with patients and their families at the end-of-life.

The Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics sponsors the Fairbanks Ethics Lecture Series as an educational outreach to physicians and staff of Indiana University Health hospitals and interested others in the central Indiana community. Lectures are free, open to all, and do not require pre-registration. Continuing education credit is offered to physicians, nurses, social workers, and chaplains at no charge, regardless of their institutional affiliation.

**Please Note– Lunch will not be provided. Food & Drinks are not permitted in the ROC Auditorium.**

For questions and comments, please contact Amy Chamness at achamnes@iuhealth.org, or (317) 962-1721. For additional information about the Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics, please visit the Fairbanks Center website.

Distinguished oncology professor and researcher to speak on models for curing cancer

Thursday, February 27, 2014
12:00 – 1:00 PM
Van Nuys Medical Science Building, Room B26

The Medical Humanities and Health Studies Program’s 2014 Spring Seminar Series will host a lecture  from an internationally renowned cancer researcher at the IU School of Medicine.

Lawrence H. Einhorn, M.D., IUPUI Distinguished Professor and Lance Armstrong Foundation Professor of Oncology at the IU School of Medicine, is widely regarded as the physician who cured testicular cancer in 95 percent of cases through a revolutionary chemotherapy regimen seen as responsible for a dramatic improvement in what previously had been a devastating and rapidly fatal disease. Dr. Einhorn is also a researcher with the IU Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center.

This talk, entitled, “Testicular Cancer: A Model for a Curable Cancer,” is co-sponsored by the John Shaw Billings History of Medicine Society, the IU Student History of Medicine Organization and Medical Humanities and Health Studies.

Video now available: ethics lecture “COPE as an Intervention for Palliative Home Care”

Were you unable to attend the November 6th Fairbanks Ethics Lecture? You can now view the video online. Please note that this video is for informational purposes only and is not for CE/CME credit.

Wednesday November 6, 2013, Methodist Petticrew Auditorium

Cosponsored by the RESPECT Center

Objectives:
  1. Describe the psychoeducational intervention called COPE and ethical implications.
  2. List the most commonly reported symptoms by cancer patients in hospice care as well as those with the highest intensity and the greatest distress.
  3. Describe the impact of the COPE intervention on palliative care patients.
About the Lecturer:

Dr. McMillan, a Distinguished University Professor, is the Lyall and Beatrice Thompson Professor of Oncology Quality of Life Nursing at the University of South Florida (USF) where she coordinates the Oncology Nursing Program in the masters and doctoral programs. Dr. McMillan’s major areas of research have been: a) symptom assessment and management in persons with cancer and b) quality of life of hospice patients with cancer and their family caregivers. She has supported that research with external funding of over $11 million. Dr. McMillan has developed several clinically relevant assessment tools including the Hospice Quality of Life Index, the Caregiver Quality of Life Index and the Constipation Assessment Scale among others. All of these have been used widely in this country and have been translated for use in other countries. Currently, Dr. McMillan is principal investigator on a clinical trials focusing on self care for symptom management in patients with cancer.

The Research in Palliative and End-of-Life Communication and Training (RESPECT) Center is a collaborative, interdisciplinary scientific community of researchers and clinicians working to advance the science of communication in palliative and end-of-life care across the lifespan. For more information please visit the website.

The Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics sponsors the Fairbanks Ethics Lecture Series as an educational outreach to physicians and staff of Indiana University Health hospitals and interested others in the central Indiana community.

For questions and comments, please contact Amy Chamness at achamnes@iuhealth.org, or (317) 962-1721. For additional information about the Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics, please visit the Fairbanks Center website.