15 teams to share $1 million in collaborative grants through IU Research program

IU Vice President of Research Jorge JosIU Vice President of Research Jorge JoséBLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Indiana University Vice President for Research Jorge José has announced over $1 million in collaborative research grants to be shared among 15 newly formed research teams. Members of the teams represent 21 departments from eight schools on three IU campuses.

The IU Collaborative Research Grants program, initiated by José and now in its fifth year, awards teams of researchers up to $75,000 to support collaborative, innovative projects with a high likelihood of securing external funding. Each project team includes faculty members from different campuses, schools, departments or disciplines.

“As it was envisioned to do, the Collaborative Research Grants program continues to increase the capacity for our investigators to do meaningful and innovative work through new partnerships,” José said. “This increased capacity for collaboration is an especially important outcome of this program.”

This year, 44 investigators make up 15 teams that represent departments and schools from Indiana University Bloomington, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and IU Southeast, in addition to one team that had a member from Purdue University.

IU President Michael A. McRobbie called the program and the most recent round of awards integral to stimulating new opportunities for sharing knowledge and expertise that lead to discovery.

“Vice President José has energetically promoted and supported this program to encourage faculty to contribute their expertise in shared, innovative ways,” McRobbie said. “As the end of his tenure draws near, Indiana University can reflect positively on the distinct successes that have been achieved by this program: New and highly productive partnerships have been forged that have already led to new discoveries; the university’s investment has been realized more than ten-fold thanks to subsequent related funding; and a new framework has been developed for our faculty that stimulates creative, passionate investigation through shared knowledge.”

Since a collaboration funded by the inaugural round of grants in 2010-11, Giovanna Guidoboni, an associate professor of mathematics at IUPUI, and Alon Harris, professor of cellular and integrative physiology at the IU School of Medicine, have seen their initial round of work on modeling glaucoma result in enormous benefits.

Following their original round of research, the pair received three external grants, including one from the National Science Foundation for over $275,000. They have also founded a new scientific journal, the Journal for Modeling in Ophthalmology; established an agreement of international cooperation with the Polytechnic University of Milan (Italy); and co-organized an international workshop in Europe.

“That 2011 collaborative research grant has indeed led to an incredible number of great successes,” Guidoboni said.

Craig Pikaard, the Carlos O. Miller Professor and Distinguished Professor of Biology at IU Bloomington, was funded in 2011 with Haixu Tang, an associate professor in the School of Informatics and Computing at IU Bloomington. Pikaard said spin-out benefits from that original grant continue to this day.

“This is a valuable university program that helped jump-start the collaboration between my lab and the group Haixu Tang leads,” he said “It also helped me obtain a highly coveted Howard Hughes Medical Institute-Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation investigator position. Haixu and I continue to collaborate, and we hold regular meetings of our groups.”

In total, it is estimated that the $3 million distributed by IU during just the first three years of the grants program has thus far helped Collaborative Research Grant-funded investigators earn more than $88 million in new external funding. This figure is expected to grow as those funded more recently pursue external funding opportunities.

“The idea behind the program was to create incentives for researchers to initiate new collaborations to address important problems in transformative ways,” José said. “While we can fund only about 15 percent of the applications, just the process of preparing applications has created some new partnerships across the university. The program has been a success so far, and we believe it will continue to be in the future.”

The 15 projects awarded funding this year are:

Single Cell Studies With Scanning Sniffer Patch Microscopy:
Lane Allen Baker, Department of Chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington; and Theodore Cummins, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, IU School of Medicine.

Investigating the Relationship Between Cumulative Disadvantage and Telomere Length as a Contributor to Cancer Disparities:
Silvia Bigatti, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, IUPUI; Brittney-Shea Herbert, Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, IU School of Medicine; Kenzie Latham, Department of Sociology, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI; and Anna Maria Storniolo, Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, IU School of Medicine.

Mechanism of the Regulation of DNA Replication by PIF1 Family Helicases:
Matthew L. Bochman, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington; Yuichiro Takagi, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, IU School of Medicine; and Amber Mosley, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, IU School of Medicine.

Matrix Engineering With Adipose Stem Cells to Promote Islet Function and Longevity: Robert V. Considine, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, IU School of Medicine; Raghu Mirmira, Department of Pediatrics, IU School of Medicine; and Sherry L. Voytik-Harbin, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University.

Using in vivo Microscopy to Build Predictive Models of Drug-induced Liver Injury: Kenneth Dunn, Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, IU School of Medicine; Richard Day, Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology, IU School of Medicine; and Steve Pressé, Department of Physics, School of Science, IUPUI.

Understanding Naturalistic Bicyclist Behavior for Safety and Sustainability:
David Good, School of Public and Environmental Affairs, IU Bloomington; Lauren Christopher, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI; Stanley Chien, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI; Jiang Zheng, Department of Computer and Information Science, School of Science, IUPUI; and Yaobin Chen, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI.

Neurotherapeutic Potential of Adipose Stem Cell-Conditioned Medium in ALS:
Kathryn Jones, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, IU School of Medicine; and Keith March, Department of Medicine, Krannert Institute of Cardiology, IU School of Medicine.

The Impact of the Public Investment in Education in the Academic Performance of K-12 English Language Learners in Southern Indiana:
Haeil Jung, SPEA, IU Bloomington; Magdalena Herdoíza-Estévez, School of Education, IU Southeast; Cathy Johnson, School of Education, IU Southeast; and Jacquelyn Singleton, School of Education, IU Southeast.

Developing Remote Sensing Techniques for Detection of Toxin-Producing Cyanobacteria:
Lin Li, Department of Earth Sciences, School of Science, IUPUI; Kevin Mandernack, Department of Earth Sciences, School of Science, IUPUI; and David Kehoe, Department of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington.

Effect of Antarctic Weathering on Global Climate:
Kathy Licht, Department of Earth Sciences, School of Science, IUPUI; and David Bish, Department of Geological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington.

A Novel Approach to Discover Drug Resistance Genes in Breast Cancer Cells:
Tao Lu, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, IU School of Medicine; and Lang Li, Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, IU School of Medicine.

Induction and Maintenance of Chronic Migraine: Regulation of TRP Channels by Endogenous N-acyl Amide Lipids:
Gerry Oxford, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, IU School of Medicine; Heather Bradshaw, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington; and Joyce Hurley, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, IU School of Medicine.

Optical-Based, Label-Free Multiplex Assay for Direct Quantification of microRNAs in Serum and Cancer Cells:
Rajesh Sardar, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, School of Science, IUPUI; and Murray Korc, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, IU School of Medicine.

Developmental Adaptation to Chronic Hypoxia:
Robert Tepper, Department of Pediatrics, IU School of Medicine; Mircea Ivan, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, IU School of Medicine; and Kenneth Nephew, Medical Sciences Program, IU School of Medicine-Bloomington.

Hippo/YAP Signaling Controls Protein Redistribution and Organ Size in Critical Illness:
Clark Wells, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biochemistry, IU School of Medicine; Teresa Zimmers, Department of Surgery, IU School of Medicine; and Leonidas Koniaris, Department of Surgery, IU School of Medicine.

Poet to direct ‘Cadaver, Speak’ reading in collaboration between schools of liberal arts, medicine

"Cadaver, Speak" cover

“Cadaver, Speak” cover

Poet Marianne Boruch will direct a readers’ theater performance of her latest poetry collection, “Cadaver, Speak,” at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 30, in the Emerson Hall Anatomy Lecture Hall, 545 Barnhill Drive.

“Cadaver, Speak” is Boruch’s eighth collection of poetry. The collection is centered on a sequence of 30 poems — narrated by a 99-year-old woman who is dissected as part of an anatomy class — that explore issues of life and death, knowledge and bodies. Six students from the IU School of Medicine and five students from the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI will read segments of “Cadaver, Speak” with Boruch.

“Marianne Boruch gets us to confront the most intimate details of our lives in a language that is both talky and imagistically rich,” says Karen Kovacik, professor of English at IUPUI and former Indiana Poet Laureate. “Thanks to the wily narrator of this poem, the human body becomes a site of wonder.”

The reading, free and open to the public, is part of the 2014 Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series at IUPUI.

Boruch will also talk about the poem on WFYI’s “Sound Medicine” at 2 p.m. Oct. 26.

Boruch, who teaches creative writing at Purdue University, has published in The New Yorker magazine and was anthologized in the 1997 and 2009 editions of “The Best American Poetry.” She has been awarded fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts, and she was a Fulbright/visiting professor at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, in 2012. In 2013, she received the prestigious Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award for her previous collection, “The Book of Hours.” She also completed a residency at the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Center.

Emily Beckman, assistant clinical professor in the medical humanities and health studies program and adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Medicine, said the reading will be especially beneficial to first-year medical students.

“Students need to realize that the body on which they are working used to belong to a living, breathing human being with a story,” she said. “Boruch’s poem aims to not only tell that story, but encourages us to consider the individual, unique stories of all who are seeking healing.”

The Rufus & Louise Reiberg Series is sponsored by the Department of English in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. Founded in 1997 in honor of former IUPUI Department of English chair and Professor Emeritus Rufus Reiberg and his wife, Louise, the annual Reiberg Reading Series brings nationally and regionally known writers to the IUPUI campus to present their work. The Rufus & Louise Reiberg Series is also made possible by the generous support of the Reiberg Family; the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research; the Office of Academic Affairs; University College; and University Library.

The Oct. 30 reading is co-sponsored by the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology in the IU School of Medicine and the Medical Humanities and Health Studies Program in the School of Liberal Arts IUPUI as well as the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute. The event was made possible by a grant from Indiana Humanities in cooperation with the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Visitor parking is available for a fee in the Riley Hospital outpatient parking garage, 575 Riley Hospital Drive; the University Hospital garage, 600 University Blvd.; and the Vermont Street garage, 1004 W. Vermont St.

RSVPs are requested to medhum@iupui.edu or 317-278-1669.


“In the Shadow of Terror: Providing Healthcare on the Northern Cameroon-Nigeria Border ”


Dr. Ellen Einterz, Director of the Kolofata District Hospital and Chief Medical Officer for the Kolofata Health District

Over the past several years, northeastern Nigeria has been wracked by violence promulgated by a group of extremists whose stated aim is to topple the status quo and establish a universal caliphate based on Islamic law. Thousands have died, and at least a million left homeless since the carnage began. Border areas in neighboring countries, including Cameroon, have been touched by the climate of terror, military reaction, and the flight of refugees.

Since 1990, Dr. Ellen Einterz, an IU graduate, has lived on the border between Cameroon and Nigeria’s Borno State. She is the Director of the Kolofata District Hospital and Chief Medical Officer for the Kolofata Health District. In her talk, she will briefly explore the conflict in its historical and present day context and provide an account of her recent personal experience as a physician in the exceptionally poor corner of Africa being rocked by this tragedy.

This lecture is presented by Medical Humanities & Health Studies and the IUPUI Global Health Student Interest Group and generous support from The IUPUI Office of International Affairs, The Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, and the Africana Studies Program in the School of Liberal Arts.

2014-2015 fellowship in clinical ethics

2014-2015 Ethics Fellowship Applications Open

Applications are available for the 2014-2015 Clinical Ethics Fellowship sponsored by the Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics. The application deadline is April 30, 2014.

This nine-month, part time fellowship focuses on training health care professionals in clinical ethics, including ethics consultation, hospital ethics committee work, and ethics research. Graduates will become capable members of the ethics community. The target audience for the fellowship includes physicians, nurses, chaplains, and social workers. Other members of the community (e.g. attorneys or members of administrative staffs) may also apply.

Application to the fellowship is competitive. The application process includes submission of a written application (which includes several brief narrative essays), a letter of support from the applicant’s immediate supervisor, one letter of recommendation, and interviews with Fairbanks Center staff.

For an application and additional information go to the Fairbanks Center website or contact Robin Bandy, JD, MA, Fairbanks Center Program Manager, at 317-962-9260, or rbandy@iuhealth.org .

“Faith and Medicine: Integration or Separation?” | Fairbanks Ethics Lecture Series

Dr. James Lynch Jr.Faith and Medicine: Integration or Separation?
Fairbanks Ethics Lecture Series
Presented by: Visiting Scholar James W. Lynch Jr, MD, FACP

When: Wednesday April 2, 2014
Time: 12:00-1:00 pm
Location: Riley Outpatient Center Auditorium

Co-sponsored by the MHHS Spirit of Medicine Program. Free CME/CE Credit Offered


  1. Articulate the various forces shaping how we think about the relationships between faith and medicine in the 21st century.
  2. Discuss how the term “professionalism” can be distorted to undermine compassion and empathy as parts of healthy physician-patient relationships.
  3. Describe the ways practitioners address their own spiritual beliefs (or lack thereof) in relation to patients and their beliefs.
  4. Identify how to address complexities that arise in discussing spiritual issues with patients or in choosing not to discuss them.

**Please Note– Lunch will not be provided.  Food and drinks are NOT permitted in the ROC Auditorium.**

About the Lecturer:

Dr. Lynch received his BA from the University of Virginia and MD from Eastern VA Medical School in 1984.  After internal medicine training at the University of Florida, he did his training in medical oncology at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda MD.  In 1991 he returned to the UFCOM and has served in multiple roles during this tenure including, course director in Oncology, program director for hematology/oncology, section chief of hematology/oncology at the VAMC and now serves as the Assistant Dean for Admissions.  He is a nationally recognized and  published expert in the diagnosis and treatment of lymphomas. He has received multiple teaching awards including clinical teacher of the year 4 times, the Hippocratic award three times, is a member of the College of Medicine Society of Teaching Scholars and in 2006 was honored by the University of Florida as one of 5 Distinguished Teaching Scholars.  He was co-founder with his wife of the Christian Study Center at the University of Florida and serves as its board president. He and his wife Laura, have 4 children and 3 grandchildren.

The Spirit of Medicine Reading and Discussion Program is funded by an IU Health Values Grant. This three-year program available to IU medical students includes monthly meetings to discuss seminar readings and opportunities to meet with thought leaders in spirituality and medicine.  Participants also attend lectures presented by notable visiting scholars and enjoy the opportunity to engage scholars in further conversations.

The Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics sponsors the Fairbanks Ethics Lecture Series as an educational outreach to physicians and staff of Indiana University Health hospitals and interested others in the central Indiana community.  Lectures are free, open to all, and do not require pre-registration.  Continuing education credit is offered to physicians, nurses, social workers, and chaplains at no charge, regardless of their institutional affiliation.

For questions and comments, please contact Amy Chamness at achamnes@iuhealth.org or (317)962-1721.  For additional information about the Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics, please visit our website at www.fairbankscenter.org.


Amy R. Chamness-Douthit
Program Coordinator- Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics
Indiana University Health (www.iuhealth.org)
Noyes E-130|317.962.1721 (office)|317.962.9262 (fax)
(website) www.fairbankscenter.org


Virologist presents lecture on the emergence of the AIDS epidemics

Wednesday March 19, 2014
12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
Emerson Hall, Room 304
545 Barnhill Drive

Professor Preston Marx will deliver a presentation entitled, “Emergence of the AIDS Epidemics: Transition from SIV to HIV.”

The sudden emergence of the AIDS pandemic in the 20th century raised questions about AIDS origin(s), including the timing and root causes. Research led to understanding that HIV/AIDS is not one pandemic, but rather a combination of multiple epidemics and failed outbreaks, alongside the well known pandemic. The sources of all HIVs are simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) on the African continent. Finding SIV and the evolution of SIV to HIV will be presented, along with prevailing theories on why AIDS emerged in the 20th century.

Marx is Professor of Tropical Medicine and Chair of the Division of Microbiology at the Tulane National Primate Research Center of Tulane University. A virologist with over 40 years of experience in research on non-human primate models of AIDS vaccines and the origins of the AIDS epidemics, Dr. Marx’s research contributions include finding Simian Immunodeficiency Viruses (SIV’s) in sooty mangabeys in West Africa, showing this particular mangabey monkey sub-species as the source of HIV-2. Dr. Marx has conducted research projects in Sierra Leone, Gabon, Cameroon and the Republic of Congo. He recently published research in Science magazine showing that the SIV family of viruses is hundreds of thousands of years older than previously believed.

Co-sponsored by the Medical Humanities and Health Studies Program and the Indiana University School of Medicine Center for AIDS Research.

Pizza will be served. Questions? Please email ticarmic@iu.edu.

McDonald Merrill Ketcham Award Lecture: “Are Physicians Fiduciaries for Their Patients?”

Thursday February 20, 2014
12:45 – 3:45 p.m.
Wynn Courtroom, Inlow Hall

Maxwell J. Mehlman, J.D., will present “Are Physicians Fiduciaries for Their Patients?” from 12:45 to 1:45 p.m. A panel discussion, then reception will follow the lecture.

A fiduciary is a legal or ethical relationship of trust between two or more parties. The patient-physician relationship would seem to be a classic example of a fiduciary relationship given the need for ill-informed patients lacking bargaining power to trust their physicians, but many scholars and judges have questioned this assumption. The lecture examines the reasons for their skepticism and argues that they are misguided. Mehlman argues that regarding doctors as fiduciaries for their patients not only is essential for the patients’ well-being, but necessary to preserve the physicians’ status as learned professionals in the face of increasing pressure to act contrary to their patients’ interests.

A speaker’s reception will be held from 2:45 to 3:45 in the Inlow Hall atrium. This event is part of the McDonald Merrill Ketcham Award Lecture series presented by the Hall Center for Law and Health at the IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law.

This is a free event, but registration is required.

Panel Discussion following Professor’s Mehlman’s lecture:

  • Mary Ott, M.D., M.A., Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine
  • Joshua Perry, J.D., M.T.S., Assistant Professor of Business Law and Ethics and a Life Sciences Research Fellow, Indiana University Kelley School of Business
  • Mark Rothstein, J.D., Herbert F. Boehl Chair of Law and Medicine, University of Louisville Louis D. Brandeis School of Law, and Director of the Institute for Bioethics, Health Policy, and Law, University of Louisville School of Medicine

Mehlman is a Distinguished University Professor and Petersilge Professor of Law at the Case Western Reserve School of Law and and professor of biomedical ethics at Case Western Reserve School of Medicine. He is also director of the Law-Medicine Center at the Case Western Reserve University. Panel discussion participants are Mary Ott, M.D.,associate professor of pediatrics at the IU School of Medicine; Joshua Perry, J.D., assistant professor of business law and ethics and a life sciences research fellow at the IU Kelley School of Business at Bloomington and Mark Rothstein, J.D., Herbert F. Boehl Chair of Law and Medicine and director of the Institute for Bioethics, Health Policy, and Law at the University of Louisville.

“Visualizing Disease” explores pathological illustrations from 16th-19th century

Wednesday February 19, 2014
12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
Van Nuys Medical Science Bldg.
Room 122A

Domenico Bertoloni-Meli, Ph.D., Department of History and Philosophy of Science, Indiana University presents “Visualizing Disease: Pathological Illustrations from the 16th to the 19th Century.”

“Visualizing Disease” explores pathological illustrations from the 16th century to the first half of the 19th century, in the period from the first representations of remarkable cases to the first comprehensive treatises with color images of diseases affecting the entire human body. The talk will illustrate and discuss the lesions found in the dissected bodies of dead patients at postmortems, and skin diseases on live patients, which played an important role in the history of pathological illustrations more generally.

Presented by the Medical Humanities & Health Studies Seminar Series. Free and open to the public. Please RSVP to medhum@iupui.edu.