Call to Action Film Series and Panel: “Slavery by Another Name”

Wednesday, October 23, 2013
6:00-8:30 pm
Inlow Hall (IH), IUPUI
530 W. New York St.
Indianapolis, IN 46202

Slavery by Another Name is a 90-minute PBS documentary that challenges one of Americans’ most cherished assumptions: the belief that slavery in this country ended with the Emancipation Proclamation. Most Americans do not realize that the constitutions of Indiana and the United States to this day legalize slavery. This is program is the first in a series.

To RSVP for this free event, visit the website.

You are invited to stay after the screening of this thought-provoking documentary for a probing panel discussion.

Panelists include:
  • Subini Ancy Annamma, IU School of Education at IUPUI Assistant Professor of Special Education John Bartlett, State Representative
  • Ken Falk, Legal Director, ACLU-IN Attorney
  • Lahny Silva, IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law Professor
  • Rev. Byron Vaughn, President of Prisoners Reformed United, Inc.
  • Rebecca Zeitlow, University of Dayton Professor
Invited guests from the IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law
  • Karen Bravo, Professor and Associate Dean for International Affairs
  • George E. Edwards, C.M. Gray Professor of Law

Presented by Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law; Indiana University School of Education at IUPUI; and Indianapolis Urban League.

For more information, contact Carlton Waterhouse, School of Law, 317-274-8055, or Chalmer Thompson, School of Education,chathomp@iupui.edu.

Film and Panel Discussion: “Donor Intent vs. Public Interest”—The Barnes Collection and The Art of the Steal


Annual Jordan and Joan Leibman Forum on the Legal and Business Environment of Art: “Donor Intent vs. Public Interest”—The Barnes Collection and The Art of the Steal
Friday, November 1, 2013
Wynne Courtroom (Room 100), Lawrence W. Inlow Hall IU McKinney School of Law
530 W New York St

4:00 p.m. Screening of The Art of the Steal, 6:00 p.m. panel discussion; 7:15 p.m. reception in the Atrium.

Described as a not-to-be-missed look at one of the art world’s most fascinating controversies and a celebrated selection of the Toronto, New York and AFI Film Festivals, Don Argott’s gripping documentary THE ART OF THE STEAL chronicles the long and dramatic struggle for control of the Barnes Foundation, a private collection of art valued at more than $25 billion.

In 1922, Dr. Albert C. Barnes formed a remarkable educational institution around his priceless collection of art, located just five miles outside of Philadelphia. Now, more than 50 years after Barnes’ death, a powerful group of moneyed interests have gone to court for control of the art, and intend to bring it to a new museum in Philadelphia. Standing in their way is a group of Barnes’ former students and his will, which contains strict instructions stating the Foundation should always be an educational institution, and that the paintings may never be removed. Will they succeed, or will a man’s will be broken and one of America’s greatest cultural monuments be destroyed?

Watch The Art of the Steal, the award-winning documentary, and then join in a lively examination of this turn of events with expert panelists from IUPUI and the Indianapolis Museum of Art.

Speakers:

Kenan L. Farrell, founder, KLF Legal and adjunct professor at IU McKinney School of Law. Farrell’s practice encompasses intellectual property, media, entertainment and business law. He teaches Art and Museum Law. He is also president of the Indianapolis Downtown Artists and Dealers Association (IDADA).

Kathryn Haigh, deputy director for Collections and Exhibitions,Indianapolis Museum of Art. Haigh manages all exhibitions and collections-related activities for the IMA. She developed the Museum Property Act in the State of Ohio and implemented the first collections management database at the Cincinnati Art Museum.

Laura Holzman, assistant professor of Art History and Museum Studies, Herron School of Art and Design and the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. Holzman is a public scholar of Curatorial Practices and Visual Art. She holds a Ph.D. in visual studies from the University of California, Irvine. Her current book in progress includes a study of the Barnes collection move.

Robert A. Katz, professor of Law at IU McKinney School of Law and professor of Philanthropic Studies at IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. Katz is an expert in the law of nonprofit organizations and chairs the Association of American Law School’s Nonprofit and Philanthropy Law Section. His recent scholarship focuses on social enterprise and for-profit enterprises that seek to combine profitability with social mission.

Additional Free Screenings of The Art of the Steal:

  • Wednesday, October 16, 7:00 p.m., Basile Auditorium, Eskenazi Hall, Herron School of Art and Design
  • Tuesday, October 29, 6:00 p.m., Wynne Courtroom (room 100), IU McKinney School of Law

Parking for McKinney School of Law: Parking is available for a nominal fee at the campus Gateway Garage, located on the corner of Michigan and California streets (address is 525 Blackford Street). Parking is also available for a nominal fee at the Sports Complex Garage two blocks west of the law school.

Parking for Herron School of Art and Design: Limited parking is available in the Sports Complex Garage just west of Herron. Park in the visitor side of the garage and bring your ticket to the Herron Galleries for validation, compliments of The Great Frame Up. Parking in the surface lot west of Herron requires a valid IUPUI parking permit.

This event is a joint project of The IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law, the IU Herron School of Art and Design, and the IU Kelley School of Business.

Warriors-turned-artists facilitate healing with paper handmade from their own uniforms

Combat Paper
September 25 – November 16
Artist’s Talk: Wednesday, September 25, 6:00 p.m.
Combat Paper Project co-founder Drew Cameron
Opening Reception: immediately following Artist’s Talk, 7:00-9:00 p.m.
Herron School of Art and Design, Basile Auditorium, Eskenazi Hall

Veterans achieve a form of catharsis through the transformative art of papermaking, pressing their own uniforms into service as the raw material in works of art. Papermaker, book artist and veteran Drew Cameron, who co-founded the Combat Paper workshops where the art is made, will speak on opening night and will be on hand for several additional public events between September 23-27.

“Coming home from war is a difficult thing,” writes artist and veteran Drew Cameron, founder of the Combat Paper Project. “There is often much to account for as a survivor.” In his own search for meaning, Cameron discovered that papermaking can be a transformative process that broadens “the traditional narrative surrounding the military experience and warfare.”

Since 2007, the Combat Paper Project, which Cameron co-founded, has grown from its San Francisco base and travelled to Canada, England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Kosovo providing workshops, exhibitions, performances and artists’ talks.

breaking rank by drew cameron

Drew Cameron, Breaking Rank

An exhibition of works from Combat Paper will open in Herron School of Art and Design’s Berkshire, Reese and Paul Galleries in Eskenazi Hall on September 25, running through November 16. Cameron will give an artist’s talk on opening night at 6:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Surrounding Cameron’s visit, there is a full slate of activities at Herron and in the broader community. At Herron, he will work with students and the public in a variety of ways, dovetailing with the school’s Book Arts and Art Therapy programs. In addition to the exhibition opening activities, Cameron’s visit is scheduled to include:

Tuesday September 24: A papermaking workshop open to the public from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in the Eskenazi Fine Arts Center, 1401 Indiana Avenue. Lunch provided from Noon to 1:30 p.m.

Wednesday September 25: Classroom visit at Eskenazi Hall with Art Therapy graduate students from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. and Book Arts students in the afternoon.

Thursday September 26: A papermaking workshop open to the public from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in the Eskenazi Fine Arts Center, 1401 Indiana Avenue. Lunch provided from Noon to 1:30 p.m.

Friday September 27: Classroom visit with Book Arts students from 9:00 a.m. to noon.

Persons interested in attending the workshops can RSVP to Paula Katz at katzp@iupui.edu to reserve a seat and lunch. Participants may bring a piece of clothing that they would like to incorporate into the batch of paper that will be made during the workshop.

November 1-16, in the Marsh Gallery: Combat Paper companion show of veteran-made art.

November 9, 2:00 p.m. in the Basile Auditorium of Eskenazi Hall: “Veterans Reclaim Armistice Day”. National Book Award for Fiction winner Tim O’Brien leads a panel discussing literary expression as a means of coping with PTSD. A project of the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library.

November 13, 7:00 p.m., in the Basile Auditorium of Eskenazi Hall: Screening of The Ghost Army

Film Screening: Tears of Gaza

This award winning film compiles first person accounts of those living in Gaza during the 2008-2009 bombings and portrays the impact it still has on Gaza today. It was shot in Palestine by Palestinians and shows actual footage from the bombings. This film is important, because it not only gives us an in-depth look at the atrocities of war but it gives the audience a unique chance to be engrossed in the perspective of Gazans toward the conflict and how the conflict they live in shapes it. After the showing of the film there will be a discussion about how the Gaza conflict impacts the lives of those involved and how the conflict shapes the tension between Israelis and Palestinians.

Wednesday, February 20th

Campus Center Theater at 6pm

This movie is sponsored by:

Council on Strategic International Affairs
Globalsolutions.org at IUPUI
Christians for Peace and Justice in the Middle East

For a trailer or more information about the film: tearsofgazamovie.com

Film: “Kinyarwanda” at IUPUI, CE 002, Oct. 9, 7 pm

Globalsolutions.org at IUPUI, Council on Strategic Internaional Affairs, and Democracy Plaza will be bring the great Sundance Film Festival winning narrative “Kinyarwanda” to Campus this Tuesday. The Film’s producer, Darren Dean, and the main actress will attend to talk afterwards and answer questions.

Also both the producer and actress would be more than happy come and talk to classes this Monday and Tuesday. To request a visit please email the contact at the bottom of the page.

“The Story of Kinyarwanda
During the Rwandan genocide, when neighbors killed neighbors and friends betrayed friends, some crossed lines of hatred to protect each other.

At the time of the 1994 Rwandan genocide, the Mufti of Rwanda, the most respected Muslim leader in the country, issued a fatwa forbidding Muslims from participating in the killing of the Tutsi. As the country became a slaughterhouse, mosques became places of refuge where Muslims and Christians, Hutus and Tutsis came together to protect each other. KINYARWANDA is based on true accounts from survivors who took refuge at the Grand Mosque of Kigali and the madrassa of Nyanza. It recounts how the Imams opened the doors of the mosques to give refuge to the Tutsi and those Hutu who refused to participate in the killing.

KINYARWANDA interweaves six different tales that together form one grand narrative that provides the most complex and real depiction yet presented of human resilience and life during the genocide. With an amalgamation of characters, we pay homage to many, using the voices of a few.”

Watch the Trailer
For more information contact Joel Clanton at joelclan@iupui.edu

 

Shakespeare at IUPUI: a trailer for a new WFYI documentary

CSI Shakespeare – In the spring of 2102, IUPUI presented the world premiere of a lost 400-year old play by William Shakespeare, titled “The History of Cardenio.” This half-hour documentary highlights the 20 year-effort by world-renowned Shakespeare scholar Gary Taylor to recreate the play, filtering old texts through modern high-tech databases to resurrect the original manuscript.  Viewers will also travel with Gary to the Globe Theatre in London and retrace his academic roots as a precocious and oft-published “enfant terrible” at Oxford University Press.  Then, we return to Indianapolis to witness the first-blown production of the work—an experimental collaboration with Hoosier Bard Productions, including the recording of a period-accurate but original musical score for vocals and lute, to christen the new urban theatre space at IUPUI.
7:30pm, November 1st.
Producer: Jim Simmons

 

 

Herron School of Art and Design to debut Design and Thinking on September 12

Herron School of Art and Design will present Design and Thinking: a documentary on design thinking on Wednesday, September 12 at 7:00 p.m. in the Basile Auditorium of Eskenazi Hall.

The film (running time 74:11) entertainingly reveals the design thinking movement’s growing relevance to problem solving across business, culture and society.

The director, Mu-Ming Tsai, has won a Cannes Young Lion award for the film Wateraid for Dennis. In his first feature-length film, rather than create a paean to the beauty of design, he aims to bring forward the ambiguity, conflicts and messy process of how designers and other creative people think and do things.

Change-making organizations from a local bike shop to Coca-Cola provide real-world inspiration through design thinking in action. Thought leaders including David Kelley, Bill Moggridge, Roger Martin and Tim Brown share their belief that asking the right questions is more important than providing firm answers.

Pamela Napier and Terri Wada, faculty members in Visual Communication Design at Herron, agree that the time for such a movie is now. “With increasingly complex issues arising on multiple fronts in our current global economy,” said Napier, “design thinking has been gaining recognition as a powerful approach to creating effective and innovative solutions to many of the ‘wicked’ challenges that businesses, organizations, institutions and communities face today.”

“In places as close to Indianapolis as Chicago and as far as California,” said Wada, “creative design firms like IDEO and the design school at Stanford University have provided ample evidence of the power of design thinking applied to the creation of revolutionary objects and services.”

Herron became an early adopter of design thinking to provide real-world experiences and professional practice for its students. In its graduate degree program in visual communication design, which has had only four graduating classes, students have produced dozens of case studies where they and their faculty mentors have developed actionable solutions for real community challenges in collaboration with stakeholders. A Herron case study is featured in the new book by Andrew Shea, Designing for Social Change, published by Princeton Architectural Press.

“The inclusion of the Herron in Designing for Social Change is an acknowledgement of our contribution to this relatively young field. The fact that we’re listed among so many respected designers and design schools demonstrates Herron’s position within the leading edge of social design,” said Marshall Jones, Herron’s communication design specialist.

The September 12 event provides a unique opportunity for designers and non-designers alike to be inspired by what design thinking can do. Herron’s Visual Communication Design Graduate Studio will be open so that visitors can learn about some of the design thinking projects that are currently underway in Indianapolis.

This screening is being made possible by a generous donation from Wil Marquez, Creative Director and Owner of With Purpose  http://www.wpurpose.com/