Anthropologist and English lecturer comment on popularity, cultural themes of ‘Planet of the Apes’

Paul Mullins 1227544_w296INDIANAPOLIS — Why does the idea of a dystopian world ruled by apes continue to pique moviegoers’ interest nearly five decades after the original “Planet of the Apes” debuted?

With the newest installment of the franchise, “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes,” opening in theaters this weekend, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis anthropology professor Paul R. Mullins and IUPUI English lecturer Michal Hughes are available for comment on the popularity and cultural themes of the movie series.

The original series — a five-film saga — began in 1968 with Charlton Heston as astronaut George Taylor marooned on an ape-ruled planet. This year’s film follows the 2011 “Rise of the Planet of the Apes,” a reboot of the original series.

On the big screen, we’ve had seven films, with a third in the reboot series announced earlier this year. What piques our fascination and keeps us coming back for more?

Mullins: “The fundamental attraction of the series remains its dystopian narrative of the price of human folly and the potential that the meek may inherit the earth; in much of the ‘Apes’ franchise, we root for the apes and are indifferent to (if not actively rooting against) the humans.”

Hughes: “A large part is the desire for answers to our questions. Why do the apes hate humans so much? What did the humans do to stir that hatred? When did the animosity between the species of apes start? How and why did it start? What caused the apocalypse? How did the humans lose speech after the apocalypse? Ad infinitum. As a prequel to the original series, viewers are hoping to discover some of the answers to these and other questions.”

There has been a change of themes in the movies, reflecting changes in society, according to Mullins and Hughes.

Mullins: “The franchise was a bit more focused on race in the ’60s and ’70s and now addresses somewhat different costs of human agency (e.g., genetic engineering, environmental impacts, etc.).”

Given that “Planet of the Apes” debuted during the civil rights era, can we expect this movie to carry the same weight as a commentary on American culture and/or history?

Hughes: “To some degree. It should show us how the seeds of hatred were sown for both the hatred between apes and humans and the class struggle between the species of apes. (Science fiction) often masks subjects like this and is able to present it to a far larger audience than other genres of film or literature. I expect the film to distinguish the subtle differences and keep these issues in the background of the story.”

Michal Hughes teaches science fiction literature in the Department of English in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. His academic interests include science fiction and fantasy. Hughes’ writings include “The Confessions of a Science Fiction Reader: Notes upon values taught by Science Fiction and Fantasy” in “Reaching Young People Through Media.”

Paul Mullins, chair of the Department of Anthropology in the School of Liberal Arts and a popular culture expert, has taught a class that includes “Planet of the Apes as American Myth: Race and Politics in the Films and Television Series” as a required textbook.

 

To arrange an interview with Mullins or Hughes, contact Diane Brown at 317-274-2195 (office), 317-371-0437 (cell) or habrown@iupui.edu.

 

 

IUPUI music and arts technology lecturer does sound for film about World Cup stadium workers

thINDIANAPOLIS — Soccer is serious business in Brazil. Just ask IUPUI Department of Music and Arts Technology lecturer Ricardo Laranja, a native of that nation of 220 million people that is hosting the 2014 World Cup soccer tournament.

That passion for the sport most of the world knows as football spawned stadium construction to help handle the monthlong schedule of games, June 12 to July 13, which led to a documentary film, “Operarios da Bola,” loosely translated as “Blue Collar Players.” Laranja got involved as an audio engineer and composer when producer-director Virna Smith asked him to help complete the documentary.

Smith’s film highlights the desire of all Brazilians to be part of this year’s international festival. Construction workers created 60 male teams and four female teams to take part in a “blue-collar” tournament nicknamed the “Cup Before the Cup.” More than 800 workers participated in the event, out of 3,000 who constructed the Mané Garrincha stadium that will host the World Cup contests.

The movie is in Brazilian theaters nationwide and will show for 60 days. Several TV stations are negotiating to air the movie, including ESPN Brasil and Globo, the biggest network TV channel in Brazil. “Operarios da Bola” has been recently accepted to be shown at a film festival in Los Angeles in September.

For Laranja, it was a great opportunity to work on the documentary. He has refined Smith’s movie several times in recent weeks, tweaking the sound to fit his own standards of musical and sound perfection.

“I am so excited to be part of this historic project,” he said. “I believes it captures the passion and love for soccer for the Brazilian people. Brazil lives soccer, basically. It’s a religion.”

It also excites Laranja’s imagination.

“To us, the World Cup is a once-in-a-lifetime thing,” he said. Even he admits being caught up in the emotion of the games. “I’m actually going (to Brazil) on June 17, and I don’t even have a ticket!”

The music technology lecturer also was able to use the project to create learning opportunities for several Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis engineering and technology students, including juniors Raul Padro, Cale Forbes and Keith Ray.

Padro is a 59-year-old returning student who “performed all of the percussion on a song I composed and produced as part of the soundtrack for the movie,” Laranja said. “Many in Indianapolis consider Raul the best percussionist in town.”

Forbes and Ray provided sound design for the movie.

Laranja is well-acquainted with Smith, the filmmaker behind “Operarios da Bola.” He worked with her on a TV talk show called “Homem Total” (“Complete Man”), which aired in 42 countries in 2008, and was the chief audio engineer, sound designer and composer on Smith’s 2013 movie “O Encontro Marcado.”

The “Cup Before the Cup” caught the attention of the people of Brazil in part because of the opportunity of the tourney champion to compete against an all-star team led by former professional soccer star Ronaldo. The Brazilian legend was inspired by the project enough to take part.

Tournament organizers also hosted a canned food drive and a fundraiser during the stadium work, a service project that benefited local underprivileged communities, Laranja said.

Story 17: Digital Bridges from the IUPUI University Library

21 years. 21 stories.
Over the course of 2014 the IUPUI Library will be sharing these stories with you.

Story 17: Digital Bridges

From the Indianapolis Motor Speedway to the Indiana Law Review, the IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship is connecting the city with the campus every day. We support the city by creating digital collections of images, newspapers, artifacts, and public records.

Missed a story? Want to read one again? All stories can be found here.

2014 Italian Film Festival schedule announced

The Italian program in the Department of World Languages and Cultures at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will host the Italian Film Festival, April 12 through May 10. The festival showcases nine films, including two documentaries.

“Once again the program in Italian brings a taste of Europe to IUPUI and Indianapolis with this year’s edition of the Italian Film Festival, showing the best in recent Italian filmmaking,” said professor Marta Anton, chair of the Department of World Languages and Cultures, part of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Indianapolis is one of 11 cities participating in the festival. All films will be presented with English subtitles and are free and open to the public. The Indianapolis series is sponsored by Fiat and the Italian Cultural Institute of Chicago in collaboration with IUPUI and the IUPUI Italian Club.

The films will be shown at either the Lilly Auditorium of the IUPUI University Library, 755 W. Michigan St., or the IUPUI Campus Center Theatre, 420 University Blvd.

The films, times and locations are:

  • “Viva L’Italia,” 2 p.m. Saturday, April 12, IUPUI University Library, Lilly Auditorium. A sudden illness results in politician Michele Spagnolo saying anything that comes into his head and doing whatever he wants, with hilarious consequences. (Comedy, 111 min)
  • “Gli Equilibristi” (“Balancing Act”), 4 p.m. Sunday, April 13, Lilly Auditorium. A critical error causes Giulio’s life to unravel. Through a series of events, Giulio discovers how thin the line truly is between well-being and poverty. (Comedy, 100 min)
  • “Bianca Come Il Latte, Rossa Come Il Sangue” (“White as Milk, Red as Blood”), 2 p.m. Saturday, April 19, Lilly Auditorium. Leo is a typical 16-year-old who finds school agonizing. Then, a new teacher encourages him to follow his dreams, which include an unattainable fellow student with fiery red hair. (Drama, 102 min)
  • “Viva La Liberta” (“Long Live Freedom”), 7 p.m. Friday, April 25, IUPUI Campus Center Theatre. When the leader of a political opposition party disappears, his wife and assistant turn to his identical twin brother, who was recently released from a psychiatric hospital. Will anyone notice the switch? (Drama, 93 min)
  • “Il Rosso E Il Blue” (“The Red and Blue”), 4 p.m. Sunday, April 27, Lilly Auditorium. Set in a Roman school are the stories of an art history professor who has lost his passion for the job, a young substitute who is trying to save a rebel student and a stern head mistress who is forced to deal with a student who has been forgotten by his mother. (Comedy, 98 min)
  • “Teorema Venezia” (“The Venice Syndrome”), 7 p.m. Saturday, May 3, Campus Center Theatre. Venice, the world’s most beautiful city, has 48,000 residents, and there are fewer every year as the city is becoming almost uninhabitable. The film shows what remains of Venetian life. (Documentary, 80 min)
  • “La Migliore Offerta” (“The Best Offer”), 7 p.m. Friday, May 9, Campus Center Theatre. An antiques expert is appointed to oversee the sale of a beautiful heiress’s priceless art collection and is soon engulfed by a passion that rocks his bland existence. (Drama, 124 min.)
  • “Women Workers’ War,” 5 p.m. Saturday, May 10, Campus Center Theatre. A documentary about two women: one who leads the longest factory sit-in by women in Italy, the other who operates a cookie factory that also encourages cultural and personal growth among the workers. (Documentary, 54 min)
  • “Il Gioellino” (“The Jewel”), 7 p.m. Saturday, May 10, Campus Center Theatre. The founder of an international conglomerate places his closest relatives and trusted managers in key positions, but they are unfit to face the challenges of today’s market. (Drama, 110 min)

For more information, view the event flyer or contact professor Cristiana Thielmann at 310-989-2810 orcthielma@iupui.edu.

“The Education of Auma Obama,” a film by Branwen Okpako: screening and discussion with filmmaker

Wednesday, April 23, 2014
6:00 – 9:00 p.m.
University Library, Lily Auditorium
755 W. Michigan St., Indianapolis, IN 46202

Admission free Reception with light refreshments to follow

Branwen Okpako is a highly talented and successful Nigerian-Welsh documentary filmmaker, who now lives and works in Berlin, Germany, where in 1999 she received a degree in Film Directing from the prestigious German Film and Television Academy in Berlin. Since 1995 she has produced several videos, mixed media installations, and films. Her work has been selected to be shown at film festivals in Europe, Great Britain, Africa, North America, and the Middle East. In addition to her work as a filmmaker, Okpako offers seminars, workshops, and projects in film studies and filmmaking and lectures at universities in the US, Canada, Europe, and other parts of the world. Topics of her presentations include: Intersections of Race, Gender, and Otherness in Film; Black Identity in German Cinema; Migration and Multiculturalism in Contemporary Europe; The Art of Filmmaking; The Theory and Practice of Screenplay Writing, to name just a few.

For her 2000/2001 film, Dreckfresser (Dirt for Dinner), Okpako received, among others, the German Next-Generation-First-Steps Award for Best Documentary Film. For her 2002 film, Sehe ich was du nicht siehst? (Do I see what you do not see?), she received the D-motion special prize for the city of Halle, Germany. Her most acclaimed film, The Education of Auma Obama, (Die Geschichte der Auma Obama) has brought Okpako much attention. The film is a captivating and intimate portrait of the U.S. president’s older half-sister, who embodies a post-colonial, feminist identity. Dr. Auma Obama studied German at the University of Heidelberg from 1981 to 1987 before continuing with graduate studies at the University of Bayreuth, earning a PhD in 1996. Her dissertation was on the conception of labor in Germany and its literary reflections. For The Education of Auma Obama, Okpako received the 2012 African Movie Academy Award for Best Diaspora Documentary, the Festival Founders Award for Best Documentary at the Pan African Film Festival in Los Angeles (both in 2012), and the Viewers Choice Award at the Africa International Film Festival (2011).

Her most recent project, Fluch der Medea (The Curse of Medea), a docu-drama about the life of the late German writer Christa Wolf, was shown at the Berlin Film Festival in 2014.

Okpako is currently a visiting professor of German at Earlham College in Richmond, Indiana. This event is co-sponsored by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and the IUPUI Max Kade German-American Center, with additional support from the Department of World Languages and Cultures and the German Program. For additional information contact: Jason M. Kelly, Director, IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, iahi@iupui.edu, (317) 274-1689 Claudia Grossmann, Interim Director, IUPUI Max Kade German-American Center,cgrossma@iupui.edu, (317) 274-3943

‘Art & Copy’ film screening

Wednesday, March 26, 2014
7:00 p.m.

Basile Auditorium
Eskenazi Hall
735 West New York Street
Indianapolis, IN 46202

Art & Copy is a film about advertising and inspiration that reveals the work and wisdom of some of the most influential advertising creatives of our time—people who’ve profoundly impacted our culture, yet are virtually unknown outside their industry.

The film received an Emmy on PBS Independent Lens for Outstanding Arts and Cultural Programming and was a selection at the 2009 Sundance Film Festival, 2009 Toronto Film Festival and its’ director, Doug Pray, won the Best Director of a Documentary at the Atlanta Film Festival.

Herron School of Art and Design’s spring events promise a visual and intellectual feast of ideas

Free Public art exhibitions, film screenings and artists talks abound at Herron School of Art and Design, with new opportunities from January through the end of the school year in May to visit and make your own observations of and about contemporary art.

January 10–February 15

Ossuary

Laurie Beth Clark invited hundreds of artists to create an artwork that is inspired by, uses, or plays with the idea of bones. The works are in many media and two, three, or four dimensions. The contributions range from political statements to personal elegies, memorials to individuals or broader statements about mortality. Some connect ancestors to descendants. Some are serious and some use bones in a completely playful manner.

January 10–January 29

Making Memory

This exhibition explores the relationships among objects, memory and the experience of both the artist and the viewer. Curator Laura Holzman, assistant professor and public scholar of curatorial practices and visual art at IUPUI, developed this exhibition with selected artists from Herron’s M.F.A. program.

Viewer

The work of Benjamin Martinkus, photography technician and adjunct faculty member, is a skeptical yet loving response to the implicit politics, subversive power relations and intoxicating pleasures inherent in an image-based culture. In this exhibition, Martinkus shows a new suite of work comprised of video, imagery and objects both appropriated and fabricated. Together, these works recast the experience of contemporary life as one defined by viewership and imageness.

January 29

6:00 p.m.: ARTIST TALK with Laurie Beth Clark

7:00 p.m.–9:00p.m.: RECEPTION for Ossuary

February 5–22

Hope Seekers

This multi-partner exhibition features photographs of child-led households in Swaziland, where AIDS infects more than one in four people, making it the country with the highest HIV/AIDS rate in the world. The result is an exploding number of households headed by children, some as young as eight or nine years old.

Brent Aldrich

New installations by Brent Aldrich, MFA candidate in photography and intermedia and community art activist, draw on geology, participation and neighborhood organizing.

February 5

6:00 p.m.: DISCUSSION on child-led households in Southern Africa

February 19

7:00p.m.: FILM SCREENING, Searching for Sugar Man

Two South Africans set out to discover what happened to their unlikely musical hero, the mysterious 1970s rock ‘n’ roller, Rodriguez (IMDb).

February 25

6:00 p.m.: CHRISTEL DEHAAN FAMILY FOUNDATION VISITING ARTIST LECTURE with Frances Whitehead, who will discuss her contemporary art practice as it relates to the process of shaping the future city.

March 5–April 17

Richard Ross: Juvenile in Justice

Exhibited worldwide, Juvenile In Justice is Ross’ photographic documentation of the placement and treatment of American juveniles housed by law in facilities that treat, confine, punish, assist and, occasionally, harm them.

Intake at Los Padrinos Juvenile Hall, Downey, California, photo by Richard Ross

Intake at Los Padrinos Juvenile Hall, Downey, California, photo by Richard Ross

March 5

6:00 p.m.: ARTIST’S TALK with Richard Ross

7:00-9:00 p.m.: OPENING RECEPTION for Richard Ross: Juvenile in Justice

March 5–20

Weapon


A multi-disciplinary exhibition of work by Herron studio technicians that meditates on the themes of attack, defense and security.

Rachel Bleil

This exhibition will feature new works by ceramic artist Rachel Bleil, an instructor at Herron who earned her M.F.A. degree in ceramics from Indiana University-Bloomington.

March 26

7:00p.m.: FILM SCREENING, Art & Copy

A film about advertising and inspiration that reveals the work and wisdom of some of the most influential advertising creatives of our time—people who’ve profoundly impacted our culture, yet are virtually unknown outside their industry (IMDb).

March 28–April 17

High School Art Invitational

This exhibition will feature top works by high school juniors from across Indiana.

in·ter·sect /ˌintƏrˈsekt/

in·ter·sect / explores parallel processes present in the electronic and physical nature of modern interpersonal relationships. The work develops on themes of shared intimacy and emotional memory. Working in tandem with students enrolled in Stefan Petranek’s advanced digital course, Daniel Cosentino will construct a Pre-, Live- and Post-opening exhibition experience via mediums of video, performance and sculpture.

April 16

6:00 p.m.: ARTIST’S TALK with Wendy White

Presented by Herron’s Active Student Artists student group, this artist’s talk features Wendy White, who is recognized internationally for her merger of painting, sculpture and architecture into large-scale works.

May 1–22

M.F.A. Thesis Exhibition 
This exhibition will feature work by Herron’s graduating class of M.F.A. students. Departments represented will include ceramics, furniture design, painting, photography, printmaking and sculpture.

 Crowd in Grand Hall at 2012 M.F.A. Exhibition, photo by Michelle Pemberton

Crowd in Grand Hall at 2012 M.F.A. Exhibition, photo by Michelle Pemberton

May 1

5:00 p.m.–9:00p.m.: OPENING RECEPTION for M.F.A. Thesis Exhibition

Limited parking is available in the Sports Complex Garage just west of Herron. Park in the visitor side of the garage and bring your ticket to the Herron Galleries for validation. Complimentary parking courtesy of The Great Frame Up.

Parking in the surface lot next to Herron School of Art and Design requires a valid IUPUI parking permit at all times.

Call to Action Film Series and Panel: “Slavery by Another Name”

Wednesday, October 23, 2013
6:00-8:30 pm
Inlow Hall (IH), IUPUI
530 W. New York St.
Indianapolis, IN 46202

Slavery by Another Name is a 90-minute PBS documentary that challenges one of Americans’ most cherished assumptions: the belief that slavery in this country ended with the Emancipation Proclamation. Most Americans do not realize that the constitutions of Indiana and the United States to this day legalize slavery. This is program is the first in a series.

To RSVP for this free event, visit the website.

You are invited to stay after the screening of this thought-provoking documentary for a probing panel discussion.

Panelists include:
  • Subini Ancy Annamma, IU School of Education at IUPUI Assistant Professor of Special Education John Bartlett, State Representative
  • Ken Falk, Legal Director, ACLU-IN Attorney
  • Lahny Silva, IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law Professor
  • Rev. Byron Vaughn, President of Prisoners Reformed United, Inc.
  • Rebecca Zeitlow, University of Dayton Professor
Invited guests from the IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law
  • Karen Bravo, Professor and Associate Dean for International Affairs
  • George E. Edwards, C.M. Gray Professor of Law

Presented by Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law; Indiana University School of Education at IUPUI; and Indianapolis Urban League.

For more information, contact Carlton Waterhouse, School of Law, 317-274-8055, or Chalmer Thompson, School of Education,chathomp@iupui.edu.

Film and Panel Discussion: “Donor Intent vs. Public Interest”—The Barnes Collection and The Art of the Steal


Annual Jordan and Joan Leibman Forum on the Legal and Business Environment of Art: “Donor Intent vs. Public Interest”—The Barnes Collection and The Art of the Steal
Friday, November 1, 2013
Wynne Courtroom (Room 100), Lawrence W. Inlow Hall IU McKinney School of Law
530 W New York St

4:00 p.m. Screening of The Art of the Steal, 6:00 p.m. panel discussion; 7:15 p.m. reception in the Atrium.

Described as a not-to-be-missed look at one of the art world’s most fascinating controversies and a celebrated selection of the Toronto, New York and AFI Film Festivals, Don Argott’s gripping documentary THE ART OF THE STEAL chronicles the long and dramatic struggle for control of the Barnes Foundation, a private collection of art valued at more than $25 billion.

In 1922, Dr. Albert C. Barnes formed a remarkable educational institution around his priceless collection of art, located just five miles outside of Philadelphia. Now, more than 50 years after Barnes’ death, a powerful group of moneyed interests have gone to court for control of the art, and intend to bring it to a new museum in Philadelphia. Standing in their way is a group of Barnes’ former students and his will, which contains strict instructions stating the Foundation should always be an educational institution, and that the paintings may never be removed. Will they succeed, or will a man’s will be broken and one of America’s greatest cultural monuments be destroyed?

Watch The Art of the Steal, the award-winning documentary, and then join in a lively examination of this turn of events with expert panelists from IUPUI and the Indianapolis Museum of Art.

Speakers:

Kenan L. Farrell, founder, KLF Legal and adjunct professor at IU McKinney School of Law. Farrell’s practice encompasses intellectual property, media, entertainment and business law. He teaches Art and Museum Law. He is also president of the Indianapolis Downtown Artists and Dealers Association (IDADA).

Kathryn Haigh, deputy director for Collections and Exhibitions,Indianapolis Museum of Art. Haigh manages all exhibitions and collections-related activities for the IMA. She developed the Museum Property Act in the State of Ohio and implemented the first collections management database at the Cincinnati Art Museum.

Laura Holzman, assistant professor of Art History and Museum Studies, Herron School of Art and Design and the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. Holzman is a public scholar of Curatorial Practices and Visual Art. She holds a Ph.D. in visual studies from the University of California, Irvine. Her current book in progress includes a study of the Barnes collection move.

Robert A. Katz, professor of Law at IU McKinney School of Law and professor of Philanthropic Studies at IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. Katz is an expert in the law of nonprofit organizations and chairs the Association of American Law School’s Nonprofit and Philanthropy Law Section. His recent scholarship focuses on social enterprise and for-profit enterprises that seek to combine profitability with social mission.

Additional Free Screenings of The Art of the Steal:

  • Wednesday, October 16, 7:00 p.m., Basile Auditorium, Eskenazi Hall, Herron School of Art and Design
  • Tuesday, October 29, 6:00 p.m., Wynne Courtroom (room 100), IU McKinney School of Law

Parking for McKinney School of Law: Parking is available for a nominal fee at the campus Gateway Garage, located on the corner of Michigan and California streets (address is 525 Blackford Street). Parking is also available for a nominal fee at the Sports Complex Garage two blocks west of the law school.

Parking for Herron School of Art and Design: Limited parking is available in the Sports Complex Garage just west of Herron. Park in the visitor side of the garage and bring your ticket to the Herron Galleries for validation, compliments of The Great Frame Up. Parking in the surface lot west of Herron requires a valid IUPUI parking permit.

This event is a joint project of The IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law, the IU Herron School of Art and Design, and the IU Kelley School of Business.

Warriors-turned-artists facilitate healing with paper handmade from their own uniforms

Combat Paper
September 25 – November 16
Artist’s Talk: Wednesday, September 25, 6:00 p.m.
Combat Paper Project co-founder Drew Cameron
Opening Reception: immediately following Artist’s Talk, 7:00-9:00 p.m.
Herron School of Art and Design, Basile Auditorium, Eskenazi Hall

Veterans achieve a form of catharsis through the transformative art of papermaking, pressing their own uniforms into service as the raw material in works of art. Papermaker, book artist and veteran Drew Cameron, who co-founded the Combat Paper workshops where the art is made, will speak on opening night and will be on hand for several additional public events between September 23-27.

“Coming home from war is a difficult thing,” writes artist and veteran Drew Cameron, founder of the Combat Paper Project. “There is often much to account for as a survivor.” In his own search for meaning, Cameron discovered that papermaking can be a transformative process that broadens “the traditional narrative surrounding the military experience and warfare.”

Since 2007, the Combat Paper Project, which Cameron co-founded, has grown from its San Francisco base and travelled to Canada, England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Kosovo providing workshops, exhibitions, performances and artists’ talks.

breaking rank by drew cameron

Drew Cameron, Breaking Rank

An exhibition of works from Combat Paper will open in Herron School of Art and Design’s Berkshire, Reese and Paul Galleries in Eskenazi Hall on September 25, running through November 16. Cameron will give an artist’s talk on opening night at 6:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Surrounding Cameron’s visit, there is a full slate of activities at Herron and in the broader community. At Herron, he will work with students and the public in a variety of ways, dovetailing with the school’s Book Arts and Art Therapy programs. In addition to the exhibition opening activities, Cameron’s visit is scheduled to include:

Tuesday September 24: A papermaking workshop open to the public from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in the Eskenazi Fine Arts Center, 1401 Indiana Avenue. Lunch provided from Noon to 1:30 p.m.

Wednesday September 25: Classroom visit at Eskenazi Hall with Art Therapy graduate students from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. and Book Arts students in the afternoon.

Thursday September 26: A papermaking workshop open to the public from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in the Eskenazi Fine Arts Center, 1401 Indiana Avenue. Lunch provided from Noon to 1:30 p.m.

Friday September 27: Classroom visit with Book Arts students from 9:00 a.m. to noon.

Persons interested in attending the workshops can RSVP to Paula Katz at katzp@iupui.edu to reserve a seat and lunch. Participants may bring a piece of clothing that they would like to incorporate into the batch of paper that will be made during the workshop.

November 1-16, in the Marsh Gallery: Combat Paper companion show of veteran-made art.

November 9, 2:00 p.m. in the Basile Auditorium of Eskenazi Hall: “Veterans Reclaim Armistice Day”. National Book Award for Fiction winner Tim O’Brien leads a panel discussing literary expression as a means of coping with PTSD. A project of the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library.

November 13, 7:00 p.m., in the Basile Auditorium of Eskenazi Hall: Screening of The Ghost Army