Call for entries: Manifest Creative Research Gallery & Drawing Center

Manifest (Cincinnati, OH) is launching a new ongoing series of exhibits focusing on works by artists in its own three-state region. This is intended to complement the ordinarily very wide geographical makeup of most Manifest exhibits with a closer look at what’s being done here, now, in our own backyard.

This exhibit has no predefined expectation for type or style of work to be considered or selected. Submissions can range from the most traditional to the most conceptual or experimental. The only criteria for entry is that works must qualify as works of photography and be made by artists living in Ohio, Kentucky, or Indiana. Works may include other processes or media, but photography must clearly be the primary media.

Manifest was founded, and continues to be operated by regional artists, so it is only fitting that, with more space in which to program, the organization offers the Regional Showcase series. We feel this is important for the artists and the public living within reasonable driving distance of the gallery. It will give each a chance to show and share, and to gain perspective on our region’s creative wealth as it relates to the broader art world.

For complete guidelines and to submit to this exhibition opportunity, vsit the Manifest website.

Herron School of Art and Design’s spring events promise a visual and intellectual feast of ideas

Free Public art exhibitions, film screenings and artists talks abound at Herron School of Art and Design, with new opportunities from January through the end of the school year in May to visit and make your own observations of and about contemporary art.

January 10–February 15

Ossuary

Laurie Beth Clark invited hundreds of artists to create an artwork that is inspired by, uses, or plays with the idea of bones. The works are in many media and two, three, or four dimensions. The contributions range from political statements to personal elegies, memorials to individuals or broader statements about mortality. Some connect ancestors to descendants. Some are serious and some use bones in a completely playful manner.

January 10–January 29

Making Memory

This exhibition explores the relationships among objects, memory and the experience of both the artist and the viewer. Curator Laura Holzman, assistant professor and public scholar of curatorial practices and visual art at IUPUI, developed this exhibition with selected artists from Herron’s M.F.A. program.

Viewer

The work of Benjamin Martinkus, photography technician and adjunct faculty member, is a skeptical yet loving response to the implicit politics, subversive power relations and intoxicating pleasures inherent in an image-based culture. In this exhibition, Martinkus shows a new suite of work comprised of video, imagery and objects both appropriated and fabricated. Together, these works recast the experience of contemporary life as one defined by viewership and imageness.

January 29

6:00 p.m.: ARTIST TALK with Laurie Beth Clark

7:00 p.m.–9:00p.m.: RECEPTION for Ossuary

February 5–22

Hope Seekers

This multi-partner exhibition features photographs of child-led households in Swaziland, where AIDS infects more than one in four people, making it the country with the highest HIV/AIDS rate in the world. The result is an exploding number of households headed by children, some as young as eight or nine years old.

Brent Aldrich

New installations by Brent Aldrich, MFA candidate in photography and intermedia and community art activist, draw on geology, participation and neighborhood organizing.

February 5

6:00 p.m.: DISCUSSION on child-led households in Southern Africa

February 19

7:00p.m.: FILM SCREENING, Searching for Sugar Man

Two South Africans set out to discover what happened to their unlikely musical hero, the mysterious 1970s rock ‘n’ roller, Rodriguez (IMDb).

February 25

6:00 p.m.: CHRISTEL DEHAAN FAMILY FOUNDATION VISITING ARTIST LECTURE with Frances Whitehead, who will discuss her contemporary art practice as it relates to the process of shaping the future city.

March 5–April 17

Richard Ross: Juvenile in Justice

Exhibited worldwide, Juvenile In Justice is Ross’ photographic documentation of the placement and treatment of American juveniles housed by law in facilities that treat, confine, punish, assist and, occasionally, harm them.

Intake at Los Padrinos Juvenile Hall, Downey, California, photo by Richard Ross

Intake at Los Padrinos Juvenile Hall, Downey, California, photo by Richard Ross

March 5

6:00 p.m.: ARTIST’S TALK with Richard Ross

7:00-9:00 p.m.: OPENING RECEPTION for Richard Ross: Juvenile in Justice

March 5–20

Weapon


A multi-disciplinary exhibition of work by Herron studio technicians that meditates on the themes of attack, defense and security.

Rachel Bleil

This exhibition will feature new works by ceramic artist Rachel Bleil, an instructor at Herron who earned her M.F.A. degree in ceramics from Indiana University-Bloomington.

March 26

7:00p.m.: FILM SCREENING, Art & Copy

A film about advertising and inspiration that reveals the work and wisdom of some of the most influential advertising creatives of our time—people who’ve profoundly impacted our culture, yet are virtually unknown outside their industry (IMDb).

March 28–April 17

High School Art Invitational

This exhibition will feature top works by high school juniors from across Indiana.

in·ter·sect /ˌintƏrˈsekt/

in·ter·sect / explores parallel processes present in the electronic and physical nature of modern interpersonal relationships. The work develops on themes of shared intimacy and emotional memory. Working in tandem with students enrolled in Stefan Petranek’s advanced digital course, Daniel Cosentino will construct a Pre-, Live- and Post-opening exhibition experience via mediums of video, performance and sculpture.

April 16

6:00 p.m.: ARTIST’S TALK with Wendy White

Presented by Herron’s Active Student Artists student group, this artist’s talk features Wendy White, who is recognized internationally for her merger of painting, sculpture and architecture into large-scale works.

May 1–22

M.F.A. Thesis Exhibition 
This exhibition will feature work by Herron’s graduating class of M.F.A. students. Departments represented will include ceramics, furniture design, painting, photography, printmaking and sculpture.

 Crowd in Grand Hall at 2012 M.F.A. Exhibition, photo by Michelle Pemberton

Crowd in Grand Hall at 2012 M.F.A. Exhibition, photo by Michelle Pemberton

May 1

5:00 p.m.–9:00p.m.: OPENING RECEPTION for M.F.A. Thesis Exhibition

Limited parking is available in the Sports Complex Garage just west of Herron. Park in the visitor side of the garage and bring your ticket to the Herron Galleries for validation. Complimentary parking courtesy of The Great Frame Up.

Parking in the surface lot next to Herron School of Art and Design requires a valid IUPUI parking permit at all times.

Herron Professor Robert Horvath presents new exhibition of sculptures

New is Better, on view from November 1 – 27, 2013
Gallery 924
924 N. Pennsylvania St
Indianapolis, IN  46204

Robert Horvath, Assistant Professor of Painting and Drawing at Herron School of Art and Design, is primarily known for his high-gloss and refined, large-scale oil paintings that represent our cultural obsession with the appearance of luxury, celebrity, and consumption. In his practice, he begins with an abstract, almost other-worldly sculpture that then serves as inspiration for the resulting highly polished and detailed painting, often mistaken for a digital image.

His most recent body of work explores these sculptures with greater depth and detail. Horvath has now escalated his practice of creating a preliminary sculpture by using more substantial materials. Through the use of porcelain, his sculptures have become more permanent and thus represent works in their own right instead of simply a preliminary work or reflection of the grander oil painting. A large collection of his new porcelain sculptures at Gallery 924 have never been seen before outside of his studio.

Herron well-represented in upcoming Indiana State Museum’s exhibit “Fearless Furniture”

Nearly 85 percent of Indiana’s dentists were trained on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus. Nearly half of the state’s lawyers have their legal roots on the IUPUI campus. Now an upcoming museum exhibit reveals many of the state’s “best of the best” furniture artists also have IUPUI academic roots.

The “Fearless Furniture” exhibit opens Oct. 5 and runs through May 2014 at the Indiana State Museum, just south of Eskenazi Hall, Herron School of Art and Design’s main academic building and home to its furniture making department.

Hundreds of furniture craftspeople either born, trained or living in Indiana submitted proposals to have their works displayed in the exhibit. Eleven of the 24 artists have ties to Herron: Six are students or graduates; one is faculty/staff; and four are both.

“So many of the people who submitted pieces were Herron graduates. … When you look at how many (Herron graduates) were accepted, it is pretty much obvious Herron has an exceptional program,” said David Buchanan, the museum’s curator of decorative objects and furniture.

The selected artists include recent students as well as graduates from as early as 1982, reflecting Herron’s history of success in training students over the years. “Herron’s built an incredible furniture design program. It’s at the very pinnacle now,” Buchanan said.

The exhibit’s name reflects a trait considered essential for anyone making a career of designing and building furniture in a studio. “We were commenting on the idea that people who do this must have a strong sense of fearlessness. They are creating one-of-a kind pieces and trying to make a living,” Buchanan said.

Cory Robinson, associate professor and fine arts department chair at Herron, is one of three artists the museum invited to anchor the show. Robinson, also a Herron alumnus, was chosen “because of the program Herron has built and the direction it’s going,” said Meredith McGovern, the Indiana State Museum’s arts and culture collections manager.

Another show anchor is Laura Drake, assistant professor of industrial design at Purdue University. Drake, also a Herron alumna, was chosen because of Purdue’s industrial design program and its furniture component, the museum said.

In addition to Robinson and Drake, Herron-related artists in “Fearless Furniture” are Erin Behling, BFA ’99; Ray Duffey, MFA ’11 and Herron shop technician; Reagan Furqueron assistant professor and director of foundations; Matt Hutton, BFA ’99; James Lee, BFA ’82; Phillip Tennant, retired professor; Steven Sander, BFA ’12; Robert Sibley, completed foundation studies at Herron; and Colin Tury, second-year MFA degree candidate.

Fifty-eight artists submitted a total of 139 pieces for the juried component of the exhibition. Wendy Maruyama, professor emerita of woodworking and design at San Diego State University, juried “Fearless Furniture.” Maruyama will present a lecture at 4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11, at the Indiana State Museum, followed by a reception celebrating the opening of the exhibition. Museum admission tickets are not required to attend the lecture or reception, which are free and open to the public, but seating is limited. To reserve seats for Maruyama’s talk, call the museum at 317-232-1637.

Regular museum hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Regular admission tickets, which include admission to the “Fearless Furniture” exhibit, are $5.50 each for children 12 and under; and $10 each for adults.

Herron Professor Anila Agha presents new exhibition: Intersections

Assistant Professor of Foundations Anila Quayyum Agha will present an exhibition of works created as part of her 2012-13 New Frontiers Research Grant from Indiana University. The exhibition entitled Intersections will be on view in the Frank and Katrina Basile Gallery from Sept. 25 – Oct.17, 2013.

Agha writes in the artist statement for Intersections:

I used a 2012-13 New Frontier’s Research Grant from Indiana University for a large-scale installation project composed of patterned wood. With this project I explored intersections of culture and religion, the dynamics and interpretation of space and sight as it threaded through cultures and emerged as varied expressions that redefine themselves with the passage of time. In this piece, a motif that is believed to represent certitude is explored to reveal its fluidity i.e. the geometrical patterning in Islamic sacred spaces. This project is meant to uncover the contradictory nature of all intersections; which are simultaneously boundaries and also points of meeting.

The Intersections project takes the seminal experience of exclusion as a woman from a space of community and creativity such as a Mosque and translates the complex expressions of both wonder and exclusion that have been my experience while growing up in Pakistan. The wooden frieze emulates a pattern from the Alhambra, which was poised at the intersection of history, culture and art and was a place where Islamic and Western discourses, met and co-existed in harmony and served as a testament to the symbiosis of difference. I have given substance to this mutualism with the installation project exploring the binaries of public and private, light and shadow, and static and dynamic. This installation project relies on the purity and inner symmetry of geometric design, the interpretation of the cast shadows and the viewer’s presence with in a public space.

The object in the Basile Gallery is a smaller version of the larger design.

Fall events include receptions with two powerhouse Herron alumni

The public is invited to receptions with two renowned Herron School of Art and Design alumni—Distinguished Alumnus Garo Antreasian (‘48 and honorary doctorate from Indiana University in ‘72) and Distinguished Alumna Lois Main Templeton (B.F.A. in Painting with High Distinction, ’81)—who will be visiting their alma mater.

A public exhibition of Antreasian’s paintings and lithographs will open in the Marsh Gallery of Eskenazi Hall on September 25 and run through October 24. There is a public reception in honor of his visit on Oct. 22 from 6:00 p.m. to 8: 00 p.m. outside the gallery.

Templeton will present an artist’s talk in the Basile Auditorium of Eskenazi Hall on October 9 at 6:00 p.m., preceded by a reception at 5:00 p.m. During that event, she will accept the 2012 Distinguished Alumna Award from the Herron Alumni Association.

photo of Garo Antreasian

Garo Antreasian,
photo courtesy David Antreasian

Antreasian, an Indianapolis native who attended Herron as a scholarship student, was hired by the school on the day of his graduation in 1948 to teach still life painting and composition. He convinced the dean to add printmaking to the curriculum and became its first instructor.

He was a founding member of the Tamarind Lithography Workshop, opened in Los Angeles in 1960, where he served as technical director. He co-authored The Tamarind Book of Lithography: Art and Techniques. Originally published in 1971, the work has been continuously updated and is still considered the seminal text on the subject.

The Tamarind Institute, now at the University of New Mexico where Antreasian was a faculty member, is also viewed by many as the most important school dedicated to lithography in the world.

Templeton returns to Indianapolis from Maine as Artist in Residence at the Conrad Indianapolis from October 6-10. On October 6 from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m., the public can mingle with Templeton at a “Sunday Art Matinee” on the Conrad’s second floor. Light fare, drinks and music are included. The Matinee marks the unveiling of Templeton’s newest works in an exhibition called “Lois Main Templeton: The Maine Event”.

Templeton, a protégé of Robert Berkshire, garnered a NUVO Cultural Vision Award in 2011. Her work is in the permanent collections of the Indiana State Museum and The Midwest Museum of American Art, and has twice been exhibited at the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C. She has published The Studio Book: Finding Your Way and the children’s book Who Makes the Sun Rise.

Exhibition: 10,800 Minutes: Not Enough

August 30 – September 19, 2013
Marsh Gallery, Herron School of Art and Design, Eskenazi Hall

10,800 Minutes: Not Enough will feature works by seniors and graduate students in Herron’s printmaking program. These new works will have been created either individually or by teams of students.

Student participants include: Senior printmakers: Talia Ariens, Anna Clinch, Nick Goldy, Brittanie Mathis, Rachel Moore, Colton Pedro, Ashley Tesmer, and Ben Walter. Graduate student printmakers: Stephanie Beisel, Ellie Ingram, Eric Johnson, Katherine Johnson, and Liz Wierzbicki.

Artists Reception on Wednesday, September 11, 2013, 5:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m., Marsh Gallery

Flowered Over, paintings and installations by Anna Kell

August 30 – September 19, 2013
Frank & Katrina Basile Gallery, Herron School of Art and Design, Eskenazi Hall

Anna Kell is a former student of Assistant Professor Robert Horvath. Originally from Columbus, Indiana, she has shown throughout the country and now teaches painting and drawing at Bucknell University in central Pennsylvania. This exhibition features some of Kell’s paintings made on full and queen sized mattresses in which she incorporates floral patterning, stains, and other features found on discarded mattresses into her compositions.

Anna Kell’s work is an investigation into the way nature is represented in our cultural commodities. She builds paintings and installations out of images of idealized nature: Victorian wallpapers, found paintings and prints, needlework, puzzles, posters, labels, patterned textiles from clothing, upholstered furniture, carpets, floral mattresses and even lampshades. These domestic ephemera become a visual vocabulary revealing the discrepancy between our cultural reality and an illusion of “the natural”.

Beyond the depiction of nature, Kell is interested in the way cultural possessions reveal the desires and values of their owners as they relate to sex, class, and aesthetics. Though the objects are collected in specific locales, they extend beyond the local to demonstrate the influence that mass-production has with the unique culture of any particular place.

Warriors-turned-artists facilitate healing with paper handmade from their own uniforms

Combat Paper
September 25 – November 16
Artist’s Talk: Wednesday, September 25, 6:00 p.m.
Combat Paper Project co-founder Drew Cameron
Opening Reception: immediately following Artist’s Talk, 7:00-9:00 p.m.
Herron School of Art and Design, Basile Auditorium, Eskenazi Hall

Veterans achieve a form of catharsis through the transformative art of papermaking, pressing their own uniforms into service as the raw material in works of art. Papermaker, book artist and veteran Drew Cameron, who co-founded the Combat Paper workshops where the art is made, will speak on opening night and will be on hand for several additional public events between September 23-27.

“Coming home from war is a difficult thing,” writes artist and veteran Drew Cameron, founder of the Combat Paper Project. “There is often much to account for as a survivor.” In his own search for meaning, Cameron discovered that papermaking can be a transformative process that broadens “the traditional narrative surrounding the military experience and warfare.”

Since 2007, the Combat Paper Project, which Cameron co-founded, has grown from its San Francisco base and travelled to Canada, England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Kosovo providing workshops, exhibitions, performances and artists’ talks.

breaking rank by drew cameron

Drew Cameron, Breaking Rank

An exhibition of works from Combat Paper will open in Herron School of Art and Design’s Berkshire, Reese and Paul Galleries in Eskenazi Hall on September 25, running through November 16. Cameron will give an artist’s talk on opening night at 6:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

Surrounding Cameron’s visit, there is a full slate of activities at Herron and in the broader community. At Herron, he will work with students and the public in a variety of ways, dovetailing with the school’s Book Arts and Art Therapy programs. In addition to the exhibition opening activities, Cameron’s visit is scheduled to include:

Tuesday September 24: A papermaking workshop open to the public from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in the Eskenazi Fine Arts Center, 1401 Indiana Avenue. Lunch provided from Noon to 1:30 p.m.

Wednesday September 25: Classroom visit at Eskenazi Hall with Art Therapy graduate students from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. and Book Arts students in the afternoon.

Thursday September 26: A papermaking workshop open to the public from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in the Eskenazi Fine Arts Center, 1401 Indiana Avenue. Lunch provided from Noon to 1:30 p.m.

Friday September 27: Classroom visit with Book Arts students from 9:00 a.m. to noon.

Persons interested in attending the workshops can RSVP to Paula Katz at katzp@iupui.edu to reserve a seat and lunch. Participants may bring a piece of clothing that they would like to incorporate into the batch of paper that will be made during the workshop.

November 1-16, in the Marsh Gallery: Combat Paper companion show of veteran-made art.

November 9, 2:00 p.m. in the Basile Auditorium of Eskenazi Hall: “Veterans Reclaim Armistice Day”. National Book Award for Fiction winner Tim O’Brien leads a panel discussing literary expression as a means of coping with PTSD. A project of the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library.

November 13, 7:00 p.m., in the Basile Auditorium of Eskenazi Hall: Screening of The Ghost Army

Herron Art Library to showcase its collection of artists’ books in First Friday event

Work from the Herron Art Library’s museum-caliber collection of artists’ books will be on view at the opening of a new exhibit this week.

Herron Art Library is part of the IUPUI University Library, which is partnering with the Harrison Center for the Arts to sponsor an exhibit titled “Spineless,” an Indianapolis Downtown Artists & Dealers Association First Friday event. The exhibit opening reception starts at 6 p.m. Friday, Aug.2, at the Harrison Center for the Arts, 1505 N. Delaware St. in Indianapolis. The artwork will be on view until Aug. 30.  Both the reception and exhibit are free and open to the public.

“Spineless” builds on four years of successful collaboration between the library and the Harrison Center to promote local and regional book artists in the field of fine arts. Work from 16 artists was chosen for this juried show to take place in the Harrison Gallery. As in the past, the University Library will award a $400 prize to the best in show. Opening night will feature a selection of books from the Herron Art Library’s permanent collection as well.

Also returning this year to give a hands-on talk about artists’ books is nationally recognized book arts dealer Bill Stewart of Vamp & Tramp Booksellers.

The Herron Art Library’s collection of artists’ books contains many forms of the book arts, including fine press books illustrated by artists such as Mark Rothko and miniature books, some conveying powerful messages addressing social and family issues of personal significance to the respective book artist. Artists’ books often become a personal extension and means of expression of a significant event or issue in an artist’s life.

Significant book artists represented in the Herron Art Library collection include Julie Chen, Ron King and Rebecca Goodale, plus local book artists, Bonnie Stahlnacker and Karen Baldner. New additions to the collection can be seen in the newly redesigned artists’ book alcove at the Herron Art Library on the IUPUI campus, 735 W. New York St., Indianapolis.

Any resident of Indiana is eligible for an IUPUI University Library card. Our resources and librarians are also available on the University Library website. Browse the online collections to learn more about the road to Indiana statehood, the history of the National FFA Organization, writer James Whitcomb Riley and much more, or contact a librarian specialist for help with professional and school-related research.