IUPUI Honors Scholars to showcase research, service-learning accomplishments

INDIANAPOLIS — Student pursuits in undergraduate research, international study and honorsservice learning will take the spotlight next week during Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis’ annual presentation of accomplishments of high-ability students.

The Fifth Annual Honors College Student Showcase takes place from 3 to 5 p.m. Thursday, April 23, in the lower lobby of the IUPUI University Library, 755 W. Michigan St. The event is free and open to the public.

“The Honors College Showcase is one of my favorite events for the college,” said Honors College Dean Jane Luzar. “It not only demonstrates the range of activities our scholars pursue but also the passion and excellence our students devote to these efforts.”

Morgan Moran is among the 26 IUPUI Honors Scholars who, using posters, live performances, media and other creative presentations, will showcase their recent accomplishments in the areas of research, art, design, visual communication, business solutions, service learning and community engagement and international experiences.

Moran, a psychology major, spent a week doing crafts and other activities with children in an orphanage in Costa Rica. She has captured the excitement of that life-changing service-learning experience in a short video that she’ll present at the showcase.

The spring break trip to Costa Rica was a confidence-builder for Moran who, in addition to maintaining a rigorous academic schedule, spends three hours per week working with children at Riley Hospital for Children at IU Health, volunteering 300 hours of service since her freshman year at IUPUI.

She looks forward to sharing video footage and still photographs from her international experience.

Moran and other students say Honors College projects and programming have allowed them to build relationships with people from different walks of life, have provided funds and opportunities for study abroad, and have increased their campus engagement.

Showcase presenters include:

Dorothy Slover, art education sophomore, who will display a collection of books, drawings, paintings and other original art. Most of her work has been independent art exploration. But when she begins her student teaching in the fall, she will build lesson plans around her creations, starting with art books like the ones in her showcase presentation.
Jeffery Joll, biomedical engineering junior, who has spent two years studying bone biology in an IU School of Medicine lab, first as an intern and now as a part-time research assistant. He will present a poster display of research that in the long term could lead to more successful therapy for people with brittle bone disease or osteoarthritis.

IU McKinney to host exhibit about treatment of Jewish lawyers under Nazi regime

INDIANAPOLIS — The Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law will host a mckinney bldgtraveling exhibit that focuses on the plight of Jewish legal professionals in Nazi-controlled Germany.

The exhibit, “Lawyers Without Rights: Jewish Lawyers in Germany Under the Third Reich,” runs April 20 to 28 in the Ruth Lilly Law Library on the first floor of Inlow Hall, 530 W. New York St. It will be available for viewing from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

The traveling exhibit focuses on the fate of Jewish lawyers, judges, law professors and civil servants throughout Germany who were disbarred and stripped of the right to practice law shortly after the Nazis came to power in 1933.

In 1998, an Israeli lawyer asked the regional bar of Berlin for a list of Jewish lawyers whose licenses had been revoked by the Nazi regime. The bar decided not only to compile the list of names but to try to find out what happened to the lawyers. Some were able to leave the country, but many were incarcerated or killed. The Berlin bar’s research was transformed into the “Lawyers Without Rights” exhibit, with other regional bars adding their own information.

An opening day reception for “Lawyers Without Rights” will take place at 10:30 a.m. April 20 at the IU McKinney School of Law. Those interested in attending may RSVP to Shawn Dankoski at sldanko@iupui.edu or 317-274-4789.

Exhibition: Dontrell: Think and Drink

http://www.sunkingbrewing.com/

On Monday, April 13 from 5:30-8:00 pm, Nathan Alan Davis and cast-members will kick off the 2015 “Think and Drink” series at Sun King Brewery. This event will be subtitled “Think and Drink: Brews, Beats, and Rhymes,” and will feature DJ Kyle Long and Tatjana Rebelle (host of Lingo and Vocab). This event will feature some of the top beat poets and spoken word artists who will perform along with attendees and Sun King employees to create and spit their own rhymes. DJ Kyle Long will be spinning an eclectic fusion of international music throughout the evening. Donations will be taken at the door to benefit the Starfish Initiative.

‘Fjord/Glacier/River’ exhibit opens with reception and gallery talk by artist Rebecca Allan

INDIANAPOLIS — Artist Rebecca Allan will discuss her most recent paintings in a gallery talk during the opening of an exhibit of Allan’s work entitled “Fjord/Glacier/River” at, located on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus. Herron School of Art and Design, located on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus.
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The exhibit, curated by Jason M. Kelly, director of the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, is presented by the IAHI and the Rivers of the Anthropocene Project. It is housed in the Basile Gallery of Eskenazi Hall, 735 W. New York St., and opens on April 2 with a reception from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Allan’s talk takes place from 6:30 to 7 p.m.
The “Fjord/Glacier/River” exhibit runs through April 24. The opening reception is free, but registration is requested.
Known for her richly layered and chromatically nuanced abstract paintings, Rebecca Allan has for many years concentrated on rivers and watershed environments as primary sources of investigation.
“Fjord/Glacier/River” presents paintings which have emerged from Allan’s travels in Norway. In Geirangerfjord, Allan made extensive drawings and studies of the waterfalls, rocks, and night skies that distinguish this majestic World Heritage site. These paintings reflect a response to the Norwegian landscape which is both exuberant and joyful but also reminds us of how urgent it is to preserve and protect our Earth’s natural resources, especially its water.
“My paintings are rooted in the dramatic cycles of nature as well as a deep curiosity about science, and the forces underlying what we observe on the surface of things. Even when it is grounded in the visible world, a painting is a sensual invention that conflates real and conjured experiences,” Allan said in her artist’s statement. “Rivers, glaciers, and fjords are central to this dialogue with nature and culture. They are complex arteries of history, culture, commerce, and ecology. ”
Allan has exhibited in the United States and abroad for more than 25 years. She received her master of fine arts degree from Kent State University and her bachelor’s degree from Allegheny College. From 2006 to 2014, Allan was head of education at the Bard Graduate Center (New York) for studies in the decorative arts, design history, and material culture.

Call for 2015 IUPUI Research Day Poster Abstracts

imagesResearch Day, April 17, 2015, provides an opportunity for the IUPUI faculty, staff, and students, and their academic, industrial, governmental partners, and the broader community, to come together and learn more about the research enterprise at IUPUI, explore new collaborations, and lay the foundation for new partnerships.

Faculty, post doctoral fellow, professional student, graduate student and staff poster presentations are coordinated by the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research.

Guidelines

  • Abstracts will be competitively selected for poster presentation on the basis of scholarship, research and creative activity
  • There is no limit on the number of abstracts you may submit, but only one will be accepted
  • Accepted abstracts will be published as received on the Research Day website unless specified otherwise on the submission page. Ensure you have permission to publish!
  • Poster sessions are 90 minutes
  • Presenters are responsible for setting up and taking down posters at designated times
  • Posters may be landscape or portrait and approximately 36” x 60”. Backer boards 40”x 60” are provided, as are easels and push pins
  • Display tables and electrical outlets are available for select presenters and must be pre-approved
  • Have 2-3 minutes of talking points prepared to “present” your work as attendees view your poster

Abstract Format
Title
Authors
Affiliations
Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis

  • No limit on title length
  • List authors and their affiliations in the style appropriate for your discipline
  • Center justify the heading
  • The abstract should be no more than one page

These abstracts are due March 23, 2015. Applicants will be notified of the status of their submission after March 27, 2015.

Submit your abstract here

Gallery Talk and Reception for Rebecca Allan: Fjord/Glacier/River

Rebecca Allan's ArtworkReception
April 2, 2015 | 5:30-7:30
Basile Gallery, Eskenazi Hall

Gallery Talk
April 2, 2015 | 6:30-7:00
Basile Gallery, Eskenazi Hall

Fjord/Glacier/River presents Rebecca Allan’s most recent paintings which have emerged from her travels in Norway. In Geirangerfjord, Allan made extensive drawings and studies of the waterfalls, rocks, and night skies that distinguish this majestic World Heritage site. These paintings reflect a response to the Norwegian landscape which is both exuberant and joyful but also reminds us of how urgent it is to preserve and protect our Earth’s natural resources, especially its water. Fjord/Glacier/River is presented by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute (iahi.iupui.edu) and the Rivers of the Anthropocene Project (rivers.iupui.edu).

Known for her richly layered and chromatically nuanced abstract paintings, Rebecca Allan has for many years concentrated on rivers and watershed environments as primary sources of investigation. Her work explores the ecology, meteorology, and geology of the Northeast, Pacific Northwest, and the Gulf Coast, among other sites. Working from a studio that overlooks the confluence of the Harlem and Hudson Rivers in The Bronx, Allan is inspired by a deep appreciation for the beauty of the natural environment overlaid with an awareness of its fragility and endangerment.

Exhibiting in the United States and abroad for more than 25 years, Allan’s most recent solo exhibitions were presented at Hudson Opera House Gallery (Hudson, New York), ArtLab78 (New York), The American Church in Paris, Ringling College of Art and Design/Longboat Key Center for the Arts; Seattle Art Museum Gallery; John Davis Gallery (Hudson, NY); and Gallery 2/20 (New York).  Allan has been a Fellow at the Hermitage Artist Retreat, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, and Dorland Mountain Arts Colony.  She received her MFA from Kent State University and BA from Allegheny College. From 2006 to 2014 she was Head of Education at the Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, Design History, and Material Culture in New York City.

Artist’s Statement

“My paintings are rooted in the dramatic cycles of nature as well as a deep curiosity about science, and the forces underlying what we observe on the surface of things. Even when it is grounded in the visible world, a painting is a sensual invention that conflates real and conjured experiences. Rivers, glaciers, and fjords are central to this dialogue with nature and culture. They are complex arteries of history, culture, commerce, and ecology. This exhibition explores my relationship to particular landscapes from Norway to the Atlantic Northeast.

My process involves mixing pigments and layer color over time, in response to observed and felt experience. The language of color is a sanctuary within which the questions and problems of artmaking — indeed, of life — are confronted. I work within a transcendental American landscape tradition that includes painters such as Frederic Church, Charles Burchfield, Joan Mitchell, and Neil Welliver but I also draw from the works of Renaissance masters such as Giovanni di Paola and Pieter Breughel in my desire to invent a new, cosmological landscape.”

Co-sponsored by the Herron School of Art and Design and Sun King Brewing.

Herron art exhibit features the exchanges of pen pals with paint brushes

Art students Jessica Casey of Herron and Rachel DiCioccio of Youngstown State exchanged these paintings.

Art students Jessica Casey of Herron and Rachel DiCioccio of Youngstown State exchanged these paintings.

The official name of the exhibit running through Feb. 21 at Basile Gallery at the Herron School of Art and Design is “Material Muse.”

But perhaps “Pen Pals With Paint Brushes” more accurately describes the true inspiration behind the exhibit on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus.

The paintings on display are exchanges between students in professor Danielle Riede’s painting class at Herron and art students taught by Youngstown State University professor Dragana Crnjak.

Eighteen sophomores and juniors from Riede’s class were paired with Youngstown State students. They exchanged original paintings. As if they were pen pals conversing by letters, a Herron student would complete an original painting and mail it to her or his partner at Youngstown, who would in turn create and mail back an original piece in response.

“We wanted a way for our students to collaborate on paintings and didn’t have big enough budgets to take all of our students to each other’s campuses,” said Riede, associate professor of art at Herron.

“We also wanted students to explore the possibilities of painting as a medium,” she said. “Collaborating in this way also opens up students to risk, which is a necessary ingredient for growth.”

All the mailed paintings were between 2 and 5 inches square. Riede recommended her students create 10 pieces and then pick a favorite to ship to Youngstown in Ohio.

“At the time most of us had not worked on such small paintings.  I was excited to try something new,” student Amy Applegate said. “I ended up sending five of my 10 pieces — two works on cardboard, a small abstraction on canvas, a whited-out promotional button and a painting on a scrap of particle board.

“My response piece was another formal experimentation using bottle caps, magnets and acrylic paint. I pulled my color palette and natural iconography from the (Youngstown) piece I was responding to,” Applegate said.

While it was perhaps hard for her students to let go of their creations, “on the other hand, opening the works that had been shipped was a really fun experience,” Riede said. “The YSU students’ paintings felt like gifts for the (Herron) students; they were so curious to open the other students’ works.”

Herron student Jessica Casey was “super-excited about the idea of collaborating and working long distance with other students in the region.”

“I sent two small mixed-media collage pieces using paint skins, drawing materials, plastic, fabric and sewing,” Casey said. “My hope (was) to inspire the person receiving the work to create something with an array of materials.

“I received a large shell covered in paint; I altered it with wire and then on canvas did gestural drawings of the shell in chalk. I then used oil, acrylic, latex and melted wax to build up mass on the canvas and create an interesting depth on the surface,” Casey said.

The Basile Gallery is in IUPUI’s Eskenazi Hall, 735 W. New York St. Gallery hours are 10 to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Admission is free and open to the public.

Artist brings his brand of war to IUPUI campus

'OH YEAH!' Tank

‘OH YEAH!’ Tank

Artist Chris Dacre

Artist Chris Dacre

Mixed media artist Chris Dacre will bring his humorous, yet satirical depiction of the complexities of war to the IUPUI campus in January.

His “OH YEAH!” solo exhibit, featuring soft sculptures of military personal and equipment, screen-printed, surplus army tents, drones-printed kites, videos and audio recordings will run Jan. 16 to Feb. 16 at the Herron School of Art and Design.

Exhibit visitors in their 30s and 40s could have flashbacks to Saturday mornings spent watching “G.I. Joe” and other cartoons interrupted by commercials featuring the Kool-Aid Man breaking through walls and uttering “Oh yeah!”

In the Herron exhibit, “a big, soft sculpture tank and its driver — has replaced the Kool-Aid Man, breaking through a wall into a young boy’s room . . . while outside the room, life-sized sculptures of soldiers wage war,” Dacre said during a phone interview.

The subject of war has always fascinated the Denver-based artist who spent eight years in the U.S. Air Force before earning a bachelor’s degree in graphic design and a master of fine arts degree in studio art and printmaking.

“What interests me most about war, is the way that we recruit for, stockpile and wage it around the globe, oftentimes in the name of freedom and liberty or some other guise,” wrote Dacre in an online artist statement.

His goal for his art is to spark conversation about the realities of war and the military-industrial-entertainment complex which surrounds it.  While he isn’t an expert in military history, his art, along with talks he gives based on his research, provide food for thought for exhibit goers.

“My job is to disseminate information that most people won’t get in everyday news. My art exhibit can become a platform to have a discussion about these issues,” Dacre said.

For example, the tank and its driver bring to mind the hundreds of inflatable tanks crafted for use in World War II. It provides an opportunity to discuss the little known history of the Ghost Army, a secret unit of soldier artists — including then budding fashion design Bill Blass — who employed the tanks and recorded sound effects to deceive enemy soldiers.

And many of the images of soldiers aren’t human in form. For example, the tank driver resembles a cartoon wolf. Making the players less human, serves to reduce the emotionalism often inherent in dialogue about war and violence, Dacre said.

“I try to take the human element out of it,” Dacre said. War “is a very depressing subject.  I am trying to make it lighter . . . I am trying to make it easier for us to talk about it.”

While viewers could come away from the exhibit thinking that Dacre is either pro-war or a pacifist, the artist believes that those who are willing to come “with an open-mind and take some time to figure it out, they can see what I am trying to say.”

Part of the exhibit’s message is that in a world where wars are often fought over the rights to natural resources needed to fuel our transnational consumer culture, we all play a role in world conflicts, Dacre said.

Dacre’s work is in the permanent collections of Denver Art Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; National Palace of Culture, Sofia, Bulgaria; Brazilian American Institute, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Museum of Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX; and several other museums.

He has held exhibitions at numerous galleries and universities, including the Ohio  University Art Gallery, the University of Wisconsin, and the LuLuBell Toy Bodega and Gallery, Tucson, Az., just to name a few.

“War will be a topic for me for a long time,” Dacre said. “I’m always learning something new that I can share.”

Deborah Butterfield will present on opening night of undergraduate student exhibitions

Deborah Butterfield, Cascade, 2014 Image courtesy Deborah Butterfield

Deborah Butterfield, Cascade, 2014
Image courtesy Deborah Butterfield

Iconic artist Deborah Butterfield partly credits her birthdate on the 75th running of the Kentucky Derby as inspiration for her life size, sculptural horses. Each of her in-demand and internationally collected works takes three to five years to make. Butterfield will appear at Herron as the 2014 Jane Fortune Outstanding Women Visiting Artist lecturer on November 12 at 6:00 p.m., in the Basile Auditorium of Eskenazi Hall.

It is the generosity of Jane Fortune—author, cultural editor, art historian, art collector and philanthropist—that brings Butterfield to Herron. “I want to make an impact on the community that surrounds me and help make the arts accessible to our residents,” Fortune said. This is the seventh lecture in the series, which has welcomed artists including Judy Chicago, Polly Apfelbaum, Judith Shea and Maria Magdalena Campos Pons to Indianapolis.

Butterfield appears in conjunction with the opening of the Undergraduate Student Exhibition, which this year will take place in both Eskenazi Hall’s Berkshire, Reese and Paul galleries and in various spaces of the Eskenazi Fine Arts Center. Shuttle service will be available between buildings. This year’s jurist will be Dr. Patricia Y. Paik, curator of contemporary art at the Indianapolis Museum of Art. In a typical year, the jurist must select from more than 300 strong submissions across a wide variety of media. The exhibition continues through November 29.

Also opening will be On the Blink, a show of photography, video, performance and installation works by Photography and Intermedia seniors.

New to the mix this year will be a graduate studio crawl. With more than 60 master’s degree students—in two buildings—the studio crawl will give students and visitors alike a chance to peek behind the curtain of spaces that are normally not seen by other students or the public.

In the Marsh Gallery, the FACE Pets Show, a group exhibition, continues with works available for purchase to benefit the Foundation Against Companion Animal Euthanasia. In the Basile Gallery, view selections from a rare collection of artists books and broadsides representing the free exchange of ideas in the wake of a 2007 car bombing in the center of Bagdad on al-Mutanabbi Street. These shows continue through November 19.