2014 M.F.A Exhibition

Herron MFA pic

L to R: detail, Lauren Davis (Photography and Intermedia), Musgave; Steve Baker (Furniture Design), Unity; Michael Helsley (Sculpture) untitled; Stephanie Kristen Erin Wichmann (Ceramics), Business As Usual.

May 1-22, 2014

Indianapolis, IN

The Annual Honors and Awards Ceremony for undergraduate students and their families kicks off the day’s celebration at the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd., beginning at 4:00 p.m on May 1. All are welcome. The exhibits will be available for viewing until May 22.

Herron School of Art and Design is recognizing the achievements of Herron’s graduating master’s degree candidates with the M.F.A. Exhibition. Graduates work will be displayed in all the galleries in Eskenazi Hall and the Eskenazi Fine Arts Center. The candidates represent Ceramics, Furniture Design, Painting, Photography, Printmaking and Sculpture.

Exhibiting at the Eskenazi Fine Arts Center will be Steven Baker, Michael Helsley, Christopher Martin, John Collins McCormick, Colin Tury and Stephanie Kristen Erin Wichmann.

In the Basile Gallery in Eskenazi Hall will be Samuel R. Ladwig.

In the Marsh Gallery in Eskenai Hall will be Melissa Michelle Hopson and Southard Freeland.

In the Berkshire, Paul and Reese galleries in Eskenazi Hall will be Denise Conrady, Lauren Davis, Margaret Elizabeth Ingram, Sarah Kasch, Hillary Russell, Marna Lee Shopoff, Bridgit Stoffer, Elizabeth Wierzbicki and David Woolf.

For more information visit the event site.

Herron’s first Indiana High School Art Invitational

Juniors from Carmel, Lafayette Jefferson and Lawrence Central high schools produced the top works in Herron’s first annual Indiana High School Art Invitational Exhibition. The prizewinners were announced during the opening reception on March 29. The works were on exhibit through April 17.

Art teachers of high school juniors throughout Indiana were invited to send the best examples of their students’ works for this first-ever, juried exhibition. Herron scholarships of $2,000, $1,000 and $500 went to the first, second and third place students, respectively. The top seven students also earned a scholarship to Honors Art and Design, taught at Herron over the summer. Teachers of the students each received a $200 scholarship toward a teacher’s workshop at Herron. Reception attendees had the opportunity to tour Eskenazi Hall and learn more about Herron’s nationally accredited, top-ranked programs and IUPUI campus life.

“Herron wants high school students to know that there are numerous opportunities for creative individuals pursuing education in art and design that lead to very successful careers,” said Herron’s Dean Valerie Eickmeier. “This invitational is one way to thank teachers and support students who want to follow their passion for art. The three judges, all Herron faculty members, were impressed by the overall quality of the work submitted. I am sure this annual exhibition will grow over time and help many students achieve their college goals.”

Student-orgnaized exhibit opens documenting community history of Near Southside

Split but Not Separated: Recapturing the Legacy of the Near Southside, a new exhibit designed by students in the Museum Methods class, will open on Sunday, April 27, at the Concord Neighborhood Center, 1301 South Meridian.

This pop-up exhibit originates in a class taught by Professor Modupe Labode (History and Museum Studies), and was inspired by an earlier student research project. In 2010, Anthropology students from IUPUI began collecting oral histories, photographs, and other memorabilia from African American and Jewish elders who had grown up together on the Near Southside. This research is captured in the oral history book The Neighborhood of Saturdays, by Professor Sue Hyatt, which was published in 2013 by Dog Ear Press. The exhibit presents another view of the history of the community and moves the story into the future by involving the views of children who are currently participating in programs at the Concord Neighborhood Center. The exhibit is open from 2-4 p.m., and the program begins at 2:30 p.m.

For more information, please contact Modupe Labode, Assistant Professor of History and Museum Studies, mlabode@iupui.edu, 274-3829.

Look/See 2014 at Herron

Look/See 2014
May 1, 2014
4:00 – 9:00 p.m.

Look/See 2014, Herron’s biggest night of the academic year, recognizes the achievements of Herron’s graduating master’s degree candidates with the M.F.A. Exhibition, which will fill all the galleries in Eskenazi Hall and the Eskenazi Fine Arts Center. Come celebrate with students, friends and family, faculty and guests.

The candidates, who come from nine states and represent Ceramics, Furniture Design, Painting, Photography, Printmaking and Sculpture are: Steven S. Baker, Denise Conrady, Lauren Anne Davis, Michael Helsley, Melissa Michelle Hopson, Margaret Elizabeth Ingram, Sarah Kasch, Samuel R. Ladwig, C.J. Martin, John Collins McCormick, Hillary Russell, Marna Lee Shopoff, Freeland Southard, Bridgit Stoffer, Colin Tury, Stephanie Kristen Erin Wichman, Elizabeth Wierzbicki and David Woolf.

The Annual Honors and Awards Ceremony for undergraduate students and their families kicks off the celebration at the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd., beginning at 4:00 p.m. All are welcome.

May 1, 2014 from 5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.:

  • School-wide open houses at Eskenazi Hall, 735 W. New York St., and Eskenazi Fine Arts Center, 1410 Indiana Ave.
  • The 2014 M.F.A. Exhibition
  • Chelsea Stillwell: Celebrating Her Artistic Life Memorial Exhibition, in the Photography Department
  • Tours of open studios
  • Food and entertainment

See the full program here.

School of Informatics and Computing to participate in Passport to Hi-Tech

The IU School of Informatics and Computing at IUPUI is joining with other organizations Saturday, March 8, to teach girls about careers in science, technology, engineering and math at Conner Prairie.

The school will bring two activities to Passport to Hi-Tech at the interactive history park. The event is open to all ages but targeted to girls ages 7 to 12. Passport to Hi-Tech takes place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and is free with paid general admission to Conner Prairie.

It will feature interactive exhibits and hands-on experiments designed to inspire girls to learn more about careers in STEM fields such as informatics, engineering, biology, chemistry, manufacturing, computer science and others. Passport to Hi-Tech was organized by Women & Hi-Tech and Conner Prairie. It is sponsored by Roche Diagnostics.

One of the School of Informatics and Computing’s activities is dubbed “Ready, Set, Compute!” Participants jump into computing and become a working part of a machine in a fast-paced game that shows what a computer does as friends play a game on it. When the players select a move, volunteer students will race to the CPU or other parts of the simulated device to deliver a signal for action, showing what goes on in a computer game.

The other activity will be demonstrating a Finch robot, a small, two-wheeled robot with bird-like features. Polly Baker, Ph.D., a professor of media arts and science in the Department of Human-Centered Computing, has programmed the robot so it can be controlled with hand gestures.

“The robot is approachable, and young people see they can control it,” said Vicki Daugherty, a school recruiting specialist. “It’s empowering. They say to themselves, ‘Hey, I can do this.’”

Herron exhibition in•ter•sect /ˌintƏrˈsekt/ combines arts of performance, video, sound, sculpture

Herron Galleries offer a breath of fresh air at the intersection of live performance, video, sound and sculpture

The end of March at Herron will offer a breath of fresh air in the Basile Gallery through in•ter•sect /ˌintƏrˈsekt/, an exhibition opening March 28 that encompasses live performance, video, sound and sculpture.

Visiting artist Daniel Cosentino, who is currently exhibits internationally from his homes in Kosovo and New York, draws upon philosophy to make artworks that accentuate the double meanings introduced by these media. His work includes references to antiquity and historic iconography. He’ll be joined by special guests from Herron’s Advanced Digital photography class, under the direction of Herron Professor Stefan Petranek.

in•ter•sect /ˌintƏrˈsekt/ will include pre-, live and post-opening components that explore intimacy and emotional memory expressed through electronic and physical aspects of modern interpersonal relationships. The exhibition runs through April 17.

Exhibit exposes stereotypical portrayals of Arabs, Muslims in U.S.

A traveling exhibition exposing stereotypical portrayals of Arabs and Muslims in U.S. popular culture will be displayed Feb. 26 to March 21 at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

“A Is for Arab: Stereotypes in U.S. Popular Culture” will be at the Multicultural Success Center in Joseph T. Taylor Hall, 815 W. Michigan St. The exhibit’s opening reception takes place from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. on Feb. 27 at the center.

“IUPUI is a university promoting diversity and moving toward internationalization of its campus. Putting this vision in action, the Office of International Affairs is organizing a series of events to promote understanding of the Arabs and their cultures over three weeks,” said Amira Mashhour, a lecturer, director of the Arabic program at IUPUI and a primary organizer of the event. “‘A Is for Arab’ will be the inaugural event for these events. It will be a visual action to eradicate prejudices and address some questionable issues related to Arab culture.”

Sandra Lemons, who also is a primary event organizer, said, “The goal of this program is to raise awareness of Arab culture and society on campus and in the surrounding community. Most importantly, we want to break down harmful stereotypes that Arab people in our community deal with on a daily basis.” Lemons is associate director for student services in the Office of International Affairs.

For a full listing of other events, visit the International Affairs website.

“A Is for Arab” features photographs of objects and materials from the Jack G. Shaheen Archive at Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives, and it documents U.S. popular culture representations of Arabs and Muslims from the early 20th century to the present. The exhibit provides historical context about these images, which include film stills and comic books.

IUPUI student designs safe house for children in Swaziland

An interior design student at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis has designed a “safe house” that will be built to protect child-led families in the Kingdom of Swaziland in southern Africa who desperately need safe places to live.

A full-sized section of the safe house, built by the Indiana/Kentucky/Ohio Regional Council of Carpenters, will be unveiled at 6 p.m. on February 18, at an exhibit of photographs that explores the lives of these children, “Hope Seekers: Survival of Southern African Child-Led Households in the Shadow of HIV.” The section of the safe house will be displayed in the main lobby at Hine Hall from February 19 – 25.

“The exhibit tells the stories of these children and really allows people to enter into an experience of gaining more of an intimate look at the child-led households in South Africa,” said Cynthia Prime, CEO of Saving Orphans through Healthcare and Outreach. SOHO is an Indianapolis-based nonprofit organization taking a leading role in efforts to help educate, nurture and feed the child-led families.

The number of households in Swaziland led by children, some as young as 8, is mushrooming, resulting from an HIV/AIDS pandemic that is creating a new orphan every 14 seconds.

The 800-square-foot sustainable safe house will be constructed of local materials and feature a single sloping roof and a rainwater collection and filtration system. Safety features include windows placed high on the walls and an outdoor courtyard surrounded by high walls. Six orphan girls will live in the safe house that provides communal sleeping and living spaces.

In a written presentation of her design, Earley wrote that the children of Swaziland have very few adults to cherish and protect them from the dangers of their world. “This is why the sustainable housing units are such an important endeavor to start to build the nourishing community these children so desperately need. Building this groundwork to create a safe haven and a means to a more thriving reality is hopefully just the beginning for these six girls that will occupy this homestead.

“As AIDS cheats these kids of parents, it is common that the surviving family also will cheat them out of anything moveable or of value from their remaining homes,” Earley said. “Everything the children knew to be theirs is ripped away from them along with their parents. For this reason, it’s essential that furniture be built into the walls of the home or fixed together resulting in immobility. It is my goal that the young girls of the homestead will feel safe, secure and confident in their permanent dwelling.”

Herron exhibit provides intimate look at child-led households created by AIDS pandemic

“Hope Seekers: Survival of Southern African Child-Led Households in the Shadow of HIV”
February 5 – February 22, 2014
Marsh Gallery, Eskenazi Hall, 735 W. Michigan St.

The HIV/AIDS pandemic in Swaziland is creating an epidemic of its own — an exploding number of households in the South African kingdom that are headed by children, some as young as eight or nine.

Swaziland has the world’s highest rate of HIV/AIDS cases, with one in four people infected by the virus. The adult AIDS death rate results in a new orphan every 14 seconds – creating the phenomenon of child-led families.

Herron School of Art and Design on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus this month is hosting an exhibit of photographs exploring the lives of children in these families.

“It tells the stories of these children and really allows people to enter into an experience of gaining more of an intimate look at the child-led households in South Africa,” said Cynthia Prime, CEO of Saving Orphans through Healthcare and Outreach (SOHO), the Indianapolis-based non-profit organization taking a leading role in efforts to help educate, nurture and feed the child-led families.

Special activities associated with the exhibit include:

  • A panel discussion, followed by a book signing and reception at 6 p.m. on Feb. 12 in Basile Auditorium, Eskenazi Hall.
  • An unveiling of a life-size prototype of sustainable, safe and secure housing designed by IUPUI engineering and technology students for orphans in Swaziland, followed by presentations by students from Crispus Attucks Medical Magnet High School, 6 p.m., Feb. 18, Eskenazi Hall.

“This exhibition represents great collaboration across IUPUI’s many schools and programs. We are excited about the momentum we’ve built working in partnership with SOHO, as we increase IUPUI’s connections with Indianapolis, Swaziland, and the world,” said Jane Luzar, dean of the IUPUI Honors College.

In addition to photographs taken by Josef Kissinger, the exhibit includes artifacts created by Swaziland children.

The artifacts include a large toy vehicle, called a Kombi, built out of wire, soft drink cans, and bottle caps; and a floor mat made from garbage bags and candy wrappers. “These articles show that these children have promise and creativity,” Prime said. “They are called hope seekers because if they had options, they could change the world they live in.”

Call for entries: Manifest Creative Research Gallery & Drawing Center

Manifest (Cincinnati, OH) is launching a new ongoing series of exhibits focusing on works by artists in its own three-state region. This is intended to complement the ordinarily very wide geographical makeup of most Manifest exhibits with a closer look at what’s being done here, now, in our own backyard.

This exhibit has no predefined expectation for type or style of work to be considered or selected. Submissions can range from the most traditional to the most conceptual or experimental. The only criteria for entry is that works must qualify as works of photography and be made by artists living in Ohio, Kentucky, or Indiana. Works may include other processes or media, but photography must clearly be the primary media.

Manifest was founded, and continues to be operated by regional artists, so it is only fitting that, with more space in which to program, the organization offers the Regional Showcase series. We feel this is important for the artists and the public living within reasonable driving distance of the gallery. It will give each a chance to show and share, and to gain perspective on our region’s creative wealth as it relates to the broader art world.

For complete guidelines and to submit to this exhibition opportunity, vsit the Manifest website.