Anila Quayyum Agha: Art, Education, and the Making of Future Creative Thinkers

anila_agha_mainDate: October 12, 2015
Reception: 4:30-5:30 PM
Lecture: 5:30-7:00 PM
Location: IUPUI Campus Center Theater, 420 University Blvd. Indianapolis, IN 46202

A successful art practice need not be measured solely on commercial success but also on the quality of life of the practitioner. Artistic excellence in creative fields is often the result of a great deal of time spent in research: analyzing, synthesizing and then producing well crafted art or design work that is heartfelt, layered and relevant to our times. The source of my own artwork has been interpretations of contrasts and similarities, within cultures/religions/rituals of people of myriad cultures. This subject matter requires deep intellectual introspection, concept development and research to assimilate it into the artwork. Having a disciplined approach to exploring a broad spectrum of ideas helps to formulate the foundations for a successful and self-sustaining long-term practice. Furthermore artistic training provides opportunities to explore a wide array of interests and to experiment and innovate with a variety of materials/processes along with conceptual development and a mastery of the visual language to deal with the challenges present in our current societies and which is essential for success in the world today. Such skills are transferable into myriad disciplines for professional advancement for students while simultaneously adding value to their lives through personal well being.

About the speaker:

Anila Quayyum Agha is Associate Professor of Drawing and Foundation Studies in the Herron School of Art and Design. She was born in Lahore, Pakistan. She has an MFA from the University of North Texas. Agha’s work has been exhibited in multiple international art fairs as well as in over twenty solo shows and fifty group shows. In 2005, Agha was an Artist in Resident at the Center for Contemporary Craft, Houston. In 2008 she relocated to Indianapolis to teach at the Herron School of Art in Indianapolis and is currently the associate professor of drawing. In 2009 Agha was the recipient of the Efroymson Arts Fellowship. She has received two IAHI grants (2010/ 2015) and a New Frontiers Research Grant (2012) from Indiana University. In 2013 Agha received the Creative Renewal Fellowship awarded by the Indianapolis Arts Council. Agha won the two top prizes at ArtPrize 2014, in the international art competition held in Grand Rapids,Michigan. Her entry, titled “Intersections”, earned the ArtPrize 2014 Public Vote Grand Prize and split the Juried Grand Prize in a tie.

Agha works in a cross disciplinary fashion with mixed media; creating artwork that explores global politics, cultural multiplicity, mass media, and social and gender roles in our current cultural and global scenario. As a result her artwork is conceptually challenging, producing complicated weaves of thought, artistic action and social experience.

Hourglass Is Back

For those of you who have been wishing for a return of Hourglass, it’s back! And this time, indianapolis-museum-of-art-dusk-david-pixelparableit will be held in BIG TENT at the Indianapolis Museum of Art 11/7 and 11/28!  And what’s BIG TENT, no less than a 40 foot diameter, 360 degree audio and visual environment, completely surrounding you in music and video.

We are very excited about this and hope you’ll mark the calendar with these dates.

A sixty-minute continuous arc of live and electronic music encouraging attendees to live in the moment with a community in motion. With Robin Cox -violin/composer, Shawn Goodman -bass clarinet, video by Ben Smith, and movement facilitated by Stephanie Nugent.,

11/7/15 at 4pm
Indianapolis Museum of Art, in the Toby Theater (as part of the Community Day “Secrets” event)

11/28/15 at 6pm
Indianapolis Museum of Art, in the Deer Zinc Pavilion (as part of the IMA’s “Silent Night” event)

IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute Open House

What are you doing on September 30 between 10:30 and 1:00? Surely, whatever it is will unnamedbe better after you’ve grabbed a coffee and bagel at the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute’s Open House. While you’re here, check out our art collection, chat with us about our grant programs, and meet faculty and staff from across campus.

RSVP to the IAHI Open House
The IAHI is on the 4th floor of the University Library (Rooms UL 4115 P, S, T). Just take the elevator to the 4th floor and look to your left. There’s a sign hanging from the ceiling that will point you to us.

Award winning alumnus Rogelio Gutierrez returns to speak at Made in Mexico opening September 30

The photography and installation-based art of Herron School of Art and Design alumni who herron_posterwork and live in the United States but share cultural and familial roots in Mexico will be featured in Made in Mexico, opening on Wednesday, September 30 with an artist’s talk, live performance and reception beginning at 6:00 p.m.

The exhibition, in the Berkshire, Reese and Paul galleries, will feature works by Leticia Alvarez, Susana Cortez (M.F.A. in Sculpture, 2013), Rogelio Gutierrez (M.F.A. in Printmaking, 2011) and Tommey Reyes (B.F.A. in Photography, 2005), curated by Linda Adele Goodine.

A companion video installation by Goodine, Made in Mexico, her place, almost her place, not her place, will open in the Marsh Gallery.

New works by Meredith Knapp Brickell, associate professor of art and art history at DePauw University, will open in the Basile Gallery. Brickell is one of the recipients of the 2015-16 Creative Renewal Arts Fellowship from the Arts Council of Indianapolis.

Gutierrez will present the visiting artist’s talk in the Basile Auditorium, to be immediately followed by Cortez’s live performance.

Gutierrez went on from Herron to a tenure track as an award-winning professor of printmaking at the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at Arizona State University-School of Art, Tempe. “I was extremely honored and grateful to be selected for the Herberger Institute School of Arts’ Endowed Professor of Art Award, which provides funding for research and travel,” he said. It allowed him to create the solo exhibition FARMAS, which debuted at Arts Visalia Visual Art Center in California and traveled to Casa Siglo XIX Museo-Sebastian in Chihuahua, Mexico. Its next stop is scheduled for the Slocomb Galleries at Middle Tennessee State University in spring 2016.

The California native studied at Herron because he “wanted to get out of my comfort zone in the West and see what the Midwest was all about; Indianapolis was the perfect place for that. Herron has a strong reputation in the academic print world and I was interested in the public aspect of the curriculum.”

His focus is on printmaking because “It is a democratic art form that is meant for the masses. Printmaking has a rich history of important Mexican printmakers like Leopoldo Mendez and Jose Guadalupe Posada who were a big part of the Mexican Revolution Movement. Printmakers and artists associated with that movement truly had an important message; they are some of my favorite artists and inspire me to make work that connects to a wide audience including your non-traditional art goer,” he said.

There is likely to be some lively political discussion during his talk, given the season: “Politics always make an impact in my work,” Gutierrez said. “As you know, I am in the ring of fire here in Arizona when it comes to immigration and Latino issues. I have a project that I am working on that is related to these issues; I will share it during my lecture.”

Perspectives on the Sand Creek Massacre A Public Program by Ari Kelman and Norma Gourneau

September 23, 2015
7:00 pm
Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art
500 W Washington St., Indianapolis, IN
Free Admission

The Eiteljorg Museum and the IUPUI Graduate Program in Public History present a thprogram on the 1864 massacre of Arapahoe and Cheyenne people at Sand Creek, Colorado Territory. This program offers an exciting and unique opportunity to embrace multiple voices and to help the public understand the history and memory and interpretation of this dark and pivotal event.

Dr. Kelman is the McCabe Greer Professor of History at Penn State University. He is the author of A Misplaced Massacre: Struggling Over the Memory of Sand Creek and the recipient of the Avery O. Craven Award, the Bancroft Prize, the Tom Watson Brown Book Award and the Robert M. Utley Prize, all in 2014.

Norma Gourneau is a Northern Cheyenne, a descendant of a survivor of the massacre, and an active participant in commemorating Sand Creek. She is Superintendant, Wind River Agency, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Fort Washak- ie, Wyoming.

Sponsored by the Eiteljorg Museum, the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, the Herron School of Art & Design, the IUPUI Department of Anthropology, the IUPUI American Studies Program, and the IUPUI Museum Studies Program.

For more information, contact the IUPUI Public History Program Office at 317.278.5983

Herron book arts exhibit on IU Bloomington campus has been extended through Aug. 14

INDIANAPOLIS — Art lovers still have time to catch the 15th annual exhibit of artist’s books photo courtesy of herron.iupui.edumade by students in the book arts program at Herron School of Art and Design, part of the Indiana University-Purdue University-Indianapolis campus.

The free exhibit has been extended through Aug. 14 in the foyer of the Fine Arts Library at IU-Bloomington, 1133 East Seventh St., Bloomington. Gallery hours are 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily.

Herron offers a minor in book arts within its printmaking department. Herron’s book arts curriculum emphasizes combining solid craftsmanship skills such as drawing, printmaking, letterpress and sculpture with an understanding of the expressive potential of the book as a medium. Students are encouraged to push the definition of the book and engage with the melding of narrative and structure, or narrative and functionality. The end result is that many of the works on display are “unbooks” bearing little resemblance to books as we know them.

The Fine Arts Library exhibit includes a bracelet-like structure that opens into two halves out of which comes an accordion-style tiny book that can be read only when the accordion is pulled out. The display also includes books created by sculptor Shana Reis, who uses the books to explore her combat experiences as a gunner on the front lines in Iraq and Afghanistan. The books include paper pages created by running military uniforms through a paper pulp beater.

In an interview with WFIU Public Radio, Herron book arts adjunct instructor Karen Baldner talks about the excitement of being on the leading edge of the “re-appropriation” of the physical book as a “medium of enormous potential” in our digital age. “Students who are engaging in this know that they are re-inventing the wheel,” Baldner said.

Listen to Baldner’s interview here.

Bradbury center to celebrate master storyteller’s birthday and legacy with August events

Photo taken from new.iupui.eduAugust 22nd marks the 95th anniversary of visionary science fiction and fantasy writer Ray Bradbury’s birth. The Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will hold three special events in August to celebrate the Midwestern-born author who went on to become one of the best-known storytellers of our time.

From Aug. 3 to 28, the center will present a free exhibit, “Miracles of Rare Device: Treasures of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies,” in the Cultural Arts Gallery on the first floor of the IUPUI Campus Center. Summer hours for the exhibition are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday until Aug. 19, when gallery hours extend from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday.

The exhibit will feature art, artifacts, books and rare magazines from Bradbury’s own collection, gifted to the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI in 2013 by the Bradbury Estate and by Donn Albright, Bradbury’s close friend and bibliographer.

“These new collections include the author’s papers, his working library, 40 years of his correspondence, his entire office, and a lifetime of awards and mementos,” said Jonathan R. Eller, Chancellor’s Professor of English and director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies.

“The August gallery show allows us to exhibit examples of these one-of-a-kind gifts for students and the broader Indianapolis community in ways that reflect Bradbury’s abiding international legacy as a champion of literacy, libraries, freedom of the imagination and the exploration of outer space.”

Eller and the IU School of Liberal Arts are working to expand the Bradbury archives and artifacts into a permanent public display, teaching and research resource on the IUPUI campus.

Two related public events will coincide with the exhibition’s run. At 6 p.m. Aug. 19, Eller will deliver the Second Annual Ray Bradbury Memorial Lecture in the Riley Meeting Room at Indianapolis Public Library’s Central Library. The lecture, “Ray Bradbury’s October Country,” reveals the timeless creativity and somewhat controversial publishing history of one of Bradbury’s most popular story collections on the 60th anniversary of its original publication.

At 5 p.m. Aug. 27, the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies will host a reception in the Campus Center Atrium outside the Cultural Arts Gallery, followed by Eller’s lecture on the collection’s amazing journey from California to IUPUI and the importance of Bradbury’s legacy in the 21st century. Both the lecture and reception are free and open to the public.

The Campus Center is at 420 University Blvd., between Michigan and New York streets. Visitor parking is available for a fee in the adjacent Vermont Street Garage and in the Sports Garage on New York Street.

Eller first met Ray Bradbury in 1989, developing a working friendship that lasted until Bradbury’s death in June 2012. Eller has authored several books, including “Becoming Ray Bradbury” and “Ray Bradbury Unbound” (University of Illinois Press). He also edits the Bradbury Center’s multivolume “Collected Stories of Ray Bradbury” (Kent State University Press).

A number of organizations are providing planning and resource support for the “Miracles of Rare Device” gallery exhibition, including the IU School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI’s Museum Studies Program, IUPUI’s Center for Digital Scholarship, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, and the Indiana Historical Society.

Popular artists with diverse backgrounds featured in July Herron Exhibits

photo courtesy of herron.iupui.eduWhat do a philanthropist looking for a winter hobby, a prosthodontist who loves to travel, a dioramist hot off a sold-out show and a philosophical photographer all have in common?

Each has an exhibit running July 10 to July 31 at the Herron School of Art and Design, located on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus.

“These exhibitions showcase a variety of art forms and the creative explorations of artists at different stages in their careers,” said Herron Dean Valerie Eickmeier. “I think it’s going to be a perfect summer show that will offer something of interest for everyone.”

A fifth Herron exhibit running throughout July features works by Eickmeier. An opening reception for all five exhibitions takes place from 5 to 8 p.m., Friday, July 10 at Eskenazi Hall, 735 W. New York St.

Dean Eickmeier’s show, “Water Musings” will be on exhibit in the Dorit and Gerald Paul Gallery. It features selected works created during her recent sabbatical.

Photographer Michelle Given opens her artist statement with several philosophical questions, including: What is the distance between desire and fulfillment when the thing that you want is within reach, but unobtainable? How does one map the width and breadth between psychological and physiological experience?

Given’s exhibit, “The Closet Distance,” features photographs of interior spaces, cityscapes and some video. It will be on display in the Eleanor Prest Reese Gallery.

Stacey M. Holloway’s entire cache of poignant yet whimsical dioramas sold out at a recent gallery show in New York. So she has had to make an entire new collection of works for her exhibit “Rough Draft,” opening in the Robert B. Berkshire gallery.

“Rough Draft” explores the uncertainty of a future and how quickly one small decision can unintentionally alter an intended plan. Holloway uses her studies of animal behavior, the landscape and architectural drafting as mechanisms for metaphors of uncertainty and longing, to build the narratives presented in her dioramas.

Civic leader and philanthropist Marianne Glick took up painting in 2004 in search of a creative outlet in the winter to replace gardening. Her exhibit of watercolor and acrylic paintings, entitled “Recent Works” will be on display in the Marsh Gallery. “Most of the works in the exhibit will have been painted since the death of my parents, which has been a time of great reflection for me,” Glick said. “A Time of Reflection” is the name of her show.

“Reflections and Shadows of the World,” featuring photography by R. Stephen Lehman, an alumnus of the IU School of Dentistry, will be on exhibit in the Basile Gallery. Lehman’s love of photography began while he was a college student.

“I am thrilled to display 12 of my favorite prints!” said Lehman, who gleaned his exhibition pieces from photographs taken during extensive travel across all six continents. “Polar Bears Plus” is a tender snapshot of an adult bear and a cub, walking across a snow-covered landscape.

“This series of summer exhibitions provides an interesting cross-section of the artistic community,” said gallery director Colin Nesbit. “The high caliber of work being created by Ms. Glick and Dr. Lehman might make some wonder why they didn’t just become professional artists.”

All five exhibits are open to the public free of charge. Visitors can park courtesy of The Great Frame Up Indianapolis in the visitor section of the Sports Complex Garage (west of Herron’s Eskenazi Hall), or park on the upper floors of the Riverwalk Garage (south of the Sports Complex Garage) until 6 p.m. on any floor. After 6 p.m., visitors should bring their parking tickets to Herron Galleries for validation.

Herron’s summer exhibitions range from photography to painting to sculpture and video

Herron School of Art and Design’s 2015 summer exhibitions will feature works by five herron_posterartists in a range of media from photography to painting to sculpture and video.

A reception in Eskenazi Hall on July 10 from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. will open the galleries, which are free and open to the public. The exhibitions continue through Jul 31.

Michelle Given lives and works in Indianapolis and has taught at Murray State University as well as Indiana University. Her work in this show includes interior spaces, landscapes and cityscapes, and video.

Stacey M. Holloway, Herron alumna (B.F.A. 2006) and former faculty member,is an assistant professor of sculpture at the University of Alabama, Birmingham. Her cache of poignant yet whimsical dioramas sold out at a recent gallery show in New York, so she has promised to make new works for this exhibition.

Valerie Eickmeier, dean of Herron, will exhibit selected works created during her recent sabbatical that meld real experiences and observations with imagined and reinterpreted images.

These paintings are based on changing sequences in nature as well as contemplation of the underlying forces that create change. In the Marsh Gallery, recent works by Marianne Glick will be on display. The civic leader and philanthropist began painting in 2004 as she searched for a creative outlet to replace gardening during the winter. She describes herself as an abstract expressionist who works mostly in watercolor and acrylic. The Basile Gallery will feature works by R. Stephen Lehman. A prosthodontist by
profession, Lehman began his love of photography in college shooting campus parties. He likens his seriousness about the medium to that of legendary cellist Pablo Casals,
who was once asked why, at 93, he continued to practice three hours a day. Casals replied, “I’m beginning to notice some improvement.”

Parking Information
Park courtesy of The Great Frame Up Indianapolis in the visitor section of the Sports Complex Garage (west of Herron’s Eskenazi Hall), or park on the upper floors of the
Riverwalk Garage (south of the Sports Complex Garage) until 6:00 p.m. Park on any floor after 6:00 p.m. Bring your parking ticket to the Herron Galleries for validation.

An interactive discussion looks at landscape painting as a mirror of life’s relationships

INDIANAPOLIS — Landscape painting has long provided humans with an artistic form for The Mirror of Landscape Advertcontemplating the relationship between nature, society and culture.

In an interactive discussion this week, New York-based artist Rebecca Allan and Jason M. Kelly, associate professor of history and director of the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Arts and Humanities Institute, will engage the audience in a conversation about the role of landscape painting in mediating our relationship with the environment and with each other.

The Mirror of Landscape” discussion takes place at 7 p.m. Thursday, June 4, at the DeBoest Lecture Hall, Indianapolis Museum of Art, 4000 Michigan Road.

Tickets are free and available online.

The discussion will explore five paintings, created between 1750 and 2015. The event will end in a visit to the Indianapolis Museum of Art’s Pont-Aven gallery to examine Paul Gauguin’s “The Flageolet Player on the Cliff.”

This event is presented by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the Indianapolis Museum of Art and the Rivers of the Anthropocene project.