Herron grad’s personal blog of ‘Things Organized Neatly’ takes international award

INDIANAPOLIS — “Let me organize your things,” said Austin Radcliffe, and with those five 476770_w296words the Herron School of Art and Design graduate accepted the 2015 People’s Voice Webby Award for Personal Blog/Website during the 19th Annual Webby Awards on May 18.

Presented by the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences, the Webby Awards honors excellence on the Internet, in the categories of websites, advertising and media, online film and video, mobile sites and apps, and social. This year’s 344 winners were chosen from nearly 13,000 entries from all 50 states and more than 60 countries.

Radcliffe’s award-winning website, “Things Organized Neatly,” includes images of just that — things organized neatly — created and curated by him.

His latest creation, “Springs Organized Neatly,” was created specifically in celebration of his Webby award; the award logo and trophy are springs. The photo was shot in collaboration with Brooke Shanesy.

“Images on my blog come from artists, mainly photographers, all over the world,” Radcliffe said. “I have featured approximately one photo every day for the last five years, so I couldn’t have done it all myself. The site has become a documentation of the trend/style of organizing things neatly.”

Other posts include:

A child’s make-believe super hero costume
Nicholas Jacobsen’s objects left behind in an old plumbing company.
Robert Wilson’s neatly organized cup and saucers for the launch of a new line of ceramics.
Jim Golden’s hair barrettes.
Renee Altov’s disassembled 1980s Mitsubishi Colt.

During the star-studded awards ceremony in New York, Radcliffe and other Webby winners received their Webby statues, a silver spring, and acknowledged their wins in five-word acceptance speeches, a Webby tradition.

“It is very exciting to be recognized by such a prestigious Internet award, for a blog project I started while at Herron,” Radcliffe said. “The awards ceremony was surreal and definitely memorable. I don’t know exactly what it will lead to, though I have already gotten a few new emails from creative agencies who want to work together.”

A resident of Cincinnati, Radcliffe graduated from Herron, on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus, in 2012 with a major in fine art and art history. His organized things have earned him an invitation to work with Tate Galleries in London, a book deal and more than 350,000 Tumblr followers.

Heineman Foundation Seed Money for Start-up and New Projects

Brief Description:
The purpose of the Foundation is to provide seed money to start-up projects and new 227604_w296projects within existing organizations for a maximum of three to five years. The Foundation’s general areas of interest are the following:
· Programs that enable economically challenged women to enter and remain in the workplace
· Environmental research that will help prevent, reduce and/or eliminate water degradation
· Live music performance for education and outreach
· Research into prevention and treatment of childhood illnesses
· Programs that enable youth to think, create, and communicate effectively
· Programs that support and promote high achievement in music, science, and literature

Award Amount:
Grants are funded once a year, following the November board meeting. Multi-year grants are not given. The average range of donations is $20,000 to $50,000, per annum.

The Foundation seeks projects in proximity to their directors. Although applications from other states are not excluded, those applicants (Indiana included) should be aware that their chances to receive funding are remote.

Limitation: One per Indiana University
Do not accept multiple submissions per year from an organization.

To apply for IU Internal competition:
For consideration as an institutional nominee, submit the following documents electronically to limited submission, limsub@iu.edu, by July 1, 2015 for internal coordination. To expedite the review process, we request that investigators who intend to submit a proposal send an email 1 week before the internal deadline with the intended investigator names/affiliations and proposal title to limsub@iu.edu with the subject line: L0954 Notice of Intent.

1. A summary of the project for which you are requesting funding, limited to 400 words.
2. Your project’s budget, and how many years the project has existed.
3. Abbreviated CV, not exceeding 3 pages, or a biosketch for the PI

IUPUI applicants must copy Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, on submissions.

IU Internal Deadline: 7/1/2015
Foundation Application Deadline: 9/1/2015

Limited Submission URL: http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=3543

Emerging Voices: You Are A Writer

Emerging Voices is a literary fellowship that aims to provide new writers, who lack access, thwith the tools they will need to launch a professional writing career. The eight-month fellowship includes:

PROFESSIONAL MENTORSHIP: Emerging Voices Mentors are carefully chosen from PEN Center USA’s membership and from professional writers based in Los Angeles. The Mentor-Fellow relationship is expected to challenge the fellow’s work and compel significant creative progress. Over the course of the fellowship, Emerging Voices Fellows and Mentors should meet three times in person, and be in contact at least once a month. In these three meetings, Mentors will offer written feedback on the Emerging Voices Fellows’ work in progress. Authors who have been mentors in the past include Ron Carlson, Harryette Mullen, Chris Abani, Ramona Ausubel, Meghan Daum, and Sherman Alexie.

CLASSES AT THE UCLA EXTENSION WRITERS’ PROGRAM: Participants will attend two free courses (a 12-week writing course and a one-day workshop) at UCLA Extension, donated by the Writers’ Program. Program Manager will assist the Emerging Voices Fellows with course selection.

AUTHOR EVENINGS: Every Monday, fellows will meet with a visiting author, editor or publisher and ask questions about craft. Fellows must read each visiting author’s book before the evening. A schedule of Author Evenings will be distributed at the first Emerging Voices orientation meeting. Authors who have participated in the past have included Jonathan Lethem, Percival Everett, Maggie Nelson, Cynthia Bond, Aimee Bender, Jerry Stahl, and Bruce Bauman, senior editor of the literary magazine Black Clock.

MASTER CLASSES: After completing the UCLA Extension Writers’ Program courses, Emerging Voices Fellows will enroll in a Master Class. The Master Class is a genre-specific workshop with a professional writer that affords fellows the opportunity to exchange feedback on their works in progress. Previous Master Class Instructors have included Diana Wagman, Alex Espinoza , and Paul Mandelbaum.

VOLUNTEER PROJECT: All Emerging Voices Fellows are expected to complete a 25-hour volunteer project that is relevant to the literary community. A few of the organizations that have participated included WriteGirl, 826LA, Cedars-Sinai Hospital, and STARS – San Diego Youth Services.

VOICE INSTRUCTION CLASS: The Fellowship will provide a one-day workshop with Dave Thomas, a professional voice actor. The Emerging Voices Fellows will read their work in a recording studio and receive instruction on reading their work publicly.

PUBLIC READINGS: Fellows will participate in three public readings, The Welcome Party, Tongue & Groove Salon, and the Final Reading. Fellows have read in various venues and events including the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, Silver Lake Jubilee, Skylight Bookstore, The Standard, Downtown LA. and Hotel Café. For the past five years, the fellowship has culminated in a Final Reading held in Hammer Museum’s Billy Wilder Theater, showcasing the progress each fellow has made in his or her work.

STIPEND: The fellowship includes a $1,000 stipend, given in $500 increments.

Participants need not be published, but the fellowship is directed toward poets and writers of fiction and creative nonfiction with clear ideas of what they hope to accomplish through their writing.

Deadline for applications: August 10, 2015
The Emerging Voices Fellowship runs from January to July.

Download the application here.

RESEARCH NOTICE: NEH Summer Stipends – Limited Submission

Brief Description:
Summer Stipends support individuals pursuing advanced research that is of value to NEH Logohumanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Recipients usually produce articles, monographs, books, digital materials, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly resources. Summer Stipends support continuous full-time work on a humanities project for a period of two consecutive months. Summer Stipends support projects at any stage of development.

The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square
NEH invites projects related to its new initiative, The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square. This initiative seeks to connect the study of the humanities to the current conditions of national life. Many of today’s challenges require more than ever the forms of understanding and knowledge represented by the humanities. They require the broadest possible engagement of scholars and the public with the resources of the humanities, including but not limited to the study of language, literature, history, philosophy, comparative religion, and ethics. The study of the humanities can help illuminate the complexity of many contemporary challenges while enriching our understanding of the common good.

Summer Stipends may not be used for:
· projects that seek to promote a particular political, religious, or ideological point of view;
· projects that advocate a particular program of social action;
· specific policy studies;
· research for doctoral dissertations or theses by students enrolled in a degree program;
· the preparation or revision of textbooks;
· curriculum development;
· the development of pedagogical tools (including teaching methods or theories);
· educational or technical impact assessments;
· empirical social science research, unless part of a larger humanities project;
· inventories of collections;
· the writing of guide books, how-to books, or self-help books;
· the writing of autobiographies, memoirs, or works of creative nonfiction; or
· works in the creative or performing arts (for example, painting, fiction or poetry, or dance performance).

Award Amount:
Summer Stipends provide $6,000 for two consecutive months of full-time research and writing. Recipients must work full-time on their projects for these two months and may hold other research grants supporting the same project during this time. Summer Stipends normally support work carried out during the summer months, but arrangements can be made for other times of the year. NEH Summer Stipends are awarded to individuals, not to institutions. They do not require cost sharing and do not include indirect costs.

· Faculty members teaching full-time at colleges or universities must be nominated by their institutions.
· All applicants must have completed their formal education by the application deadline. While applicants need not have advanced degrees, individuals currently enrolled in a degree-granting program are ineligible to apply.
· Individuals who have been awarded a major fellowship or research grant or its equivalent within the three academic years prior to the deadline are ineligible. (Applicants who have held such fellowships or research grants are eligible only if their award period ended at least three years before the deadline for Summer Stipends applications.) . A “major fellowship or research grant”; is a postdoctoral research award that provides a stipend of at least $15,000. Sabbaticals and grants from an individual’s own institution and stipends and grants from other sources supporting study and research during the summer are not considered major fellowships. See Program details.
· Individuals who have received Summer Stipends may apply to support a new stage of their projects.
· See Program details for more specific information.

Each college and university in the United States and its jurisdictions (campus) may nominate two faculty members. Any faculty member teaching full-time is eligible for nomination.

The following individuals may apply online without a nomination or internal competition:
· independent scholars not affiliated with a college or university;
· college or university staff members who are not faculty members and will not be teaching during the academic year preceding the award tenure
· emeritus faculty; and
· adjunct faculty, part-time faculty, and applicants with academic appointments that terminate by the summer of the award tenure.

IUPUI Internal competition:
For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward,emward@iupui.edu by July 1, 2015 for internal competition.

Format pages with one-inch margins and with a font size no smaller than eleven point.
The narrative should not assume specialized knowledge and should be free of technical terms and jargon.
The narrative limitation does not include references.
Limited Submission URL:  http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=2320

IU Internal Deadline: 7/1/2015
NEH Online Application Deadline: 10/1/2015

Indiana University researchers awarded grant to study employment behavior of artists

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — With a newly announced grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, two Indiana University researchers will examine key economic issues facing IU Logoartists.

School of Public and Environmental Affairs faculty members Doug Noonan and Joanna Woronkowicz will use data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Current Population Survey and data from crowdfunding websites including Kickstarter and Indiegogo to study these questions:

What was the effect of the Great Recession on the employment of artists and how have they fared during the recovery?
How do crowdfunding campaigns for arts projects differ in their results from similar campaigns for technology and other non-arts projects?

The $15,000 research grant is one of only 19 research projects nationwide funded by the NEA through its Research: Art Works program.

“We want to better understand the role of artists in creating economic value,” Noonan said. “We want to develop data that shows the impact of artists on the economic fabric of society.”

Tracking employment and salary for artists is difficult because of the nature of their work. They have flexibility in schedules, often hold multiple jobs and can be footloose in regard to where they live and work.

“We know a good deal about artists from data taken at a particular moment in time, but this research goes in a new direction,” Woronkowicz said. “By studying how artists work and move across years and during a sustained and challenging economic period, we can get a much broader understanding of how they survive and how, as a society, we can help them thrive.”

Noonan and Woronkowicz will analyze data from the 2003-14 Current Population Surveys as well as data from Kickstarter and Indiegogo from 2009 to 2014.

“We hope to create data sets that other researchers can use to further define the economic contributions of artists,” Noonan said. “They enrich our lives in so many ways, but too little is known about the many ways artists earn a living.”

Noonan is a professor at the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. He is also research director for the IU Public Policy Institute. Woronkowicz is an assistant professor at SPEA at IU Bloomington.

Arbor Day Foundation honors IUPUI as a Tree Campus USA

INDIANAPOLIS – Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis was honored with a 2014 Tree Campus USA recognition by the Arbor Day Foundation for its commitment to effective urban forest management.

The award marks the third time IUPUI has received the Tree Campus USA recog476311_w296nition.

Leading up to the award May 5, the campus participated in the 2015 Arbor Day tree planting program. Twenty Honors College students, with the support of Campus Facility Services, planted 16 trees May 1.

IUPUI also participated in an NCAA tree-planting event during the Final Four in Indianapolis last month. Four trees were planted in an area designated Celebration Plaza, between one of the NCAA’s buildings and the Herron School of Art and Design.

Tree Campus USA is a national program created in 2008 by the Arbor Day Foundation and sponsored by Toyota to honor colleges and universities for effective campus forest management and for engaging staff and students in conservation goals.

According to the foundation, IUPUI achieved the title of Tree Campus USA by meeting five standards, which include maintaining a tree advisory committee, a campus tree-care plan, dedicated annual expenditures for its campus tree program, an Arbor Day observance and student service-learning project.

About the Arbor Day Foundation:

The Arbor Day Foundation is a million-member nonprofit conservation and education organization with the mission to inspire people to plant, nurture and celebrate trees.

Look/See showcases M.F.A. Exhibition and more during Herron’s biggest events of the year

Look/See 2015 Logo Courtesy of Herron StaffThis year at Herron School of Art and Design, there’s even more to May, with two Visual Communication Design events kicking off our celebration of the academic year end leading up to Look/See on Thursday, May 7, which includes a full slate of events at both Herron buildings.

Design Day at Herron—May 4
2015 marks the first-ever Design Day at Herron: Design Thinking for People Centered Innovation from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in room 143 of Eskenazi Hall. This introductory Design Thinking workshop will bring together visual communication design practitioners and community members to explore a particular challenge affecting Indianapolis. This workshop is open to anybody who is curious about Design Thinking. For more information, contact Youngbok Hong, coordinator, Design Thinking and Design Leadership Graduate Program, at youhong@iupui.edu. To register on a first-come, first-served basis,
RSVP to herron4u@iupui.edu. Use subject line “Herron Design Day” and include your name and phone number.

Momentum: Design in Action—May 6
Momentum is an exhibit of senior Visual Communication Design portfolios and capstone projects that will demonstrate the 37 students’ various interests, creative problem-solving processes and plans for the future, revealing the connections that they have made through the course of their time at Herron.

The May 6 opening is by invitation only for members of the local design community. The public opening will be on May 7 from 5:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m. in room 122 of Eskenazi Hall. Visit vcd.iupui.edu for more information.

Look/See—May 7

Honors and Awards
To start the party, join us for the Honors and Awards ceremony in the IUPUI Campus Center, room CE450, at 4:00 p.m. Everyone is welcome to come and cheer the accomplishments of students and faculty alike.

M.F.A. Exhibition
Then it’s on to the 2015 M.F.A. Exhibition beginning at 5:00 p.m., which showcases pinnacle works by master’s degree candidates Brent Aldrich, Stephanie J. Beisel, Carly Connelly, Di Sun, Matthew Eickhoff, Jonathan Love, Andrés Marcial, Kristen Jane Morsches, Katie R. Smith, Stephen Smolinski, Shelley Spicuzza and Jac Tardie.

This culminating exhibition takes up all the available gallery space in both Eskenazi Hall and Eskenazi Fine Arts Center. Colin Nesbit, Herron’s gallery director, describes Look/See as “the crescendo of the academic year at Herron. For the students whose works comprise the 2015 MFA Exhibition, the last two years have build up to this single event. These students’ works represent the array of fine arts programs available at Herron performing at their highest level.”

Art Therapy
Nesbit continued, “and this year for the first time, Herron master’s degree candidates in Art Therapy Bonnie Burke, Chelsea Leeds, Elisa Pamelia, Meghan Sullivan, Mu-Chien Tsai, and Kaycee Wilson are going to have a display that explains their discipline and includes versions of their theses for people to look at.

Visual Communication Design
Master’s degree candidates in Visual Communication Design Kaelyn Donnelly, Jennifer Smerdel and Nicholas Walters also will have an interactive exhibition including panels describing their research processes, outcomes and contexts.”

Think It Make It Lab
The public will also get its first chance to see Herron’s new Think It Make It Lab in Eskenazi Hall, which is chock-full of the latest in 3-D and other digital technologies. Live demonstrations of 3-D printing and laser cutting will be included, with a memento for visitors to take home.

The festivities include tours, open studios and a print and ceramics sale, along with refreshments.

Complimentary parking courtesy of The Great Frame Up Indianapolis will be available. Shuttle service between buildings will be available throughout the evening.

WONDER AND THE NATURAL WORLD: A Call for Grant Proposals

Logo for CSRES courtesy of News.iupui.eduCALL FOR GRANT PROPOSALS: Symposia, workshops, performances, and seminar series for departments, institutes, and research centers at all IU campuses
Deadline for submission: June 15, 2015
Awards announced by mid-July 2015

The IU Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics, and Society (CSRES) announces a grant competition on the theme of Wonder and the Natural World. Departments, research centers, and institutes across all IU campuses may apply for funds to support or supplement symposia, workshops, seminar series, performances, or small conferences during the 2015-2016 academic year that align with the Consortium’s two-year theme of Wonder and the Natural World. This call for proposals is part of a two-year thematic initiative sponsored by CSRES.

Wonder has been framed as a key moral disposition, as well as an aesthetic, emotional, or cognitive response; depending on its objects and orientation, it may display both salutary and sinister dimensions. Wonder at nature is prompted by the odd and uncanny, the strange and novel, the transcendent and sublime, as well as encounters with the monstrous and horrific. It has variously been associated with, or dissociated from, curiosity, awe, intimations of divinity, infinity, the sublime, the miraculous or supernatural, feelings of astonishment and puzzlement. We welcome projects that explore wonder or its cognate terms in relation to nature or the natural, broadly construed. Proposals should clearly relate the project to the announced theme.

Grants will be awarded in amounts up to $2500, $5000, and $7500 depending on the scope of the proposed project. Funds can be used for travel and honoraria for external speakers, as well as hospitality expenses in keeping with university regulations. IU faculty may not receive honoraria. Applications for funding should include:

• summary of the project (750 words max.)
• a list of invited presenters
• a detailed budget
• letter of support from department chair or school/unit dean (included with the application or emailed separately)
• evidence of other funding obtained or requested (for requests over $2000)

Questions about the grant competition, and complete grant proposals may be emailed to CSRES Director Lisa Sideris at lsideris@indiana.edu.

The Indiana University Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics, and Society is an interdisciplinary association of scholars, academic programs, and research centers from the eight campuses of Indiana University. Their mandate is to aid in the development of research and scholarship to better understand religion, ethics, values, and spirituality in society. An initiative of the IU Vice President for Research Office, CSRES is also supported by the Office of the President, The Office of the Executive Vice President and Chancellor, IUPUI, and the College of Arts and Sciences at IU Bloomington.

15 teams to share $1 million in collaborative grants through IU Research program

IU Vice President of Research Jorge JosIU Vice President of Research Jorge JoséBLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Indiana University Vice President for Research Jorge José has announced over $1 million in collaborative research grants to be shared among 15 newly formed research teams. Members of the teams represent 21 departments from eight schools on three IU campuses.

The IU Collaborative Research Grants program, initiated by José and now in its fifth year, awards teams of researchers up to $75,000 to support collaborative, innovative projects with a high likelihood of securing external funding. Each project team includes faculty members from different campuses, schools, departments or disciplines.

“As it was envisioned to do, the Collaborative Research Grants program continues to increase the capacity for our investigators to do meaningful and innovative work through new partnerships,” José said. “This increased capacity for collaboration is an especially important outcome of this program.”

This year, 44 investigators make up 15 teams that represent departments and schools from Indiana University Bloomington, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and IU Southeast, in addition to one team that had a member from Purdue University.

IU President Michael A. McRobbie called the program and the most recent round of awards integral to stimulating new opportunities for sharing knowledge and expertise that lead to discovery.

“Vice President José has energetically promoted and supported this program to encourage faculty to contribute their expertise in shared, innovative ways,” McRobbie said. “As the end of his tenure draws near, Indiana University can reflect positively on the distinct successes that have been achieved by this program: New and highly productive partnerships have been forged that have already led to new discoveries; the university’s investment has been realized more than ten-fold thanks to subsequent related funding; and a new framework has been developed for our faculty that stimulates creative, passionate investigation through shared knowledge.”

Since a collaboration funded by the inaugural round of grants in 2010-11, Giovanna Guidoboni, an associate professor of mathematics at IUPUI, and Alon Harris, professor of cellular and integrative physiology at the IU School of Medicine, have seen their initial round of work on modeling glaucoma result in enormous benefits.

Following their original round of research, the pair received three external grants, including one from the National Science Foundation for over $275,000. They have also founded a new scientific journal, the Journal for Modeling in Ophthalmology; established an agreement of international cooperation with the Polytechnic University of Milan (Italy); and co-organized an international workshop in Europe.

“That 2011 collaborative research grant has indeed led to an incredible number of great successes,” Guidoboni said.

Craig Pikaard, the Carlos O. Miller Professor and Distinguished Professor of Biology at IU Bloomington, was funded in 2011 with Haixu Tang, an associate professor in the School of Informatics and Computing at IU Bloomington. Pikaard said spin-out benefits from that original grant continue to this day.

“This is a valuable university program that helped jump-start the collaboration between my lab and the group Haixu Tang leads,” he said “It also helped me obtain a highly coveted Howard Hughes Medical Institute-Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation investigator position. Haixu and I continue to collaborate, and we hold regular meetings of our groups.”

In total, it is estimated that the $3 million distributed by IU during just the first three years of the grants program has thus far helped Collaborative Research Grant-funded investigators earn more than $88 million in new external funding. This figure is expected to grow as those funded more recently pursue external funding opportunities.

“The idea behind the program was to create incentives for researchers to initiate new collaborations to address important problems in transformative ways,” José said. “While we can fund only about 15 percent of the applications, just the process of preparing applications has created some new partnerships across the university. The program has been a success so far, and we believe it will continue to be in the future.”

The 15 projects awarded funding this year are:

Single Cell Studies With Scanning Sniffer Patch Microscopy:
Lane Allen Baker, Department of Chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington; and Theodore Cummins, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, IU School of Medicine.

Investigating the Relationship Between Cumulative Disadvantage and Telomere Length as a Contributor to Cancer Disparities:
Silvia Bigatti, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, IUPUI; Brittney-Shea Herbert, Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, IU School of Medicine; Kenzie Latham, Department of Sociology, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI; and Anna Maria Storniolo, Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, IU School of Medicine.

Mechanism of the Regulation of DNA Replication by PIF1 Family Helicases:
Matthew L. Bochman, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington; Yuichiro Takagi, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, IU School of Medicine; and Amber Mosley, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, IU School of Medicine.

Matrix Engineering With Adipose Stem Cells to Promote Islet Function and Longevity: Robert V. Considine, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, IU School of Medicine; Raghu Mirmira, Department of Pediatrics, IU School of Medicine; and Sherry L. Voytik-Harbin, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University.

Using in vivo Microscopy to Build Predictive Models of Drug-induced Liver Injury: Kenneth Dunn, Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, IU School of Medicine; Richard Day, Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology, IU School of Medicine; and Steve Pressé, Department of Physics, School of Science, IUPUI.

Understanding Naturalistic Bicyclist Behavior for Safety and Sustainability:
David Good, School of Public and Environmental Affairs, IU Bloomington; Lauren Christopher, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI; Stanley Chien, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI; Jiang Zheng, Department of Computer and Information Science, School of Science, IUPUI; and Yaobin Chen, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI.

Neurotherapeutic Potential of Adipose Stem Cell-Conditioned Medium in ALS:
Kathryn Jones, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, IU School of Medicine; and Keith March, Department of Medicine, Krannert Institute of Cardiology, IU School of Medicine.

The Impact of the Public Investment in Education in the Academic Performance of K-12 English Language Learners in Southern Indiana:
Haeil Jung, SPEA, IU Bloomington; Magdalena Herdoíza-Estévez, School of Education, IU Southeast; Cathy Johnson, School of Education, IU Southeast; and Jacquelyn Singleton, School of Education, IU Southeast.

Developing Remote Sensing Techniques for Detection of Toxin-Producing Cyanobacteria:
Lin Li, Department of Earth Sciences, School of Science, IUPUI; Kevin Mandernack, Department of Earth Sciences, School of Science, IUPUI; and David Kehoe, Department of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington.

Effect of Antarctic Weathering on Global Climate:
Kathy Licht, Department of Earth Sciences, School of Science, IUPUI; and David Bish, Department of Geological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington.

A Novel Approach to Discover Drug Resistance Genes in Breast Cancer Cells:
Tao Lu, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, IU School of Medicine; and Lang Li, Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, IU School of Medicine.

Induction and Maintenance of Chronic Migraine: Regulation of TRP Channels by Endogenous N-acyl Amide Lipids:
Gerry Oxford, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, IU School of Medicine; Heather Bradshaw, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington; and Joyce Hurley, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, IU School of Medicine.

Optical-Based, Label-Free Multiplex Assay for Direct Quantification of microRNAs in Serum and Cancer Cells:
Rajesh Sardar, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, School of Science, IUPUI; and Murray Korc, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, IU School of Medicine.

Developmental Adaptation to Chronic Hypoxia:
Robert Tepper, Department of Pediatrics, IU School of Medicine; Mircea Ivan, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, IU School of Medicine; and Kenneth Nephew, Medical Sciences Program, IU School of Medicine-Bloomington.

Hippo/YAP Signaling Controls Protein Redistribution and Organ Size in Critical Illness:
Clark Wells, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biochemistry, IU School of Medicine; Teresa Zimmers, Department of Surgery, IU School of Medicine; and Leonidas Koniaris, Department of Surgery, IU School of Medicine.

NEH awards IUPUI-Ivy Tech partnership $119,009 grant to create world religions curriculum

With funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will work in partnership with Ivy Tech Community College faculty to create 150 course modules on world religions for Ivy Tech humanities classes.Photo courtesy of Center for Interfaith Cooperation.

The NEH, in Washington, D.C., recently announced it has awarded IUPUI $119,009 to conduct “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis,” a two-year study program on contemporary religious traditions in greater Indianapolis for 15 faculty members at the Indianapolis campus of Ivy Tech Community College.

Led by IUPUI professors Edward Curtis and Arthur Farnsley and Ivy Tech humanities chair Jack Cooney, the program will help the Ivy Tech faculty develop course modules on five world religions for the existing Ivy Tech humanities core, including courses on history, literature and cultural anthropology.

“This NEH grant for ‘World Religions in Greater Indianapolis’ exemplifies all we reach for at Ivy Tech Community College as we provide our students with learning opportunities which lead them to flourishing lives as well-educated citizens and as resourcefully nimble employees,” Cooney said. “We are both honored and proud to partner with our teacher colleagues at IUPUI whose vision for this substantial NEH grant is not without regard to our possibilities.”

The Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture, a unit of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, will operate the program, which will connect Ivy Tech faculty to experts on Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism at IUPUI, Indiana University Bloomington, Butler University and Marian University.

The program seeks not only to bolster humanities content at Ivy Tech but also to create more understanding of Central Indiana’s religious diversity, especially of recent immigrant communities.

“This project will aid faculty in helping students understand the breadth of religious traditions in America and in central Indiana,” IUPUI Chancellor Charles R. Bantz said. “At a time when there are far too many examples of misunderstandings about religions, this is a vital project. I am pleased that the Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture, one of our outstanding research and public outreach centers, is willing to lead this project.”

Ivy Tech faculty in the program will be introduced to world religious traditions and their sacred texts, and study their significance to U.S. history and culture. After their study of a particular tradition, the faculty will then arrange discussions with members of a recent immigrant community from that tradition. The faculty will create the Ivy Tech course modules as capstone projects based on their comprehensive studies.

Participating religious communities from Central Indiana include Jews from the former Soviet Union, Russia and Ukraine; Spanish-speaking Roman Catholic Christians from Latin America; Muslims from West Africa; Hindus from India; and Buddhists from Vietnam.

“We are grateful to all of our community partners for making it possible to bring together Central Indiana’s academic experts and its rich immigrant cultures in a program for Ivy Tech faculty,” said Bill Blomquist, dean of the IU School of Liberal Arts.

NEH grants are among the most prestigious research awards in the humanities. The “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” program received one of only four grants awarded in the NEH’s “Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges” category, for which there were 46 applications.

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the NEH supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation.