WONDER AND THE NATURAL WORLD: A Call for Grant Proposals

Logo for CSRES courtesy of News.iupui.eduCALL FOR GRANT PROPOSALS: Symposia, workshops, performances, and seminar series for departments, institutes, and research centers at all IU campuses
Deadline for submission: June 15, 2015
Awards announced by mid-July 2015

The IU Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics, and Society (CSRES) announces a grant competition on the theme of Wonder and the Natural World. Departments, research centers, and institutes across all IU campuses may apply for funds to support or supplement symposia, workshops, seminar series, performances, or small conferences during the 2015-2016 academic year that align with the Consortium’s two-year theme of Wonder and the Natural World. This call for proposals is part of a two-year thematic initiative sponsored by CSRES.

Wonder has been framed as a key moral disposition, as well as an aesthetic, emotional, or cognitive response; depending on its objects and orientation, it may display both salutary and sinister dimensions. Wonder at nature is prompted by the odd and uncanny, the strange and novel, the transcendent and sublime, as well as encounters with the monstrous and horrific. It has variously been associated with, or dissociated from, curiosity, awe, intimations of divinity, infinity, the sublime, the miraculous or supernatural, feelings of astonishment and puzzlement. We welcome projects that explore wonder or its cognate terms in relation to nature or the natural, broadly construed. Proposals should clearly relate the project to the announced theme.

Grants will be awarded in amounts up to $2500, $5000, and $7500 depending on the scope of the proposed project. Funds can be used for travel and honoraria for external speakers, as well as hospitality expenses in keeping with university regulations. IU faculty may not receive honoraria. Applications for funding should include:

• summary of the project (750 words max.)
• a list of invited presenters
• a detailed budget
• letter of support from department chair or school/unit dean (included with the application or emailed separately)
• evidence of other funding obtained or requested (for requests over $2000)

Questions about the grant competition, and complete grant proposals may be emailed to CSRES Director Lisa Sideris at lsideris@indiana.edu.

The Indiana University Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics, and Society is an interdisciplinary association of scholars, academic programs, and research centers from the eight campuses of Indiana University. Their mandate is to aid in the development of research and scholarship to better understand religion, ethics, values, and spirituality in society. An initiative of the IU Vice President for Research Office, CSRES is also supported by the Office of the President, The Office of the Executive Vice President and Chancellor, IUPUI, and the College of Arts and Sciences at IU Bloomington.

15 teams to share $1 million in collaborative grants through IU Research program

IU Vice President of Research Jorge JosIU Vice President of Research Jorge JoséBLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Indiana University Vice President for Research Jorge José has announced over $1 million in collaborative research grants to be shared among 15 newly formed research teams. Members of the teams represent 21 departments from eight schools on three IU campuses.

The IU Collaborative Research Grants program, initiated by José and now in its fifth year, awards teams of researchers up to $75,000 to support collaborative, innovative projects with a high likelihood of securing external funding. Each project team includes faculty members from different campuses, schools, departments or disciplines.

“As it was envisioned to do, the Collaborative Research Grants program continues to increase the capacity for our investigators to do meaningful and innovative work through new partnerships,” José said. “This increased capacity for collaboration is an especially important outcome of this program.”

This year, 44 investigators make up 15 teams that represent departments and schools from Indiana University Bloomington, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and IU Southeast, in addition to one team that had a member from Purdue University.

IU President Michael A. McRobbie called the program and the most recent round of awards integral to stimulating new opportunities for sharing knowledge and expertise that lead to discovery.

“Vice President José has energetically promoted and supported this program to encourage faculty to contribute their expertise in shared, innovative ways,” McRobbie said. “As the end of his tenure draws near, Indiana University can reflect positively on the distinct successes that have been achieved by this program: New and highly productive partnerships have been forged that have already led to new discoveries; the university’s investment has been realized more than ten-fold thanks to subsequent related funding; and a new framework has been developed for our faculty that stimulates creative, passionate investigation through shared knowledge.”

Since a collaboration funded by the inaugural round of grants in 2010-11, Giovanna Guidoboni, an associate professor of mathematics at IUPUI, and Alon Harris, professor of cellular and integrative physiology at the IU School of Medicine, have seen their initial round of work on modeling glaucoma result in enormous benefits.

Following their original round of research, the pair received three external grants, including one from the National Science Foundation for over $275,000. They have also founded a new scientific journal, the Journal for Modeling in Ophthalmology; established an agreement of international cooperation with the Polytechnic University of Milan (Italy); and co-organized an international workshop in Europe.

“That 2011 collaborative research grant has indeed led to an incredible number of great successes,” Guidoboni said.

Craig Pikaard, the Carlos O. Miller Professor and Distinguished Professor of Biology at IU Bloomington, was funded in 2011 with Haixu Tang, an associate professor in the School of Informatics and Computing at IU Bloomington. Pikaard said spin-out benefits from that original grant continue to this day.

“This is a valuable university program that helped jump-start the collaboration between my lab and the group Haixu Tang leads,” he said “It also helped me obtain a highly coveted Howard Hughes Medical Institute-Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation investigator position. Haixu and I continue to collaborate, and we hold regular meetings of our groups.”

In total, it is estimated that the $3 million distributed by IU during just the first three years of the grants program has thus far helped Collaborative Research Grant-funded investigators earn more than $88 million in new external funding. This figure is expected to grow as those funded more recently pursue external funding opportunities.

“The idea behind the program was to create incentives for researchers to initiate new collaborations to address important problems in transformative ways,” José said. “While we can fund only about 15 percent of the applications, just the process of preparing applications has created some new partnerships across the university. The program has been a success so far, and we believe it will continue to be in the future.”

The 15 projects awarded funding this year are:

Single Cell Studies With Scanning Sniffer Patch Microscopy:
Lane Allen Baker, Department of Chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington; and Theodore Cummins, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, IU School of Medicine.

Investigating the Relationship Between Cumulative Disadvantage and Telomere Length as a Contributor to Cancer Disparities:
Silvia Bigatti, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, IUPUI; Brittney-Shea Herbert, Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, IU School of Medicine; Kenzie Latham, Department of Sociology, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI; and Anna Maria Storniolo, Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, IU School of Medicine.

Mechanism of the Regulation of DNA Replication by PIF1 Family Helicases:
Matthew L. Bochman, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington; Yuichiro Takagi, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, IU School of Medicine; and Amber Mosley, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, IU School of Medicine.

Matrix Engineering With Adipose Stem Cells to Promote Islet Function and Longevity: Robert V. Considine, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, IU School of Medicine; Raghu Mirmira, Department of Pediatrics, IU School of Medicine; and Sherry L. Voytik-Harbin, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University.

Using in vivo Microscopy to Build Predictive Models of Drug-induced Liver Injury: Kenneth Dunn, Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, IU School of Medicine; Richard Day, Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology, IU School of Medicine; and Steve Pressé, Department of Physics, School of Science, IUPUI.

Understanding Naturalistic Bicyclist Behavior for Safety and Sustainability:
David Good, School of Public and Environmental Affairs, IU Bloomington; Lauren Christopher, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI; Stanley Chien, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI; Jiang Zheng, Department of Computer and Information Science, School of Science, IUPUI; and Yaobin Chen, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI.

Neurotherapeutic Potential of Adipose Stem Cell-Conditioned Medium in ALS:
Kathryn Jones, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, IU School of Medicine; and Keith March, Department of Medicine, Krannert Institute of Cardiology, IU School of Medicine.

The Impact of the Public Investment in Education in the Academic Performance of K-12 English Language Learners in Southern Indiana:
Haeil Jung, SPEA, IU Bloomington; Magdalena Herdoíza-Estévez, School of Education, IU Southeast; Cathy Johnson, School of Education, IU Southeast; and Jacquelyn Singleton, School of Education, IU Southeast.

Developing Remote Sensing Techniques for Detection of Toxin-Producing Cyanobacteria:
Lin Li, Department of Earth Sciences, School of Science, IUPUI; Kevin Mandernack, Department of Earth Sciences, School of Science, IUPUI; and David Kehoe, Department of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington.

Effect of Antarctic Weathering on Global Climate:
Kathy Licht, Department of Earth Sciences, School of Science, IUPUI; and David Bish, Department of Geological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington.

A Novel Approach to Discover Drug Resistance Genes in Breast Cancer Cells:
Tao Lu, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, IU School of Medicine; and Lang Li, Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, IU School of Medicine.

Induction and Maintenance of Chronic Migraine: Regulation of TRP Channels by Endogenous N-acyl Amide Lipids:
Gerry Oxford, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, IU School of Medicine; Heather Bradshaw, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington; and Joyce Hurley, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, IU School of Medicine.

Optical-Based, Label-Free Multiplex Assay for Direct Quantification of microRNAs in Serum and Cancer Cells:
Rajesh Sardar, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, School of Science, IUPUI; and Murray Korc, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, IU School of Medicine.

Developmental Adaptation to Chronic Hypoxia:
Robert Tepper, Department of Pediatrics, IU School of Medicine; Mircea Ivan, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, IU School of Medicine; and Kenneth Nephew, Medical Sciences Program, IU School of Medicine-Bloomington.

Hippo/YAP Signaling Controls Protein Redistribution and Organ Size in Critical Illness:
Clark Wells, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biochemistry, IU School of Medicine; Teresa Zimmers, Department of Surgery, IU School of Medicine; and Leonidas Koniaris, Department of Surgery, IU School of Medicine.

NEH awards IUPUI-Ivy Tech partnership $119,009 grant to create world religions curriculum

With funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will work in partnership with Ivy Tech Community College faculty to create 150 course modules on world religions for Ivy Tech humanities classes.Photo courtesy of Center for Interfaith Cooperation.

The NEH, in Washington, D.C., recently announced it has awarded IUPUI $119,009 to conduct “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis,” a two-year study program on contemporary religious traditions in greater Indianapolis for 15 faculty members at the Indianapolis campus of Ivy Tech Community College.

Led by IUPUI professors Edward Curtis and Arthur Farnsley and Ivy Tech humanities chair Jack Cooney, the program will help the Ivy Tech faculty develop course modules on five world religions for the existing Ivy Tech humanities core, including courses on history, literature and cultural anthropology.

“This NEH grant for ‘World Religions in Greater Indianapolis’ exemplifies all we reach for at Ivy Tech Community College as we provide our students with learning opportunities which lead them to flourishing lives as well-educated citizens and as resourcefully nimble employees,” Cooney said. “We are both honored and proud to partner with our teacher colleagues at IUPUI whose vision for this substantial NEH grant is not without regard to our possibilities.”

The Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture, a unit of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, will operate the program, which will connect Ivy Tech faculty to experts on Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism at IUPUI, Indiana University Bloomington, Butler University and Marian University.

The program seeks not only to bolster humanities content at Ivy Tech but also to create more understanding of Central Indiana’s religious diversity, especially of recent immigrant communities.

“This project will aid faculty in helping students understand the breadth of religious traditions in America and in central Indiana,” IUPUI Chancellor Charles R. Bantz said. “At a time when there are far too many examples of misunderstandings about religions, this is a vital project. I am pleased that the Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture, one of our outstanding research and public outreach centers, is willing to lead this project.”

Ivy Tech faculty in the program will be introduced to world religious traditions and their sacred texts, and study their significance to U.S. history and culture. After their study of a particular tradition, the faculty will then arrange discussions with members of a recent immigrant community from that tradition. The faculty will create the Ivy Tech course modules as capstone projects based on their comprehensive studies.

Participating religious communities from Central Indiana include Jews from the former Soviet Union, Russia and Ukraine; Spanish-speaking Roman Catholic Christians from Latin America; Muslims from West Africa; Hindus from India; and Buddhists from Vietnam.

“We are grateful to all of our community partners for making it possible to bring together Central Indiana’s academic experts and its rich immigrant cultures in a program for Ivy Tech faculty,” said Bill Blomquist, dean of the IU School of Liberal Arts.

NEH grants are among the most prestigious research awards in the humanities. The “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” program received one of only four grants awarded in the NEH’s “Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges” category, for which there were 46 applications.

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the NEH supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation.

25 IU faculty from five campuses earn New Frontiers in Arts and Humanities grants

IU Vice President for Research Jorge José | Photo by Indiana UniversityOn the heels of President Michael A. McRobbie’s announcement as part of Indiana University’s Bicentennial Strategic Plan of continued funding for the New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities program, Vice President for Research Jorge José has named 25 more faculty members to receive New Frontiers grants.

Considered one of the largest internally funded university arts and humanities programs supporting scholarship and creative activity, the New Frontiers program has awarded more than $9.3 million to 451 faculty members in the past 10 years.

The new five-year extension was the second made by McRobbie after the Lilly Endowment’s Excellence in Indiana Initiative funded an initial five years beginning in 2004-05. This latest round of awards provides up to $50,000 each in Creativity and Scholarship Awards to 19 faculty members from four campuses and up to $15,000 each in Experimental Fellowship Awards for six faculty members from three campuses.

New Frontiers has helped define IU’s commitment to support innovative and creative scholarship with the potential for transformative achievement, McRobbie noted.

“New Frontiers has repeatedly fostered exciting new opportunities for our faculty by integrating the arts, scholarship and creativity, and empowering that relationship with a strong commitment of support,” he said. “This program has allowed our faculty to expand the breadth and depth of their research and creative activity and led to the development of innovative works across a wide range of disciplines. In doing so, it has guaranteed that IU’s longstanding tradition of excellence in the arts and humanities continues to thrive and enrich our quality of life.”

José said continued support of the program validates IU’s commitment to the arts and humanities as a sustaining stakeholder in IU’s mission set down in the Bicentennial Strategic Plan.

“The New Frontiers program, which is unique among major research universities, fosters and strengthens the university’s commitment to transformative innovation, outstanding scholarship, and creative and intellectual achievement,” José said. “More broadly, New Frontiers helps demonstrate the importance of the arts and humanities in contemporary life and is truly a signature program for the university.”

In addition to these grant programs, New Frontiers also supports outstanding and topical scholarly symposia through the New Currents program, and faculty travel for research and creative activity through the Exploratory Travel Fellowship program.

Jean Robertson, the Chancellor’s Professor of Art History at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis’ Herron School of Art and Design, has been a New Frontiers grant recipient and later a member of the IU faculty panel that reviews new grant applications. She said receipt of the award provided her the support, motivation and freedom to attain new levels of academic achievement.

“Beyond the practical benefits, New Frontiers funding has given me moral support and strong motivation. I want to justify the confidence Indiana University has expressed in me, thus I aim even higher than I would on my own,” she said. “I don’t know of another university in the country that provides such generous financial support for faculty who specialize in arts and humanities disciplines, and the sheer volume of research that IU faculty members have been able to accomplish as the outcomes of New Frontiers grants is jaw dropping.”

Recipients of 2014-15 New Frontiers grants are:

New Frontiers of Creativity and Scholarship

  • Heather Blair, Department of Religious Studies, IU Bloomington, “The Gods Make You Giggle: Finding Religion in Japanese Children’s Picture Books”
  • Purnima Bose, Department of English, IU Bloomington, “Intervention Narratives: Afghanistan, the United States, and the War on Terror”
  • Judith Brown, Department of English, IU Bloomington, “Passive States: India and Global Modernism”
  • Maria Bucur-Deckard, Department of History, IU Bloomington, “The Century of Women”
  • Konstantin Dierks, Department of History, IU Bloomington, “Globalization of the United States, 1789-1861: An Interactive Digital Atlas”
  • Jeffrey Gould, Department of History, IU Bloomington, “Port Triumph”
  • Patricia Ingham, Department of English, IU Bloomington, “A Cultural History of Curiosity: Part 1, Monkey Business”
  • Sarah Knott, Department of History, IU Bloomington, “Mother: the past in our present”
  • Elizabeth Kryder-Reid, Department of Anthropology, IUPUI, “An Investigation of Stakeholder-Defined Value at Two Contested Cultural Heritage Sites in Indiana”
  • C. Thomas Lewis, Department of Human-Centered Computing, IUPUI, “Participatory Filmmaking Confronting HIV Stigma”
  • Eden Medina, School of Informatics and Computing, IU Bloomington, “How Data Become Law: Computer-Mediated Evidence in Cases of Human Rights Violations”
  • Jonathan Rossing, Department of Communication Studies, IUPUI, “Humor, Race, and Rhetorical Agency in Post-apartheid South Africa”
  • Kelly Alisa Ryan, Department of History, IU Southeast, “Violence, Self Presentation and Power”
  • R. Matthew Shockey, Department of Philosophy, IU South Bend, “The Bounds of Self: An Essay on Heidegger’s ‘Being and Time'”
  • Ruth Stone, Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology, IU Bloomington, “Ebola in Town: Critical Musical Connections in Liberian Communities during the 2014 Ebola Crisis in West Africa”
  • Alberto Varon, Department of English, IU Bloomington, “Textual Citizens: Literary Manhood and the Making of Mexican Americans, 1848-1959”
  • John Walsh, Department of Information and Library Science, IU Bloomington, “CoBRA: Comic Book Readership Archive”
  • Brenda Weber, Department of Gender Studies, IU Bloomington, “Gendered Modernity and Mediated Mormonism”
  • Gregory Witkowski, Lilly Family School of Philanthropic Studies, IUPUI, “Donors in a Dictatorship”

New Frontiers Experimentation Fellowships

  • Jim Ansaldo, Indiana Institute on Disability and Community, IU Bloomington, “Exploring the Impact of Improv Classes for Teens on the Autism Spectrum”
  • Lesley Baker, Herron School of Art and Design, IUPUI, “Digital Clay — Extrapolation”
  • Andrew Hopson, Department of Theatre, Drama and Contemporary Dance, IU Bloomington, “Using Motion Tracking to Control Audio Playback”
  • Gregory Schrempp, Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology, IU Bloomington, “Science the Second Time Around”
  • Susan Skoczen, Department of Humanities, IU Kokomo, “Electroformed Metal Mesh as New Material in the Creation of Wearables”
  • Rachel Wheeler, Department of Religious Studies, IUPUI, “Songs of the Spirit: Building Bridges between Eighteenth and Twenty-first Century Mohican Music”

IUPUI professors named among IBJ’s Forty Under 40

Genevieve G. Shaker

Genevieve G. Shaker

Daniel Vreeman

Daniel Vreeman

Two professors on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus are among the young professionals recognized as the Indianapolis Business Journal’s Class of 2015 Forty Under 40.

Genevieve Shaker of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, and Daniel Vreeman of the Indiana University School of Medicine, also on the IUPUI campus, are named on the list of rising stars in their respective professions who were recognized not only for their early professional success, but also for their accomplishments in the greater Indianapolis community and the likelihood they will remain Indianapolis residents and build on those achievements.

This year’s IBJ Forty Under 40 are introduced in a special section of the Feb. 2 to 8 edition of the publication. Profiles of the 40 young professionals are also published in an interaction version available online.

Shaker, 39, associate dean for development and external affairs in the School of Liberal Arts, is also an assistant professor of philanthropic studies in the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy.

Her IBJ profile cites Shaker’s “successful conclusion of the School of Liberal Arts’ seven-year, $18 million campaign, earning an award from the Association of Fundraising Professionals in the process.”

The Association of Fundraising Professionals named Shaker as the recipient of the organization’s 2015 Emerging Scholar Award. The award honors an early-career scholar or scholar-practitioner whose research has and will continue to shape the discourse on philanthropy and fundraising.

Shaker, who teaches the giving and volunteering in America course in the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, also received the Indiana University Trustees Teaching Award in 2013 and the IUPUI Student Athlete “Favorite Professor” award in 2013.

Vreeman, 36, is associate research professor in the School of Medicine and associate director of terminology services and research scientist with the Center for Biomedical Informatics at the Regenstrief Institute. As a child experimenting with his dad’s Commodore 64 computer, Vreeman created a database to keep track of his baseball card collection.

Today Vreeman has combined his love for computer science and technology with a career in medicine and biology and is advancing the use of computers in health care. He is directing development of a medical vocabulary standard, Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes, or LOINC, for short. The language allows for the exchange and aggregation of results across clinics using universal codes. As a principal investigator, he has received $16 million in external funding, and has collaborated on another $40 million in projects.

“Reading about the Forty Under 40 is inspiring for all of us — and Professors Shaker and Vreeman demonstrate how IUPUI faculty make a difference — whether shaping health information or philanthropy,” IUPUI Chancellor Charles R. Bantz said. “Incredibly talented and passionate about their work, they are making long-lasting impact on Indiana and beyond.”

IBJ’s Forty Under 40 recognition program is in its 23rd year. New this year for each honoree is the chance to support causes important to him or her. Central Indiana Community Foundation has provided $40,000 in grants to be designated to local organizations by this year’s Forty Under 40 honorees.

A committee of three IBJ staff members and two members of the 2014 Forty Under 40 class selected this year’s class from among 269 nominations made by IBJ readers and staff.

All 40 young professionals will be honored during a reception Tuesday, Feb. 3 at the Skyline Club.

Congressional Research Grants Applications Available Now

dclogo_300px_400x400The Dirksen Congressional Center invites applications for grants to fund research on congressional leadership and the U.S. Congress. The Center, named for the late Senate Minority Leader Everett M. Dirksen, is a private, nonpartisan, nonprofit research and educational organization devoted to the study of Congress. Since 1978, the Congressional Research Grants program has invested more than $944,208 to support over 436 projects. Applications are accepted at any time, but the deadline is March 1 for the annual selections, which are announced in April.

The Center has allocated $50,000 in 2015 for grants (an increase of $15,000 over 2014) with individual awards capped at $3,500. Stay tuned for news on the application and selection process.

The competition is open to individuals with a serious interest in studying Congress. Political scientists, historians, biographers, scholars of public administration or American studies, and journalists are among those eligible. The Center encourages graduate students who have successfully defended their dissertation prospectus to apply and awards a significant portion of the funds for dissertation research. Applicants must be U.S. citizens who reside in the United States.

Complete information about what kind of research projects are eligible for consideration, what could a Congressional Research Award pay for, application procedures, and how recipients are selected may be found at The Center’s website.

To Apply: Download the Word document — Congressional Research Grant Application — and complete the required entries. You may send the application as a Word or pdf attachment to an e-mail directed to Frank Mackaman at fmackaman@dirksencenter.org. Please insert the following in the Subject Line: “CRG Application [insert your surname].”

Deadline: All proposals must be received no later than March 1, 2015.

IUPUI associate dean Genevieve Shaker honored with professional group’s Emerging Scholar Award

Genevieve G. Shaker

Genevieve G. Shaker

An Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis administrator and professor has received national recognition for demonstrating a promising career as a researcher whose scholarship will shape the disciplines of philanthropy and fundraising.

The Association of Fundraising Professionals has selected Genevieve G. Shaker, associate dean for development and external affairs in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and assistant professor in the IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, as the recipient of the organization’s 2015 Emerging Scholar Award.

Established by the Research Council of the Association of Fundraising Professionals in 2013, the Emerging Scholar Award honors an early-career scholar or scholar-practitioner whose research has and will continue to shape the discourse on philanthropy and fundraising.

“The Emerging Scholar jury recognized Dr. Shaker’s extremely impressive training and experience,” said Russell James, chair of the association’s Emerging Scholar Award Committee. “Her research provides a greater understanding of academic workplace giving and motivation of faculty in seeking academic careers. Her work will further enhance fundraising strategy development for the field and will provide insights regarding donor motivations, interests and giving trends.”

Emerging Scholar jurors rated nominated scholars on their record of scholarship; demonstrated evidence of a further promising career as an academic researcher or scholar-practitioner; demonstrated impact on the state of scholarship or advancement of knowledge; and evidence of impact on fundraising practice.

“I’m humbled to have been chosen by my peers in AFP for this wonderful award and grateful for the support I have received at IUPUI to pursue my research interests as well as to serve the university as an advancement professional,” Shaker said. “I’m looking forward to the opportunity to make further contributions to the field, higher education and society.”
Shaker, who is also an adjunct professor of liberal arts, focuses her research on workplace giving and higher education advancement, as well as the faculty profession. She has been recognized with several other national awards, including the Dissertation of the Year Award in 2009 from the Association for the Study of Higher Education; and, with her co-authors, the 2009 Robert Menges Award for research in educational development and a 2013 Charles F. Elton Best Paper Award from the Association for Institutional Research.

“Dr. Shaker has quickly become a highly productive and influential researcher on fundraising within colleges and universities, and especially on the philanthropic activities of faculty and staff,” said Bill Blomquist, dean of the IU School of Liberal Arts. “It is very gratifying to see her work receive this well-deserved national recognition through the AFP Emerging Scholar Award.”

Shaker completed her doctorate in higher education at Indiana University Bloomington and holds a master’s in philanthropic studies from the Center on Philanthropy, the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy’s predecessor.

Since 1960, the Association of Fundraising Professionals has advanced effective and ethical philanthropy by providing advocacy, research, education, mentoring, collaboration and technology opportunities for the world’s largest network of professional fundraisers. AFP’s more than 30,000 members raise more than $100 billion annually.
The AFP Research Council leads the association’s efforts to identify research priorities for AFP; recognize and promote research that informs philanthropy and fundraising practice; and translate and disseminate research-based knowledge to practitioners.

Alumnus Jason Ramey selected for $12,000 fellowship as 2014-2015 Jerome Foundation Emerging Artist

Jason Ramey welcomed his daughter, Eva Rae, on December 5. Other recent creations include It's Not Bulletproof. OSB siding, paint, found furniture. 60"x24"x70", 2013. (images courtesy Jason Ramey)

Jason Ramey welcomed his daughter, Eva Rae, on December 5. Other recent creations include It’s Not Bulletproof. OSB siding, paint, found furniture. 60″x24″x70″, 2013.
(images courtesy Jason Ramey)

Life’s been proceeding at a fast pace for Jason Ramey (B.F.A. ‘08 in Furniture Design) since he left Herron. He moved to the University of Wisconsin, Madison to complete a master’s degree and currently teaches furniture design and 3-D foundations as a visiting full time faculty member at the Minnesota College of Art and Design (MCAD).

In 2014, Ramey discovered that he is among a five-person cadre of Minnesotans named to a 2014-2015 Jerome Foundation Fellowship for Emerging Artists. The honor comes with a $12,000 award for each recipient. (To round out the year, his daughter Eva Rae, all eight pounds and 20 inches of her, chose to make her arrival on December 5. He may be a little sleep deprived of late.)

According to MCAD’s website, the Jerome Fellows “…were selected out of a pool of 252 applicants by a panel of arts professionals that included Candida Alvarez, artist and professor in the painting and drawing department at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago; Shannon Fitzgerald, curator, writer and executive director of Rochester Art Center; and David Norr, independent curator and writer currently based in New York City.

Art Critic Michelle Grabner has described Ramey as admirably staking out “…. a psychological landscape taut with existential metaphors and personal narratives. At the same time, he unflinchingly confronts the problematic historical debates between the visual arts and crafts, furniture and props, display and architecture by employing the tropes of these dichotomies in his work”—the sorts of debates that occasionally can be found in the furniture design studios at Herron.

Ramey’s artist’s statement attributes his work to his youthful curiosity “about who might have constructed the walls in my family home, and what type of people they were. … These walls weren’t just inane parts of my childhood home, they were my childhood,” he said. His current work still explores these and other domestic themes as it binds up memory “in the space that enfolds our material world.”

Ramey characterizes Herron as “a huge part of my development as an artist. “I had very little experience before coming to Herron,” he said, “I was lucky to work with Cory Robinson, Phil Tennant and David Lee on the basics of design and fabrication. I continue to be amazed at the work I see coming from Herron students.”

In addition to a Jerome Fellows group show at MCAD in the fall, Ramey also has solo exhibitions in Cleveland and the Weber Gallery at Winona State University in the works for late 2015.

NEA Literature Fellowships: Prose, FY 2016 Applications Now Available

thThe Arts Endowment’s support of a project may begin any time between January 1, 2016, and January 1, 2017, and extend for up to two years. The NEA Literature Fellowships program offers $25,000 grants in prose (fiction and creative nonfiction) and poetry to published creative writers that enable recipients to set aside time for writing, research, travel, and general career advancement. Applications are reviewed through an anonymous process in which the only criteria for review are artistic excellence and artistic merit. To review the applications, the NEA assembles a different advisory panel every year, each diverse with regard to geography, race and ethnicity, and artistic points of view. The NEA Literature Fellowships program operates on a two-year cycle with fellowships in prose and poetry available in alternating years. For FY 2016, which is covered by these guidelines, fellowships in prose (fiction and creative nonfiction) are available. Fellowships in poetry will be offered in FY 2017 and guidelines will be available in the fall of 2015. You may apply only once each year. Competition for fellowships is extremely rigorous. We typically receive more than 1,000 applications each year in this category and award fellowships to fewer than 5% of applicants. You should consider carefully whether your work will be competitive at the national level.

Deadline: Mar 11, 2015 You must submit your application electronically through Grants.gov, the federal government’s online application system. The Grants.gov system must receive your validated and accepted application no later than 11:59 p.m., Eastern Time, on March 11, 2015.

Ganci’s study of ubiquitous computing attracts Springer Family Innovative Faculty Award

Aaron Ganci was selected by his peers for the 2015 Springer Award.(image: Herron staff)

Aaron Ganci was selected by his peers for the 2015 Springer Award.(image: Herron staff)

Whether you’re resentful of being monetized by your apps or unconcerned about the data you provide with your every keystroke, Aaron Ganci’s research findings will likely be relevant to you.

Ganci, assistant professor of visual communication design, has been chosen by his peers as the 2015 recipient of the Frank C. Springer Family Innovative Faculty Award. The award is Herron School or Art and Design’s most prestigious and largest faculty research prize.

Ganci’s specialty is experience design—a subset of visual communication—that he weaves into his students’ coursework. His curiosity led him to propose a research project that will examine the potential of ubiquitous computing, that is, the integration of data gathering technology into everyday objects, to “enable extremely powerful interaction experiences and a new breed of smart digital interfaces,” he said.

The burgeoning capability to gather data about users and their actions “will enable designers to achieve new levels of engagement, personalization and usefulness through digital interfaces,” Ganci predicted.

It is those kinds of interfaces that enable the bookseller on your device to make recommendations on what you might like to read, based on the types of titles you have already ordered, comments you have made about them and people with whom you’ve shared them.

Ganci said ubiquitous computing will impact many more facets of our lives. “Smart environments are growing exponentially. As this technology becomes more available in the mass market, connected environments—virtual and physical—will become much more prevalent.” A big part of what Herron Visual Communication Design graduates will be creating in the next five or ten years is experience design for all manner of digital interfaces.

Thanks to the Springer Prize, Ganci will do a deep dive into what this means for tomorrow’s designers through a very specific project that he was inspired to undertake by fellow faculty members Craig McDaniel and Jean Robertson.

In their soon to be published book, McDaniel and Robertson assert that a standardized alphabet has outlived its usefulness for expressive visual communication through text. They propose that people should have the ability to customize their own personal alphabet to better align with their communication needs.

Ganci will use this assertion as the basic premise for his work, integrating ubiquitous computing into a user interface that will make alphabetic translations passive and seamless. “This project is an important first step in understanding how and why designers might use this technology to create more engaging, personalized or useful experiences,” he said.

In the experiment, text translated into a personalized alphabet identified with a specific individual will be displayed on a smart wall in a room that can sense who is present. When the smart wall senses an individual is near, it will translate the displayed text to that person’s personalized alphabet. As more people begin interacting with the wall, only the area nearest them will translate. This will create a public-yet-personalized experience that would be impossible without ubiquitous computing technology.

The Springer family created the award to inspire Herron faculty members to expand their artistic, creative and scholarly work in memory of Frank C. Springer Jr., a long-time friend to Herron and beloved Indianapolis philanthropist.