IUPUI health informatics professor receives $100,000 grant

An IU School of Informatics and Computing faculty member at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will receive a $100,000 grant and two years of targeted scientific mentoring after being selected as an early-career scholar by a national center that seeks to improve population health.

Brian Dixon, an assistant professor in health informatics, will receive the award from the National Coordinating Center for Public Health Services and Systems Research. The center is housed at the University of Kentucky College of Public Health and funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Dixon is also a research scientist at the Regenstrief Institute and an investigator in residence for the Center for Health Information and Communication, part of the Department of Veterans Affairs’ Health Services Research and Development Service.

In a statement, the National Coordinating Center for Public Health Services and Systems Research said the funding and mentorship are designed to speed the discovery of strategies for improving the nation’s public health system. Dixon and the three others who were named early-scholars are expected to become the next generation of national leaders in the field of public health services and systems research.

The scholars’ studies investigate innovative public health programs and practices that have the potential to improve health status on a population-wide basis but currently have insufficient evidence about their effectiveness and value, the center said.

The project Dixon will focus on is titled “Improving Vaccine-Preventable Disease Reporting and Surveillance Through Health Information Exchange.”

Dixon’s research will implement and evaluate an automated process designed to improve reporting rates for vaccine-preventable diseases in Indiana, and to support more efficient provider reporting to public health agencies. The process takes advantage of Indiana’s statewide health information exchange that enables data-sharing between clinical and public health organizations, and it replaces existing, inefficient reporting procedures involving manual completion of health department forms.

Data from the health information exchange will be used to partially complete many of the required fields submitted to public health departments leaving blank only a small number of fields for clinical providers to complete. The process will also help identify cases of vaccine-preventable diseases that providers might otherwise forget to report because of high patient volumes or missing information.

Regenstrief Institute investigator Dr. Shaun Grannis, associate professor of family medicine at the Indiana University School of Medicine, and P. Joseph Gibson, director of epidemiology at the Marion County Public Health Department, will serve as Dixon’s mentors. Grannis collaborates closely with state, national and international public health stakeholders to advance technical infrastructure and data-sharing capabilities for population health. Gibson oversees disease surveillance for Marion County and advises state and federal authorities on using information technologies to improve public health practice.

University center founders honored at Walker/Douglass lecture series

Two founders of university centers focused on African American business ventures were honored for their contributions during an Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis lecture series named for historic businesswoman Madam C.J. Walker.

Juliet E.K. Walker, a pioneer scholar of black business history in America, received the first Madame C.J. Walker Lifetime Achievement Award during the inaugural Madame C.J. Walker/Frederick Douglass Annual Lecture Series on Dec. 6 at the Jewel Center in Indianapolis.

Juliet Walker is the founder of the Center for Black Business History, Entrepreneurship and Technology at the University of Texas at Austin, where she has been a professor of history since 2001.

Bessie House-Soremekun, director of Africana studies in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, received the Global African American Activist Ambassador Award.

House-Soremekun is founding executive director of the Center for Global Entrepreneurship and Sustainable Development, part of the School of Liberal Arts. The center’s mission is to build entrepreneurial capacity and sustainable development initiatives in America and African countries.

Juliet Walker, who earned her Ph.D. in American history from the University of Chicago, is considered the foremost scholar in black business history in America. Her development of that field is linked to the publication of her book, “Free Frank: A Black Pioneer on the Antebellum Frontier.” Her book, “The History of Black Business in America: Capitalism, Race, Entrepreneurship,” was the first comprehensive study of African American businesses.

“It is entirely befitting for Professor Walker to receive this prestigious award … for the first woman to establish a major field in black entrepreneurship to (receive the inaugural) award named after the first female self-made millionaire in the United States,” said Walker’s letter of nomination.

photo house-soremekun

Bessie House-Soremekun

The Walker/Douglass lecture series was co-hosted and co-created by the Africana Studies Program, an academic unit of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, under the leadership of House-Soremekun, and the Frederick Douglass Papers in in the Institute for American Thought in the School of Liberal Arts, led by Professor John Kaufman-McKivigan.

The theme for this year’s event was “The Life and Times of Madame C.J. Walker: The Historical Development of a Business Empire.” Madam Walker was a self-made African American millionaire, having made a fortune from beauty and hair-care businesses before her death in 1919. Juliet Walker was the luncheon keynote speaker for the event.

The Activist Ambassador Award acknowledges House-Soremekun, also professor of political science and Africana studies at IUPUI, for investing in multicultural networking; exhibiting hope and faith for a brighter future for African-Americans; and bridge building to ensure the African-American community is enlightened and enhanced.

“The presentation of this award is emblematic of the impact that Dr. House-Soremekun has made both at home and abroad,” said David A. Scott Sr., who presented the award to House-Soremekun on behalf of the African American Restoration Movement of Indianapolis and the Globe Changers Movement.

Professor Juliet King receives first Frank C. Springer Family Innovative Faculty Award

Juliet King, MA, ATR-BC, LPC and director of Herron School of Art and Design’s Art Therapy Program, is the first to receive the Frank C. Springer Family Innovative Faculty Award. The newly-created award is the school’s most prestigious and largest faculty research prize.

King will conduct a meta-analysis of art therapy and neuroscience studies to search for patterns and gaps in art therapy research. She expects to present her findings at the American Art Therapy Association national conference in 2014 and for her work to be published. Her research will also benefit Herron art therapy graduate students as she weaves it into the curriculum.

The Springer Family, including Cathy Springer Brown and Rick Brown of Indianapolis and Mary Ann and Scott Hillstrom of the Chicago area, devised the award to inspire Herron faculty members to expand their artistic, creative and scholarly work in innovative directions to yield new insights into the human condition.

The award honors the spirit of Frank C. Springer Jr., a beloved Indianapolis philanthropist and art connoisseur who was a great friend to Herron and many other organizations.

Cathy Springer Brown said “Uncle Frank would be pleased knowing the award will help support important research in the field of art therapy.” She encourages others to think about what their passions might be and explore ways to support Herron. “It’s powerful when you think about the impact your support will have on countless students and faculty,” she said. “Making a gift in honor of someone special makes the experience even more rewarding.”

Herron faculty will competitively submit research proposals for the Springer Award each fall. Herron’s Faculty Affairs Committee, this year led by Professor Eric Nordgulen, will select one proposal for the award annually.

United States Capitol Historical Society Fellowship

Applications are invited for the twenty-eighth year of the United States Capitol Historical Society Fellowship. This fellowship is designed to support research and publication on the history, art, and architecture of the United States Capitol and related buildings. Graduate students and scholars may apply for periods ranging from one to twelve months; the stipend is $2500.00 per month. (Most awards are for one to four months.)

Applications must be postmarked, e-mailed, or faxed by March 15, 2014, for fellowships beginning in September 2014 and ending in August 2015. Applications should be mailed to Dr. Donald Kennon, U.S. Capitol Historical Society, 200 Maryland Avenue, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20002; faxed to the Architect of the Capitol at (202)-228-4602; or e-mailed in PDF format to bwolanin@aoc.gov and dkennon@uschs.org.

Further details can be found at USCHS website. If you have questions about a potential topic, contact Dr. Barbara Wolanin at (202)-228-2700 or bwolanin@aoc.gov.

Call for nominations: Madame C.J. Walker Lifetime Achievement Award

Deadline: Monday, November 24, 2013 at 5:00 P.M.

The Africana Studies Program and Frederick Douglass Papers at Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis invite nominations forthe inaugural Madame C.J. Walker Lifetime Achievement Award, the first of which will be presented at the upcoming Madame C.J. Walker/Frederick Douglass Annual Lecture Series that will take place on December 6, 2013. This award is named in honor of the phenomenal Madame C.J. Walker, who is credited with being the first female self-made millionaire in the United States as a result of her creative genius, hard work and ingenuity in creating a hair-care business in Indianapolis, Indiana.

The above programs invite nominations for senior scholars who currently hold the rank of Associate or Full Professor. In particular,  nominations are sought for an individual who has served as a dedicated pioneer and innovative scholar in the fields of History, Black Business History, African or African American Entrepreneurship, Business and Marketing, Sociology, Women’s Studies, African Studies, African American Studies, Anthropology, or other related disciplines.

According the Call for Nominations: “We seek to honor a scholar who has served as an intellectual front-runner and scholar extraordinaire in uncovering the contributions, historical narratives, and real world experiences of African or African American entrepreneurs as they created various products and services to enhance the economic marketplace and promote economic development in their communities and nations. We seek to honor a scholar who has dedicated his/her lifetime to the relentless pursuit of knowledge and all that this embodies to create a large body of research and publications which has been considered by his/her peers to be of the highest quality. We seek scholars who have made indelible impacts on the academy both in terms of the sheer volume of their publications as well as the depth of their research. We seek to honor scholars who have performed original, innovative work to illuminate the historical and contemporary activities, accomplishments, and manifestations of entrepreneurial endeavors in order to demonstrate how it has impacted the survival mechanisms of African or African American entrepreneurs either on the continent of Africa or in the African Diaspora with regard to the promulgation of various principles of self-help and economic self-sufficiency.”

Please, email all letters of nomination along with a resume of the nominee to Dr. Bessie House-Soremekun, the Director of Africana Studies at Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis at beshouse@iupui.edu.

 

Call for nominations: 2013 Dr. Joseph T. Taylor Award for Excellence in Diversity

In honor of Dr. Joseph T. Taylor, the first dean of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, this is a call for nominations and applications for the 14th annual IUPUI Excellence in Diversity Awards. The awards will be conferred by Chancellor Charles R. Bantz during the 25th Annual Joseph T. Taylor Symposium on February 25, 2014. Award recipient(s) will be selected from nominations or applications submitted by faculty, staff or students in recognition of exemplary IUPUI individuals, academic and support programs, events, policies and activities that have led to one or more of the following:

  • Institutional Leadership and Commitment – Clarity of expectations, resource investment, and accountability at all levels of leadership.
  • Curricular and Co-Curricular Transformation – Incorporation of principles of multiculturalism, pluralism, equity and diversity into the curriculum and co-curriculum.
  • Campus Climate – The degree to which the events, messages, symbols, values of the campus make it a welcoming and inclusive environment.
  • Representational Diversity – The degree to which the campus attracts, retains, and develops students, faculty, and staff of color.
  • IUPUI Community in issues related to race, class, or gender through innovative curriculum, research, programs or events.

For applications, nomination forms and additional information, visit the Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion website.

School of Informatics and Computing’s Davide Bolchini receives Google Faculty Research Award

Davide Bolchini, interim chair of the Department of Human-Centered Computing and assistant professor of human-computer interaction at the School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, recently received the prestigious Google Faculty Research Award.

The award is accompanied by a $44,252 grant that will support the study “Augmenting Screen-Reader Navigation by Linkless Dialogues” being conducted by Bolchini and human-computer interaction Ph.D. candidate Prathik Gadde. The study investigates how the blind and visually impaired can interact with and navigate through complex websites to compensate for their lack of sight. The study will examine novel solutions that could make surfing the Web easier for visually challenged users.

“The blind user experience with the Web is still very far from enjoyable,” Bolchini said. “There is so much more that we can do to make it not just slightly better but considerably more natural and desirable. Together with our stellar graduate students, we will explore strategies to help blind users understand where they are on a complex website, where they can go next from a page, or what to do to know more about a topic. This can make a significant difference in daily Web navigation tasks.”

The work will leverage the five-year collaboration with the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired. The study will build upon the research on “aural informatics” in collaboration with professor Steve Mannheimer and Executive Associate Dean Mathew Palakal in the Department of Human-Centered Computing, which already has a prior Google Research Award and two NSF-funded projects on Web accessibility, non-speech sounds and aural navigation.

Google Research Awards‘ mission is to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful. As part of that vision, the Google Research Awards program aims to identify and support world-class, full-time faculty pursuing research in areas of mutual interest.

This round, Google received 550 proposals from 50 countries. After expert reviews, 105 projects were selected for funding, with an acceptance rate of 19 percent.

Droege, Tennant, Maultsby receive President’s Medal from IU

Indiana University President Michael A. McRobbie presented the President’s Medal for Excellence to three professors Oct. 8 at the university’s Academic Excellence Dinner.

Those receiving medals were Anthony Droege, professor emeritus of art at Indiana University South Bend; Phillip Tennant, who retired in June from IUPUI’s Herron School of Art and Design; and Portia Maultsby, professor of folklore and ethnomusicology in IU Bloomington’s College of Arts and Sciences.

The highest honor an IU president can bestow, the President’s Medal for Excellence recognizes, among other criteria, distinction in public service, service to IU, and extraordinary merit and achievement in the arts, humanities, sciences, education and industry. The medal itself is a reproduction in silver of the symbolic jewel of office worn by IU’s president at ceremonial occasions.

“At Indiana University, we recognize that the disciplines that comprise the arts and humanities remain central to our ability to discover, collaborate, create and innovate, and we will continue to invest in and support them,” McRobbie said. “These three Indiana University faculty members, Portia Maultsby, Phillip Tenant and Tony Droege, who are from three different IU campuses, exemplify IU’s continued strength and excellence in the arts and humanities. They have each reached the pinnacle of academic achievement in their widely different fields, and they have also been recognized by their peers around the world for their tireless dedication and tremendous contributions to their disciplines.

“We are extremely pleased to recognize and honor their outstanding intellectual achievements, their commitment to excellence in every endeavor they have pursued and their tireless dedication to enriching the life of the university.”

Droege retired in 2008 after 37 years on IU South Bend’s faculty, where he served as chair of the Fine Art Department from 1982 to 1990. He received his Bachelor of Arts from Penn State and his Master of Arts and Master of Fine Arts from the University of Iowa. He earned his master’s degree from the University of Iowa and taught at Murray State University in Kentucky before Harold Zisla hired him to teach painting at IU South Bend in 1971.

Primarily known for his large oil paintings, Droege also works in watercolor and a variety of drawing media. In recent years he has made serious explorations in landscape and still life.

Maultsby, who has been at IU Bloomington since 1971, is the Laura Boulton Professor of Folklore and Ethnomusicology. She received her Ph.D. in ethnomusicology and her master’s degree in musicology from the University of Wisconsin in Madison and a bachelor’s degree in piano, theory and composition from Mount St. Scholastica College in Atchison, Kan.

Her research interests include popular music, the music industry, African American music and musical aesthetics and transnationalism. She is also director of the Archives of African American Music and Culture.

Maultsby received an award in 2011 from the National Association for the Study and Performance of African American Music, and serves as an advisory board member for the Institute for Popular Music at the New York-based University of Rochester. She has served as researcher or advisor for various video and radio documentaries for the National Afro-American Museum, PBS, Radio Smithsonian and NPR, among others. She also founded and conducted the Indiana University Soul Revue, a touring student ensemble.

Tennant was recruited to the Herron School of Art and Design in 1974 to launch a woodworking program for art majors. It began as a small struggling program in the basement of the old Herron Museum building on 16th Street in Indianapolis. Under his watch, the program tripled the number of students and broadened its curriculum. In 2008, Herron launched new MFA degrees and has attained national prominence among the top furniture design programs.

Before joining the Herron School, Tennant earned his degree from Alfred University in New York and studied under master woodworker and furniture designer Wendell Castle.

Tennant’s creative activities and scholarly work have been focused on designing contemporary fine art furniture and the exploration of material and process. His work has been exhibited nationally and featured in various publications, including Fine Woodworking, American Craft Magazine and Furniture Studio. He also conducts many workshops as a visiting artist and has received numerous public and private commissions.

IUPUI Center for Economic Education wins statewide award

The IUPUI Center for Economic Education has won the 2013 Peter V. Harrington Award for University Centers from the Indiana Council for Economic Education and its executive committee. The center — part of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and directed by senior lecturer in economics Mohammad Kaviani with support from program coordinator Terri Crews — works with Indiana schools to help students become better decision-makers, more knowledgeable consumers and productive citizens.

To accomplish this task, the center works with K-12 educators to improve their understanding of economics and personal finance and provides them with teaching strategies that can be easily integrated into their classroom instruction.

“I firmly believe that developing an economic way of thinking is like learning a foreign language: the younger the better. We need to tackle economic illiteracy early and persistently both in and outside the classroom,” Kaviani said. “The center plays a vital role in helping Central Indiana teachers, students and area residents take a common sense approach to economics.

“The center facilitates programs that engage teachers at all grade levels, on a variety of topics, and helps them learn how to implement economics into their existing curricula. Last year’s programs included workshops on basic economics and personal finance concepts; the role of economics in energy and environmental policy; using children’s literature to teach economics; and the impact and outcome of the recent financial crisis. The center also coordinated two high school competitions: the Economics Challenge and the Personal Finance Challenge. These programs, along with the center’s efforts to build a stronger relationship with teachers in Indianapolis Public Schools, were highlights last year.”

The Indiana Council for Economic Education commended the Center for Economic Education for its K-12 professional development and student-focused programs offered during the 2012-13 school year. The Harrington Judging Committee praised the center for its continued high level of programming, the increase in the number of teachers and students who participated in those programs, and the variety of economic education opportunities it made available to teachers and students last year.

“There are 11 Centers for Economic Education statewide in Indiana, and I’m very pleased that the IUPUI center is receiving this year’s Harrington Award,” said William Blomquist, dean of the IU School of Liberal Arts. The Harrington Award was presented at an event at the Indianapolis Children’s Museum on Sept. 20. The honor comes with a $3,000 award funded by Duke Realty.

Tempel named nonprofit sector’s national “Influencer of the Year”

Gene Tempel, founding dean of the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, has been named the “Influencer of the Year” in the U.S. nonprofit sector by The NonProfit Times, a leading nonprofit sector publication.

Tempel was selected for the honor from among 50 leaders nationwide who The NonProfit Times is recognizing as its 2013 “Power and Influence Top 50,” the 50 individuals the publication considers to have the greatest impact on the nonprofit sector.

The “Influencer of the Year” award was announced last night at a gala in Washington, DC, honoring the people who comprise the 2013 Top 50 list. The annual list recognizes leaders for their innovation, their influence on the broader sector, and for developing organizational models that can be replicated. It is compiled by The NonProfit Times’ staff and leaders from the philanthropic sector. Tempel has been honored on the list 12 of the 16 times it has been published since its debut in 1998.

In recognizing Tempel’s leadership, the publication said, “Tempel heads the nation’s first school of philanthropy. He also headed what was the premier Center on Philanthropy. It can be argued that nobody has spent more time effectively building a center of knowledge on the topic of philanthropy, where people turn for answers and illumination.”

Tempel played an integral role in establishing the school and its precursor, the Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University, and served as the Center’s executive director from 1997 through 2008, developing it into a leading national resource

Committed to strengthening the philanthropic sector, Tempel was the first elected president of the Nonprofit Academic Centers Council, a national association of academic centers and programs that focus on the study of nonprofit organizations, voluntarism and philanthropy. He is a past chair of the national Association of Fundraising Professionals’ Ethics Committee and a member of Independent Sector’s Expert Advisory Panel that created national guidelines for nonprofit governance and ethical behavior. He is president emeritus of the Indiana University Foundation.

About Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy: The Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy is dedicated to improving philanthropy to improve the world by training and empowering students and professionals to be innovators and leaders who create positive and lasting change. The School offers a comprehensive approach to philanthropy—voluntary action for the public good—through its academic, research and international programs and through The Fund Raising School, Lake Institute on Faith & Giving and the Women’s Philanthropy Institute.