IU consortium awards faculty grants for work on ‘Wonder and the Natural World’

The Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics and Society has awarded $51,248 to 11 faculty members from three IU campuses to further their research on the topic of “Wonder and the Natural World.”

This grant funding is the first phase of a two-year thematic initiative sponsored by the consortium on the theme of “Wonder and the Natural World.” The first phase will culminate in a daylong public symposium in May, at which funding recipients, along with invited guests, will present their works in progress.

“We received a truly impressive array of proposals, linking wonder to many facets of human and nonhuman life,” said IU Bloomington religious studies professor and consortium director Lisa Sideris. “The successful proposals reflect on the light and dark dimensions of wonder, as well as wonder’s ethical, emotional, cognitive, pedagogical, aesthetic and religious forms. It will be exciting to see the conversations that emerge from these diverse studies of wonder.”

The goal of the funding is to encourage faculty to engage with the idea of “wonder” in all its forms and in a variety of disciplines. The awardees cut across academic fields, including faculty in religious studies, English, bioethics and anthropology.

Heather Blair, assistant professor in the Department of Religious Studies at IU Bloomington, was awarded funding for her project “Super-Natural: Configuring Childhood Virtue in Contemporary Japanese Picture Books.”

“This project examines representations of the natural world in post-war Japanese children’s literature,” she said, “with a particular emphasis on contemporary picture books designed for children ages 3 to 6. Broadly speaking, it aims to introduce the study of Japanese children’s literature into ongoing conversations about childhood, character education, religion and ethics.”

Richard Gunderman, professor and vice chairman of radiology at the IU School of Medicine, will conduct research titled “Medicine: Wonder-less or Wonderful?” He seeks to explore the disconnect between what is taught at medical school, the dispassionate science of treating injury and disease, and the power of wonder for both the patient and the physician.

“Every time a physician sees a patient,” he said, “there is something awesome in bringing hidden things to light and assisting natural healing processes. Birth, death, illness, regeneration — these are the physician’s daily stock and trade, and they are pregnant with mystery.”

Other awardees and their projects include:

  • James Capshew, IU Bloomington Department of History and Philosophy of Science, “Bristlecone Pine: The Construction and Fate of a Scientific Wonder “
  • Edward E. Curtis IV, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Department of Religious Studies, “Elijah Muhammad’s World of Wonders: Astrophysical Disaster, Genetic Engineering, UFOs, White Apocalypse and Black Resurrection in the Nation of Islam”
  • David Haberman, IU Bloomington Department of Religious Studies, “Anthropomorphism without Anthropocentrism: Ritualized Ways of Enhancing the Experience of Wonder With Natural Phenomena in Devotional Hinduism”
  • Kelly E. Hayes, IUPUI Department of Religious Studies, “Intergalactic Space-Time Travelers: The Enchanted World of Brazil’s Valley of the Dawn”
  • Kelcey Parker, IU South Bend Department of English, “Living Nature: Surrealist Landscapes and Dreamscapes”
  • Phaedra C. Pezzullo, IU Bloomington Department of Communication and Culture, “‘Unprecedented, Unthinkable and Horrific’: Filipino Climate Justice Advocacy and The Sea Around Us”
  • Peter Thuesen, IUPUI Department of Religious Studies, “Wonder in the Whirlwind: Tornadoes as an American Sublime”
  • Michael Muehlenbein, IU Bloomington Department of Anthropology, and Vicky Meretsky, School of Public and Environmental Affairs, “Conservation Values, Personality and Motivations for Conserving Primate Populations”

The symposium, May 22, 2015, will provide a space for grantees to present their in-progress work to colleagues and the public. It will be followed in 2016 by an international conference to explore more deeply discussions of wonder and nature begun at the symposium.

About the Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics and Society

The Indiana University Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics and Society is an interdisciplinary association of scholars, academic programs and research centers from the eight campuses of Indiana University. The consortium’s mandate is to aid in the development of research to better understand religion, ethics, values and spirituality in society. The consortium receives support from the College of Arts and Sciences at IU Bloomington and the Office of the Vice Provost for Research at IU Bloomington, which is dedicated to supporting ongoing faculty research and creative activity, developing new multidisciplinary initiatives and maximizing the potential of faculty to accomplish path-breaking work.

Related Links

Last Lecture Series Call for 2015 Nominations

headerLessons for Life from a Lifetime of Learning

The Last Lecture Series offers the university community the opportunity to hear reflections on life’s lessons and meaning from a current or retired IUPUI colleague of exceptional merit. The featured speaker shares the wisdom he or she has gained through academic pursuits and life experiences; distilling a life of inquiry, reflection, and service into advice for successive generations.

The 2015 Last Lecture is planned for Friday, March 27, 2015 at 2:00 p.m. in the IUPUI Campus Center Theatre. Nominations are now being accepted for the 2015 speaker. All current and retired IUPUI based faculty, administrators, and staff members are eligible for nomination.  All IUPUI faculty, retired faculty, staff and students are invited to submit nominations by midnight on November 23, 2014. Nominators should click on the link below to submit a brief description of the nominee along with a short justification why his or her nominee deserves consideration.

A committee of the IUPUI Senior Academy will consider all nominations and select a pool of candidates by mid-December. In January, selected nominees will be invited to submit a synopsis of their proposed presentation.

Click here to submit your nomination

Click here to view the Call for Nominations

For additional information, contact Academic Affairs by filling out our contact form here.

The Last Lecture Series is sponsored by IUPUI Senior Academy, IUPUI administration, and Indiana University Foundation.

* All times are Eastern Standard Time.

Successful Bowen Scholars program expands to Ivy Tech grads at IUPUI

Bob and Terry Bowen, Bowen Family Foundation

Bob and Terry Bowen, Bowen Family Foundation

A scholarship program with a proven record of high graduation rates among Ivy Tech Community College students is now being offered to eligible Ivy Tech graduates who pursue their bachelor’s degree at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

The IUPUI Bowen Scholars Program is being established to assist African American students who are transitioning to IUPUI in pursuit of a baccalaureate degree after earning an associate degree at Ivy Tech.

Bob and Terry Bowen of the Bowen Family Foundation are funding the new IUPUI scholars program as part of a broader expression of the program model originated at Ivy Tech. University College at IUPUI will administer the new scholarship program and recently selected four students as the first cohort of IUPUI Bowen Scholars.

“My colleagues and I are so grateful for the generosity that Bob and Terry Bowen have demonstrated through (their) gift,” said Kathy E. Johnson, dean of University College. “They have a deep commitment to the transformative potential of education and understand that by giving these scholars an opportunity, they impact individuals’ lives as well as their family members and the surrounding community.”

The Bowen Scholars program at Ivy Tech has fostered incredible success in its students’ academic and life achievements, having provided more than 600 students with various scholarships since 1993.

The Ivy Tech model program strives for high retention and graduation rates through a hands-on approach with students. The graduation rate among Bowen Scholars at Ivy Tech is about 67 percent, compared to 12 to 17 percent among the general Ivy Tech student population.

“The Bowen Family Foundation is excited to expand its scholarship program to IUPUI,” Terry Bowen said. “Not only do our scholars receive much-needed financial help, but they are also part of a wrap-around support system, which has proved very effective. We have seen a significant increase in graduation rates because of this focused support.”

Candidates for the IUPUI Bowen Scholars Program will typically reside in Marion County and will be expected to graduate from IUPUI within three years. Students must meet the minimum 2.0 GPA standard and be engaged in a community service project each year as part of the scholarship program requirements.

Charlie Johnson, director of Scholar Support Programs at IUPUI, will oversee the program and work directly with the scholars to customize the program to address students’ needs.

School of Liberal Arts Summer 2015 Research, Creative Activity , and Scholarship Grants Call for Proposals

imagesPurpose: The SLA Summer Research, Creative Activity, and Scholarship Grant is intended to support primary research, creative activity, and scholarship. Teaching and service activities are not funded through this program.

Amounts and use of funds: The committee expects to award 4-5 grants. The typical award amount is no more than $6,300 for salary and fringe, although proposals for smaller amounts are also welcome. Grants will be made for projects requiring at least one month of full-time research. This does not preclude teaching one class in the summer, though consultation with your department chair or program director is strongly recommended. Funds may be used for salary and benefits, research assistance, travel, and material collection or analysis. Special consideration will be given to career development and funding needs for research. Funds may be used as matches or in combination with other research grants. Applications for new projects are encouraged.

Please note: If you request salary, you must also include fringe benefits in your budget. You may request no more than $5,000 in salary. If you take your salary in June, the fringe rate is 25.31%, for total salary and fringe of $6,265.50. If you take your salary in July, the fringe rate is estimated to be 26.06%, for total salary and fringe of $6,303. The actual award amount for July summer salary will be adjusted when 2015-2016 fringe benefit rates are announced in Spring 2015.

Eligibility:

Tenured and tenure-track faculty in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI who did not receive a SLA Summer Research grant last year. IUPUC faculty are not eligible

Deadline: November 24 (SLA Internal Deadline November 17), 5 p.m.

SLA Summer Research, Creative Activity, and Scholarship Grants

New Frontiers Exploratory Travel Fellowships Applications Available Now

imagesIndiana University New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities
Indiana University is pleased to announce the 2014-2015 New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities seed funding program. The objective of this opportunity is to help Indiana University faculty members by supporting the initial stages of path-breaking and transformative programs of scholarly investigation or creative activity.

Exploratory Travel Fellowship funding up to $3,000 is available to support national and international travel for scholars and researchers pursuing new and innovative research or artistic projects in the arts and humanities. The grants will allow travel to museums, libraries, laboratories, art galleries, and cultural sites; travel and participation in conferences, workshops, symposia, and performances; and visits to collaborators. Exploratory travel fellowships prioritize travel that is a crucial element of new projects which are themselves potentially significant to the larger scholarly or creative community.

Travel to present or support work that is already well advanced is not eligible for support; travel to give short conference presentations of exploratory work, or to participate in conferences that have limited impact in the field have low priority for New Frontiers. Because overall New Frontiers funding is limited, multiple fellowships for the same project are not possible, and funding is not available for projects that have already been supported through other New Frontiers programs. For the same reason, faculty members are limited to one Exploratory Travel Fellowship award every 18 months (calculated from the submission deadline of the most recent award).

Deadline: December 15 (SLA Internal Deadline December 8), 5 pm

Guidelines

Wein Artist Prize of $50,000 goes to Herron alumnus Samuel Levi Jones

Samuel Levi Jones  image by Tressa Pack

Samuel Levi Jones
image by Tressa Pack

“Sam Jones (B.F.A. ’09 in Photography) is an artist with a dream,” said Professor Linda Adele Goodine, who teaches photography and intermedia at Herron. “He has followed his vision to graduate school and now, the larger art stage. It’s an infinite plan to create and bring wonder and curiosity to the public by making art that begs us to look at who we are and where we come from.”

Goodine’s assessment was not lost on those who bestow the Joyce Alexander Wein Artist Prize, which for nine years has been awarded to an African-American artist “who demonstrates great innovation, promise and creativity.” George Wein created the $50,000 prize in memory of his wife. It is given each year by the Studio Museum in Harlem. The prize was announced on October 27.

“I remember Sam Jones vividly,” said Professor Jean Robertson. “He was a student in several of my art history classes, and a complete pleasure in every way. He was always engaged in class and eager to learn and discuss. He was particularly interested in documentary photography that shone a light on the situation of impoverished and disadvantaged people. Sam has a strong sense of social justice, and wanted to use his art to make a difference in the world. Clearly he was a young man who was going to be a success, given his dedication and commitment.”

As for Jones, he said he was at home in the San Francisco Bay area when he got the fateful phone call. “I was really surprised. I never imagined getting this award.” His website describes his art making as “…an attempt to address identity within the modern world upon the existence of exclusion.” He describes his first class in photography as a life changing experience even though his work has evolved into additional mediums.

Work by Jones will be featured in Black White Thread, a solo exhibition opening on November 8 at Papillon in Los Angeles.

Call for Nominations: Max Planck Research Award

Alexander von Humboldt Foundation

Alexander von Humboldt Foundation

Excellent scientists and scholars of all nationalities who are expected to continue producing outstanding academic achievements in international collaboration – not least with the assistance of this award – are eligible to be nominated for the Max Planck Research Award.

On an annually-alternating basis, the call for nominations addresses areas within the natural and engineering sciences, the life sciences, and the social sciences and humanities.

The Max Planck Research Award 2015 will be conferred in the area of humanities and social sciences in the subject

Religion and Modernity: Secularisation and Social and Religious Pluralism
.
The multidisciplinary field “Religion and Modernity: Secularisation and Social and Religious Pluralism” addresses a range of diverse fundamental, partly interconnected research questions with reference to the development and change of religious thought and practice on their way to modernity and up to the present time. Is the conventional equation between modernity and secularisation a valid one? To what extent is the system of values, which shapes modern culture and society, rooted in the Christian tradition of the Middle Ages or in that of the early modern period (individualism, human rights, the intrinsic value of a secular order in contrast to a spiritual one)? Other questions playing a role within this debate address the adaptability of different religious and confessional communities to the challenges of modernity, as well as the relationship between state/secular authority and church(es) or other religious communities in the recent past and particularly in our present time. Concepts which are important in this area are for example laicism (Laïcité) or “civil religion” or privileging large religious communities. Finally the rise of religious pluralism and the individualisation of religious experience are relevant phenomena for this topic.

Every year, the Humboldt Foundation and the Max Planck Society grant two research awards to one researcher working abroad and one researcher working in Germany. These two awards will be bestowed independently.

The Presidents/Vice Chancellors of universities and the heads of research institutions in Germany are eligible to make nominations (c.f. list of eligible nominators). Direct applications are not accepted. As a rule, each award is endowed with 750,000 EUR and may be used over a period of three to a maximum of five years to fund research chosen by the award winner.

Sponsor deadline: 31 Jan 2015, Nominations

Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung Max Planck Research Award

Collaborative Research Grants (IUCRG) Applications Available Now

imagesIndiana University is pleased to announce the 2014-2015 Collaborative Research Grants program (IUCRG). This opportunity is open to faculty on all Indiana University campuses. The goals of this competition are to facilitate and support outstanding research and cutting edge discoveries by teams of experts who have not worked together previously in the project’s subject matter. Teams should include experts from different campuses, schools, departments, or disciplines. The maximum funding per project will be $75,000.

The intent of this initiative is to support research which will significantly advance a research field and in doing so, impact the lives of Indiana residents, the U.S. and the world. The program as a whole is designed to help increase Indiana University’s competitiveness for external funding involving innovative and transformative research; proposals must therefore include explicit plans for securing external funding for projects extending from the findings of the IUCRG. IUCRG recipients are required to submit a proposal for external funding within 18 months from the date that IUCRG funds are available. Applicants should make explicit their plans for targeting external funding including but not limited to the funding agency, their RFAs, and institute/program.

IUCRG will fund projects in emerging fields of study, innovative or multidisciplinary research with the potential to significantly increase Indiana University’s research competitiveness, reputation and funding. Proposals should fit at least one of the following subject areas:

  1. Social and Behavioral sciences: innovative multidisciplinary or multi-collaborator approaches to issues of local, state, national or international significance; educational research including but not limited to effective approaches to K‐12 STEM education (not curricular development);
  2. Biological and Health Sciences; innovative multidisciplinary or multi-collaborator approaches to issues in neuroscience, -omics, biological, biomedical or chemical sciences;
  3. Physical, Applied, and Computer Sciences: innovative multidisciplinary or multi-collaborator approaches to compelling issues in physical and applied sciences including material sciences, engineering research, or approaches to other areas of research that rely upon innovative uses of technology, engineering, or computer and applied sciences.

All proposals should indicate which category or mix of categories from this list of areas best describes the proposed research. Arts and Humanities proposals that do not fit into these categories should be submitted to Indiana University’s New Frontiers seed funding program.

Eligibility: All faculty and staff whose appointments allow them to submit external proposals are allowed to apply. A minimum of two faculty members from different campuses schools or departments, or different disciplines from the same campus must collaborate as co-principal investigators on the proposed project. Projects must be for NEW areas of research for the investigators, within their areas of expertise, but not a continuation of previous or current research activities. Faculty previously submitting together for external funding (NIH, NSF, DOD, etc.) are not eligible unless the IUCRG proposal represents a new area of research, or a new collaborator(s) is added to enhance the breadth of the proposed research.

Deadlines: December 3, 2014 (SLA Internal Deadline November 26), 5 pm

Terms of Awards: Applicants can request up to $75,000 for one year. Budgets must be justified and consistent with the scope of the proposed project. Applicants must commit to submitting an external funding proposal within 18 months from the start of the award; failure to do so will preclude eligibility for future internal funding programs. Recipients of funding in 2014-15 will participate in an open Workshop in the spring of 2016 where awardees will present project results and detailed plans to secure external funding. Final reports are required at study completion detailing the project’s progress including proposals submitted and funding received. IUCRG support should be acknowledged in all related publications and reports. Award notices are expected to go out no later than February 21 with funds available March 15, 2015.

Request for Proposals (PDF)

Guidelines

International Development Fund (IDF) Applications Now Available

imagesThe IDF grant was developed to enhance the international research and scholarly activity focus of the IUPUI academic mission. Generally, the IDF grant serves as venture capital to stimulate additional funding for international research and scholarly activity, which have strong potential to generate indirect cost recovery from extramural sources.

 

Deadline: November 15 (SLA Internal Deadline November 8) 5 p.m.

ELIGIBILITY

  • Eligibility is limited to principal investigators with full-time faculty appointments within a unit located on the Indianapolis campus.
  • Visiting and associate faculty members and post-doctoral fellows are not eligible.

FUNDING AND PROJECT DURATION

  • Projects will be limited to one (1) year in duration.
  • Faculty salaries will not be funded through this mechanism.
  • Funds will not be granted for a project currently supported by another internal funding mechanism.
  • An investigator may not serve as PI on more than one proposal in a given round, and may apply for only one category.
  • Applications must show strong promise of funding support from outside sources, contributing to the recovery of indirect costs.
  • A letter of support from the applicant’s Chair is required.

CATEGORIES

  • International Research and Scholarly Activity Program Initiation: up to $15,000 to support international research and scholarly activity program initiation efforts, not maintenance of existing international programs. New initiations as well as existing partnerships adding new components will be considered.
  • Small International Research and Scholarly Activity Travel Grant: up to $3,000 for travel necessary to initiate new partnerships activities. Preference given for travel to key international partner institutions.
  • Supplement for Residence at Key Partner Institutions in Support of Research and Scholarly Activity: up to $5,000 generally in the form of a sabbatical or grant supplement to encourage and oversee partnership activities, visits, exchanges, while in residence.
  • School or Department Internationalization: up to $5,000 to a department or school to spend a year developing a comprehensive internationalization plan supporting research and scholarly activity, in collaboration with the Office of International Affairs and the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research.
  • Innovative Use of Technology for Internationalization: up to $5,000 to faculty for making use of interactive video or various web platforms to advance the internationalization of research or the classroom.

Guidelines and Application

Final Report Form

Important Note: Guidelines for most of the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research internal grant programs have changed. The new guidelines must be used for all applications starting this fall including resubmissions.

(deadlines that fall on Saturday or Sunday will be due the following Monday)

 

Herron art professor earns unprecedented $300,000 in prizes at sixth annual ArtPrize competition

Anila Quayyum Agha

Anila Quayyum Agha

Herron School of Art and Design professor Anila Quayyum Agha has won the two top prizes at ArtPrize 2014, earning a record $300,000 in the international art competition held in Grand Rapids, Mich.

Her entry, titled “Intersections,” earned the ArtPrize 2014 Public Vote Grand Prize of $200,000 and split the Juried Grand Prize of $200,000 in a tie with “The Haircraft Project,” by artist Sonya Clark of Richmond, Va.

Agha’s wins mark the first time one entry has won both the ArtPrize grand prize awarded by popular vote and the grand prize awarded by a jury of international art experts. Her total prize is also the highest amount given to one individual in the competition, which awards the world’s largest art prize.

The professor’s unprecedented success was no surprise to Susan Scarafia, a 1983 IU Kelley School of Business graduate who traveled to Grand Rapids to join the thousands of visitors — including Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder — who viewed the entries on display at venues within the three-mile square art district in downtown Grand Rapids.

“I thought Anila would win from my first look at ‘Intersections,’” Scarafia, who has attended the past four ArtPrize competitions, said Sunday in an email interview. “There was buzz about it online. … once I got to the city, ‘Intersections’ was the piece others recommended most when I asked what I should see.

“But the way I knew, really knew, that ‘Intersections’ would win was that I could see that everyone who saw it was so involved with it. They weren’t just passing by or taking a quick picture. They walked into the room, stopped talking, looked up, looked around and kept looking from different angles. It seemed to me that this art really hooked into people.”

The “hooked” included one man who, while viewing “Intersections,” dropped to his knees and surprised his girlfriend with a marriage proposal, according to a news report.

Agha is associate professor of drawing and foundation studies at Herron, the art school on the IUPUI campus.

The professor’s “Intersections,” completed under a 2012-13 New Frontiers Research Grant from Indiana University, is composed of a 6.5-foot laser-cut wooden cube created using Herron’s new computer numeric control router.

When illuminated by the single bulb installed inside, the wooden frieze casts patterns of light and shadows inspired by the geometric patterning of Islamic sacred places as found in the Alhambra Palace in Granada, Spain. During the 19-day ArtPrize exhibit, which ended Sunday, the entry was on display at the Grand Rapids Art Museum.

“This is a wonderful and well-deserved award for Herron professor Anila Agha,” Herron Dean Valerie A. Eickmeier said. “Her prize-winning installation presents a perfect example of how our new digital technology equipment has assisted the creative work of our faculty. Anila teaches drawing, and her artwork is usually made on paper or fabric. This is the first work that she has created with Herron’s new computer numeric control router. Anila’s achievement provides an excellent example for Herron students as well.”

A smaller version of Agha’s winning entry was on view in the Frank and Katrina Basile Gallery at Herron last fall.

ArtPrize 2014, an independent competition open to anyone 18 or older, included 1,536 entries representing 51 countries and 42 U.S. states and territories. Entries were submitted in 2-D, 3-D, time-based and installation categories.

The contest, which drew 400,000 visitors last year, awarded two grand prizes totaling $400,000 and eight awards in the four categories worth a total of $160,000. ArtPrize has a parallel awards structure, with half of the awards decided by public vote cast by mobile devices or online and half by a jury of international art experts.

“Intersections” was chosen for the popular grand prize by the 41,109 registered voters who cast 398,714 votes.

After three days of deliberation over the 20 finalists selected by category jurors, the grand prize jury of Susan Sollins, Leonardo Drew and Katharina Grosse decided to split the $200,000 prize between “Intersections” and “The Haircraft Project.”

“By the end of our adventure here and after much, much discussion, we came to the conclusion that there were two artists of equal caliber and talent who had risen to the top of our list,” Sollins said. “We felt strongly that both artists had to be recognized equally. In short, there was nothing for it but to declare a tie.”

The winners were announced in Hollywood fashion during an ArtPrize Awards ceremony Oct. 10 at the Grand Rapids Civic Theatre. A town hall recap of this year’s competition takes place Wednesday, Oct.15.

Agha’s acceptance speech is included in awards ceremony television coverage posted online.

An after-show interview on Grand Rapids television is also available online.