2014-15 American Council of Learned Societies Fellowship Competitions Now Open

acls-logoACLS is pleased to announce that the 2014-15 ACLS fellowship competitions are now open. ACLS offers fellowship programs that promote the full spectrum of humanities and humanistic social sciences research and support scholars at the advanced graduate student level through all stages of the academic career. Comprehensive information and eligibility criteria for all programs can be found at www.acls.org/programs/comps.

Application deadlines vary by program:

September 24, 2014
ACLS Fellowships (the central program)
ACLS Collaborative Research Fellowships
ACLS Digital Innovation Fellowships
Charles A. Ryskamp Research Fellowships
Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowships for Recently Tenured Scholars

October 1, 2014
Luce/ACLS Predissertation-Summer Travel Grants in China Studies
Luce/ACLS Postdoctoral Fellowships in China Studies
Luce/ACLS Collaborative Reading-Workshop Grants in China Studies
Comparative Perspectives on Chinese Culture and Society (grants for planning meetings, workshops, and conferences)

October 22, 2014
Luce/ACLS Dissertation Fellowships in American Art
Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships
The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Dissertation Fellowships in Buddhist Studies
The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowships in Buddhist Studies
The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Collaborative Research Fellowships in Buddhist Studies

November 1, 2014
African Humanities Program

January 14, 2015
The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Visiting Professorships in Buddhist Studies

March 2015 (date TBA)
ACLS Public Fellows

The American Council of Learned Societies is the leading private institution supporting scholars in the humanities. In the 2013-14 competition year, ACLS awarded over $15 million to nearly 300 scholars worldwide. Recent fellows’ profiles and research abstracts are available at www.acls.org/fellows/new. The 2014-15 season promises to be equally successful!

With best wishes,

Matthew Goldfeder
Director of Fellowship Programs
American Council of Learned Societies
fellowships@acls.org
www.acls.org

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Furniture Design graduate students imagine a new version of Brunswick Billiard’s most iconic pool table

UntitledBrunswick Billiards President Brent Hutton approached Herron School of Art and Design to connect with the talented faculty and students in its Furniture Design Program. The task? To reimagine the Gold Crown pool table for its sixth edition. The Gold Crown is Brunswick’s most iconic table—preferred by the pros and tapped by Hollywood to serve as the centerpiece of such classic movies as The Color of Money and The Hustler.

Through the school’s Basile Center for Art, Design and Public Life, 11 furniture design graduate students got the chance to create a new version. The Basile Center pairs Herron students and faculty with real client projects. Everyone involved gets an education in the process.

Brunswick views pool as a more than a game. Each pool table is a finely crafted piece of furniture, so the pairing was perfect.

Over the years, Hutton’s exposure to Herron as a Bedford, Indiana native and an alumnus of Indiana University has made a favorable impression. He has spent lunches between business meetings in Indianapolis at Herron, looking at student work. “The thing I remembered most is the freshness of the ideas,” he said. “I really did not see that anywhere else, and at the time I was traveling to New York and Chicago.

“The fit for me,” Hutton continued, “was, unlike an industrial design school, this was studio design, and I thought leading edge in terms of art and thinking.” Hutton considered the leap he was about to take working with students. “It was a risk we took,” he said, “but I tell you, it could not have worked out any better.”

Guided by faculty members Cory Robinson, Katie Hudnall and Glen Fuller, a detailed specification provided by Brunswick and their own research, the students had the opportunity to work on a project that would have been an exhilarating and challenging assignment for a seasoned professional—refreshing the Gold Crown’s appeal to a tech culture and a female audience while retaining its iconic brand attributes.

At the end of June, three finalists remained; Sam Ladwig, Shelley Spicuzza and Colin Tury. When the designs were presented to a gathering of Brunswick Billiards’ top retailers, they met with an enthusiastic response. The students will gain more than a hefty notch on their belts; the first place designer wins an award of $2,500, and the two honorable mention designers will walk away with $500 each. A decision about which design goes into production is expected later this summer. We’ll keep Herronline readers updated as this story develops. Click the link below to hear an interview with the finalists produced by James Gray of WFIU radio. http://indianapublicmedia.org/arts/brunswick-billiards-iupui-team/

Gov. Pence recognizes 2014 class of Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellows

389647_w296INDIANAPOLIS — Ten aspiring teachers — including an oil industry engineer and a product development and quality control officer from the manufactured housing industry — will enroll at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis as members of the 2014 class of Woodrow Wilson Indiana Teaching Fellows.

Now in its sixth year at IUPUI, the Woodrow Wilson program is designed to prepare recent college graduates or working professionals with strong backgrounds in the STEM fields  – science, technology, engineering, and math — to teach in high-need secondary schools.

The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation recently named a class of 45 2014 Indiana fellows. Indiana Gov. Mike Pence recognized the selected fellows June 9 during a Statehouse press conference attended by officials from the foundation, IUPUI and the other participating universities: Ball State University, Purdue University, University of Indianapolis and Valparaiso University.

“Attracting talent in science, technology, engineering and math to the teaching field will help our students better understand and be successful in these fields, which are so important to our state’s future success,” Pence said.

The Woodrow Wilson program at IUPUI is an interdisciplinary program between the IU School of Education, Purdue School of Science and Purdue School of Engineering and Technology. The IUPUI program offers a residency in which students are paired with a master teacher as a mentor for an full academic year.

“We feel this is the best way to prepare exemplary and experienced teachers for today’s diverse schools,” said Pat Rogan, executive associate dean of the IU School of Education at IUPUI. “Our program has been successful in preparing a total of 66 secondary STEM teachers over the course of five years, and these teachers have secured jobs in high-need schools — primarily in Marion County.

“We continue to attract incredibly talented candidates who want to teach in high-need schools.  Our program prepares them to be successful via in-depth content expertise and leading-edge teaching and learning practices, intensive clinical experiences, strong mentorship and support during their first three years of teaching — all in partnership with our middle and high school partners.”

The teaching fellowship, started in Indiana, is now established in Ohio, Michigan, New Jersey and Georgia. Each Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellow receives $30,000 to complete a specially designed, leading-edge master’s degree program based on a yearlong classroom experience. In return, fellows commit to teach for three years in the Indiana schools that most need strong STEM teachers. Throughout the three-year commitment, fellows receive intensive ongoing support and mentoring.

“At IUPUI, we have designed our Woodrow Wilson STEM teacher preparation program to reflect teaching as a practice-based profession, much like a medical residency,” said Kathy Marrs, director of the IUPUI Woodrow Wilson Program. “Woodrow Wilson fellows at IUPUI complete a master’s degree program that combines a solid academic base, a strong one-year clinical teaching residency in our local urban schools, a three-year new teacher induction experience, and ongoing opportunities such as Project Lead the Way or special education dual certification.”

The IUPUI program is the only Woodrow Wilson Fellowship program in the country that offers dual certification in both STEM and special education certification.

The 10 IUPUI 2014 Woodrow Wilson teaching fellows, listed with previous graduation dates and majors, are:

  • Jonathan Bernardi: Amherst College ’99, Russian
  • Justin Bush, IUPUI ’13, biology
  • William Johnson: Purdue University ’07, mechanical engineering technology
  • Danielle Lord: Albion College ’08, geological sciences; University of New Mexico ’13, M.S., earth and planetary sciences
  • Tamara Markey: Purdue University ’94, industrial engineering
  • Donovan McCubbins: Bellarmine University ’13, chemistry
  • Taylor Mobley: Indiana University Bloomington ’14, chemistry
  • Katherine Russo: Indiana University Bloomington ’12, human biology
  • Daryl Traylor: Eastern Kentucky University ’13, biology; IUPUI ’14, M.S., biology
  • Lauren Wyatt: IUPUI ’13, biology

Library dean’s ‘landmark’ article chosen for College & Research Libraries 75th anniversary issue

205249_w296INDIANAPOLIS — Readers of College & Research Libraries have selected an article written by IUPUI University Library Dean David W. Lewis as one of seven “landmark” articles to be published in a special journal for the association’s 75th anniversary.

Originally published in July 1988, Lewis’ article “Inventing the Electronic University” foreshadowed many of the key technologies, such as the digital collection, that University Library at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and the campus are leveraging today to effectively engage with students and the wider community.

Lewis argued that the rapid evolution of information technology employed in teaching, learning and research presages a “fundamental change” in higher education that will require academic libraries to be less concerned with “the automation of old systems” and more concerned with the “restructuring of institutions.”

“David Lewis’ innovation and leadership have a lasting legacy in IUPUI’s pioneering efforts to integrate information technology across the academic enterprise, especially in University Library,” said Nasser Paydar, executive vice chancellor and chief academic officer. “He is most deserving of this recognition as a national thought-leader and author from College & Research Libraries’ 75-year history.”

Lewis is also Indiana University assistant vice president for digital scholarly communication and as such has responsibility for advancing the university’s  efforts to foster open access to scholarly research by developing new models for scholarly publication that enable scholars, and their collective communities, to re-assert control over rights to scholarship literature.

In March, the editorial board and past editors of College & Research Libraries identified 30 articles from the journal’s history, including Lewis’, as finalists for publication in the special issue scheduled for March 2015. Readers were asked to select six articles from the 30, plus a reader’s choice, for publication.

College & Research Libraries is the official scholarly research journal of the Association of College & Research Libraries, a division of the American Library Association. More than 300 readers voted on the landmark articles. The chosen articles will also be a topic for discussion at the Association of College Research Libraries 2015 Conference in Portland, Ore.

“Reviewing every article published in the journal since 1939 reminded the editorial board of the incredible contributions that our authors have made to research and practice in academic librarianship over the past 75 years, and we are looking forward to reflecting on those contributions and considering what they mean for the future of research in our field with the publication of this special issue in March 2015,” said C&RL Editor Scott Walter of DePaul University.

Located at 755 W. Michigan St. in the heart of the IUPUI campus, University Library is a public library, serving nearly 1 million visitors a year, 10 percent of them community users. University Library supports students and faculty across all of IUPUI’s more than 200 degree programs with research expertise and a wide array of resources. Any resident of Indiana is eligible for an IUPUI University Library card.

IUPUI Africana Studies Program receives award from National Council for Black Studies

385606_w296INDIANAPOLIS — The Africana Studies Program in the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis has received the Mary McLeod Bethune and Carter G. Woodson Award for Outstanding Service in the Promotion of Social Responsibility in Africana Studies from the National Council for Black Studies.

The award was presented at the 38th annual National Council for Black Studies Conference in March in Miami, Fla. IUPUI’s Africana Studies Program served as the local co-host of the council’s 2013 conference, along with IU Bloomington, Notre Dame and Purdue universities.

“This award acknowledges the collective efforts of Africana studies faculty, students and staff who played strategic roles in the local conference planning as well as their active participation in the NCBS conference that was held in Indianapolis last year,” said Bessie House-Soremekun, director of Africana studies and professor of political science and Africana studies. “We are deeply humbled to receive this prestigious award named in honor of two great exemplars of social responsibility, Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune and Dr. Carter G. Woodson.”

The 2013 National Council for Black Studies conference, at the Westin Hotel in downtown Indianapolis, had the second highest attendance in the organization’s history. The conference, which featured more than 400 concurrent sessions, drew on the diverse talents of IUPUI Africana studies faculty, staff and students, as well as members of the Indianapolis community. Professor Monroe Little served as chair of the local arrangements committee, and IUPUI senior Kendrea Williams and graduate assistant Juhanna Rogers provided invaluable service as members of the local arrangements committee.

IUPUI and Indianapolis community members also presented papers and served as volunteers at the conference. House-Soremekun presented a welcome speech at the opening reception at the Madame Walker Theatre Center. Three IUPUI students — Stella Brown, Leon Bates and Gregory Efiom — were inducted into the National Council for Black Studies National Honor Society.

The National Council for Black Studies was founded in 1975 by African American scholars who believed in the importance of providing scholarly information on the historical contributions of Africa and the experiences of African descended people in the African Diaspora. It has emerged as one of the most respected professional organizations in the United States dedicated to engendering an ongoing respect for people of African descent.

IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI recognizes three with alumni awards

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAINDIANAPOLIS — Sheila Gilbert dedicates her life to helping the poor. Charity Counts brings educational opportunities to Indianapolis. Brian Denton puts his statistical skills to work in the medical field.

Their accomplishments are unique, but they are connected by their liberal arts education. And on May 9, Gilbert, Counts and Denton were honored with IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI Alumni Awards.

“Sheila Gilbert, Charity Counts and Brian Denton are three wonderful examples of liberal arts alumni making a difference,” said William Blomquist, dean of the IU School of Liberal Arts. “It’s a joy to recognize their career and community achievements and add them to the rolls of accomplished alumni of the school.”

Each year the Liberal Arts Alumni Association recognizes alumni and friends of the School of Liberal Arts for their achievements and service. The Distinguished Alumni Service Award recognizes outstanding alumni who distinguish themselves either professionally or by giving extraordinary service to the school/university. The Early Career Achievement Award recognizes outstanding accomplishments in a profession or for service to the school/university; graduates within 15 years of degree completion are eligible for this award.

Gilbert received the Liberal Arts Distinguished Alumni Service Award for her work with people in need. Counts and Denton received the Early Career Achievement Award for success in their respective career paths and contributions to their alma mater. The awards were presented as part of the school’s annual celebration of its graduating classes, which took place at the Indianapolis Arts Garden.

Honorees were nominated by faculty, community members and alumni, and selection was made by the Alumni Association Board.

More information about the honorees:

Sheila Gilbert (BA sociology, 1978; MA public and environmental affairs, 1983)

Sheila Gilbert is the national president of the St. Vincent de Paul Society. She is a past president of the society’s Indianapolis Council and currently facilitates its educational program, Changing Lives, a 26-week training and educational program that helps low-income families exit poverty.

She was a St. Mary of the Woods College adjunct faculty member and previously served as director of Project CLASS, a career development and work experience program of Indianapolis Public Schools for more than 800 economically disadvantaged adults.

“She is the unpaid servant leader of an organization that yearly provides more than half a billion dollars’ worth of goods and services to people in need in the United States,” said Robert White, professor and chair of sociology. “I cannot conceive of an alumna who brings more honor to the IU School of Liberal Arts than Sheila Gilbert.”

Charity Counts (MA museum studies, 2008)

Charity Counts is the associate vice president of exhibits at the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. Since receiving her master’s degree, she has been active with the Museum Studies Program as a donor, guest presenter and internship mentor.

While a student, she published the article “Spectacular Design in Museum Exhibitions,” which became a cover story in Curator: The Museum Journal, the top peer-reviewed publication in the field.

“Ms. Counts embodies the spirit and purpose of the liberal arts and brings that knowledge to her everyday work,” said Elizabeth Wood, associate professor and director of museum studies. “Her attention and commitment to intellectual pursuits and leadership in the field indicate the strength of an early and distinguished career.”

Counts is credited for developing strong relationships for the Children’s Museum with content providers such as Lego, National Geographic and Nickelodeon, as well as negotiating exhibitions such as the Terra Cotta Warriors from Xi’an, China.

Brian Denton (BA economics, 2002; BA German/political science, 2003; MA economics, 2005; BS mathematics, 2009)


While working on his master’s degree, Brian Denton discovered a passion for statistics and computer programming. Since then, Denton has used his extensive training to build a career as a statistician.

He spent two years as a statistical research assistant at the prestigious Sloan-Kettering Memorial Cancer Center in New York. While there, he helped develop new techniques to predict and classify genetic mutations and liposarcoma subtypes based on clinical and gene expression data.

“Brian has made impressive strides early in his career,” said Paul Carlin, professor of economics. “He has been and remains a strong supporter of the Department of Economics’ mission.”

Denton currently works as a computational statistician for Eli Lilly and Co, and serves on the Liberal Arts Dean’s Advisory Council.

 

Herron’s first Indiana High School Art Invitational

Juniors from Carmel, Lafayette Jefferson and Lawrence Central high schools produced the top works in Herron’s first annual Indiana High School Art Invitational Exhibition. The prizewinners were announced during the opening reception on March 29. The works were on exhibit through April 17.

Art teachers of high school juniors throughout Indiana were invited to send the best examples of their students’ works for this first-ever, juried exhibition. Herron scholarships of $2,000, $1,000 and $500 went to the first, second and third place students, respectively. The top seven students also earned a scholarship to Honors Art and Design, taught at Herron over the summer. Teachers of the students each received a $200 scholarship toward a teacher’s workshop at Herron. Reception attendees had the opportunity to tour Eskenazi Hall and learn more about Herron’s nationally accredited, top-ranked programs and IUPUI campus life.

“Herron wants high school students to know that there are numerous opportunities for creative individuals pursuing education in art and design that lead to very successful careers,” said Herron’s Dean Valerie Eickmeier. “This invitational is one way to thank teachers and support students who want to follow their passion for art. The three judges, all Herron faculty members, were impressed by the overall quality of the work submitted. I am sure this annual exhibition will grow over time and help many students achieve their college goals.”

2014 Chancellor’s Academic Honors Convocation

The Chancellor’s Academic Honors Convocation is a celebration of the outstanding achievements made by IUPUI faculty and students across all areas of IUPUI’s mission: excellence in teaching and learning; excellence in research, scholarship, and creative activity; excellence in civic engagement; and excellence in diversity, collaboration, and best practices.

This year’s ceremony for the 2013-14 academic year will be held on Friday, April 25, 2014, in the Hine Hall Auditorium on the IUPUI Campus and will begin at 3:00 p.m.

New Frontiers grants in the Arts and Humanities awarded to IU faculty

Thirty-two faculty members from six IU campuses have been awarded grants for their projects in arts and humanities through Indiana University’s 2013-14 New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities program.

In 2014, New Frontiers enters its 10th year of supporting IU faculty in the arts and humanities. Initially funded by the Lilly Endowment Inc. starting in 2004, funding for New Frontiers was continued by IU President Michael A. McRobbie in 2010. The program is overseen and administered by IU’s Office of the Vice President for Research.

Over the past 10 years, the New Frontiers program has awarded funding to more than 680 IU faculty members. In the current round, funded projects include solo art installations, photography exhibitions, electronic music compositions, a book-length manuscript on painting in the 21st century and a symposium on the intersection between intellectual property and the arts.

“We’re very pleased to be able to continue to fund such a rich array of arts and humanities projects,” Vice President for Research Jorge José said. “The New Frontiers program is a unique opportunity for our faculty members, and we are very appreciative of President McRobbie’s commitment to supporting outstanding scholarship and creative activity in the arts and humanities.”

Currently, the New Frontiers program offers three types of grants: major awards of up to $50,000 (New Frontiers); smaller awards of up to $20,000 for workshops, symposia or small conferences (New Currents); and fellowships of up to $3,000 to support faculty travel (Exploratory Travel Fellowships).

The 2013-14 New Frontiers grant recipients are:
New Frontiers Grants
  • Blane De St. Croix, Henry Radford Hope School of Fine Arts, IU Bloomington: “‘Dead Ice’ Production/Exhibition”
  • Jennifer Fleissner, English, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Maladies of the Will: Literature as a Symptomatology of Modernity”
  • Laura Foster, gender studies, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Re-inventing Hoodia: Patent Law, Benefit Sharing and Identity in Southern Africa”
  • John Gibson, Jacobs School of Music, IU Bloomington: “In Flight: a Composition for Chorus and Electronics”
  • Halina Goldberg, Jacobs School of Music, IU Bloomington: “Digital Scholarly Companion to ‘In Mrs. Goldberg’s Kitchen’
  • Jeffrey Hass, Jacobs School of Music, IU Bloomington: “Contemporary Dance-Based Multimedia Work With Original Computer Music”
  • Susan Hyatt, anthropology, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI: “Between the National and the Local: The British Community Development Projects and the Creation of New Knowledge”
  • Herbert Timothy Lovelace, Maurer School of Law, IU Bloomington: “The World Is On Our Side: The Black Freedom Movement and the U.S. Origins of the U.N. Race Convention”
  • Robert Meyer-Lee, English, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, IU South Bend: “Valuing Middle English Literature Across the Divide: Literary Value in Chaucer, Langland, Audelay and Lydgate”
  • Osamu Nakagawa, Henry Radford Hope School of Fine Arts, IU Bloomington: “Memorial: Tracing the Past”
  • Jean Robertson and Craig McDaniel, Herron School of Art and Design, IUPUI: “Rethinking Painting in the 21st Century”
  • Meredith Setser, Herron School of Art and Design, IUPUI: “Agricultura Aesthetics”
  • Erich Holt Stem, music, School of Arts and Letters, IU Southeast: “America By: A Symphony Tour”
  • Eva White, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, IU Kokomo: “Who Is Irish? Roddy Doyle’s Hyphenated Identities”
  • Jeffrey Wolin, Henry Radford Hope School of Fine Arts, and Andrew Lumsdaine, School of Informatics and Computing, IU Bloomington: “The Art of Plenoptics: A Collaboration”
New Currents Grants
  • Konstantin Dierks, history, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Symposium: Globalization of the United States, 1789-1861”
  • Mark David Janis, Maurer School of Law, IU Bloomington: “Intellectual Property and the Performing Arts Symposium”
  • John Kaufman-McKivigan, history, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI: “Frederick Douglass’s The Heroic Slave and the American Revolutionary Tradition: A Scholarly Symposium”
Exploratory Travel Fellowships
  • Julie Belz, English, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI: “Re-conceptualizing Intercultural Communicative Competence”
  • Dennis Bingham, English, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI: “Bob Fosse and the Revisionist Film Musical”
  • Matthew Bradley, political science, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, IU Kokomo: “Politics and Motivating the Next Generation of Public Servants”
  • Alisa Clapp-Intyre, English, IU East: “Reclaiming Children’s Voices: British Children’s Nineteenth-Century Diaries”
  • Melissa Dinverno, Spanish and Portuguese, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Rewriting Lorca: Modernism, Publication, Folklore and (Trans)nationalisms in 1920-1930s Spain”
  • David Dzubay, Jacobs School of Music, IU Bloomington: “New Work for Berlin Piano Percussion”
  • Amit Hagar, history and philosophy of science, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Thou Shalt Not Commute: A Finitist Outlook on Probability in Statistical Physics”
  • Chu He, English, College of Liberal Arts and Science, IU South Bend: “Narrating Trauma in Jennifer Johnston’s ‘O Ananias, Azarias, and Miseal’ and Mary Beckett’s ‘A Belfast Woman’”
  • Elizabeth Lloyd, history and philosophy of science, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Regional Climate Models, ‘Value Added,’ and ‘Model Robustness’”
  • Micheline Nilsen, history, College of Liberal Arts and Science, IU South Bend: “From Turnips to Lawn Chairs: Allotment Gardens in Europe, 1920-1975”
  • Kathleen O’Connell, Herron School of Art and Design, IUPUI: “Illustration Master Class 2014 at Amherst College”
  • Margaret Ryznar, McKinney School of Law, IUPUI: “The Ethics and Philosophy of Child Support as a Human Right”
  • Marietta Simpson, Jacobs School of Music, IU Bloomington: “Mosaic Melodies of the Diaspora”
  • Estella Vieira, Spanish and Portuguese, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Female Figures in Fernando Pessoa”

Susan Sutton study abroad program awardees announced

A Department of World Languages and Cultures faculty member in the IU School of Liberal Arts and an academic advisor in the Kelley School of Business were chosen as the 2014 recipients of the Susan Buck Sutton awards. The IUPUI Office of International Affairs presents the awards to a campus faculty member and a staff member who made significant contributions to study abroad programs at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

Claudia Grossman, a senior lecturer and interim director of the Max Kade German-American Center, and Eric Raider, a Kelley School of Business academic advisor, were presented their awards at the IUPUI International Festival on Feb. 27.

The award is named in honor of Susan Buck Sutton, who was the first associate vice chancellor for international affairs at IUPUI.

Selection of award recipients is based on efforts to promote a campus climate where students are encouraged to study abroad and new programs are developed and supported.

Grossman’s efforts were noted in a nominating letter that said, “It is hard to imagine today’s international landscape at IUPUI were it not for the extraordinary creativity and investment of time and energy that Claudia Grossman has spent over the last two decades on making study abroad a reality for many students and faculty across several schools on this campus.”

A list of Grossman’s accomplishments in the area of study abroad were cited, including study abroad program development, creation and instruction of courses connected with study abroad, program direction, student advising and publications related to study abroad.

Raider’s work to expand the undergraduate study abroad program at the business school was cited, with one nominator saying, “Eric took the reins of the Kelley undergraduate program and has not looked back. It is evident that Eric is passionate about study abroad and has already made a lasting impact on our programs in Kelley.”