Award: $2.1M grant will advance research on women’s and men’s giving, increase understanding of motivations

INDIANAPOLIS — Research about men’s and women’s giving will be accelerated as a IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy Logoresult of a new $2.1 million research grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to the Women’s Philanthropy Institute at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus.

“Increasing and improving philanthropy requires that we continually increase the depth and breadth of knowledge about giving,” said Amir Pasic, the Eugene R. Tempel Dean of the IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. “We thank the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation for their support of this important research, which will provide women and men donors with insights that help them give more effectively and better understand why they give differently.”

The wide-ranging, three-year project will marshal myriad approaches and multiple scholars to address two central areas of research. The first will identify and examine the factors that influence men and women to give more, to give more intentionally and to give more effectively. Researchers will explore the effects of issues such as donor education, household decision-making, life cycle and demographic changes, and technology and newer forms of philanthropy such as crowdfunding. The second area of research will focus on charitable giving to aid women and girls, including who gives, where they give, what factors influence their giving, how to increase giving and how to engage more men and younger women in supporting these causes.

The project will produce a variety of accessible, easy-to-use resources to inform and assist donors, nonprofits and others.

The new project builds on insights developed under an earlier report that identified, among other results, ways that women’s and men’s differing preferences, priorities and financial resources influence couples’ charitable giving. The project also demonstrated that nearly half of all donors make contributions to causes that aid women and girls. Looking at giving by gender, it found that half of women donors and two out of five men donors give to these causes.

“The initial research enabled us to step back and take a comprehensive look at the field of gender and philanthropy, identify the related research that has been conducted to date, and determine the major gaps in the understanding of these issues,” said Debra Mesch, Eileen Lamb O’Gara Chair in Women’s Philanthropy, director of WPI and principal investigator for the project. “This new grant acknowledges that while knowledge about gender and philanthropy has come a long way in a relatively short period, we have barely scratched the surface, and many key research questions remain to be answered.”

The Women’s Philanthropy Institute is in the vanguard of building the body of knowledge on women’s leadership in philanthropy and how women think about and practice their giving. Its Women Give research series and its other studies have revealed important new insights into women’s giving. The knowledge and resources generated by the new grant will leverage and expand upon that foundation.

“Providing research that informs practice is a key tenet of the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy,” said Una Osili, co-principal investigator for the project. “Through this new research, donors at all levels of giving — nonprofit and fundraising professionals, financial and donor advisors, scholars, and others — will gain greater understanding of gender and philanthropy, the capacity of women’s giving, and opportunities to expand the donor base and increase charitable giving.”

About the Women’s Philanthropy Institute

The Women’s Philanthropy Institute is part of the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. WPI increases understanding of women’s philanthropy through rigorous research and education, interpreting and sharing these insights broadly to improve philanthropy. Learn more. Follow us on Twitter and “Like” us on Facebook.

About the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy

The Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy is dedicated to improving philanthropy to improve the world by training and empowering students and professionals to be innovators and leaders who create positive and lasting change. The school offers a comprehensive approach to philanthropy through its academic, research and international programs and through The Fund Raising School, Lake Institute on Faith & Giving, and the Women’s Philanthropy Institute. Follow us on Twitter or “Like” us on Facebook.

Award: School of Informatics and Computing receives $120K grant from Nina Mason Pulliam Charitable Trust

INDIANAPOLIS — The IU School of Informatics and Computing at IUPUI has received a grant totaling $120,000 from the Nina Mason Pulliam Charitable informatics logoTrust.

The grant will help fund Informatics: Diversity-Enhanced Workforce, an innovative, year-round, dual-credit multifaceted information technology program that will benefit approximately 180 students for their four-year career at Arsenal Technical, Pike or Providence Cristo Rey high school in Indianapolis.

The program features mentorship, IT certification training, project-based learning and internships to prepare students for interesting, high-paying, in-demand careers in IT fields.

The grant will be used for the first and second years of the program to:

  • Help pay the salary of a School of Informatics and Computing lecturer to teach learning education modules and train the high school teachers.
  • Help purchase tablets for students to use and keep.
  • Help cover the costs of a professional program evaluator.

Informatics: Diversity-Enhanced Workforce addresses the critical shortage of skilled workers in IT as well as the dramatically low number of blacks, Latinos, women and other underrepresented groups working in the IT sector.

“There are over 1.4 million unfilled jobs in the IT industry, and the number continues to grow,” said Mathew Palakal, executive associate dean of the School of Informatics and Computing. “These jobs are high-paying and available all over the United States. We feel a sense of responsibility to assist with the preparation of the workforce of the future.”

During her career, Nina Mason Pulliam shared her financial success and business-leadership skills with many charities. She was particularly sensitive to human needs, animal welfare and environmental issues. “She had a keen awareness of challenges that face our community and would take great pride in the outstanding work being done by organizations like the IU School of Informatics and Computing,” said Carol Schilling, trustee chair. “Through her trust, we continue to build on her legacy, which clearly reflects her heart for philanthropy.”

The grant to the School of Informatics and Computing represents one of 27 awarded to nonprofit organizations in Indiana by the Nina Mason Pulliam Charitable Trust during the second of two grant cycles this year.

Since the trust began its grant-making in 1998, it has awarded more than $252 million to nonprofit organizations in Indiana and Arizona. As of Sept. 30, the trust had assets of approximately $364 million.

Award: Sociology professor receives national honor for work as an HIV/AIDS activist, survivor

INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis professor Carrie E. Carrie E Foote ImageFoote is among an elite group of individuals being honored as long-term gladiators in the fight against HIV/AIDS.

POZ magazine has named Foote to its “2015 POZ 100” list for her work teaching “countless students how to think about HIV — compassionately and unconventionally — and how to get involved in HIV activism.”

Once a homeless injection-drug user addicted to heroin, Foote, 46, is now a respected sociology scholar and director of graduate studies in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. She was diagnosed with HIV in 1988.

“I am honored,” Foote said of her inclusion on the POZ list. This year’s list celebrates U.S. residents who are long-term survivors of HIV, defined as having been diagnosed in 1995 or earlier, before effective treatment was available.

Nominated for the list by IUPUI students, colleagues and community partners, Foote said she is focused on reducing the stigma associated with having HIV/AIDS.

“The social stigma associated with being HIV-positive is the main barrier to our being able to end this epidemic,” she said.

Foote’s current research includes a project with the Indiana State Department of Health and the CDC regarding the Scott County, Ind., HIV outbreak among injection-drug users.

POZ celebrated its sixth annual “100” list in conjunction with the Nov. 19 New York City debut of a traveling pop-up art installation featuring pictures and testimonials of HIV-positive men and women over 50 years of age. That exhibit, part of a Walgreens-Graying of AIDS project, “Well Beyond HIV,” ran two days at Rogue Space Chelsea gallery in New York.

Foote’s activism will be evident on World AIDS Day 2015 as her sociology class AIDS and Society will host longtime HIV survivor and advocate Sean Strub as a guest campus lecturer. “An Evening with Sean Strub: The Criminalization of HIV” will take place from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 3, in Room 450C at the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd. Author of “Body Counts: A Memoir of Activism, Sex and Survival,” Strub will hold a book-signing immediately following his talk. The event is free and open to the public.

Langsam/Oswalt Lecturer Summer Fellowship for Full-Time Non-Tenure Track Teaching Faculty

The Langsam/Oswalt Faculty Award award supports a summer fellowship for non-tenureiu-logo track, full-time teaching faculty to allow them to take a summer “sabbatical” from teaching to pursue professional development activities. This award is for $6,000, and can be used for summer salary (including required withholdings).

*****NOTE: The timeline on this award application has been moved to December to give departments time to change summer teaching schedules, as necessary.

Application:
Applications may be by individuals or by departments/programs and must detail proposed professional development activity that supports their teaching mission. Activities supported by this award include those that lead to scholarly dissemination of knowledge about teaching, curriculum development projects, and other activities of long-term professional benefit to the teacher and the unit, including related travel and/or conference expenses as well as library and equipment acquisitions. A committee appointed by the Dean of the School of Liberal Arts shall determine the recipient of the Fellowship based on the merit of the proposal.

Eligibility:
Candidates must be non-tenure track, full time teaching faculty of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and have worked in this capacity for a minimum of three years. Visiting faculty are not eligible for this Fellowship. This Fellowship can be received in conjunction with other funding.

Proposal:
Submit the following:

  • A maximum of a three-page proposal detailing the activity and at least one letter of support. The entire proposal may not exceed more than 5 pages.
  • A current CV (does not count in page limit).

Submit all required documents, electronically, to Candice L. Smith, canlsmit@iupui.edu by 5:00 p.m. on Monday, November 23, 2015.

ECA Community College Initiative Program

Limited Submission URL: http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=3612

IU Internal Deadline: 9/30/2015
ECA Application Deadline: 11/16/2015

Brief Description:
The CCI Program provides international participants from underserved and iu-logounderrepresented communities with an intensive academic-year long program at accredited U.S. community colleges, focused on building technical and professional skills while deepening participants’ understanding of the United States.

The CCI Program demonstrates the U.S. commitment to education for all by providing access to educational opportunities to a broad spectrum of international students from underserved and underrepresented communities. By providing quality technical and professional education, community colleges can provide students from developing countries with skills and experiences that will help them to participate constructively in their countries’ development. The Bureau is engaged with the U.S. community college sector to increase the number of international students enrolled at U.S. community colleges and to reinforce efforts to build international ties. International students bring opportunities for global engagement and learning to U.S. classrooms and campuses, encouraging U.S. community college students to study abroad and fostering global awareness and skills development for those U.S. students who may not have the opportunity to study or travel abroad.

Award Amount:
It is the Bureau’s intent to award up to three cooperative agreements (one base year plus two non-competitive continuations) for an estimated three-year total amount of $15,600,000, pending availability of funds. There is no minimum or maximum cost sharing percentage required for this competition. However, the Bureau encourages applicants to provide maximum levels of cost sharing and funding in support of its programs.

Eligibility:
Proposals requesting funding for infrastructure development activities, sometimes referred to as “bricks and mortar support,” are NOT eligible for consideration under this competition and will be declared technically ineligible and will receive no further consideration in the review process.

Limitation: One per Indiana University
Eligible applicants may not submit more than one proposal in this competition.

To apply for IU Internal competition:
For consideration as an institutional nominee, submit the following documents electronically to limited submission, limsub@iu.edu, by September 30, 2015 for internal coordination. To expedite the review process, we request that investigators who intend to submit a proposal send an email 1 week before the internal deadline with the intended investigator names/affiliations and proposal title to limsub@iu.edu with the subject line: L0986 Notice of Intent.

· Project Narrative, not exceeding 2 pages (excluding references and figures)
· A letter of support from Chair or Dean
· Abbreviated CV, not exceeding 3 pages, or a biosketch for the PI

IUPUI applicants must copy Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, on submissions.

The Nancy Weiss Malkiel Junior Faculty Fellowship

THE FELLOWSHIP
The Nancy Weiss Malkiel Fellowship, created on the occasion of Dr. Malkiel’s 40th year of wwservice on the Woodrow Wilson Foundation Board, is designed to support junior faculty as they work towards achieving tenure. Five 12-month awards of $10,000 will be made in the 2015–16 academic year. This one-time Fellowship program will support a small cadre of emerging faculty leaders whose careers promise—like Dr. Malkiel’s—to play a significant role in shaping American higher education. Applicants, who must have passed their third-year review, may be working in any field of the humanities or social sciences. Preference will be given to those addressing topics related to 20th- and 21st-century American history, politics, culture, and society, with emphases including but not limited to African American issues, women’s issues, and/or higher education. Read below for information about eligibility and application requirements.

ABOUT NANCY WEISS MALKIEL
Nancy Weiss Malkiel, a 1965 Woodrow Wilson Fellow, joined the history faculty at Princeton University in 1969—the first woman hired in that department and one of the first three to be appointed to the professorial ranks at the university. She has become known as a leading scholar of civil rights and race relations in early and mid-20th-century America; she is also currently working on a history of coeducation at elite colleges and universities in the United States and the United Kingdom in the period 1969–74. She also served for a record 24 years as Princeton’s Dean of the College, the senior officer responsible for undergraduate education at the university. Dr. Malkiel, who joined the Woodrow Wilson Foundation Board in 1975, epitomizes an all-too-rare blend of uncompromising scholarly production with careful attention to the quality of student life and learning. For more about her career, download the program brochure.

MORE INFORMATION
If you’re interested in applying for the NWM Fellowship, please see the information on the following pages:

Eligibility and Selection

Application Information

The Award

Three IU projects receive $690,000 in latest round of National Endowment for the Humanities funding

INDIANAPOLIS — The National Endowment for the Humanities has awarded $690,000 to unnamedthree Indiana University research and learning projects.

The NEH grants will fund a summer training program for university and college faculty interested in exploring the cultures of African and African diaspora cities; a workshop series on applying digital methods to issues in Native American and Indigenous studies; and the Santayana Edition’s ongoing publication of writings of American philosopher George Santayana.

The three IU projects — two on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus and one at Indiana University Bloomington — are among 212 projects sharing $36.6 million in recent NEH funding.

“The grant projects represent the very best of humanities scholarship and programming,” NEH Chairman William Adams said. “NEH is proud to support programs that illuminate the great ideas and events of our past, broaden access to our nation’s many cultural resources, and open up for us new ways of understanding the world in which we live.”

The IUPUI projects, both housed in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, are:

“The Digital Native American and Indigenous Studies Project,” $249,817 for a series of three workshops on teaching new digital methods and exploring issues of digital cultural heritage in Native American studies, to be directed by IUPUI assistant professor of history Jennifer Guiliano. Yale University, Arizona State University and IUPUI will in turn host a three-day workshop for 35 participants.
“The Works of George Santayana,” directed by associate professor of philosophy Martin Coleman, which involves the preparation for print and digital publication of American philosopher George Santayana’s “Three Philosophical Poets” (Vol. 8), “Winds of Doctrine” (Vol. 9) and “Scepticism and Animal Faith” (Vol. 8) and the beginning of work on “Realm of Being,” (Vol. 16). A three-year grant of $225,000 and $23,623 in matching funds to the Santayana Edition will provide salaries for an editor and graduate student interns who will contribute to the production of the printed and electronic texts.

Indiana University Bloomington received $191,592 for “Arts of Survival: Recasting Lives in African Cities,” a three-week seminar for 25 college and university faculty who will study the arts and culture of Accra, Lagos, Nairobi, New Orleans and Port-au-Prince. The project is led by Eileen Julien, director of IU’s Institute for Advanced Study.

Organizers believe the IUPUI Native American studies project is the first workshop specifically focused on digital humanities that encourages participants in the development of a more systematic approach to integrating digital technologies within and throughout academic institutions, cultural organizations and tribal communities.

“While tremendous work has been done around the preservation and access of analog materials within Native American communities, there has been much less attention paid to the ways in which digital objects, practices and methods function within Native communities and through Native American studies scholarship,” Guiliano said.

The international reputation and broad appeal of Santayana justifies the Santayana Edition’s aim of preserving and disseminating Santayana’s thought in reliable and accurate texts. This will be published as “The Works of George Santayana” so readers can research, evaluate and appreciate Santayana’s role in shaping American letters, Coleman said.

Yasmine K. Kasem wins Outstanding Student Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award

The International Sculpture Center has announced that Yasmine K. Kasem (B.F.A. in sculptureSculpture, ’15) is a recipient of the Outstanding Student Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award for 2015 for her work El Qamesha El Wahida (The Lonely Cloth)

In a letter notifying associate professors of sculpture Eric Nordgulen and Greg Hull, who were Kasem’s faculty nominators, a center representative said there were “an exceptional number of nominees this year; 423 students … .” The nominees came from more than 158 college and university sculpture programs in North America and abroad.

The judges, all from New York, included sculptor Chakaia Booker, Dia Art Foundation Assistant Curator Kelly Kivland, and CUNY Professor of Fine Arts Maki Hajikano. They selected Kasem’s sculpture after deliberating over 952 images of sculptural works, the letter said.

The award includes an exhibition with catalog at Grounds for Sculpture—a sculpture garden on the former New Jersey State Fairgrounds in Trenton. The exhibition will take place October 2015 through March 2016 with an opening reception for honorees and their faculty sponsors on October 24. Sculpture magazine will also feature the awards in its October issue. Kasem’s work will be added to an archive of winners on the International Sculpture Center’s website.

“It’s very good for an undergraduate student to get this award,” said Nordgulen.

Although Kasem joins recipients from Herron including alumni Emily Stergar (B.F.A. in Sculpture, ‘04) and James Darr (B.F.A. in Sculpture, ‘03), they had already graduated from Herron and were nominated by the graduate schools they were attending at the universities of Arizona and Delaware, respectively.

Kasem said her experiences at Herron have been among the best of her life. “The faculty and facilities gave me the guidance and resources I needed to explore and develop. But not only that, I saw that Herron genuinely cares about its students and their ability to succeed. I owe so much of my success to Herron, my professors and peers. I’ve gotten the wonderful opportunity to work alongside so many talented artists and grow with them in the studio as well.”

“I’m truly grateful for being selected for this award,” she said. “If you would have told me four years ago that I would’ve accomplished what I have, I wouldn’t have believed you. I was so insecure about what I was making and how it held up in comparison to my peers. But all of the positive support, honest critiques and conversations I’ve had with friends, faculty and staff at Herron is what motivated me to keep working hard through any obstacle I encountered.”

As she got closer to applying for college, Kasem said, “I realized that I felt much stronger about visual art and that it would be a better fit for me than studying jazz,” as had been her initial intent.

Once she decided on Herron, there was no question she wanted to study sculpture. “Growing up, I always looked for ways to keep myself occupied,” she said, “which usually led me to building something in the back yard, or playing with the leftover clay my mom had from making beads for her jewelry. Kasem loved making something beautiful out of nothing, but “wanted to work with even more materials, so sculpture was the logical choice.”

Kasem has applied for residencies in Egypt and Switzerland and sees her future at an as yet undetermined graduate school. She’s making new work for a group show in the fall.

“Now that I’ve graduated, I haven’t slowed down at all,” she said. “After that, just continuing my process and hoping I can get my message across to as many people as I can” is the plan.

“Career wise, I’d love to teach, and that’s something I’ve discovered more recently. On the other hand, working at the Herron Galleries has really instilled a deep interest in what goes into running a gallery. But beyond all of that, I want to be a successful artist. That’s what I’m working towards and that’s what gets me up in the morning.”

Terence Main is Herron’s 2015 Distinguished Alumnus

Terence Main (B.F.A. ‘76) is the 2015 recipient of the Distinguished Alumni Award. The herron_posterHerron Alumni Association gives the award to recognize outstanding alumni who have brought honor to their alma mater by distinguishing themselves professionally or through extraordinary service to the school and university.
Dean Valerie Eickmeier and Herron Alumni Association President Sara Love will present the award on Wednesday, October 28 at 6:00 p.m. in the Basile Auditorium in Eskenazi Hall.

Immediately following the presentation, Herron Gallery Director Colin Tuis Nesbit will lead a conversation with Main about works from Turning Line, an exhibition of his drawings that is opening in the Basile Gallery. Dean Eickmeier and Mark Rushman, curator of contemporary art at the Indiana State Museum, will join the conversation. A reception will follow.

Main went on from Herron to earn an M.F.A. degree from Cranbrook Academy of Art in 1978. His work is in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum of Fine Arts, the Denver Art Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston and the Indianapolis Museum of Art, among others.

Speaking of Main’s work, art critic Ronny Cohen described him as an “object-maker and sculptor who has been re-mapping the boundaries of design and art since the early 1980s.” The exhibit at Herron will provide insight to the role drawings play “in generating the fresh, bold and intriguing forms of the chairs, benches, tables and lighting structures that Main is known for.”

Main’s work is known around the world. Clodagh Design International commissioned him in 2014 to create Urban Dogs—cast stone, sculptural benches—for Abinginton House on the High Line in New York City. Via the Magen Gallery, Peter Marino commissioned Main to create Five, a cast aluminum bench that graces Dior showrooms from Florence to Shanghai.

Main joins recent recipients of the Distinguished Alumni Award including Steve Mueller (B.F.A. ’76), 2014; Lois Main Templeton (B.F.A. ’81 in Painting), 2013; Garo Antresian (’48 in Fine Arts), 2012; Mike Garber (B.F.A. ’97 in Visual Communications), 2011; David Bowen (B.F.A. ’99 in Sculpture), 2010; Leah Traugott (’46 in Painting), 2009; and Lois Davis (’47 in Painting), 2008.

Essay on Indiana sports legends earns IUPUI student top score in national scholarship contest

INDIANAPOLIS — An Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis journalism student’s first-hand account of the IUPUI dedication celebrating a new recreational facility and 479272_w296honoring local sports legends — the Lockefield Gardens Dust Bowl and Crispus Attucks High School state basketball champions — has earned top honors in a national scholarship contest.

As the top-scoring writer, Elizabeth Cotter, 19, will receive the 2015 Jim Murray Memorial Foundation Judges’ Choice Scholarship Award of $5,000 for her essay showcasing the Dust Bowl, a dirt basketball court once on a spot that is now part of the IUPUI campus. The Dust Bowl became a proving ground for hundreds of young Indianapolis players, including members of the Attucks teams that won Indiana state championships in 1955 and 1956.

Cotter’s 987-word essay received the highest score in the foundation’s annual competition.  More than 30 colleges and universities are affiliated with the Jim Murray Memorial Foundation. Cotter is the first IUPUI student to win a Murray foundation scholarship.

“Elizabeth’s effort took a forgotten piece of campus real estate and brought it back to life,” said Malcolm Moran, director of the National Sports Journalism Center at Indiana University on the IUPUI campus. “She met every deadline, submitted every revision, responded to every suggestion and searched for every detail that would capture the significance of the Dust Bowl and its place in Indiana history.”

The Jim Murray Memorial Foundation perpetuates the legacy of Jim Murray, a Pulitzer Prize-winning sports columnist of the Los Angeles Times who died in 1998. In this year’s contest, students were tasked with writing essays that showcased a person, event or location of historical significance to their respective campuses.

In her winning essay, Cotter writes about “A Championship Tribute,” the April 1 dedication of the IUPUI Campus Recreation Outdoor Facility which included basketball great and Attucks star Oscar Robertson as a guest speaker:

“When I saw this tree over there,” Oscar Robertson said. “I thought, ‘There was where the Dust Bowl was.'” He stood beneath a tent on the (IUPUI) campus on a sunny spring afternoon, pointing to his right toward a tree just beyond a black iron fence …

The tree towers over the three-story, multi-colored tan brick Lockefield Gardens apartment complex a few feet beyond the northeast section of the IUPUI campus known as Lockefield Green, where students have walked to class for years with no idea of what stood there and the powerful meaning that spot holds.

Although she knew about Robertson’s sports legacy, Cotter said she only learned of the Dust Bowl because of the dedication.

“If I didn’t know about it, I figured a lot of other students didn’t know either. To showcase it was very cool,” said Cotter, who attended the dedication ceremony and the panel discussion afterward featuring Robertson and other Attucks alumni.

Cotter, a graduate of Indian River High School in Philadelphia, N.Y., moved with her family to Fort Wayne, Ind., after her father retired from a 20-year-career in the United States Army.

A junior in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, Cotter is majoring in journalism with a sports concentration. She is sports editor for the IUPUI student-run media page, “The Campus Citizen,” and has participated in fantasy leagues following National Football League players since she was 11. Cotter, a summer intern at the CBS affiliate in Fort Wayne, dreams of becoming a sports writer reporting from the sidelines of NFL games.

The Murray foundation scholarship competition started with students from the nation’s top 15 university journalism programs before expanding to its current size. Each year, a panel of professional judges score submitted essays and award $5,000 scholarships to the entrants with the top five scores. This year, six winners were selected because of a tie for fifth place.

“It is such an honor to receive such a prestigious award and be a part of the Jim Murray Memorial Foundation family,” Cotter said. “I cannot thank IUPUI enough for giving me this opportunity.”

The other 2015 scholarship winners are from the University of Kansas, University of Georgia, Penn State University, University of Missouri and Northwestern University. The Murray foundation will hold a celebration for all the winners on Oct. 24 at Santa Anita Racetrack in Arcadia, Calif.