New IUPUI certificate program addresses need for translation professionals

INDIANAPOLIS — The current demand for skilled language translators far outweighs the 480965_w296supply available, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics has indicated that employment of interpreters and translators is projected to grow 46 percent from 2012 to 2022, much faster than the average for all occupations.

A new certificate offered by the Department of World Languages and Cultures in the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will prepare students for these careers. Applications for the new Graduate Certificate in Translation Studies are now being accepted. The post-graduate program begins in fall 2016.

“The new certificate program will help prepare the workforce needed for the numerous requests for the growing limited English proficiency populations in Indiana and in the U.S. by providing quality translations through emerging technologies,” said professor Enrica Ardemagni, director of the Graduate Certificate in Translation Studies.

Globalization of business, law and trade relations and changing U.S. demographics have increased demand for translation skills in many fields, especially educational, medical, legal and technical. Translation studies is the interdisciplinary study of the theory, description and application of translation, interpretation and localization. It is recognized as an academic discipline that includes the application of theory and practice to specific fields of translation.

Academically well-prepared and highly motivated individuals with advanced language proficiency in English and French, German and/or Spanish who are interested in the study of translation are invited to apply for the new IUPUI certificate program. A baccalaureate degree in a language from an accredited institution is required for admission; however, other degrees will be taken into consideration based on completion of prerequisites in preparation for graduate-level study. The application deadline is Feb. 1.

A minimum of 18 credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree is required to complete coursework for the IU Graduate Certificate in Translation Studies, which also includes advanced courses in interpreting (Spanish only). A required internship will give students hands-on practice to ensure command of the lexical precision and detailed understanding of contexts or terminologies as well as a nuanced sense of the purpose of language and its designated audience.

“We are proud to add this new certificate program to our program offerings in the IU School of Liberal Arts,” Dean Thomas J. Davis said. “These students will work with faculty in the Department of World Languages and Cultures as well as in other departments and the community to hone their translation skills, as well as to offer a much-needed service to the growing limited-English-proficiency populations of the state. These future translators will comprise the next generation of professionals who will ensure access to needed services; they will, as well, broaden the scope of research that can be done in several languages through exemplary translated works.”

The graduate certificate will be officially announced on International Translation Day at IUPUI. The event takes place from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Sept. 30 at the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd. Bolivian author Maria Cristina Botelho will make a special presentation and deliver a bilingual reading from her book “Memoria de las Mariposas.”

Summer Youth Program Fund feeds thinking and making at Herron Creativity Camps

At Herron School of Art and Design, if you can think it, you can make it. That holds true for herron_posterthe 147 youths who attended this year’s Summer Creativity Camps.

Camp Cartoon, Camp Tomorrow, Camp Noise and Camp Kinetics each ran for a week in Eskenazi Hall. Students explored, discovered and made things—often with digital technology in the school’s newly established Think It Make It Lab.

“These new camps are what the students are looking for,” said instructor Lauren Saunders (B.A.E., 2015). “Bringing together traditional studio art practices and digital technologies opens up a whole new set of skills for the students. It also takes them out of their comfort zone and results in great brainstorming and exploration.”

Hannah, a 13-year-old camper, tried all of the creativity camps. “I came to camp to learn how to do animation and broaden my experiences,” she said. She described the unfamiliar hand-to-computer processes in Camp Cartoon as really tough at first, but “the more I did it, the easier it got. I feel like I really pushed myself.”

A scholarship made it possible for Hannah to attend. “Scholarships are good,” she said, “because there are a lot of kids who want to come to camp but can’t. That’s too bad because they may not be able to become what they want to be. I feel lucky.”

Thanks to donors including the Summer Youth Program Fund—a collaborative coordinated by the Central Indiana Community Foundation and Lilly Endowment, Inc.—many Marion County youths had something fun to do this summer.

Sisters Nyela, 12, and Mesgana, 13, said their mother was looking for educational camps online when she found Herron. The pair said she was happy to learn that scholarships were available. The girls attended camp for two weeks. They both wanted to thank whoever made the scholarships possible. “It’s neat that two people from the same family got to come to camp,” Nyela said.

This year’s Summer Youth Program Fund partners included Lilly Endowment, Inc., Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation and the Christel DeHaan Family Foundation.

The Lacy Foundation also supported Herron Creativity Camps through its support to Herron’s Community Learning Programs.

Herron’s Community Learning Programs have undoubtedly made a positive mark on the lives of aspiring artists. To learn more about these programs, visit

First physician assistant program class prepares to begin new jobs caring for Hoosiers

INDIANAPOLIS — Thirty-seven students at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis are making history again.479165_w296

Twenty-seven months ago, they were members of the first class of students to begin the Master of Physician Assistant Studies program in the IU School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences.

They will record another first on Friday when they complete the program, created to help fill the need for health care practitioners, particularly for medically undeserved populations and Hoosiers living in rural areas.

“Most of the students already have jobs lined up in various areas of medicine, including surgery, primary care and emergency departments,” said Rebecca Rebman, a physician assistant and director of the physician assistant program. “Some have applied for physician assistant residencies to gain additional education needed to practice in a specialized area.

“Physician assistants are advanced practice providers whose training is modeled after medical students,” she said. They study primary care as well as specialties.

“They are dependent practitioners who work in a collaborative arrangement with a supervising physician, but physician assistants also have a lot of autonomy,” Rebman said. They can see patients on their own, consulting with a physician as needed.

“They are able to assess patients, order diagnostic tests and then develop a treatment plan and write prescriptions,” Rebman said.

During the 27-month program, students take 111 credit hours, compared to the 128 credit hours taken by a typical undergraduate student over four years.

“It’s a demanding program,” Rebman said. “It’s like sprinting through a marathon.”

Rebman said the students have done well in their classes and clinical rotations. More importantly, she said, the program’s health partners — which are among the health organizations hiring the students — feel the same way.

Now a lecturer and academic coordinator in the physician assistant program, Sarah Eli had her first encounter with the students while working as a physician assistant in the Indiana University Health West Hospital emergency department.

She said the emergency department staff was a little nervous when the first student arrived for a clinical rotation. “We hadn’t had a physician assistant student before, and we had no idea of what their preparation might be.”

“The first (IU) student just blew our socks off,” Eli said. “He was great. He knew his content, he was enthusiastic, and he was willing to do everything.

New accelerated degree programs at IUPUI speed students to in-demand, well-paying jobs

INDIANAPOLIS — Students will save thousands of dollars, graduate a year earlier and be informatics logopositioned for in-demand and well-paying jobs thanks to academic career paths being created by the IU School of Informatics and Computing and other schools at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

Beginning with its own programs, including bioinformatics, health informatics, human-computer interaction and media arts and sciences, the informatics school developed accelerated programs that enable students to earn an undergraduate degree and a master’s in five years, instead of six. That move would save Indiana students $7,000 in tuition and fees and save out-of-state residents $18,000.

With a master’s and advanced informatics skills, students in these degree programs will be prepared for jobs paying an average of $71,000.

Similar programs are being developed that will allow students in other IUPUI schools — including health and rehabilitation science, public health, business, public affairs, science, physical education and tourism management, philanthropy and law — to complete undergraduate degrees in their respective schools in four years and then complete an informatics master’s degree in one year.

Informatics is the application of information technology to other fields.

Ph.D. music technology program to be offered at IUPUI

INDIANAPOLIS — The Indiana University Board of Trustees has approved a Ph.D. program thin music technology at the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

One of the principal objectives of the program is to train graduates who will develop and research transformative new technologies in music and the arts, according to Debra S. Burns, associate professor of music therapy and chair of the school’s Department of Music and Arts Technology.

Graduates will also explore the practices of designing, making and managing music technology, developing research methodologies in music technology, and integrating music technology in society and industry.

“The Ph.D. program in music technology addresses the comprehensive nature of the field, whose needs include designing new technological tools and techniques, leadership, business entrepreneurship, interdisciplinary research, and creative activity utilizing new and evolving technologies,” Burns said.

Music technology degree programs have been proliferating throughout the country over the past few years. More recently, it has started to emerge as an academic discipline internationally, Burns said. The Ph.D. program builds on the continuing success of the department’s undergraduate and master’s programs.

In addition to academic positions, graduates will be qualified for employment at a number of performing arts organizations and educational centers, such as Auralex Corp. in Indianapolis; Black Entertainment Television in Washington, D.C.; D’Addario Music Products in Farmingdale, N.Y.; MakeMusic Inc. in Minneapolis; Music for All Inc. in Indianapolis; National Arts Center in Athens, Greece; National Arts Center in Beijing; Ruth Lilly Health Education Center in Indianapolis; Scripps Network Interactive in Nashville, Tenn.; Seoul Arts Center in Seoul, Korea; and Sirius Radio in New York.

“The rise of technologies such as file sharing, portable computing and interactive media have transformed the very nature of how music is both created and experienced,” Burns said. “It is expected that the Ph.D. program will produce academic and professional leaders capable of addressing a rapidly changing environment driven by continual development and integration of technology.”

Free massive open online course to explore public libraries

INDIANAPOLIS — The Department of Library and Information Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will launch on April 6 a massive open online course exploring public libraries.informatics logo

The free, four-week course is open to anyone anywhere, but RSVP required. Persons interested in the course are encouraged to register in advance, but registration will continue after the class begins.

The course will cover four topics, one each week. The topics are: the “Customer Service and the User Experience,” “Youth Librarianship: Best Practices to Serve our Youngest Patrons,” “Technology: Improving Library Services by Managing Technology,” and “Community Engagement,” said Andrea Copeland, an assistant professor in the department. Copeland, who developed the course, will teach the Community Engagement section.

Given the central role of information technology in libraries and the transition of the Master of Library Science to an entirely online program, creating the massive open online course was a natural step for the department, Copeland said. The Department of Library and Information Science is in the IU School of Informatics and Computing.

“Our degree is open to a national audience in a way that it was never before,” she said. “The library community is national and international and I thought this would be a good way to let people know we’re here and what we’re really good at.”

One of the department’s strongest areas is public libraries, Copeland said. “The course is a digital open house where people can, at no cost, and with as much energy as they wish to expend, learn about our program and what’s going on in public libraries.”

An equally important goal is to explore the feasibility of using the online site for the course for professional development of Hoosier librarians.

As of March 31st, 206 people have registered for the course from 20 states and three countries. About half of the people who registered for the course are librarians. The Indiana State Library will award 12 educational credits for the course.

The course will feature instructional video as well as resources to read, explore and view. Participants, have freedom to work at their own pace, will have the option to participate in weekly discussions, take quizzes on the week’s lectures and readings.

Fashion Design course among fall electives

UntitledIn response to many requests from IUPUI students, Herron School of Art and Design is happy to offer “Fashion Design” this fall. The three credit-hour elective will be held on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:00 p.m to 8:30 p.m. in room 261 of Eskenazi Hall.

 Jo Dean Tipton, a fashion and textiles designer, entrepreneur and professional in the fashion industry, will instruct. Tipton has designed costumes for dance, gymnastics and cheerleading, as well as textile prints. She has taught fabric painting in a workshop

in Taos, New Mexico, and worked with textiles as a fine art medium. Tipton just completed her master’s degree Apparel Design from Ball State University. She studied as an undergraduate at the Fashion Institute of Technology and Purdue University. Most recently,

she exhibited last April in the group show Shaping Visions in the Cultural Arts Gallery in IUPUI’s Campus Center.

The course will explore design principles that are the foundation of creating marketable ideas and designs for the fashion industry.  Students will learn how designs are transformed into products, apply design principles and elements to solve design problems and communicate creative concepts effectively. Students will also produce technically accurate and aesthetically pleasing designs that communicate their ideas visually, investigate and select resources to support the design and solve a given problem independently.

 Enrollment is limited to the first 18 students.

HER-E 220  EXPLORING ART (3 CR)  32809
Variable Title course: FASHION DESIGN
Tuesdays and Thursdays 6:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Herron School of Art and Design room 261

For questions, please contact Anita Giddings by email or by phone at (317)278-9492

Summer course takes students into the world of Parisian Impressionism


Paul Signac (French, 1863 to 1935), Opus 217. Against the Enamel of a Background Rhythmic with Beats and Angles, Tones and Tints, Portrait of M. Felix Fénéon in 1890, 1890-1891, oil on canvas, 29 x 36-1/2 in. Fractional gift of a private collector, The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Digital image © The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by SCALA/Art Resource, NY. | PHOTO COURTESY INDIANAPOLIS MUSEUM OF ART

A summer II session history course in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI will take students out of the classroom and into the Indianapolis Museum of Art to study firsthand the impact urban Paris played on Impressionist artists and the artists’ role in Parisian society.

Cultural History of Modern France-Impressionism begins Tuesday, July 1, and runs through Thursday, Aug. 7. The class meets Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 6 to 9:15 p.m. and will include visits to the Indianapolis Museum of Art for guided tours of relevant galleries and the print vaults.

“The beauty of the French galleries at the IMA is you can watch French modern art evolve,” course instructor Kevin Robbins said. “By turning your head 90 degrees you can watch four decades of French culture go by.”

The course focuses on the origins and developments of Impressionism as a broad cultural movement based largely in Paris. The class begins with a look at Paris’ development under imperial urban renewal and the development of a leisure economy within the city. From there, the class expands to examine the many artists, patrons, and critics assembled in the Impressionist movement.

Students will examine Impressionist works from artists such as Monet, Degas and Renoir for evidence of how the artists saw and understood the Parisian urban world.

“Students are empowered as detectives,” Robbins said. “It turns every painting into a readable document that needs to be decoded. This makes paintings into a much more accessible, malleable subject matter for history students. You can read the images critically, you can read them using documentary analytical strategies developed in other classes and it makes the course more accessible to many people who don’t have training in art history or art.”

The class does not require any previous background in art or art history study and is open to all IUPUI students and students from other colleges and universities.

Robbins said the course will be beneficial to students with an interest in urban history, modern history and politics.

“This is not a standard art history course,” he said. “This is more about asking relentlessly: ‘Where does Impressionism come from as an urban historical phenomenon and an urban visual phenomenon?’ The emphasis is on how Paris becomes the essential incubator of Impressionisms.”

To help students gain a better grasp of Impressionistic influences, the course will also explore popular cultural events like ballet, opera and music.

“One of the things the Impressionists had in common was they were all passionate devotees of music in one form or another — be it dancehall music, popular song or classical music of the era,” Robbins said. “These were individuals who reveled in all the musical possibilities Paris presented.”

“This really is an intensive tour of all the various expressive art forms of Paris at the time.”

For more information about the course, contact Robbins by email or by phone at 317-274-5819.

Humanities Intensive Teaching and Learning (HILT) Institute

HILT logoRegistration for the Annual Humanities Intensive Learning + Teaching 2014 Conference is now available.

The Keynote Speaker will be Tara McPherson. Tara McPherson is Associate Professor of Critical Studies at the University of Southern California’s School of Cinematic Arts. She is a core faculty member of the IMAP program, USC’s innovative practice based-Ph.D., and also an affiliated faculty member in the American Studies and Ethnicity Department. Her research engages the cultural dimensions of media, including the intersection of gender, race, affect and place. She has a particular interest in digital media. Here, her research focuses on the digital humanities, early software histories, gender, and race, as well as upon the development of new tools and paradigms for digital publishing, learning, and authorship.

Her Reconstructing Dixie: Race, Gender and Nostalgia in the Imagined South (Duke UP: 2003) received the 2004 John G. Cawelti Award for the outstanding book published on American Culture, among other awards. She is co-editor of Hop on Pop: The Politics and Pleasures of Popular Culture (Duke UP: 2003) and editor of Digital Youth, Innovation and the Unexpected, part of the MacArthur Foundation series on Digital Media and Learning (MIT Press, 2008.) Her writing has appeared in numerous journals, including Camera Obscura, The Velvet Light Trap, Discourse, and Screen, and in edited anthologies such as Race and Cyberspace, The New Media Book, The Object Reader, Virtual Publics, The Visual Culture Reader 2.0, and Basketball Jones. The anthology, Interactive Frictions, co-edited with Marsha Kinder, is forthcoming from the University of California Press, and she is currently working on a manuscript examining the digital transformation of the archive as it mutates into the database.

She is the Founding Editor of Vectors, a multimedia peer-reviewed journal affiliated with the Open Humanities Press, and is a founding editor of the MacArthur-supported International Journal of Learning and Media (launched by MIT Press in 2009.) She is a widely sought-out speaker on the digital humanities, digital scholarship, and feminist technology studies. Tara was among the founding organizers of Race in Digital Space, a multi-year project supported by the Annenberg Center for Communication and the Ford and Rockefeller Foundations. She is on the advisory board of the Mellon-funded Scholarly Communications Institute, has frequently served as an AFI juror, is a core board member of HASTAC , and is on the boards of several journals and other organizations. At USC, she co-directs (with Phil Ethington) the new Center for Transformative Scholarship and is a fellow at the Center for Excellence in Teaching. With major support from the Mellon Foundation, she is currently working with colleagues from leading universities and with several academic presses, museums, scholarly societies, and archives to explore new modes of scholarship for visual culture research. She is the lead PI on the new authoring platform, Scalar, and for the Alliance for Networking Visual Culture.

Courses for 2014 include:

Project Development led by Simon Appleford, Clemson University and Jennifer Guiliano, MITH
This course will explore the fundamentals of project planning and design including, but not limited to: formulating appropriate disciplinary questions for digital humanities research, investigating digital humanities tools and resources, structuring your first project, critical path scheduling, understanding roles and responsibilities, risk management, documenting your project work, writing your first grant proposal, budget setting and controls, building the project team, and selecting and implementing project management tools and software. This is an advanced course and, as such, you are expected to have an understanding of the definition of digital humanities. Materials will be covered through lectures, discussions, presentations, and hands-on activities. Participants will get the most of the course if they arrive with at least some sense of a potential digital humanities project that they would like to develop throughout the course.

Introduction to Web Development, Design, and Principles led by Jeremy Boggs, Scholars’ Lab, and Jeri Wierenga, George Mason University
This course introduces students to best practices and techniques for standards-based, accessible web design and development including, but not limited to: Current trends and issues in web design/development; Responsive design for a variety of platforms and devices; HTML, CSS, and JavaScript; Managing code using the Git version control system. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with steps and skills to conceive, design, develop, and publish a web site. Topics will be covered primarily through hands-on activities, with some supplementary lectures and discussions. By the end of the course, students will have a modest web site published on the Web. Prior experience with web design or development could be useful, but is not required.

Humanities Programming led by Wayne Graham, Scholars’ Lab, and Brandon Walsh, University of Virginia
This course focuses on introducing participants to humanities programming through the creation and use of the Ruby on Rails web application framework. This course will introduce programming and design concepts, project management and planning, workflow, as well as the design, implementation, and deployment of a web-based application. Technologies covered in this course will include git, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Ruby, Rails, and relational (and non-relational) data stores. Over the course of the week, we will work through the practical implementation of a developing and deploying a small-scale web application.

Games in the Humanities Classroom led by Anastasia Salter, University of Baltimore
Games can be a great way to add experiential and playful learning to the humanities classroom by integrating learning objectives with game mechanics. We’ll look at three main ways to integrate games into learning objectives: teaching and debriefing existing games, making games for students to play, and building games with your students. Along the way, we’ll discuss what makes an effective learning game and how integrating games can offer a gentle way to learn from failure while offering the opportunity for exploration, collaboration, and the probing of ideas through new lenses. Participants will engage in “critical play” of several examples of humanities board games, text games, and graphical games and learn simple tools for making games in these genres while building simple games. No programming experience is required or assumed.

Large-Scale Text Analysis with R led by Matt Jockers, University of Nebraska
Text collections such as the Google Books have provided scholars in many fields with convenient access to their materials in digital form, but text analysis at the scale of millions or billions of words still requires the use of tools and methods that may initially seem complex or esoteric to researchers in the humanities. Large-Scale Text Analysis with R will provide a practical introduction to a range of text analysis tools and methods. The course will include units on data extraction, stylistic analysis, authorship attribution, genre detection, gender detection, unsupervised clustering, supervised classification, topic modeling, and sentiment analysis. The main computing environment for the course will be R, “the open source programming language and software environment for statistical computing and graphics.” While no programming experience is required, students should have basic computer skills and be familiar with their computer’s file system and comfortable with the command line. The course will cover best practices in data gathering and preparation, as well as addressing some of the theoretical questions that arise when employing a quantitative methodology for the study of literature. Participants will be given a “sample corpus” to use in class exercises, but some class time will be available for independent work and participants are encouraged to bring their own text corpora and research questions so they may apply their newly learned skills to projects of their own.

Network Analysis and Visualization led by Elijah Meeks, Stanford University
This course will cover the principles of network analysis and representation with an emphasis on expressing network structures and measures using information visualization. The tool we’ll be using will be Gephi, which is freely available at, with some time spent on learning how to deploy your network visualization in a dynamic or interactive manner on the web using a variety of frameworks. This course will introduce and explain a variety of traditional network statistics, such as various measures of centrality and clustering, and explain the appropriate use of network statistics to various classes of networks. The workshop will consist of lectures followed by discussion and hands-on activities. If participants can bring a sample of their network data, the activities will usually be applicable to all manner of networks, but a variety of sample network datasets will be available to explore different network phenomena. This workshop will cover traditional social networks, geographic networks, dynamic networks, and n-partite networks and will deal with issues of modeling networks, formatting data, and using information visualization best practices in representation of your network.

Born-Digital Forensics led by Kam Woods, University of North Carolina, and Porter Olsen, MITH
This course will introduce students to the role of digital forensics in the act of preserving, investigating, and curating born-digital culture artifacts. We will explore the technical underpinning and the physical materiality of the digital objects we frequently, in our screen-centric world, mistake as ephemeral. Using open source tools including Linux, The Sleuth Kit, and BitCurator, students will get hands-on training exploring a wide variety of digital media and learning how to look for deleted files, how to search and redact personally identifiable information, and how to produce information-rich metadata about a forensic disk image. In addition to practical skills, students will develop a theoretical understanding of digital storage media–and the forensics disk images produced from them–as objects of study in their own right and the importance of learning to read these objects as richly as we do more traditional texts. There are no essential prerequisite skills for this course; however, a working knowledge of Linux will be a great benefit. Students who have access to their own collection of born-digital materials to work with are encouraged to bring them to the course.

Crowdsourcing Cultural Heritage led by Ben Brumfield, Independent Developer, and Mia Ridge, Ph.D. Candidate, Open University
Successful crowdsourcing projects help organizations connect with audiences who enjoy engaging with their content and tasks, whether transcribing handwritten documents, correcting OCR errors, identifying animals on the Serengeti or folding proteins. Conversely, poorly-designed crowdsourcing projects find it difficult to attract or retain participants. This class will present international case studies of best practice crowdsourcing projects to illustrate the range of tasks that can be crowdsourced, the motivations of participants and the characteristics of well-designed projects. We’ll study crowdsourcing projects from the worlds of citizen science, investigative journalism, genealogy and free culture to look for lessons which might apply to humanities projects. We’ll discuss models for quality control over user-generated projects, explore the cross-overs between traditional in-house volunteer projects internet-enabled crowdsourcing, and look at the numbers behind real-world projects. Finally, the course will give students hands-on experience with several different crowdsourcing platforms for image annotation, manuscript transcription, and OCR correction. Students are encouraged to bring their project ideas and some scanned material for the lab sessions.

Critical Race and Gender in the Digital Humanities led by Jarah Moesh, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Maryland
The methods and tools used and produced by Digital Humanists function as organizing principles that frame how race, gender, sexuality, and ability are embodied and understood within and through projects, code-bases, and communities of practice. The very ‘making’ of tools and projects is an engagement with power and control. Through a critical theoretical exploration of the values in the design and use of these tools and methods, we begin to understand that these methods and practices are structures which are themselves marginalizing, tokenizing, and reductionist. By pairing hands-on learning/making with Critical Race Theory, Queer, and Gender Theories, we will interrogate the structures of the tools themselves while creating our own collaborative practices and methods for ‘doing’ (refracting) DH differently. To accomplish this, each day will focus on one tool or method. Mornings will be a combination of reading-based discussion and experimental structural/tools-based exercises, while afternoon sessions will focus on pulling it all together in collaborative analytical projects. While no prior technical experience is necessary, you will be experimenting with, and creating your own theoretical practice that incorporates key themes in critical race, gender and queer theories with digital humanities methods and tools. Therefore, the key requirement for this course is curiosity and a willingness to explore new ideas in order to fully engage with the materials. Students are also encouraged to bring their own research questions to explore through these theories and practices.

When: August 48, 2014
University of Maryland
Cost: Non-student: $950/ Student: $500

For group discounts, email here
For more information on HILT, visit their website here

IU to offer free Information Visualization MOOC designed to illustrate data

Jan. 10, 2013

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Indiana University’s Katy Börner, the Victor H. Yngve Professor of Information Science at the School of Library and Information Science and an international leader in information visualization, will offer a free massive open online course on the topic beginning Jan. 22.

Börner is curator of the internationally traveled Places & Space: Mapping Science exhibit and author of the Atlas of Science: Visualizing What We Know, published in 2010 by The MIT Press. She specializes in the study of the structure and evolution of scientific disciplines, the analysis and visualization of online activity, and the development of cyberinfrastructures for large-scale scientific collaboration and computation.

The course will run seven weeks from the start date, with a target audience of graduate students able to work three to six hours per week. Anyone interested in generating temporal, geospatial, topical or network analyses and visualizations from either personal or professional data would benefit from the course.

Personal data like bank statements, email activity and friendship networks, or business data like Twitter activity, funding statistics and return-on-investment data, can each provide the information needed to then identify trends, geospatial distributions, topical coverage and previously unrecognized informational links, Börner said.

“The visualization framework I teach and the tools that students will use in the course help answering ‘when,’ ‘where,’ ‘what’ and ‘with whom’ questions,” she said. “The resulting visualizations aim to improve daily decision-making; they are not just eye candy. One goal of the course is to empower a large audience to design insightful visualizations.”

The homepage for the Information Visualization MOOC offers an introductory video, a course schedule, biographies of Börner and the other instructors, and a registration link. Everybody who registers gains free access to the Scholarly Database (26 million paper, patent and grant records) and the Sci2 Tool (100-plus algorithms and tools).

It is one of the first MOOCs offered by IU and the first to offer an opportunity for students to work in teams with actual clients like researchers interested in understanding data patterns and trends, government agencies developing visual interfaces for data holdings, industry representatives looking to maximize return on investment, medical doctors seeking cures, and not-for-profit organizations hoping to communicate impacts and achievements.

“Data mining and visualization skills are best acquired by working on projects that make a difference,” Börner argues. “To be successful, students must care about and understand a client’s needs, become intimately familiar with the data available to address this need, and apply the best algorithms and tools to design effective workflows that render data into insight.”

Information visualization continues to broaden its reach from computer science and human-computer interaction into fields like drug discovery, financial analysis and scientific research. Later this month, Börner will attend the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting in Davos-Klosters, Switzerland, to give a talk titled “Visualizing What We Know” using a 26-foot-wide display wall. She will also speak on the topic “Dangerous Visualizations: Big Data Is Watching You” as part of a panel session on “Reinforcing Critical Infrastructure With Cyber Experts.”

For more information or to speak with Börner, please contact Steve Chaplin, IU Communications, at 812-856-1896 or