IUPUI library collaborates to create digital collection honoring Allison Transmission’s centennial

INDIANAPOLIS — As part of ongoing efforts to preserve and share the history of Allison thTransmission in honor of the manufacturer’s centennial in 2015, Allison and University Library at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis have collaborated in the creation of a new digital collection.

The project, executed by the University Library Center for Digital Scholarship, enables unprecedented access to Allison Transmission’s heritage in a searchable database. The online collection includes newsletters, brochures, advertisements, press releases and selected photographs.

Following current preservation standards for scanning and metadata creation, the Center for Digital Scholarship has created the most comprehensive digital collection of Allison materials available to the public. The project, which began in December 2013 with a pilot collection of 137 digital objects, now includes more than 2,600 items. The selections are from a larger archival collection held by Allison.

Creating digital files allows rare and fragile original items to be preserved and protected. Preservation of the digitized copies is also secure in that high-resolution master files are backed up on multiple servers and protected by University Library for future generations.

The Center for Digital Scholarship works to provide open access to IUPUI scholarship, research data and the cultural heritage of Indiana communities. The center disseminates unique scholarship, data and artifacts created by IUPUI faculty, students, staff and community partners; advocates for both the rights of authors, and the public’s fair use and open access to information and publications; implements best practices for the creation, description, preservation, sharing and reuse of digital collections; and provides digital scholarship consultations and literacy services.

About Allison Transmission

Allison Transmission is the world’s largest manufacturer of fully automatic transmissions for medium- and heavy-duty commercial vehicles and is a leading manufacturer of hybrid-propulsion systems for city buses. Allison transmissions are used in a variety of applications including refuse, construction, fire, distribution, bus, motorhomes, defense and energy. Founded in 1915 by James A. Allison, the company is headquartered in Indianapolis with additional manufacturing facilities in Hungary and India.

About IUPUI University Library

Serving nearly 1 million visitors a year, 10 percent of them community users, the University Library at IUPUI supports students and faculty across all of IUPUI’s more than 200 degree programs with research expertise and a wide array of resources. Resources include signature collections like the Joseph and Matthew Payton Philanthropic Studies Library, the Ruth Lilly Special Collections & Archives and the Herron Art Library, plus over 60 digital collections.

IUPUI Honors Scholars to showcase research, service-learning accomplishments

INDIANAPOLIS — Student pursuits in undergraduate research, international study and honorsservice learning will take the spotlight next week during Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis’ annual presentation of accomplishments of high-ability students.

The Fifth Annual Honors College Student Showcase takes place from 3 to 5 p.m. Thursday, April 23, in the lower lobby of the IUPUI University Library, 755 W. Michigan St. The event is free and open to the public.

“The Honors College Showcase is one of my favorite events for the college,” said Honors College Dean Jane Luzar. “It not only demonstrates the range of activities our scholars pursue but also the passion and excellence our students devote to these efforts.”

Morgan Moran is among the 26 IUPUI Honors Scholars who, using posters, live performances, media and other creative presentations, will showcase their recent accomplishments in the areas of research, art, design, visual communication, business solutions, service learning and community engagement and international experiences.

Moran, a psychology major, spent a week doing crafts and other activities with children in an orphanage in Costa Rica. She has captured the excitement of that life-changing service-learning experience in a short video that she’ll present at the showcase.

The spring break trip to Costa Rica was a confidence-builder for Moran who, in addition to maintaining a rigorous academic schedule, spends three hours per week working with children at Riley Hospital for Children at IU Health, volunteering 300 hours of service since her freshman year at IUPUI.

She looks forward to sharing video footage and still photographs from her international experience.

Moran and other students say Honors College projects and programming have allowed them to build relationships with people from different walks of life, have provided funds and opportunities for study abroad, and have increased their campus engagement.

Showcase presenters include:

Dorothy Slover, art education sophomore, who will display a collection of books, drawings, paintings and other original art. Most of her work has been independent art exploration. But when she begins her student teaching in the fall, she will build lesson plans around her creations, starting with art books like the ones in her showcase presentation.
Jeffery Joll, biomedical engineering junior, who has spent two years studying bone biology in an IU School of Medicine lab, first as an intern and now as a part-time research assistant. He will present a poster display of research that in the long term could lead to more successful therapy for people with brittle bone disease or osteoarthritis.

IUPUI University Library to cohost Digital Public Library of America’s national conference

With 90-plus digitized collections of unique and historically important materials accessible to any user via the Web, the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis University Library is gaining recognition as a national leader in digital scholarship.image courtesy of fotos.starmedia.com

That leadership role will expand this month as the library co-hosts the Digital Public Library of America’s national conference.

The conference, DPLAfest 2015 takes place April 17 and 18 in Indianapolis.

As co-hosts, IUPUI University Library, the Indianapolis Public Library, the Indiana State Library and the Indiana Historical Society are helping to organize and staff the event and will serve as meeting sites for conference workshops, presentations and discussions. The four local groups had submitted a proposal to host the conference, which 300 people from across the country are currently registered to attend.

“We are excited to be given the opportunity to share the city of Indianapolis with members of the Digital Public Library of America and showcase some of the work that we have done in preserving the history of Indianapolis,” said Jennifer A. Johnson, digital scholarship outreach librarian in the University Library Center for Digital Scholarship.

With its community partners, the IUPUI University Library has created over 90 digital collections, covering topics in local history such as Crispus Attucks High School, poet James Whitcomb Riley and Indiana artists.

The Digital Public Library of America offers open online access to almost 9 million items through partnerships with national-caliber content providers such as the HathiTrust and the Library of Congress, plus a network of member archives, museums, cultural heritage centers and libraries such as the IUPUI University Library, all of whom operate under state-based DPLA service hubs. As such, the two-year-old DPLA is a goldmine for researchers around the globe, making the riches of America’s libraries and museums freely available online to the worldwide public.

“For example, a basketball fan in Texas could view Oscar Robertson’s high school scrapbook about the 1954-55 Crispus Attucks state championship team by searching the Crispus Attucks Museum digital collection,” Johnson said.

The DPLAfest conference offers a mix of interactive workshops and hands-on activities, as well as presentations and discussions for a range of professionals including librarians, archivists, museum staff, developers, technologists, publishers and authors, teachers, students and others.

While the conference will feature several national speakers, the IUPUI and Bloomington campuses will be represented in a wide range of presentations.  Presenters include:

David Lewis, Kristi Palmer and Jenny Johnson, IUPUI University Library.

Andrea Copeland, IUPUI School of Informatics and Computing.

Jason Kelly, IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute.

Lea Shaver, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law.

Benjamin Keele, Ruth Lilly Law Library.

Robert McDonald, Indiana University associate dean for library technologies.

Dirk Herr-Hoyman, Indiana University Bloomington, HathiTrust Research Center operations manager.

Free massive open online course to explore public libraries

INDIANAPOLIS — The Department of Library and Information Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will launch on April 6 a massive open online course exploring public libraries.informatics logo

The free, four-week course is open to anyone anywhere, but RSVP required. Persons interested in the course are encouraged to register in advance, but registration will continue after the class begins.

The course will cover four topics, one each week. The topics are: the “Customer Service and the User Experience,” “Youth Librarianship: Best Practices to Serve our Youngest Patrons,” “Technology: Improving Library Services by Managing Technology,” and “Community Engagement,” said Andrea Copeland, an assistant professor in the department. Copeland, who developed the course, will teach the Community Engagement section.

Given the central role of information technology in libraries and the transition of the Master of Library Science to an entirely online program, creating the massive open online course was a natural step for the department, Copeland said. The Department of Library and Information Science is in the IU School of Informatics and Computing.

“Our degree is open to a national audience in a way that it was never before,” she said. “The library community is national and international and I thought this would be a good way to let people know we’re here and what we’re really good at.”

One of the department’s strongest areas is public libraries, Copeland said. “The course is a digital open house where people can, at no cost, and with as much energy as they wish to expend, learn about our program and what’s going on in public libraries.”

An equally important goal is to explore the feasibility of using the online site for the course for professional development of Hoosier librarians.

As of March 31st, 206 people have registered for the course from 20 states and three countries. About half of the people who registered for the course are librarians. The Indiana State Library will award 12 educational credits for the course.

The course will feature instructional video as well as resources to read, explore and view. Participants, have freedom to work at their own pace, will have the option to participate in weekly discussions, take quizzes on the week’s lectures and readings.

Digital Humanities Workshop: Caitlin Pollock, “Introduction to TEI”

February 11, 2015 | 12:00-2:30
Location: IUPUI University Library, Room 2120
Free tickets available below

Co-sponsored by the IUPUI Library Center for Digital Scholarship

The Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) sets the standards for text-encoding, born-digital editing, and digital humanities projects. It is the preferred format for granting agencies such as the National Endowment for the Humanities. TEI’s guidelines (TEI) define an XML format for textual materials represented in a digital form.

This workshop provides attendees with a hands-on introduction to basic text encoding with TEI. It assumes attendees have some basic knowledge of XML or other markup languages.

Award-winning poets and novelist headline Fall 2014 Reiberg Reading Series

INDIANAPOLIS — The Fall 2014 Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis features poets Marcus Wicker and Marianne Boruch and novelist Randa Jarrar.

The Department of English in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI is the series sponsor. All events, which take place at various locations on the IUPUI campus, are free and open to the public.

MarcusWicker

Marcus Wicker

The series kicks off with poet Marcus Wicker at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 9 in the IUPUI University Library Lilly Auditorium, 755 W. Michigan St. This event is co-sponsored by the O­ffice for Academic Affairs at IUPUI.

D.A. Powell selected Wicker’s poetry collection, “Maybe the Saddest Thing” (Harper Perennial), for the National Poetry Series. Wicker received a 2011 Ruth Lilly Fellowship and his work has appeared in American Poetry Review and many other magazines. Wicker is an assistant professor of English at the University of Southern Indiana.

Wicker served as the final judge for the 2014 IUPUI Poetry Contest. Contest winners and finalists will share their original poems in an awards ceremony preceding the Wicker reading.

MarianneBoruch

Marianne Boruch

Poet Marianne Boruch will read her work at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 30 in the Emerson Hall Anatomy Lecture Hall, 545 Barnhill Drive. This event is co-sponsored by the IU School of Medicine, the Medical Humanities and Health Studies Program in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, and the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute.

Boruch is the author of the recently published poetry collection, “Cadaver, Speak,” along with eight other books of poetry. Her poetry has been anthologized in the 1997 and 2009 editions of “The Best American Poetry.” Boruch, a Fulbright visiting professor at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, in 2012, currently teaches creative writing at Purdue University.

RandaJarrar

Randa Jarrar

Novelist Randa Jarrar will conclude the fall series with a reading at 7 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 17, at the Herron School of Art & Design Basile Auditorium, 735 W. New York St. This reading is part of the Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here Symposium and is co-sponsored by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute in collaboration with the IUPUI Library. This event is free but registration is required.

Jarrar is an award-winning novelist, short story writer, essayist, and translator. She grew up in Kuwait and Egypt, and moved to the United States after the first Gulf War. Her novel, “A Map of Home,” was published in half a dozen languages and won a Hopwood Award, an Arab-American Book Award, and was named one of the best novels of 2008 by the Barnes and Noble Review. In 2010 Jarrar was named one of the most gifted writers of Arab origin under the age of 40.

The Rufus & Louise Reiberg Series was founded in 1997 in honor of former IUPUI Department of English chair and Professor Emeritus Rufus Reiberg and his wife, Louise. The series is made possible by the generous support of the Reiberg Family; the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute; the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research; the Office of Academic Affairs; University College; and University Library.

Visitor parking for the readings is available in the North Street Garage, 819 W. North St.; the Vermont Street Garage, 1004 W. Vermont St.; and the Sports Complex Garage, 875 W. New York St.

For additional information, contact Terry Kirts at tkirts@iupui.edu or 317-274-8929 or visit http://liberalarts.iupui.edu/reiberg. Facebook user can “like” the series’ page at The Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series @ IUPUI.

Randa Jarrar, Award-Winning Novelist, Coming to IUPUI

A Map of HomeAs part of the Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here Symposium, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute in collaboration with the IUPUI Library and the Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series invites you to join us on the evening of November 17 for a presentation by Randa Jarrar.

Time: 7:00-8:30 pm
Date: November 17, 2014
Location: Basile Auditorium, Eskenazi Hall (Herron School of Art and Design)
Tickets are free, but registration is required.

Randa Jarrar is an award-winning novelist, short story writer, essayist, and translator. In 2010, a collaborative project between the Hay Festival, Beirut UNESCO’s World Book Capital 2009 celebrations, Banipal magazine and the British Council recognized her as a member of the Beirut39 — 39 of the world’s most promising Arab writers under the age of 39.

Jarrar grew up in Kuwait and Egypt, and moved to the US after the first Gulf War.  Her first novel, A Map of Home, has been published in half a dozen languages and won a Hopwood Award, an Arab-American Book Award, and was named one of the best novels of 2008 by the Barnes and Noble Review.

Her work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The Utne Reader, Salon.com, Guernica, The Rumpus, The Oxford American, Ploughshares, Five Chapters, and others. She has received fellowships from the Civitella Ranieri Foundation, Hedgebrook, Caravansarai, and Eastern Frontier.

About Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here at IUPUI

On March 5, 2007, in the middle of the Iraq war, a car bomb killed dozens and injured over a hundred people.  It also devastated al-Mutanabbi Street, a busy avenue of cafés and bookstores that had served as a meeting place for generations of writers and thinkers.  In response to the attack, San Francisco bookseller Beau Beausoleil rallied a community of international artists and writers to produce “Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here,” a collection of letterpress-printed broadsides (poster-like works on paper), artists’ books (unique works of art in book form) and an anthology of writing focused on expressing solidarity with Iraqi booksellers, writers and readers.

“Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here” includes 260 artists’ books; a publication titled “Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here: Poets and Writers Respond to the March 5, 2007, Bombing of Baghdad’s ‘Street of the Booksellers,'” plus 130 broadsides — one for every person killed or injured in the bombing.  Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will serve as one of only three repositories in the world to hold the complete collection.  It will also sponsor three biennial conferences to explore the themes and implications of the collection through papers, panels, posters and presentations with international scholars, artists and writers from a range of disciplines.

 

Library dean’s ‘landmark’ article chosen for College & Research Libraries 75th anniversary issue

205249_w296Readers of College & Research Libraries have selected an article written by IUPUI University Library Dean David W. Lewis as one of seven “landmark” articles to be published in a special journal for the association’s 75th anniversary.

Originally published in July 1988, Lewis’ article “Inventing the Electronic University” foreshadowed many of the key technologies, such as the digital collection, that University Library at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and the campus are leveraging today to effectively engage with students and the wider community.

Lewis argued that the rapid evolution of information technology employed in teaching, learning and research presages a “fundamental change” in higher education that will require academic libraries to be less concerned with “the automation of old systems” and more concerned with the “restructuring of institutions.”

“David Lewis’ innovation and leadership have a lasting legacy in IUPUI’s pioneering efforts to integrate information technology across the academic enterprise, especially in University Library,” said Nasser Paydar, executive vice chancellor and chief academic officer. “He is most deserving of this recognition as a national thought-leader and author from College & Research Libraries’ 75-year history.”

Lewis is also Indiana University assistant vice president for digital scholarly communication and as such has responsibility for advancing the university’s  efforts to foster open access to scholarly research by developing new models for scholarly publication that enable scholars, and their collective communities, to re-assert control over rights to scholarship literature.

In March, the editorial board and past editors of College & Research Libraries identified 30 articles from the journal’s history, including Lewis’, as finalists for publication in the special issue scheduled for March 2015. Readers were asked to select six articles from the 30, plus a reader’s choice, for publication.

College & Research Libraries is the official scholarly research journal of the Association of College & Research Libraries, a division of the American Library Association. More than 300 readers voted on the landmark articles. The chosen articles will also be a topic for discussion at the Association of College Research Libraries 2015 Conference in Portland, Ore.

“Reviewing every article published in the journal since 1939 reminded the editorial board of the incredible contributions that our authors have made to research and practice in academic librarianship over the past 75 years, and we are looking forward to reflecting on those contributions and considering what they mean for the future of research in our field with the publication of this special issue in March 2015,” said C&RL Editor Scott Walter of DePaul University.

Located at 755 W. Michigan St. in the heart of the IUPUI campus, University Library is a public library, serving nearly 1 million visitors a year, 10 percent of them community users. University Library supports students and faculty across all of IUPUI’s more than 200 degree programs with research expertise and a wide array of resources. Any resident of Indiana is eligible for an IUPUI University Library card.

Al-Mutanabbi Street Project

al-mutanabbi streetThe Herron Art Library—a full-service branch of the University Library—has recently been selected to house a unique collection of artists’ books.

On March 5th 2007, in the middle of the Iraq war, a car bomb exploded in Baghdad, destroying a busy avenue of cafés and bookstores that had served as a meeting place for generations of middle-eastern writers and thinkers. In response to the attack, a San Francisco bookseller, Beau Beausoleil, rallied a community of international artists and writers to produce a collection of letterpress-printed broadsides (poster-like works on paper), artists’ books (unique works of art in book form), and an anthology of writing, all focused on expressing solidarity with Iraqi booksellers, writers and readers. The coalition calls itself Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here.

The coalition has agreed to donate a complete run of the Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here collection to the Herron Art Library. Valued at over $250,000, the Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here collection includes 260 artists’ books; a publication entitled Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here: Poets and Writers Respond to the March 5th, 2007, Bombing of Baghdad’s “Street of the Booksellers”, plus 130 broadsides—one for every person killed or injured in the bombing of al-Mutanabbi Street. The Herron Art Library will be one of only three libraries worldwide to be a permanent home to the collection, and the only library in the U.S.

Along with the collection, the library is hosting a conference this fall on the IUPUI campus and a show featuring some of the collection in August at the Harrison Center for the Arts. For more information on the collection, please go to this website.

The Center for Digital Scholarship: Preserving the past and preparing for the future

UntitledThe online, digital environment is changing the way scholars communicate, access scholarly resources, and share the products of their research. In recent years, the University Library’s program of digital scholarship has grown so much that we were prompted to formalize our efforts by creating the IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship.

The Center for Digital Scholarship can help faculty, staff, and students navigate this fast-changing environment. The Center will enable faculty to share articles, data, images, learning objects, posters, presentations and working papers with students. In addition, it can be used as a means of engaging students in primary research and knowledge creation.

Much like the library itself, the Center will benefit community members as well as IUPUI faculty, staff and students. The Center functions as an important bridge through which we co-create collections with community organizations, providing access and preserving the stories of many of Central Indiana’s leading cultural institutions.

Engagement with the Indianapolis and Indiana community is one of the core principles of IUPUI, and a significant point in the current draft of the IUPUI Strategic Plan. While the library has been engaging with the community through digital collection creation for over 12 years (the majority of our historical digital collections are physically owned by other cultural heritage institutions, including libraries, historical societies, and community organizations), the Center offers an additional connection to our community partners.

We have the technology and expertise to digitize and provide access to historic collections that would otherwise be accessible only to those able to visit the cultural heritage institutions. We are making Indianapolis history visible to the world. We are also creating trusting relationships in the community that have proved fruitful for ventures outside of digitization.

The Center for Digital Scholarship represents the next chapter in the library’s enduring commitment to technology. We encourage you to take advantage of the Center and all of the resources it has to offer.