Workshop | Visualizing evidence for your P&T dossier

Date: Thursday, April 21, 2016 Indiana University-logo
Time: 2:00-3:00 PM
Location: University Library, Room 2120

Register here.

Presenting your evidence of scholarly work outcomes in an effective method allows you to make a better case for promotion and tenure. This workshop will give participants the opportunity to work with visualization tools to create interactive timelines and maps demonstrating the progress and reach of your scholarship. The visualizations can also be incorporated into your blog, online portfolio, and scholarly bio page.

Presented by IUPUI Library Center For Digital Scholarship.

Workshop | Research metrics: Gathering evidence of impact

Date: Tuesday, April 5, 2016 Indiana University-logo
Time: 2:00-3:30 PM
Location: University Library, Room 2120

Register here.

Faculty are required to provide strong evidence of impact in order to achieve promotion and tenure. This hands-on workshop will introduce several key sources of evidence to support your case. We will demonstrate strategies and tools for gathering both citation and altmetrics as indicators of impact to support your narrative of excellence.

Workshop | Share your scholarship, increase your impact

Date: Wednesday, March 2, 2016Indiana University-logo
Time: 1:30-2:30 PM
Location: University Library, Room 2120

Register here.

Once you have created an online profile, the next step is to share and connect your work so that people can find it. There are many options for sharing your work to increasing its reach. This seminar will help you choose the tools that are right for you. We will demonstrate how these tools work with online profiles and sources of citation and altmetrics.

Presented by IUPUI Library Center For Digital Scholarship.

Workshop | Create your online scholarly profile

Date: Tuesday, February 2, 2016Indiana University-logo
Time: 11:30-12:30 PM
Location: University Library, Room 2120

Register here.

Be proactive and take charge of your scholarly reputation online. A strong online profile increases the visibility of your work in search results and helps you to find collaborators, promote your work, and track your impact. While working on your profile, you will learn about options for owning a scholarly bio page and the benefits of ORCID.

Presented by IUPUI Library Center for Digital Scholarship.

Lecture: Philanthropy expert Ken Prewitt to discuss ‘Do charitable foundations make a difference?’ at IUPUI

INDIANAPOLIS — America’s 86,192 charitable foundations frequently receive both praise Kenneth Prewitt Imageand criticism for their efforts to create change. Are they really making a difference? Former Rockefeller Foundation executive, foundation scholar and Columbia University Carnegie Professor of Public Affairs Kenneth Prewitt will explore the topic “Can Foundations Know If They Are Making a Difference? Navigating between Ivory Towers and Performance Metrics” during a talk at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis next week.

The program, presented under the auspices of the Stead Family Chair in International Philanthropy at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, will begin with a 5 p.m. reception followed by Prewitt’s lecture at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 10, in the lower level of the Lilly Auditorium at University Library, 755 W. Michigan St., on the IUPUI campus.

Prewitt’s talk will be followed by a panel discussion with local philanthropy leaders and faculty, including:

  • Dewayne Matthews, vice president of strategy development, Lumina Foundation
  • Christie Gillespie, vice president of community impact, United Way of Central Indiana
  • Catherine Herrold, assistant professor of philanthropic studies, IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy

Prewitt, the former director of the U.S. Census Bureau, argues that it is increasingly important for foundations to effectively track, measure and share whether the work they fund actually helps make a difference, and he deems insufficient the current reporting methods used by U.S. foundations.

Prewitt previously has written that “significant, specific achievements can be attributed to foundation grantmaking” but also notes, “Although not wishing to subtract from the worthiness and social significance of these achievements, skeptics might ask … how we can assess the magnitude of social change in relation to the funds spent.'”

“The debate about whether and how foundations’ impact can be measured is a long-standing but important conversation,” said Amir Pasic, the Eugene R. Tempel Dean of the school. “Ken Prewitt’s research, thought leadership and insightful questioning of how we assess foundations provide context to help philanthropic institutions evaluate their impact and consider whether adjusting or rethinking metrics could enhance the services they fund and provide.”

The event is free and open to the public; RSVPs are requested.

Panel and Workshop: RISE Day

Date: November 6, 2015IUPUI Logo
Time: 10:30 AM-2:30 PM
Location: University Library, Lilly Auditorium
Get your free tickets here.

RISE Day will be a gathering of students, faculty/staff, and community partners that will include a keynote address by Dr. Paul Mullins, lunch, a student poster session highlighting a variety of RISE experiences, and a Q&A panel featuring RISE instructors and community partners.

The conference will be followed by a student workshop about how to market RISE participation to employers and graduate schools. Registration for the workshop is separate.

IUPUI RISE Program
The RISE to the IUPUI Challenge initiative engages students more deeply in their learning and contributes to their intellectual and professional development in unique ways. Each undergraduate student is challenged to include at least two of the four RISE experiences—research, international, service learning, and experiential learning—into their degree programs.

The RISE to the IUPUI Challenge initiative enhances the teaching and learning process that occurs during formal classroom course work. The initiative builds on IUPUI’s long tradition and commitment to experiential learning. Each RISE category incorporates qualified experiences, integration of knowledge, reflection, and assessment and will be documented on students’ transcripts.

The IUPUI undergraduate educational experience is distinctive because it intentionally uses experiential learning to prepare students for graduate school, careers, and citizenship. It provides skills, knowledge, and experiences that are highly prized by employers and establishes the foundation for future leaders.

Workshop: Applying for National Science Foundation Funding

Date: November 13, 2015
Time: 9:00 AM–11:00 AM
Location: University Library, Lilly AuditoriumIUPUI Library

Join the “Ins and Outs of Applying for NSF Funding” workshop from 9 to 11 a.m. on Friday, Nov. 13, in University Library’s Lilly Auditorium. The workshop will provide an overview of the foundation, its mission, its priorities and NSF programs that cut across disciplines. Specific topics include a description of various funding mechanisms and their appropriateness for each career stage, attributes of high-quality proposals, and resources available within the university to support proposal development.

Representatives from the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research, the Office of Research Administration and NSF awardees on the IUPUI faculty will focus on how to prepare and submit grant proposals to the NSF. Highlighting the event is a panel discussion by current NSF reviewers who will provide an in-depth look into the peer-review process.

IUPUI University Library honored for digital archiving of 120-year-old African-American newspaper

INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis University Library was unnamedamong the honorees as the nation’s fourth-oldest surviving African-American newspaper celebrated its 120th anniversary.

The Indianapolis Recorder, a weekly newspaper, marked 12 decades of publication with an awards ceremony and a reception Oct. 15 at the Indiana State Museum. More than 200 people attended the public event, “The Art of Storytelling.”

The newspaper presented 20 awards honoring “the legacy of those individuals who have played a monumental role in the continuing mission and vision of the paper to educate and inform generations of readers to come.” Honorees included the paper’s creators, columnists and staffers, and longtime community supporters.

University Library’s award recognized its service in digitizing the archives of the Indianapolis newspaper. The Indianapolis Recorder Digital Collection provides access to the paper’s 1899-2003 editions. The Recorder is the longest-published African-American paper in Indiana.

“We believe we are one of the first African-American papers in the nation to be digitized,” said Victoria Davis, the Recorder’s newsroom manager.

Newspapers and print publications in general, especially black publications, have faced challenges with digitalization, Davis said. Having the University Library collection has been invaluable to the Recorder’s readers, who have been able to look up family history, research community events and reflect on historical events through the collection, she said.

“A lot of people use it, and they are really excited that they can do that from the comfort of their own home using the computer,” said Davis, who anticipates the library-newspaper collaboration producing a second project.

“We hope to have our sister publication, The Indiana Minority Business Magazine, digitized as well,” Davis said.

The Indianapolis Recorder Digital Collection currently is the library’s most popular digital collection, averaging about 50 visits and 1,000 pages downloaded each day, according to a library audit. The Recorder collection is one of more than 80 digitized cultural-heritage collections available online through the University Library Center for Digital Scholarship.

The Recorder was founded in 1899 by George P. Stewart and William H. Porter as a two-page church bulletin.

University Library Dean David W. Lewis and Jenny Johnson, digital scholarship outreach librarian, attended the event and accepted the award for the library.

“We are really honored to be a part of such an important community resource. The Indianapolis Recorder is the most significant resource that documents the African-American community in Indiana,” Lewis said. “The award is a recognition of a really good partnership. They trusted us with their content in a way that is not typical. The award shows that we earned the trust they put in us. ”

The library’s award is a framed collage including the cover of the Recorder’s commemorative book, the ceremony invitation and a replica of the paper’s front page with a story thanking the library for its contribution.

Other Recorder anniversary honorees included Amos Brown, award-winning radio host and columnist; Arthur Carter, Tuskegee airman; Mari Evans, poet and author; Wilma Moore, archivist with the Indiana Historical Society; and Barbara Turner, descendant of founder George Stewart.

Reiberg Reading Series: Amy Quan Barry

Amy Quan Barry FlyerThe IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and the IUPUI Department of English present the Reiberg Reading Series featuring Amy Quan Barry

Date: November 5, 2015
Time: 7:30 pm
Location: Lilly Auditorium, IUPUI Library; 755 W. Michigan St.
Click here for free tickets

Amy Quan Barry is the author of the four poetry collections Asylum, Controvertibles, Water Puppets, and most recently Loose Strife. Her poems have appeared in The New Yorker, The Missouri Review, Ploughshares, The Kenyon Review, and other literary publications. She is the recipient of the Agnes Lynch Starrett Prize (for Asylum). Her third book, Water Puppets, won the AWP Donald Hall Prize for Poetry and was a PEN/Open Book finalist. She has received NEA Fellowships in both fiction and poetry. Her novel, She Weeps Each Time You’re Born, tells the tumultuous history of modern Vietnam as experienced by a young girl born under mysterious circumstances a few years before the country’s reunification.

Support for the Reiberg Reading Series comes from the Reiberg family, IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, the IUPUI University Library, the IUPUI Office of Academic Affairs, and IUPUI Division of Undergraduate Education.

Reiberg Reading Series: Dan Wakefield

Dan WakefieldThe IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and the IUPUI Department of English present the Reiberg Reading Series featuring Dan Wakefield

Date: November 4, 2015
Time: 7:30 pm
Location: IUPUI University Library, Lilly Auditorium, 755 W. Michigan St.
Get your free tickets here

A native of Indianapolis, Dan Wakefield is a novelist, journalist and screenwriter whose books include Revolt in the South, Going All The Way, New York in the Fifties, The Hijacking of Jesus: How the Religious Right Distorts Christianity and Promotes Prejudice and Hate, and many more. His best-selling novels Going All The Way and Starting Over were produced as feature films. He has recently edited If This Isn’t Nice, What Is?: Advice to the Young, a selection of commencement speeches by Kurt Vonnegut, a longtime friend.

Wakefield has been the recipient of a Neiman Fellowship in Journalism, the Bernard DeVoto Fellowship to the Bread Loaf Writers Conference, a Rockefeller Grant for Creative Writing, and an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. He has taught in the writing programs at Boston University, the University of Massachusetts at Boston, Emerson College, The Iowa Writers Workshop, and is presently Writer in Residence at Florida International University in Miami. He has been a staff writer for The Nation, a Contributing Editor of The Atlantic Monthly, a Contributing Writer for GQ, a Contributing Editor of The Yoga Journal, and is on the advisory board of Image: A Journal of The Arts and Religion.

In 2015, NUVO awarded Wakefield the Lifetime Achievement Cultural Vision Award.

Sponsored by the Reiberg family, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the IUPUI Department of English, IUPUI University Library, IUPUI University College, IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, IU School of Informatics, IUPUI Office of Academic Affairs, and IUPUI Division of Undergraduate Education.