Award-winning poets and novelist headline Fall 2014 Reiberg Reading Series

INDIANAPOLIS — The Fall 2014 Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis features poets Marcus Wicker and Marianne Boruch and novelist Randa Jarrar.

The Department of English in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI is the series sponsor. All events, which take place at various locations on the IUPUI campus, are free and open to the public.

MarcusWicker

Marcus Wicker

The series kicks off with poet Marcus Wicker at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 9 in the IUPUI University Library Lilly Auditorium, 755 W. Michigan St. This event is co-sponsored by the O­ffice for Academic Affairs at IUPUI.

D.A. Powell selected Wicker’s poetry collection, “Maybe the Saddest Thing” (Harper Perennial), for the National Poetry Series. Wicker received a 2011 Ruth Lilly Fellowship and his work has appeared in American Poetry Review and many other magazines. Wicker is an assistant professor of English at the University of Southern Indiana.

Wicker served as the final judge for the 2014 IUPUI Poetry Contest. Contest winners and finalists will share their original poems in an awards ceremony preceding the Wicker reading.

MarianneBoruch

Marianne Boruch

Poet Marianne Boruch will read her work at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 30 in the Emerson Hall Anatomy Lecture Hall, 545 Barnhill Drive. This event is co-sponsored by the IU School of Medicine, the Medical Humanities and Health Studies Program in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, and the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute.

Boruch is the author of the recently published poetry collection, “Cadaver, Speak,” along with eight other books of poetry. Her poetry has been anthologized in the 1997 and 2009 editions of “The Best American Poetry.” Boruch, a Fulbright visiting professor at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, in 2012, currently teaches creative writing at Purdue University.

RandaJarrar

Randa Jarrar

Novelist Randa Jarrar will conclude the fall series with a reading at 7 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 17, at the Herron School of Art & Design Basile Auditorium, 735 W. New York St. This reading is part of the Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here Symposium and is co-sponsored by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute in collaboration with the IUPUI Library. This event is free but registration is required.

Jarrar is an award-winning novelist, short story writer, essayist, and translator. She grew up in Kuwait and Egypt, and moved to the United States after the first Gulf War. Her novel, “A Map of Home,” was published in half a dozen languages and won a Hopwood Award, an Arab-American Book Award, and was named one of the best novels of 2008 by the Barnes and Noble Review. In 2010 Jarrar was named one of the most gifted writers of Arab origin under the age of 40.

The Rufus & Louise Reiberg Series was founded in 1997 in honor of former IUPUI Department of English chair and Professor Emeritus Rufus Reiberg and his wife, Louise. The series is made possible by the generous support of the Reiberg Family; the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute; the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research; the Office of Academic Affairs; University College; and University Library.

Visitor parking for the readings is available in the North Street Garage, 819 W. North St.; the Vermont Street Garage, 1004 W. Vermont St.; and the Sports Complex Garage, 875 W. New York St.

For additional information, contact Terry Kirts at tkirts@iupui.edu or 317-274-8929 or visit http://liberalarts.iupui.edu/reiberg. Facebook user can “like” the series’ page at The Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series @ IUPUI.

Randa Jarrar, Award-Winning Novelist, Coming to IUPUI

A Map of HomeAs part of the Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here Symposium, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute in collaboration with the IUPUI Library and the Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series invites you to join us on the evening of November 17 for a presentation by Randa Jarrar.

Time: 7:00-8:30 pm
Date: November 17, 2014
Location: Basile Auditorium, Eskenazi Hall (Herron School of Art and Design)
Tickets are free, but registration is required.

Randa Jarrar is an award-winning novelist, short story writer, essayist, and translator. In 2010, a collaborative project between the Hay Festival, Beirut UNESCO’s World Book Capital 2009 celebrations, Banipal magazine and the British Council recognized her as a member of the Beirut39 — 39 of the world’s most promising Arab writers under the age of 39.

Jarrar grew up in Kuwait and Egypt, and moved to the US after the first Gulf War.  Her first novel, A Map of Home, has been published in half a dozen languages and won a Hopwood Award, an Arab-American Book Award, and was named one of the best novels of 2008 by the Barnes and Noble Review.

Her work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The Utne Reader, Salon.com, Guernica, The Rumpus, The Oxford American, Ploughshares, Five Chapters, and others. She has received fellowships from the Civitella Ranieri Foundation, Hedgebrook, Caravansarai, and Eastern Frontier.

About Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here at IUPUI

On March 5, 2007, in the middle of the Iraq war, a car bomb killed dozens and injured over a hundred people.  It also devastated al-Mutanabbi Street, a busy avenue of cafés and bookstores that had served as a meeting place for generations of writers and thinkers.  In response to the attack, San Francisco bookseller Beau Beausoleil rallied a community of international artists and writers to produce “Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here,” a collection of letterpress-printed broadsides (poster-like works on paper), artists’ books (unique works of art in book form) and an anthology of writing focused on expressing solidarity with Iraqi booksellers, writers and readers.

“Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here” includes 260 artists’ books; a publication titled “Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here: Poets and Writers Respond to the March 5, 2007, Bombing of Baghdad’s ‘Street of the Booksellers,’” plus 130 broadsides — one for every person killed or injured in the bombing.  Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will serve as one of only three repositories in the world to hold the complete collection.  It will also sponsor three biennial conferences to explore the themes and implications of the collection through papers, panels, posters and presentations with international scholars, artists and writers from a range of disciplines.

 

Library dean’s ‘landmark’ article chosen for College & Research Libraries 75th anniversary issue

205249_w296INDIANAPOLIS — Readers of College & Research Libraries have selected an article written by IUPUI University Library Dean David W. Lewis as one of seven “landmark” articles to be published in a special journal for the association’s 75th anniversary.

Originally published in July 1988, Lewis’ article “Inventing the Electronic University” foreshadowed many of the key technologies, such as the digital collection, that University Library at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and the campus are leveraging today to effectively engage with students and the wider community.

Lewis argued that the rapid evolution of information technology employed in teaching, learning and research presages a “fundamental change” in higher education that will require academic libraries to be less concerned with “the automation of old systems” and more concerned with the “restructuring of institutions.”

“David Lewis’ innovation and leadership have a lasting legacy in IUPUI’s pioneering efforts to integrate information technology across the academic enterprise, especially in University Library,” said Nasser Paydar, executive vice chancellor and chief academic officer. “He is most deserving of this recognition as a national thought-leader and author from College & Research Libraries’ 75-year history.”

Lewis is also Indiana University assistant vice president for digital scholarly communication and as such has responsibility for advancing the university’s  efforts to foster open access to scholarly research by developing new models for scholarly publication that enable scholars, and their collective communities, to re-assert control over rights to scholarship literature.

In March, the editorial board and past editors of College & Research Libraries identified 30 articles from the journal’s history, including Lewis’, as finalists for publication in the special issue scheduled for March 2015. Readers were asked to select six articles from the 30, plus a reader’s choice, for publication.

College & Research Libraries is the official scholarly research journal of the Association of College & Research Libraries, a division of the American Library Association. More than 300 readers voted on the landmark articles. The chosen articles will also be a topic for discussion at the Association of College Research Libraries 2015 Conference in Portland, Ore.

“Reviewing every article published in the journal since 1939 reminded the editorial board of the incredible contributions that our authors have made to research and practice in academic librarianship over the past 75 years, and we are looking forward to reflecting on those contributions and considering what they mean for the future of research in our field with the publication of this special issue in March 2015,” said C&RL Editor Scott Walter of DePaul University.

Located at 755 W. Michigan St. in the heart of the IUPUI campus, University Library is a public library, serving nearly 1 million visitors a year, 10 percent of them community users. University Library supports students and faculty across all of IUPUI’s more than 200 degree programs with research expertise and a wide array of resources. Any resident of Indiana is eligible for an IUPUI University Library card.

Al-Mutanabbi Street Project

al-mutanabbi streetThe Herron Art Library—a full-service branch of the University Library—has recently been selected to house a unique collection of artists’ books.

On March 5th 2007, in the middle of the Iraq war, a car bomb exploded in Baghdad, destroying a busy avenue of cafés and bookstores that had served as a meeting place for generations of middle-eastern writers and thinkers. In response to the attack, a San Francisco bookseller, Beau Beausoleil, rallied a community of international artists and writers to produce a collection of letterpress-printed broadsides (poster-like works on paper), artists’ books (unique works of art in book form), and an anthology of writing, all focused on expressing solidarity with Iraqi booksellers, writers and readers. The coalition calls itself Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here.

The coalition has agreed to donate a complete run of the Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here collection to the Herron Art Library. Valued at over $250,000, the Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here collection includes 260 artists’ books; a publication entitled Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here: Poets and Writers Respond to the March 5th, 2007, Bombing of Baghdad’s “Street of the Booksellers”, plus 130 broadsides—one for every person killed or injured in the bombing of al-Mutanabbi Street. The Herron Art Library will be one of only three libraries worldwide to be a permanent home to the collection, and the only library in the U.S.

Along with the collection, the library is hosting a conference this fall on the IUPUI campus and a show featuring some of the collection in August at the Harrison Center for the Arts. For more information on the collection, please go to this website.

The Center for Digital Scholarship: Preserving the past and preparing for the future

UntitledThe online, digital environment is changing the way scholars communicate, access scholarly resources, and share the products of their research. In recent years, the University Library’s program of digital scholarship has grown so much that we were prompted to formalize our efforts by creating the IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship.

The Center for Digital Scholarship can help faculty, staff, and students navigate this fast-changing environment. The Center will enable faculty to share articles, data, images, learning objects, posters, presentations and working papers with students. In addition, it can be used as a means of engaging students in primary research and knowledge creation.

Much like the library itself, the Center will benefit community members as well as IUPUI faculty, staff and students. The Center functions as an important bridge through which we co-create collections with community organizations, providing access and preserving the stories of many of Central Indiana’s leading cultural institutions.

Engagement with the Indianapolis and Indiana community is one of the core principles of IUPUI, and a significant point in the current draft of the IUPUI Strategic Plan. While the library has been engaging with the community through digital collection creation for over 12 years (the majority of our historical digital collections are physically owned by other cultural heritage institutions, including libraries, historical societies, and community organizations), the Center offers an additional connection to our community partners.

We have the technology and expertise to digitize and provide access to historic collections that would otherwise be accessible only to those able to visit the cultural heritage institutions. We are making Indianapolis history visible to the world. We are also creating trusting relationships in the community that have proved fruitful for ventures outside of digitization.

The Center for Digital Scholarship represents the next chapter in the library’s enduring commitment to technology. We encourage you to take advantage of the Center and all of the resources it has to offer.

Previously unseen photos of 1989 Tiananmen Square movement are online as IUPUI digital collection

tiananmen squareINDIANAPOLIS — University Library at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis is making public more than 400 previously unseen black-and-white photographs of the historic student-led 1989 Tiananmen Square pro-democracy movement. The library has digitized photographs taken by an IUPUI professor and added them to the library’s online digital collections.

It was April 15, 1989, when Hu Yaobang, the ousted general secretary of the Chinese Communist Party, died in Beijing. Thousands of people went to Tiananmen Square to mourn his death. College students in Beijing universities soon turned the mourning into a grassroots movement that called for political reform, including an end to government corruption and a guarantee of freedom of speech. The movement ended abruptly with the killing of hundreds of protesting Chinese citizens during a military crackdown on June 4, 1989.

Thousands of media professionals, along with ordinary citizens, captured the events of the student-led movement on camera. Nevertheless, relatively few of these images survived since the Chinese government confiscated cameras and film in its crackdown on the movement and its leaders.

The photographs in the University Library digital collection, “Tiananmen Square, 1989,” are exhibited in memory of those who died during the movement. The collection can also serve as an educational tool for younger generations to learn about that period of history visually.

The photographer, Edgar Huang, a faculty member from the IU School of Informatics and Computing on the Indianapolis campus, was then a university instructor and a documentary photographer in Beijing. He traveled almost every day to different university campuses and different locations in Beijing, especially Tiananmen Square, to record with his Nikon F3 all the exciting, frustrating and sad moments.

After the government crackdown, some of Huang’s negatives were confiscated, but more than 90 percent of his 54 rolls of 36mm film were carefully hidden in different locations in Beijing to avoid possible raids.

“Many young people in China have no recollection of what happened in Beijing in the spring/summer of 1989,” Huang said. “These photographs will serve as a reminder of numerous ordinary Beijing citizens’ bravery and are exhibited in memory of those who died.

“Thanks to my beloved late wife, Lily Sun, who brought the negatives to the United States in 1994, these photographs are now possible to be exhibited to the public.”

Huang expressed appreciation for the work of IUPUI University Library staff, especially Kristi L. Palmer, Jennifer Ann Johnson and Ann Lys Proctor, in making the digitization of all the negatives and eventually this online exhibition possible.

Located at 755 W. Michigan St. in the heart of the IUPUI campus, the University Library is a public library, serving nearly 1 million visitors a year, 10 percent of them community users. University Library supports students and faculty across all of IUPUI’s more than 200 degree programs with research expertise and a wide array of resources. Any resident of Indiana is eligible for an IUPUI University Library card.

Story 17: Digital Bridges from the IUPUI University Library

21 years. 21 stories.
Over the course of 2014 the IUPUI Library will be sharing these stories with you.

Story 17: Digital Bridges

From the Indianapolis Motor Speedway to the Indiana Law Review, the IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship is connecting the city with the campus every day. We support the city by creating digital collections of images, newspapers, artifacts, and public records.

Missed a story? Want to read one again? All stories can be found here.

Indianapolis Motor Speedway and IUPUI bring racing history to life online

thCAJ85RU0INDIANAPOLIS — In partnership with the Indianapolis Motor Speedway (IMS), IUPUI University Library brings 100 years of track history to life through a collection of free online audio stories. The short oral histories offer race insights and commentary and are accompanied by photographs of some of the most important moments in the life of the Indianapolis 500.

The oral race summaries expand on a one of a kind digital repository that captures the history of IMS through more than 14,000 images taken from 1879 to 2013. Thanks to grants from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library services and administered by the Indiana State Library, the photographs can be viewed on the IUPUI University Library’s website. Just Google: Digital Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

With the help of Donald Davidson, IMS historian since 1998, the oral histories were created by a 2013 IUPUI graduate, from the school of Informatics, Joe Skibinski. There are currently 66 audio histories and the collection continues to grow. Among the highlights are the 1960 race during which Jim Rathmann edged out Rodger Ward by 12.75 seconds and a flashback to the 2006 showdown when Sam Hornish Jr. pulled alongside Marco Andretti on the front stretch in a sprint to the finish to win by 0.0635 seconds. Some vignettes feature clips of the IMS Radio Network’s broadcast coverage with iconic announcers like Sid Collins and Paul Page.

This online collection allows users from across the world to explore the storied past of the landmark that has put Indianapolis at the epicenter of motorsports history for one hundred years. Visitors to the site can search for a favorite year of Indianapolis 500 racing, a favorite driver or car and more. The Indianapolis Motor Speedway Collection is one of more than 60 online collections created by the IUPUI University Library and its community partners, including Conner Prairie Living History Museum, in nearby Fishers, and the Indianapolis Recorder Newspaper. To browse the digital collections, visit the library on the web at www.ulib.iupui.edu.

Located at 755 W. Michigan Avenue in the heart of the IUPUI campus, the University Library is a public library, serving nearly one million visitors a year, 10 percent of them community users. University Library supports students and faculty across all of IUPUI’s more than 200 degree programs with research expertise and a wide array of resources. Any resident of Indiana is eligible for an IUPUI University Library card.

International Women’s Day celebration

Friday March 21, 2014
6:30 p.m.
Lily Auditorium, University Library

This year International Women’s Day Celebration is scheduled for Thursday, 3/21, in the IUPUI University Library, Lilly Auditorium. It will open with a reception at 6:30 p.m., featuring local activists and a buffet of international eats, followed by a reading of Polish poet Agnieszka Kuciak’s rollicking _Distant Lands: An Anthology of Poets Who Don’t Exist_, a tour de force roster of made-up poets, performed by Andy Buchenot, Brandon Butcher, Stacey Emley, Chris Forhan, Gabe Harley, Terry Kirts, Keith Leonard, Jane Schultz, Susan Shepherd, Erica Swanfeldt Stout, Ben Van Wyke, and Jacqui Weeks.

If you’re interested in participating in the multicultural, multilingual open mike, contact Kelli Vorndran (klvorndr@umail.iu.edu) to reserve a slot. Reminder: Perform up to one page or poetry or a half page of prose–must be written by a woman. If you want to do a poem by a woman poet in another language, provide an English translation.

IUPUI University Library launches Center for Digital Scholarship for Open Access Week

In celebration of the sixth annual Open Access Week, IUPUI University Library has announced the opening of the Center for Digital Scholarship.

The center works to provide open access to IUPUI scholarship, research data and the cultural heritage of our communities. With Kristi L. Palmer as director, the center disseminates unique scholarship, data and artifacts created by IUPUI faculty, students, staff and community partners; advocates for the rights of authors, fair use and open access to information and publications; implements best practices for the creation, description, preservation, sharing and reuse of digital collections; and provides digital scholarship consultations and literacy services.

Located in Room 1115 on the first floor of the library, the Center for Digital Scholarship is open for services and questions related to open access. Hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday.

Recent open access collaborations with IUPUI scholars and Indiana community organizations include:

  • Advances in Social Works: A peer-reviewed, open access journal — one of seven journals hosted on Open Journal Systems at IUPUI.
  • Faculty Grants: Supporting the digitization and online organization of open access collections related to faculty scholarship.
  • Indianapolis Recorder: Open access to over 5,000 issues and 106 years of African American history in a community newspaper.
  • Indianapolis Motor Speedway Collection: Open access to over 14,000 historic images dating back to 1909.
  • IUPUI DataWorks: A new open access data repository for preserving and sharing IUPUI digital research data.
  • IUPUI Open Access Publishing Fund: A pilot fund of $47,000 to underwrite reasonable publication charges for articles published in fee-based, peer-reviewed, open access journals.
  • IUPUI ScholarWorks: An open access repository of over 3,000 articles, reports, posters, dissertations and theses by IUPUI faculty and students.
  • Neighborhood of Saturdays: A unique digital humanities collaboration providing open access to over 500 images and artifacts from a multiethnic neighborhood on the near south side of Indianapolis.

The Center for Digital Scholarship will also host a special open house in November for the campus and the community to learn more about its work. The event will take place from 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. Friday, Nov. 22, on the ground floor of the University Library.

Open Access Week

The International Open Access Week, Oct. 21 to 27, is a global event in its sixth year. Open Access Week is a time for the academic community to share the potential benefits of open access, the practice of providing free and unrestricted access via the Internet to peer-reviewed scholarly research, and help integrate the practice in scholarship and research. To learn how you can claim the benefits of open access for your research at IUPUI, visit the IUPUI University Library.