Herron exhibit provides intimate look at child-led households created by AIDS pandemic

“Hope Seekers: Survival of Southern African Child-Led Households in the Shadow of HIV”
February 5 – February 22, 2014
Marsh Gallery, Eskenazi Hall, 735 W. Michigan St.

The HIV/AIDS pandemic in Swaziland is creating an epidemic of its own — an exploding number of households in the South African kingdom that are headed by children, some as young as eight or nine.

Swaziland has the world’s highest rate of HIV/AIDS cases, with one in four people infected by the virus. The adult AIDS death rate results in a new orphan every 14 seconds – creating the phenomenon of child-led families.

Herron School of Art and Design on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus this month is hosting an exhibit of photographs exploring the lives of children in these families.

“It tells the stories of these children and really allows people to enter into an experience of gaining more of an intimate look at the child-led households in South Africa,” said Cynthia Prime, CEO of Saving Orphans through Healthcare and Outreach (SOHO), the Indianapolis-based non-profit organization taking a leading role in efforts to help educate, nurture and feed the child-led families.

Special activities associated with the exhibit include:

  • A panel discussion, followed by a book signing and reception at 6 p.m. on Feb. 12 in Basile Auditorium, Eskenazi Hall.
  • An unveiling of a life-size prototype of sustainable, safe and secure housing designed by IUPUI engineering and technology students for orphans in Swaziland, followed by presentations by students from Crispus Attucks Medical Magnet High School, 6 p.m., Feb. 18, Eskenazi Hall.

“This exhibition represents great collaboration across IUPUI’s many schools and programs. We are excited about the momentum we’ve built working in partnership with SOHO, as we increase IUPUI’s connections with Indianapolis, Swaziland, and the world,” said Jane Luzar, dean of the IUPUI Honors College.

In addition to photographs taken by Josef Kissinger, the exhibit includes artifacts created by Swaziland children.

The artifacts include a large toy vehicle, called a Kombi, built out of wire, soft drink cans, and bottle caps; and a floor mat made from garbage bags and candy wrappers. “These articles show that these children have promise and creativity,” Prime said. “They are called hope seekers because if they had options, they could change the world they live in.”

Gary L. Freeman in memoriam

Gary L. Freeman (1937-2014)

Professor Emeritus of Sculpture Gary L. Freeman died on January 6, 2014 in hospice care. According to the Herron Chronicle, he came to Herron in the fall of the 1968-69 academic year to teach sculpture and establish the school’s foundry, which he did in a former radiator shop on 16th Street a block or so from the school. “With our casting system,” he said at the time, “students will learn how to control production of a piece of metal sculpture through the finishing process.” That meld of thinking and making is still a hallmark of Herron School of Art and Design today.

During demonstrations in the new facility, he told attendees, “Sculpture is a life of exploration, whether it be figurative or nonrepresentational. Only by exploring the many facets can a trained artist find his aspirations.” Freeman headed the Sculpture Department for 33 years, retiring in 2001.

Freeman was born in Wellington, Kansas. He earned a B.F.A. degree from the Kansas City Art Institute and an M.F.A. degree from Tulane University. He studied stainless steel production methods in Mexico and throughout Europe.

During his academic career, he maintained an active studio life including numerous public and private sculptural commissions. Dislike of the limelight notwithstanding, he was widely regarded as a preeminent sculptor in Indianapolis. His work is in 23 public and private collections, including the Indianapolis Museum of Art, New Orleans Museum of Art, Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, and the Newcomb Art School, Tulane University.

Perhaps his most beloved work on display in Indianapolis is For Endless Trees, in front of WFYI’s studios at 1630 N. Meridian St.

“I am sad for Gary’s passing,” said Herron’s Dean Valerie Eickmeier. “He was a longtime friend and colleague who made a difference in my life and countless others. Gary shaped the careers of many young sculptors who continue to be grateful for his mentorship. Characteristically, Gary did not want a funeral service. But there will be a remembrance celebration at Herron for him this spring.” Details will be announced later.

Freeman is survived by his loving wife and partner of more than 30 years, Sally Rice Freeman.

Those wishing to make a contribution to the Gary L. Freeman Scholarship can send them to:

Kim Hodges, Director of Development Herron School of Art and Design 735 W. New York Street Indianapolis, IN 46202

Checks should be made payable to Herron/IUF. For questions, Kim Hodges can be reached at kshodges@iupui.edu or 317-278-9472.

For a beautiful, long-form remembrance of Gary L. Freeman written by his colleague Steve Mannheimer, click here.

Professor Juliet King receives first Frank C. Springer Family Innovative Faculty Award

Juliet King, MA, ATR-BC, LPC and director of Herron School of Art and Design’s Art Therapy Program, is the first to receive the Frank C. Springer Family Innovative Faculty Award. The newly-created award is the school’s most prestigious and largest faculty research prize.

King will conduct a meta-analysis of art therapy and neuroscience studies to search for patterns and gaps in art therapy research. She expects to present her findings at the American Art Therapy Association national conference in 2014 and for her work to be published. Her research will also benefit Herron art therapy graduate students as she weaves it into the curriculum.

The Springer Family, including Cathy Springer Brown and Rick Brown of Indianapolis and Mary Ann and Scott Hillstrom of the Chicago area, devised the award to inspire Herron faculty members to expand their artistic, creative and scholarly work in innovative directions to yield new insights into the human condition.

The award honors the spirit of Frank C. Springer Jr., a beloved Indianapolis philanthropist and art connoisseur who was a great friend to Herron and many other organizations.

Cathy Springer Brown said “Uncle Frank would be pleased knowing the award will help support important research in the field of art therapy.” She encourages others to think about what their passions might be and explore ways to support Herron. “It’s powerful when you think about the impact your support will have on countless students and faculty,” she said. “Making a gift in honor of someone special makes the experience even more rewarding.”

Herron faculty will competitively submit research proposals for the Springer Award each fall. Herron’s Faculty Affairs Committee, this year led by Professor Eric Nordgulen, will select one proposal for the award annually.

Glick Fund Gift to Herron School of Art and Design will provide up to 70 need-based scholarships for Saturday School

Glick Fund Gift to Herron School of Art and Design will provide up to 70 need-based scholarships for Saturday School The Glick Fund, a fund of Central Indiana Community Foundation (CICF), has made a $17,850 gift to Herron School of Art and Design’s Saturday School Program. One of the Glick Fund’s target areas is the arts and creative expression. Herron was one of 49 local organizations in the Fund’s latest round of grants, announced in mid-November, which totaled more than $4 million.

Last spring, 43 students requested tuition aid to attend Herron’s Saturday School. Only two scholarships were available. “This gift will help us better serve students in grades six through 12 from IPS and Wayne and Warren township schools,” said Jodie Hardy, director of community learning programs at Herron. The Glick Fund gift will provide scholarships for up to 70 students. Registration is already underway for spring 2014 Saturday School, which runs January 25 through March 15. Each class session is three hours. Tuition is $255 per student per eight-week session.

“We hope our grants will help address the immediate needs of the community while also building the long-term capacity of the organizations delivering services,” said Marianne Glick, director at the Eugene & Marilyn Glick Family Foundation and The Glick Fund.

About Saturday School
Saturday School student from 2012

Saturday School student from 2012.

Established in 1922, Herron School of Art and Design’s Saturday School program provides quality art instruction for youth and adults for eight Saturdays each fall and spring.

Classes offer a variety of media—painting, ceramics, drawing, photography and more. Students’ ages range from second graders to high school seniors. Classes are also open to adults, allowing families to enjoy creating together. The average student is a creative junior high or high school student interested in discovering more about art and design while learning within a fun, safe and professional environment. Classes are taught by Herron’s degree-seeking students and take place in excellent studio facilities, giving many younger students their first exposure to a university environment.

Each semester concludes with an open house exhibition, reception and awards ceremony.

About the Glick Fund:

The Glick Fund is a donor-advised fund of the Central Indiana Community Foundation. It was established by Eugene and Marilyn Glick in 1998 to support a variety of causes. Grants are awarded by invitation only, with no unsolicited grant applications accepted.

The Glick Fund also strives to align with the Central Indiana Community Foundation’s three broader community leadership initiatives of: Family Success & Making Connections; Inspiring Places; and College Readiness & Success – initiatives aimed at making central Indiana one of the best places in the nation to live, work and raise a family. To date, The Glick Fund has awarded over $49 million in grants to not-for-profit organizations. For more information, please visit the Central Indiana Community Foundation website.

Herron School of Art and Design’s spring events promise a visual and intellectual feast of ideas

Free Public art exhibitions, film screenings and artists talks abound at Herron School of Art and Design, with new opportunities from January through the end of the school year in May to visit and make your own observations of and about contemporary art.

January 10–February 15

Ossuary

Laurie Beth Clark invited hundreds of artists to create an artwork that is inspired by, uses, or plays with the idea of bones. The works are in many media and two, three, or four dimensions. The contributions range from political statements to personal elegies, memorials to individuals or broader statements about mortality. Some connect ancestors to descendants. Some are serious and some use bones in a completely playful manner.

January 10–January 29

Making Memory

This exhibition explores the relationships among objects, memory and the experience of both the artist and the viewer. Curator Laura Holzman, assistant professor and public scholar of curatorial practices and visual art at IUPUI, developed this exhibition with selected artists from Herron’s M.F.A. program.

Viewer

The work of Benjamin Martinkus, photography technician and adjunct faculty member, is a skeptical yet loving response to the implicit politics, subversive power relations and intoxicating pleasures inherent in an image-based culture. In this exhibition, Martinkus shows a new suite of work comprised of video, imagery and objects both appropriated and fabricated. Together, these works recast the experience of contemporary life as one defined by viewership and imageness.

January 29

6:00 p.m.: ARTIST TALK with Laurie Beth Clark

7:00 p.m.–9:00p.m.: RECEPTION for Ossuary

February 5–22

Hope Seekers

This multi-partner exhibition features photographs of child-led households in Swaziland, where AIDS infects more than one in four people, making it the country with the highest HIV/AIDS rate in the world. The result is an exploding number of households headed by children, some as young as eight or nine years old.

Brent Aldrich

New installations by Brent Aldrich, MFA candidate in photography and intermedia and community art activist, draw on geology, participation and neighborhood organizing.

February 5

6:00 p.m.: DISCUSSION on child-led households in Southern Africa

February 19

7:00p.m.: FILM SCREENING, Searching for Sugar Man

Two South Africans set out to discover what happened to their unlikely musical hero, the mysterious 1970s rock ‘n’ roller, Rodriguez (IMDb).

February 25

6:00 p.m.: CHRISTEL DEHAAN FAMILY FOUNDATION VISITING ARTIST LECTURE with Frances Whitehead, who will discuss her contemporary art practice as it relates to the process of shaping the future city.

March 5–April 17

Richard Ross: Juvenile in Justice

Exhibited worldwide, Juvenile In Justice is Ross’ photographic documentation of the placement and treatment of American juveniles housed by law in facilities that treat, confine, punish, assist and, occasionally, harm them.

Intake at Los Padrinos Juvenile Hall, Downey, California, photo by Richard Ross

Intake at Los Padrinos Juvenile Hall, Downey, California, photo by Richard Ross

March 5

6:00 p.m.: ARTIST’S TALK with Richard Ross

7:00-9:00 p.m.: OPENING RECEPTION for Richard Ross: Juvenile in Justice

March 5–20

Weapon


A multi-disciplinary exhibition of work by Herron studio technicians that meditates on the themes of attack, defense and security.

Rachel Bleil

This exhibition will feature new works by ceramic artist Rachel Bleil, an instructor at Herron who earned her M.F.A. degree in ceramics from Indiana University-Bloomington.

March 26

7:00p.m.: FILM SCREENING, Art & Copy

A film about advertising and inspiration that reveals the work and wisdom of some of the most influential advertising creatives of our time—people who’ve profoundly impacted our culture, yet are virtually unknown outside their industry (IMDb).

March 28–April 17

High School Art Invitational

This exhibition will feature top works by high school juniors from across Indiana.

in·ter·sect /ˌintƏrˈsekt/

in·ter·sect / explores parallel processes present in the electronic and physical nature of modern interpersonal relationships. The work develops on themes of shared intimacy and emotional memory. Working in tandem with students enrolled in Stefan Petranek’s advanced digital course, Daniel Cosentino will construct a Pre-, Live- and Post-opening exhibition experience via mediums of video, performance and sculpture.

April 16

6:00 p.m.: ARTIST’S TALK with Wendy White

Presented by Herron’s Active Student Artists student group, this artist’s talk features Wendy White, who is recognized internationally for her merger of painting, sculpture and architecture into large-scale works.

May 1–22

M.F.A. Thesis Exhibition 
This exhibition will feature work by Herron’s graduating class of M.F.A. students. Departments represented will include ceramics, furniture design, painting, photography, printmaking and sculpture.

 Crowd in Grand Hall at 2012 M.F.A. Exhibition, photo by Michelle Pemberton

Crowd in Grand Hall at 2012 M.F.A. Exhibition, photo by Michelle Pemberton

May 1

5:00 p.m.–9:00p.m.: OPENING RECEPTION for M.F.A. Thesis Exhibition

Limited parking is available in the Sports Complex Garage just west of Herron. Park in the visitor side of the garage and bring your ticket to the Herron Galleries for validation. Complimentary parking courtesy of The Great Frame Up.

Parking in the surface lot next to Herron School of Art and Design requires a valid IUPUI parking permit at all times.

Herron Professor Robert Horvath presents new exhibition of sculptures

New is Better, on view from November 1 – 27, 2013
Gallery 924
924 N. Pennsylvania St
Indianapolis, IN  46204

Robert Horvath, Assistant Professor of Painting and Drawing at Herron School of Art and Design, is primarily known for his high-gloss and refined, large-scale oil paintings that represent our cultural obsession with the appearance of luxury, celebrity, and consumption. In his practice, he begins with an abstract, almost other-worldly sculpture that then serves as inspiration for the resulting highly polished and detailed painting, often mistaken for a digital image.

His most recent body of work explores these sculptures with greater depth and detail. Horvath has now escalated his practice of creating a preliminary sculpture by using more substantial materials. Through the use of porcelain, his sculptures have become more permanent and thus represent works in their own right instead of simply a preliminary work or reflection of the grander oil painting. A large collection of his new porcelain sculptures at Gallery 924 have never been seen before outside of his studio.

IAHI Lecture: Jace Clayton, “Sounds Create Social Meaning”

The IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute is teaming up with our friends at We Are City to support another round of artists-in-residence in Indianapolis as part of the We Are City [SUMMIT] Series.

This November, artists Jace Clayton (a.k.a. DJ/rupture) and Rocio Rodriguez Salceda will use fashion design and participatory performance to explore how group affiliation interacts with civic memory in Indianapolis.

While in residence, Clayton will give a public lecture hosted by the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute and the Herron School of Art and Design. Tickets are free but space is limited.

Eskenazi Hall Room: HR 111 A – Basile Center Classroom
735 W. New York St. – Indianapolis
Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013
11:45 am-12:45 pm

Free Tickets: http://jaceclayton.eventbrite.com

 

About the Artists

Jace Clayton uses an interdisciplinary approach to focus on core concerns for how sound, memory, and public space interact, with an emphasis on low-income communities and the global South.

 

Rocio Rodriguez Salceda is an artist from Madrid who operates in the space between visual art, fashion design, and social practice.

Leibman Forum to tackle legal and cultural issues surrounding ‘The Art of the Steal’

Was the $25 billion art collection of Albert C. Barnes “stolen” decades after his death, as some say, or was it simply “moved in the public interest”?

Art and legal pundits and interested others can judge for themselves during a lively examination of the facts during the annual Jordan H. and Joan R. Leibman Forum on the Legal and Business Environment of Art on Friday, Nov. 1, at the IU McKinney School of Law.

This year’s forum, “Donor Intent vs. Public Interest,” examines the issues raised in the film “The Art of the Steal,” a documentary about the disposition of the Barnes collection. The program includes a screening of the film, followed by a panel discussion featuring legal, art and philanthropic experts.

“Donor Intent vs. Public Interest” takes place from 4 to 8 p.m. in Inlow Hall, 530 W. New York St. The film screening takes place at 4 p.m., followed by the panel discussion at 6 p.m., both in Wynne Courtroom. A reception will follow the discussion at 7:15 p.m. in the Atrium.

At his death in 1951, Barnes had amassed a matchless collection of modern and post-impressionist art. He also left a will with strict instructions for the collection to remain forever at an original location in a Philadelphia suburb. After a battle that included a lawsuit by one faction of Philadelphia residents and a countersuit by another, the collection was relocated to downtown Philadelphia in 2012.

The public debate over moving the collection was one of the most “significant, heated and widespread debates about art, culture and place in Philadelphia” around the turn of the 21st century, said Laura Holzman, a forum panelist.

Holzman, assistant professor of art history and museum studies at the Herron School of Art and Design and the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, is working on a book project about civil discourse and visual culture that includes a study of the discourse about moving the Barnes collection.

“The use of extreme language (like describing the relocated collection as ‘stolen’) is significant because it demonstrates the fervor behind people’s beliefs about what was best for the collection and its publics,” Holzman said. “It also suggests that debates about the ethics of relocation were steeped in concerns about cultural capital, or who has ownership of the art.”

Other forum speakers are:

  • Kenan Farrell, attorney and adjunct professor teaching art and museum law at IU McKinney School of Law.
  • Kathryn Haigh, deputy director for collections and exhibitions at the Indianapolis Museum of Art.
  • Robert A. Katz, professor of law at IU McKinney School of Law and professor of philanthropic studies at IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy.

An additional free screening of “The Art of the Steal” will take place from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 29, in Room 375, Inlow Hall. Online registration is suggested.

The Jordan H. and Joan R. Leibman Forum was established at IUPUI in 2004 to examine issues on the legal and business environment of the arts. It is co-sponsored by the IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law, the IU Herron School of Art and Design and the IU Kelley School of Business Indianapolis.

The forum is free of change, but registration is required online. Indiana continuing legal education credit of 1.4 hour is available free of charge.

For questions, contact Beth Young at ejmoody@iupui.edu.

Cuba’s 2013 Venice Biennale representative to speak at Herron School of Art and Design

Artist Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons will appear at Herron School of Art and Design as the 2013 Jane Fortune Outstanding Women Visiting Artist Lecturer.

Her artist’s talk, titled “Global Journey,” is scheduled to take place on December 4 in the Basile Auditorium at 6:00 p.m., the same night the Undergraduate Student Exhibition opens in the Berkshire, Reese and Paul Galleries. Both events are free and open to the public.

Inclusion in the juried undergraduate show is an honor for the students whose work is chosen. In a typical year, the jury must select from more than 300 very strong submissions. The exhibition usually contains 60 works across a wide variety of media.

Also opening in the Basile and Marsh Galleries will be two exhibitions from the graduate Collaborative Practices course taught by Professor Andrew Winship and Basile Center Director Kathryn Armstrong.

The three exhibitions continue through December 19.

photo campos-pons

Photo of artist by Ricardo Gay Luger Courtesy of Maria Magdalena studio and Galleries.

Campos-Pons was born in Cuba in 1959. She is a faculty member at the School of The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. According to its website, “Her work of the last 20 years covers an extended range of visual language investigations…from the early 1980s focus on painting and the discussion of sexuality in the crossroads of Cuban mixed cultural heritage to incisive questioning, critique and insertion of the black body in the contemporary narratives of the present.” She represented Cuba in the 2013 Venice Biennale.

“Campos-Pons’s work is largely autobiographical but speaks to a much-needed dialogue about history, place and identity. She does this through a contemporary language that also provides universal access to discussing our current socio-political landscape,” said Herron’s Gallery Director Paula Katz.

It is the generosity of Jane Fortune—author, cultural editor, art historian, art collector and philanthropist—that brings Campos-Pons to Herron. “I want to make an impact on the community that surrounds me and help make the arts accessible to our residents,” she said. This is the sixth Jane Fortune Outstanding Women Visiting Artist Lecture, which has welcomed artists including Judy Chicago, Polly Apfelbaum and Judith Shea to Herron.

Grilled cheese at the center of the newest IUPUI University Library sculpture

In a playful sculpture of floating cartoon-like images, artist Michael Helsley chooses a favorite comfort food — grilled cheese — to take the edge off his grief, represented by five rocks and a bear. The mobile-style sculpture, installed in the University Library atrium, tells of Helsley’s journey of discovery following a personal time of grief.

Helsley’s sculpture is the newest installation in an annual art competition the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis University Library sponsors for Herron School of Art and Design students. As this year’s winner, Helsley received funding to create the large-scale sculpture. It has been installed in the second-floor atrium in the University Library for display for one year.

Helsley’s art draws in its viewers as the images simultaneously appear and disappear, reflecting the movement of the five stages of grief outlined by Dr. Kubler Ross. Helsley constructed the images from rigid foam sheets, using commercially printed material salvaged from billboards and repainted by hand. The Herron student cast an astronaut as himself, part explorer, part cowboy, among the boulders, a bear and the grilled cheese sandwich as he floats and sometimes falls during his journey of exploration of both the past and the future.

The size and flatness of the images allows them to simultaneously disappear in one location while appearing to a viewer in another location. The act of “revealing” themselves relates directly to the act of discovery, whether it is new or as it relates to memory.