Herron School of Art and Design’s spring events promise a visual and intellectual feast of ideas

Free Public art exhibitions, film screenings and artists talks abound at Herron School of Art and Design, with new opportunities from January through the end of the school year in May to visit and make your own observations of and about contemporary art.

January 10–February 15

Ossuary

Laurie Beth Clark invited hundreds of artists to create an artwork that is inspired by, uses, or plays with the idea of bones. The works are in many media and two, three, or four dimensions. The contributions range from political statements to personal elegies, memorials to individuals or broader statements about mortality. Some connect ancestors to descendants. Some are serious and some use bones in a completely playful manner.

January 10–January 29

Making Memory

This exhibition explores the relationships among objects, memory and the experience of both the artist and the viewer. Curator Laura Holzman, assistant professor and public scholar of curatorial practices and visual art at IUPUI, developed this exhibition with selected artists from Herron’s M.F.A. program.

Viewer

The work of Benjamin Martinkus, photography technician and adjunct faculty member, is a skeptical yet loving response to the implicit politics, subversive power relations and intoxicating pleasures inherent in an image-based culture. In this exhibition, Martinkus shows a new suite of work comprised of video, imagery and objects both appropriated and fabricated. Together, these works recast the experience of contemporary life as one defined by viewership and imageness.

January 29

6:00 p.m.: ARTIST TALK with Laurie Beth Clark

7:00 p.m.–9:00p.m.: RECEPTION for Ossuary

February 5–22

Hope Seekers

This multi-partner exhibition features photographs of child-led households in Swaziland, where AIDS infects more than one in four people, making it the country with the highest HIV/AIDS rate in the world. The result is an exploding number of households headed by children, some as young as eight or nine years old.

Brent Aldrich

New installations by Brent Aldrich, MFA candidate in photography and intermedia and community art activist, draw on geology, participation and neighborhood organizing.

February 5

6:00 p.m.: DISCUSSION on child-led households in Southern Africa

February 19

7:00p.m.: FILM SCREENING, Searching for Sugar Man

Two South Africans set out to discover what happened to their unlikely musical hero, the mysterious 1970s rock ‘n’ roller, Rodriguez (IMDb).

February 25

6:00 p.m.: CHRISTEL DEHAAN FAMILY FOUNDATION VISITING ARTIST LECTURE with Frances Whitehead, who will discuss her contemporary art practice as it relates to the process of shaping the future city.

March 5–April 17

Richard Ross: Juvenile in Justice

Exhibited worldwide, Juvenile In Justice is Ross’ photographic documentation of the placement and treatment of American juveniles housed by law in facilities that treat, confine, punish, assist and, occasionally, harm them.

Intake at Los Padrinos Juvenile Hall, Downey, California, photo by Richard Ross

Intake at Los Padrinos Juvenile Hall, Downey, California, photo by Richard Ross

March 5

6:00 p.m.: ARTIST’S TALK with Richard Ross

7:00-9:00 p.m.: OPENING RECEPTION for Richard Ross: Juvenile in Justice

March 5–20

Weapon


A multi-disciplinary exhibition of work by Herron studio technicians that meditates on the themes of attack, defense and security.

Rachel Bleil

This exhibition will feature new works by ceramic artist Rachel Bleil, an instructor at Herron who earned her M.F.A. degree in ceramics from Indiana University-Bloomington.

March 26

7:00p.m.: FILM SCREENING, Art & Copy

A film about advertising and inspiration that reveals the work and wisdom of some of the most influential advertising creatives of our time—people who’ve profoundly impacted our culture, yet are virtually unknown outside their industry (IMDb).

March 28–April 17

High School Art Invitational

This exhibition will feature top works by high school juniors from across Indiana.

in·ter·sect /ˌintƏrˈsekt/

in·ter·sect / explores parallel processes present in the electronic and physical nature of modern interpersonal relationships. The work develops on themes of shared intimacy and emotional memory. Working in tandem with students enrolled in Stefan Petranek’s advanced digital course, Daniel Cosentino will construct a Pre-, Live- and Post-opening exhibition experience via mediums of video, performance and sculpture.

April 16

6:00 p.m.: ARTIST’S TALK with Wendy White

Presented by Herron’s Active Student Artists student group, this artist’s talk features Wendy White, who is recognized internationally for her merger of painting, sculpture and architecture into large-scale works.

May 1–22

M.F.A. Thesis Exhibition 
This exhibition will feature work by Herron’s graduating class of M.F.A. students. Departments represented will include ceramics, furniture design, painting, photography, printmaking and sculpture.

 Crowd in Grand Hall at 2012 M.F.A. Exhibition, photo by Michelle Pemberton

Crowd in Grand Hall at 2012 M.F.A. Exhibition, photo by Michelle Pemberton

May 1

5:00 p.m.–9:00p.m.: OPENING RECEPTION for M.F.A. Thesis Exhibition

Limited parking is available in the Sports Complex Garage just west of Herron. Park in the visitor side of the garage and bring your ticket to the Herron Galleries for validation. Complimentary parking courtesy of The Great Frame Up.

Parking in the surface lot next to Herron School of Art and Design requires a valid IUPUI parking permit at all times.

Herron Professor Robert Horvath presents new exhibition of sculptures

New is Better, on view from November 1 – 27, 2013
Gallery 924
924 N. Pennsylvania St
Indianapolis, IN  46204

Robert Horvath, Assistant Professor of Painting and Drawing at Herron School of Art and Design, is primarily known for his high-gloss and refined, large-scale oil paintings that represent our cultural obsession with the appearance of luxury, celebrity, and consumption. In his practice, he begins with an abstract, almost other-worldly sculpture that then serves as inspiration for the resulting highly polished and detailed painting, often mistaken for a digital image.

His most recent body of work explores these sculptures with greater depth and detail. Horvath has now escalated his practice of creating a preliminary sculpture by using more substantial materials. Through the use of porcelain, his sculptures have become more permanent and thus represent works in their own right instead of simply a preliminary work or reflection of the grander oil painting. A large collection of his new porcelain sculptures at Gallery 924 have never been seen before outside of his studio.

IAHI Lecture: Jace Clayton, “Sounds Create Social Meaning”

The IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute is teaming up with our friends at We Are City to support another round of artists-in-residence in Indianapolis as part of the We Are City [SUMMIT] Series.

This November, artists Jace Clayton (a.k.a. DJ/rupture) and Rocio Rodriguez Salceda will use fashion design and participatory performance to explore how group affiliation interacts with civic memory in Indianapolis.

While in residence, Clayton will give a public lecture hosted by the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute and the Herron School of Art and Design. Tickets are free but space is limited.

Eskenazi Hall Room: HR 111 A – Basile Center Classroom
735 W. New York St. – Indianapolis
Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013
11:45 am-12:45 pm

Free Tickets: http://jaceclayton.eventbrite.com

 

About the Artists

Jace Clayton uses an interdisciplinary approach to focus on core concerns for how sound, memory, and public space interact, with an emphasis on low-income communities and the global South.

 

Rocio Rodriguez Salceda is an artist from Madrid who operates in the space between visual art, fashion design, and social practice.

Leibman Forum to tackle legal and cultural issues surrounding ‘The Art of the Steal’

Was the $25 billion art collection of Albert C. Barnes “stolen” decades after his death, as some say, or was it simply “moved in the public interest”?

Art and legal pundits and interested others can judge for themselves during a lively examination of the facts during the annual Jordan H. and Joan R. Leibman Forum on the Legal and Business Environment of Art on Friday, Nov. 1, at the IU McKinney School of Law.

This year’s forum, “Donor Intent vs. Public Interest,” examines the issues raised in the film “The Art of the Steal,” a documentary about the disposition of the Barnes collection. The program includes a screening of the film, followed by a panel discussion featuring legal, art and philanthropic experts.

“Donor Intent vs. Public Interest” takes place from 4 to 8 p.m. in Inlow Hall, 530 W. New York St. The film screening takes place at 4 p.m., followed by the panel discussion at 6 p.m., both in Wynne Courtroom. A reception will follow the discussion at 7:15 p.m. in the Atrium.

At his death in 1951, Barnes had amassed a matchless collection of modern and post-impressionist art. He also left a will with strict instructions for the collection to remain forever at an original location in a Philadelphia suburb. After a battle that included a lawsuit by one faction of Philadelphia residents and a countersuit by another, the collection was relocated to downtown Philadelphia in 2012.

The public debate over moving the collection was one of the most “significant, heated and widespread debates about art, culture and place in Philadelphia” around the turn of the 21st century, said Laura Holzman, a forum panelist.

Holzman, assistant professor of art history and museum studies at the Herron School of Art and Design and the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, is working on a book project about civil discourse and visual culture that includes a study of the discourse about moving the Barnes collection.

“The use of extreme language (like describing the relocated collection as ‘stolen’) is significant because it demonstrates the fervor behind people’s beliefs about what was best for the collection and its publics,” Holzman said. “It also suggests that debates about the ethics of relocation were steeped in concerns about cultural capital, or who has ownership of the art.”

Other forum speakers are:

  • Kenan Farrell, attorney and adjunct professor teaching art and museum law at IU McKinney School of Law.
  • Kathryn Haigh, deputy director for collections and exhibitions at the Indianapolis Museum of Art.
  • Robert A. Katz, professor of law at IU McKinney School of Law and professor of philanthropic studies at IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy.

An additional free screening of “The Art of the Steal” will take place from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 29, in Room 375, Inlow Hall. Online registration is suggested.

The Jordan H. and Joan R. Leibman Forum was established at IUPUI in 2004 to examine issues on the legal and business environment of the arts. It is co-sponsored by the IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law, the IU Herron School of Art and Design and the IU Kelley School of Business Indianapolis.

The forum is free of change, but registration is required online. Indiana continuing legal education credit of 1.4 hour is available free of charge.

For questions, contact Beth Young at ejmoody@iupui.edu.

Cuba’s 2013 Venice Biennale representative to speak at Herron School of Art and Design

Artist Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons will appear at Herron School of Art and Design as the 2013 Jane Fortune Outstanding Women Visiting Artist Lecturer.

Her artist’s talk, titled “Global Journey,” is scheduled to take place on December 4 in the Basile Auditorium at 6:00 p.m., the same night the Undergraduate Student Exhibition opens in the Berkshire, Reese and Paul Galleries. Both events are free and open to the public.

Inclusion in the juried undergraduate show is an honor for the students whose work is chosen. In a typical year, the jury must select from more than 300 very strong submissions. The exhibition usually contains 60 works across a wide variety of media.

Also opening in the Basile and Marsh Galleries will be two exhibitions from the graduate Collaborative Practices course taught by Professor Andrew Winship and Basile Center Director Kathryn Armstrong.

The three exhibitions continue through December 19.

photo campos-pons

Photo of artist by Ricardo Gay Luger Courtesy of Maria Magdalena studio and Galleries.

Campos-Pons was born in Cuba in 1959. She is a faculty member at the School of The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. According to its website, “Her work of the last 20 years covers an extended range of visual language investigations…from the early 1980s focus on painting and the discussion of sexuality in the crossroads of Cuban mixed cultural heritage to incisive questioning, critique and insertion of the black body in the contemporary narratives of the present.” She represented Cuba in the 2013 Venice Biennale.

“Campos-Pons’s work is largely autobiographical but speaks to a much-needed dialogue about history, place and identity. She does this through a contemporary language that also provides universal access to discussing our current socio-political landscape,” said Herron’s Gallery Director Paula Katz.

It is the generosity of Jane Fortune—author, cultural editor, art historian, art collector and philanthropist—that brings Campos-Pons to Herron. “I want to make an impact on the community that surrounds me and help make the arts accessible to our residents,” she said. This is the sixth Jane Fortune Outstanding Women Visiting Artist Lecture, which has welcomed artists including Judy Chicago, Polly Apfelbaum and Judith Shea to Herron.

Grilled cheese at the center of the newest IUPUI University Library sculpture

In a playful sculpture of floating cartoon-like images, artist Michael Helsley chooses a favorite comfort food — grilled cheese — to take the edge off his grief, represented by five rocks and a bear. The mobile-style sculpture, installed in the University Library atrium, tells of Helsley’s journey of discovery following a personal time of grief.

Helsley’s sculpture is the newest installation in an annual art competition the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis University Library sponsors for Herron School of Art and Design students. As this year’s winner, Helsley received funding to create the large-scale sculpture. It has been installed in the second-floor atrium in the University Library for display for one year.

Helsley’s art draws in its viewers as the images simultaneously appear and disappear, reflecting the movement of the five stages of grief outlined by Dr. Kubler Ross. Helsley constructed the images from rigid foam sheets, using commercially printed material salvaged from billboards and repainted by hand. The Herron student cast an astronaut as himself, part explorer, part cowboy, among the boulders, a bear and the grilled cheese sandwich as he floats and sometimes falls during his journey of exploration of both the past and the future.

The size and flatness of the images allows them to simultaneously disappear in one location while appearing to a viewer in another location. The act of “revealing” themselves relates directly to the act of discovery, whether it is new or as it relates to memory.

Droege, Tennant, Maultsby receive President’s Medal from IU

Indiana University President Michael A. McRobbie presented the President’s Medal for Excellence to three professors Oct. 8 at the university’s Academic Excellence Dinner.

Those receiving medals were Anthony Droege, professor emeritus of art at Indiana University South Bend; Phillip Tennant, who retired in June from IUPUI’s Herron School of Art and Design; and Portia Maultsby, professor of folklore and ethnomusicology in IU Bloomington’s College of Arts and Sciences.

The highest honor an IU president can bestow, the President’s Medal for Excellence recognizes, among other criteria, distinction in public service, service to IU, and extraordinary merit and achievement in the arts, humanities, sciences, education and industry. The medal itself is a reproduction in silver of the symbolic jewel of office worn by IU’s president at ceremonial occasions.

“At Indiana University, we recognize that the disciplines that comprise the arts and humanities remain central to our ability to discover, collaborate, create and innovate, and we will continue to invest in and support them,” McRobbie said. “These three Indiana University faculty members, Portia Maultsby, Phillip Tenant and Tony Droege, who are from three different IU campuses, exemplify IU’s continued strength and excellence in the arts and humanities. They have each reached the pinnacle of academic achievement in their widely different fields, and they have also been recognized by their peers around the world for their tireless dedication and tremendous contributions to their disciplines.

“We are extremely pleased to recognize and honor their outstanding intellectual achievements, their commitment to excellence in every endeavor they have pursued and their tireless dedication to enriching the life of the university.”

Droege retired in 2008 after 37 years on IU South Bend’s faculty, where he served as chair of the Fine Art Department from 1982 to 1990. He received his Bachelor of Arts from Penn State and his Master of Arts and Master of Fine Arts from the University of Iowa. He earned his master’s degree from the University of Iowa and taught at Murray State University in Kentucky before Harold Zisla hired him to teach painting at IU South Bend in 1971.

Primarily known for his large oil paintings, Droege also works in watercolor and a variety of drawing media. In recent years he has made serious explorations in landscape and still life.

Maultsby, who has been at IU Bloomington since 1971, is the Laura Boulton Professor of Folklore and Ethnomusicology. She received her Ph.D. in ethnomusicology and her master’s degree in musicology from the University of Wisconsin in Madison and a bachelor’s degree in piano, theory and composition from Mount St. Scholastica College in Atchison, Kan.

Her research interests include popular music, the music industry, African American music and musical aesthetics and transnationalism. She is also director of the Archives of African American Music and Culture.

Maultsby received an award in 2011 from the National Association for the Study and Performance of African American Music, and serves as an advisory board member for the Institute for Popular Music at the New York-based University of Rochester. She has served as researcher or advisor for various video and radio documentaries for the National Afro-American Museum, PBS, Radio Smithsonian and NPR, among others. She also founded and conducted the Indiana University Soul Revue, a touring student ensemble.

Tennant was recruited to the Herron School of Art and Design in 1974 to launch a woodworking program for art majors. It began as a small struggling program in the basement of the old Herron Museum building on 16th Street in Indianapolis. Under his watch, the program tripled the number of students and broadened its curriculum. In 2008, Herron launched new MFA degrees and has attained national prominence among the top furniture design programs.

Before joining the Herron School, Tennant earned his degree from Alfred University in New York and studied under master woodworker and furniture designer Wendell Castle.

Tennant’s creative activities and scholarly work have been focused on designing contemporary fine art furniture and the exploration of material and process. His work has been exhibited nationally and featured in various publications, including Fine Woodworking, American Craft Magazine and Furniture Studio. He also conducts many workshops as a visiting artist and has received numerous public and private commissions.

Herron well-represented in upcoming Indiana State Museum’s exhibit “Fearless Furniture”

Nearly 85 percent of Indiana’s dentists were trained on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus. Nearly half of the state’s lawyers have their legal roots on the IUPUI campus. Now an upcoming museum exhibit reveals many of the state’s “best of the best” furniture artists also have IUPUI academic roots.

The “Fearless Furniture” exhibit opens Oct. 5 and runs through May 2014 at the Indiana State Museum, just south of Eskenazi Hall, Herron School of Art and Design’s main academic building and home to its furniture making department.

Hundreds of furniture craftspeople either born, trained or living in Indiana submitted proposals to have their works displayed in the exhibit. Eleven of the 24 artists have ties to Herron: Six are students or graduates; one is faculty/staff; and four are both.

“So many of the people who submitted pieces were Herron graduates. … When you look at how many (Herron graduates) were accepted, it is pretty much obvious Herron has an exceptional program,” said David Buchanan, the museum’s curator of decorative objects and furniture.

The selected artists include recent students as well as graduates from as early as 1982, reflecting Herron’s history of success in training students over the years. “Herron’s built an incredible furniture design program. It’s at the very pinnacle now,” Buchanan said.

The exhibit’s name reflects a trait considered essential for anyone making a career of designing and building furniture in a studio. “We were commenting on the idea that people who do this must have a strong sense of fearlessness. They are creating one-of-a kind pieces and trying to make a living,” Buchanan said.

Cory Robinson, associate professor and fine arts department chair at Herron, is one of three artists the museum invited to anchor the show. Robinson, also a Herron alumnus, was chosen “because of the program Herron has built and the direction it’s going,” said Meredith McGovern, the Indiana State Museum’s arts and culture collections manager.

Another show anchor is Laura Drake, assistant professor of industrial design at Purdue University. Drake, also a Herron alumna, was chosen because of Purdue’s industrial design program and its furniture component, the museum said.

In addition to Robinson and Drake, Herron-related artists in “Fearless Furniture” are Erin Behling, BFA ’99; Ray Duffey, MFA ’11 and Herron shop technician; Reagan Furqueron assistant professor and director of foundations; Matt Hutton, BFA ’99; James Lee, BFA ’82; Phillip Tennant, retired professor; Steven Sander, BFA ’12; Robert Sibley, completed foundation studies at Herron; and Colin Tury, second-year MFA degree candidate.

Fifty-eight artists submitted a total of 139 pieces for the juried component of the exhibition. Wendy Maruyama, professor emerita of woodworking and design at San Diego State University, juried “Fearless Furniture.” Maruyama will present a lecture at 4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11, at the Indiana State Museum, followed by a reception celebrating the opening of the exhibition. Museum admission tickets are not required to attend the lecture or reception, which are free and open to the public, but seating is limited. To reserve seats for Maruyama’s talk, call the museum at 317-232-1637.

Regular museum hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Regular admission tickets, which include admission to the “Fearless Furniture” exhibit, are $5.50 each for children 12 and under; and $10 each for adults.

Herron Professor Anila Agha presents new exhibition: Intersections

Assistant Professor of Foundations Anila Quayyum Agha will present an exhibition of works created as part of her 2012-13 New Frontiers Research Grant from Indiana University. The exhibition entitled Intersections will be on view in the Frank and Katrina Basile Gallery from Sept. 25 – Oct.17, 2013.

Agha writes in the artist statement for Intersections:

I used a 2012-13 New Frontier’s Research Grant from Indiana University for a large-scale installation project composed of patterned wood. With this project I explored intersections of culture and religion, the dynamics and interpretation of space and sight as it threaded through cultures and emerged as varied expressions that redefine themselves with the passage of time. In this piece, a motif that is believed to represent certitude is explored to reveal its fluidity i.e. the geometrical patterning in Islamic sacred spaces. This project is meant to uncover the contradictory nature of all intersections; which are simultaneously boundaries and also points of meeting.

The Intersections project takes the seminal experience of exclusion as a woman from a space of community and creativity such as a Mosque and translates the complex expressions of both wonder and exclusion that have been my experience while growing up in Pakistan. The wooden frieze emulates a pattern from the Alhambra, which was poised at the intersection of history, culture and art and was a place where Islamic and Western discourses, met and co-existed in harmony and served as a testament to the symbiosis of difference. I have given substance to this mutualism with the installation project exploring the binaries of public and private, light and shadow, and static and dynamic. This installation project relies on the purity and inner symmetry of geometric design, the interpretation of the cast shadows and the viewer’s presence with in a public space.

The object in the Basile Gallery is a smaller version of the larger design.

Fall events include receptions with two powerhouse Herron alumni

The public is invited to receptions with two renowned Herron School of Art and Design alumni—Distinguished Alumnus Garo Antreasian (‘48 and honorary doctorate from Indiana University in ‘72) and Distinguished Alumna Lois Main Templeton (B.F.A. in Painting with High Distinction, ’81)—who will be visiting their alma mater.

A public exhibition of Antreasian’s paintings and lithographs will open in the Marsh Gallery of Eskenazi Hall on September 25 and run through October 24. There is a public reception in honor of his visit on Oct. 22 from 6:00 p.m. to 8: 00 p.m. outside the gallery.

Templeton will present an artist’s talk in the Basile Auditorium of Eskenazi Hall on October 9 at 6:00 p.m., preceded by a reception at 5:00 p.m. During that event, she will accept the 2012 Distinguished Alumna Award from the Herron Alumni Association.

photo of Garo Antreasian

Garo Antreasian,
photo courtesy David Antreasian

Antreasian, an Indianapolis native who attended Herron as a scholarship student, was hired by the school on the day of his graduation in 1948 to teach still life painting and composition. He convinced the dean to add printmaking to the curriculum and became its first instructor.

He was a founding member of the Tamarind Lithography Workshop, opened in Los Angeles in 1960, where he served as technical director. He co-authored The Tamarind Book of Lithography: Art and Techniques. Originally published in 1971, the work has been continuously updated and is still considered the seminal text on the subject.

The Tamarind Institute, now at the University of New Mexico where Antreasian was a faculty member, is also viewed by many as the most important school dedicated to lithography in the world.

Templeton returns to Indianapolis from Maine as Artist in Residence at the Conrad Indianapolis from October 6-10. On October 6 from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m., the public can mingle with Templeton at a “Sunday Art Matinee” on the Conrad’s second floor. Light fare, drinks and music are included. The Matinee marks the unveiling of Templeton’s newest works in an exhibition called “Lois Main Templeton: The Maine Event”.

Templeton, a protégé of Robert Berkshire, garnered a NUVO Cultural Vision Award in 2011. Her work is in the permanent collections of the Indiana State Museum and The Midwest Museum of American Art, and has twice been exhibited at the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C. She has published The Studio Book: Finding Your Way and the children’s book Who Makes the Sun Rise.