NEH Summer Stipends

NEH Logo provided by neh.govNEH Summer Stipends
Limited Submission URL: here.
IU Internal Deadline: 7/1/2015
NEH Online Application Deadline: 10/1/2015

Brief Description:
Summer Stipends support individuals pursuing advanced research that is of value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Recipients usually produce articles, monographs, books, digital materials, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly resources. Summer Stipends support continuous full-time work on a humanities project for a period of two consecutive months. Summer Stipends support projects at any stage of development.

The Common Good:  The Humanities in the Public Square
NEH invites projects related to its new initiative, The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square. This initiative seeks to connect the study of the humanities to the current conditions of national life. Many of today’s challenges require more than ever the forms of understanding and knowledge represented by the humanities. They require the broadest possible engagement of scholars and the public with the resources of the humanities, including but not limited to the study of language, literature, history, philosophy, comparative religion, and ethics. The study of the humanities can help illuminate the complexity of many contemporary challenges while enriching our understanding of the common good.

Summer Stipends may not be used for:
• projects that seek to promote a particular political, religious, or ideological point of view;
• projects that advocate a particular program of social action;
• specific policy studies;
• research for doctoral dissertations or theses by students enrolled in a degree program;
• the preparation or revision of textbooks;
• curriculum development;
• the development of pedagogical tools (including teaching methods or theories);
• educational or technical impact assessments;
• empirical social science research, unless part of a larger humanities project;
• inventories of collections;
• the writing of guide books, how-to books, or self-help books;
• the writing of autobiographies, memoirs, or works of creative nonfiction; or
• works in the creative or performing arts (for example, painting, fiction or poetry, or dance performance).

Award Amount:
Summer Stipends provide $6,000 for two consecutive months of full-time research and writing. Recipients must work full-time on their projects for these two months and may hold other research grants supporting the same project during this time. Summer Stipends normally support work carried out during the summer months, but arrangements can be made for other times of the year. NEH Summer Stipends are awarded to individuals, not to institutions. They do not require cost sharing and do not include indirect costs.

Eligibility:
• Faculty members teaching full-time at colleges or universities must be nominated by their institutions.
• All applicants must have completed their formal education by the application deadline. While applicants need not have advanced degrees, individuals currently enrolled in a degree-granting program are ineligible to apply.
• Individuals who have been awarded a major fellowship or research grant or its equivalent within the three academic years prior to the deadline are ineligible. (Applicants who have held such fellowships or research grants are eligible only if their award period ended at least three years before the deadline for Summer Stipends applications.) . A “major fellowship or research grant”; is a postdoctoral research award that provides a stipend of at least $15,000. Sabbaticals and grants from an individual’s own institution and stipends and grants from other sources supporting study and research during the summer are not considered major fellowships. See Program details.
• Individuals who have received Summer Stipends may apply to support a new stage of their projects.
• See Program details for more specific information.
INTERNAL COMPETITION NECESSARY: TWO FACUTLY MEMBERS PER CAMPUS
Each college and university in the United States and its jurisdictions (campus) may nominate two faculty members. Any faculty member teaching full-time is eligible for nomination.

APPLICANTS EXEMPT FROM NOMINATION / NO INTERNAL COMPETITION NEEDED
The following individuals may apply online without a nomination or internal competition:
• independent scholars not affiliated with a college or university;
• college or university staff members who are not faculty members and will not be teaching during the academic year preceding the award tenure
• emeritus faculty; and
• adjunct faculty, part-time faculty, and applicants with academic appointments that terminate by the summer of the award tenure.

IUPUI Internal competition:
For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward,emward@iupui.edu by July 1, 2015 for internal competition.
Format pages with one-inch margins and with a font size no smaller than eleven point.
The narrative should not assume specialized knowledge and should be free of technical terms and jargon. The narrative limitation does not include references.

1. Provide a 1-3 page narrative that includes the following:
• Project Title
• Project Director Name and Credentials
• Research and contribution: Describe the intellectual significance of the proposed project, including its value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Provide an overview of the project, explaining the basic ideas, problems, or questions examined by the study. Explain how the project will complement, challenge, or expand relevant studies in the field.
• Methods and work plan: Describe your method(s) and clarify the part or stage of the project that will be supported by the Summer Stipend. Provide a work plan, describing what you will accomplish during the award period. Your work plan must be based on a full-time commitment to the project; part-time work is not allowed. If you do not anticipate finishing the entire project during the award period, discuss your plan for doing so. For book projects, explain how the final project will be organized. If possible, provide a brief chapter outline. For digital projects, describe the technologies that will be used and developed, and how the scholarship will be presented to benefit audiences in the humanities.
• Competencies, skills, and access: Explain your competence in the area of your project. If the area of inquiry is new to you, explain your reasons for working in it and your qualifications to do so. Specify your level of competence in any language or digital technology needed for the study. Describe where the study will be conducted and what research materials will be used.
• Final product and dissemination: Describe the intended audience and the intended results of the project. If relevant, explain how the results will be disseminated and why these means are appropriate to the subject matter and audience.

2. A Letter from the Chair or Dean

3. 1-2 page abbreviated CV which includes:
• Current and Past Positions
• Education: List degrees, dates awarded, and titles of theses or dissertations
• Awards and Honors: Include dates. If you have received support from NEH, indicate the dates of these grants and any resulting publications.
• Publications: Include full citations for publications and presentations
• Other Relevant Professional Activities & Accomplishments

WONDER AND THE NATURAL WORLD: A Call for Grant Proposals

Logo for CSRES courtesy of News.iupui.eduCALL FOR GRANT PROPOSALS: Symposia, workshops, performances, and seminar series for departments, institutes, and research centers at all IU campuses
Deadline for submission: June 15, 2015
Awards announced by mid-July 2015

The IU Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics, and Society (CSRES) announces a grant competition on the theme of Wonder and the Natural World. Departments, research centers, and institutes across all IU campuses may apply for funds to support or supplement symposia, workshops, seminar series, performances, or small conferences during the 2015-2016 academic year that align with the Consortium’s two-year theme of Wonder and the Natural World. This call for proposals is part of a two-year thematic initiative sponsored by CSRES.

Wonder has been framed as a key moral disposition, as well as an aesthetic, emotional, or cognitive response; depending on its objects and orientation, it may display both salutary and sinister dimensions. Wonder at nature is prompted by the odd and uncanny, the strange and novel, the transcendent and sublime, as well as encounters with the monstrous and horrific. It has variously been associated with, or dissociated from, curiosity, awe, intimations of divinity, infinity, the sublime, the miraculous or supernatural, feelings of astonishment and puzzlement. We welcome projects that explore wonder or its cognate terms in relation to nature or the natural, broadly construed. Proposals should clearly relate the project to the announced theme.

Grants will be awarded in amounts up to $2500, $5000, and $7500 depending on the scope of the proposed project. Funds can be used for travel and honoraria for external speakers, as well as hospitality expenses in keeping with university regulations. IU faculty may not receive honoraria. Applications for funding should include:

• summary of the project (750 words max.)
• a list of invited presenters
• a detailed budget
• letter of support from department chair or school/unit dean (included with the application or emailed separately)
• evidence of other funding obtained or requested (for requests over $2000)

Questions about the grant competition, and complete grant proposals may be emailed to CSRES Director Lisa Sideris at lsideris@indiana.edu.

The Indiana University Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics, and Society is an interdisciplinary association of scholars, academic programs, and research centers from the eight campuses of Indiana University. Their mandate is to aid in the development of research and scholarship to better understand religion, ethics, values, and spirituality in society. An initiative of the IU Vice President for Research Office, CSRES is also supported by the Office of the President, The Office of the Executive Vice President and Chancellor, IUPUI, and the College of Arts and Sciences at IU Bloomington.

Call for 2015 IUPUI Research Day Poster Abstracts

imagesResearch Day, April 17, 2015, provides an opportunity for the IUPUI faculty, staff, and students, and their academic, industrial, governmental partners, and the broader community, to come together and learn more about the research enterprise at IUPUI, explore new collaborations, and lay the foundation for new partnerships.

Faculty, post doctoral fellow, professional student, graduate student and staff poster presentations are coordinated by the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research.

Guidelines

  • Abstracts will be competitively selected for poster presentation on the basis of scholarship, research and creative activity
  • There is no limit on the number of abstracts you may submit, but only one will be accepted
  • Accepted abstracts will be published as received on the Research Day website unless specified otherwise on the submission page. Ensure you have permission to publish!
  • Poster sessions are 90 minutes
  • Presenters are responsible for setting up and taking down posters at designated times
  • Posters may be landscape or portrait and approximately 36” x 60”. Backer boards 40”x 60” are provided, as are easels and push pins
  • Display tables and electrical outlets are available for select presenters and must be pre-approved
  • Have 2-3 minutes of talking points prepared to “present” your work as attendees view your poster

Abstract Format
Title
Authors
Affiliations
Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis

  • No limit on title length
  • List authors and their affiliations in the style appropriate for your discipline
  • Center justify the heading
  • The abstract should be no more than one page

These abstracts are due March 23, 2015. Applicants will be notified of the status of their submission after March 27, 2015.

Submit your abstract here

Call for Nominations: Max Planck Research Award

Alexander von Humboldt Foundation

Alexander von Humboldt Foundation

Excellent scientists and scholars of all nationalities who are expected to continue producing outstanding academic achievements in international collaboration – not least with the assistance of this award – are eligible to be nominated for the Max Planck Research Award.

On an annually-alternating basis, the call for nominations addresses areas within the natural and engineering sciences, the life sciences, and the social sciences and humanities.

The Max Planck Research Award 2015 will be conferred in the area of humanities and social sciences in the subject

Religion and Modernity: Secularisation and Social and Religious Pluralism
.
The multidisciplinary field “Religion and Modernity: Secularisation and Social and Religious Pluralism” addresses a range of diverse fundamental, partly interconnected research questions with reference to the development and change of religious thought and practice on their way to modernity and up to the present time. Is the conventional equation between modernity and secularisation a valid one? To what extent is the system of values, which shapes modern culture and society, rooted in the Christian tradition of the Middle Ages or in that of the early modern period (individualism, human rights, the intrinsic value of a secular order in contrast to a spiritual one)? Other questions playing a role within this debate address the adaptability of different religious and confessional communities to the challenges of modernity, as well as the relationship between state/secular authority and church(es) or other religious communities in the recent past and particularly in our present time. Concepts which are important in this area are for example laicism (Laïcité) or “civil religion” or privileging large religious communities. Finally the rise of religious pluralism and the individualisation of religious experience are relevant phenomena for this topic.

Every year, the Humboldt Foundation and the Max Planck Society grant two research awards to one researcher working abroad and one researcher working in Germany. These two awards will be bestowed independently.

The Presidents/Vice Chancellors of universities and the heads of research institutions in Germany are eligible to make nominations (c.f. list of eligible nominators). Direct applications are not accepted. As a rule, each award is endowed with 750,000 EUR and may be used over a period of three to a maximum of five years to fund research chosen by the award winner.

Sponsor deadline: 31 Jan 2015, Nominations

Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung Max Planck Research Award

TEDxIndianapolis and the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute Team Up for Free Ticket Giveway

TEDxIndianapolis and Entanglements LectureTEDxIndianapolis and the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute have teamed up for a free ticket giveaway for two inspiring and entertaining events during the month of October.

Just tweet or retweet this announcement between September 3 and September 8 with the hashtag #IAHITEDx, and you will be entered into our drawing to win a ticket to the Entanglements Lecture on October 8 and a ticket to TEDxIndianapolis on October 21.

The Entanglements Lecture is a new series that brings together scientists, humanists, and artists to discuss “big questions” that affect all of us.  At the inaugural event on October 8, E.O. Wilson, two-time Pulitzer Prize winning biologist and recipient of the TED Prize, will join Katherine Hayles, specialist in the culture of cyborgs and virtual bodies, in a conversation that will take us on a journey to answer one of humanity’s most fundamental questions: “What makes us human?”

TEDxIndianapolis is a self-organized, local platform to share big, TED-like ideas. Organized by Jim Walker with the incredible support of partners, sponsors, and volunteers, this year’s TEDxIndianapolis will explore the theme Get Outside IN at Hilbert Circle Theatre on October 21, 2014. Tickets are on sale now. More than 500 people attended the first TEDxIndianapolis, DESIGN LEARNING, at the Indianapolis Museum of Art in 2012 (photos here/videos here). And more than 1,200 people converged at last year’s TEDxIndianapolis, held on October 22, 2013, at the Hilbert Circle Theatre. It was a day of Big Ideas, conversation, and inspiration related to the theme of MIX IT UP, a rousing mashup of local and national speakers and performers, plus recorded TED talks and engaging interactive experiences. Read more about the 2013 TEDxIndianapolis in last year’s event wrap-up.

More event details are below.


Entanglements Lecture Series
E.O. Wilson and Katherine Hayles, “What Makes us Human?”
October 8, 2014 | 7:00-8:45
Indianapolis Central Library, Clowes Auditorium
$35 general admission | $15 students

When did we become human? Are human and animal societies that much different? Do we already live in an age of cyborgs?

E.O. Wilson and Katherine Hayles visit Indianapolis as part of the new IAHI Entanglements Lecture Series.  Entanglements brings together scientists, humanists, and artists to discuss “big questions” that affect all of us.

At our inaugural event, E.O. Wilson, two-time Pulitzer Prize winning biologist, will join Katherine Hayles, specialist in the culture of cyborgs and virtual bodies, in a conversation that will take us on a journey to answer one of humanity’s most fundamental questions: “What makes us human?”

Over the course of this evening, Wilson and Hayles will discuss the evolution of human consciousness, the relationship between biology, society, culture, and technology, and the future of humanity.  This will be an event that changes the way you think about yourself and your world.

EO WilsonDr. E.O. Wilson is Professor Emeritus and Honorary Curator in Entomology at Harvard University.  He is a two time Pulitzer Prize winner, a National Medal of Science awardee, a Crafoord Prize recipient (given by the Academy in fields of science it does not cover by the Nobel Prize), and a TED Prize Winner.  In fact, he has received over 100 awards throughout his career. He is the author of numerous books, including SociobiologyThe AntsThe Diversity of Life,ConsilienceThe Social Conquest of Earth, and Letters to a Young Scientist.  During his career he has explored the biggest questions through the littlest creatures — ants. He is a prominent environmental advocate, and in March 2014, the government of Mozambique opened the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Laboratory in Gorongosa National Park — a tribute to Wilson’s worldwide impact.

Katherine HaylesDr. Katherine Hayles is Professor of Literature at Duke University.  Her book, How We Became Posthuman, published in 1999, was named one of the best 25 books of 1999 by The Village Voice and received the Rene Wellek Prize for Best Book in Literary Theory.  She is the author of multiple books, including The Cosmic Web, Chaos Bound, Writing Machines, How We Think, and My Mother Was a Computer.  A recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, two NEH Fellowships, a Rockefeller Residential Fellowship, and a National Humanities Center Fellowship, Dr. Hayles  is a leading social and literary critic with interests in cyborg anthropology, digital humanities, electronic literature, science and technology, science fiction, and critical theory.

The Entanglements Lecture Series is made possible through the generous support of the Efroymson Family Fund, the IU School of Dentistry, and the Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute.

This event is a collaboration between the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, Indiana Humanities, and the Spirit and Place Festival.

logo image


TEDxIndianapolis
October 21, 2014 | 8:00-5:30
Hilbert Circle Theater
$69 early bird admission | $79 after Sept. 30

Like all TEDx events, TEDxIndianapolis is a self-organized, local platform to share big, TED-like ideas. Organized by Jim Walker with the incredible support of partners, sponsors, and volunteers, this year’s TEDxIndianapolis will explore the theme Get Outside IN at Hilbert Circle Theatre on October 21, 2014.Tickets are on sale now. 

More than 500 people attended the first TEDxIndianapolis, DESIGN LEARNING, at the Indianapolis Museum of Art in 2012 (photos here/videos here). And more than 1,200 people converged at last year’s TEDxIndianapolis, held on October 22, 2013, at the Hilbert Circle Theatre. It was a day of Big Ideas, conversation, and inspiration related to the theme of MIX IT UP, a rousing mashup of local and national speakers and performers, plus recorded TED talks and engaging interactive experiences. Read more about the 2013 TEDxIndianapolis in last year’s event wrap-up.

 

2014-15 American Council of Learned Societies Fellowship Competitions Now Open

acls-logo

The American Council of Learned Societies

The American Council of Learned Societies is the leading private institution supporting scholars in the humanities. ACLS is pleased to announce that the 2014-15 ACLS fellowship competitions are now open. ACLS offers fellowship programs that promote the full spectrum of humanities and humanistic social sciences research and support scholars at the advanced graduate student level through all stages of the academic career. Comprehensive information and eligibility criteria for all programs can be found here. In the 2013-14 competition year, ACLS awarded over $15 million to nearly 300 scholars worldwide. Recent fellows’ profiles and research abstracts are available.

Deadlines: Application deadlines vary by program
September 24, 2014: ACLS Fellowships (the central program); ACLS Collaborative Research Fellowships; ACLS Digital Innovation Fellowships
Charles A. Ryskamp Research Fellowships; Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowships for Recently Tenured Scholars
October 1, 2014: Luce/ACLS Predissertation-Summer Travel Grants in China Studies; Luce/ACLS Postdoctoral Fellowships in China Studies; Luce/ACLS Collaborative Reading-Workshop Grants in China Studies; Comparative Perspectives on Chinese Culture and Society (grants for planning meetings, workshops, and conferences)
October 22, 2014: Luce/ACLS Dissertation Fellowships in American Art; Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships; The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Dissertation Fellowships in Buddhist Studies; The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowships in Buddhist Studies
The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Collaborative Research Fellowships in Buddhist Studies
November 1, 2014: African Humanities Program
January 14, 2015: The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Visiting Professorships in Buddhist Studies
March 2015 (date TBA): ACLS Public Fellows

For more information, contact Matthew Goldfeder, Director of Fellowship Programs

IUPUI Motorsports engineering and furniture design students build Formula-style race car

391007_w296The Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Formula-style race car competing this week in Lincoln, Neb., is the unique collaborative work of students from two diverse programs on the IUPUI campus – motorsports engineering and furniture design.

The vehicle is one of more than 90 cars entered in the Formula SAE student design competition organized by SAE International, formerly known as the Society of Automotive Engineers.

Students from the motorsports engineering program in the Purdue School of Engineering & Technology at IUPUI designed, built and tested the majority of the IUPUI race car. However, the bodywork is the team work of motorsports students and students in the furniture design program of the Herron School of Art and Design at IUPUI.

“This inventive collaboration is a perfect example of the relevance of art and design to a broad array of applications beyond ‘fine art.’ It also serves as an example of the opportunities afforded to students at IUPUI by faculty who are more than willing to work across school boundaries with their colleagues,” said Glennda McGann, assistant dean for development and external affairs at Herron.

Pete Hylton, associate professor of mechanical engineering technology, is director of the motorsports engineering program at IUPUI, the first U.S. university to offer a bachelor’s degree in motorsports engineering.

Furniture craftsman Cory Robinson, associate professor and chair of Herron’s fine arts department, directed the Herron students working on the race car project.

“It was very interesting to see the kinds of machines that they use to make furniture….and to figure out how to translate our needs to their equipment,” said Nikky Saxon, a motorsports engineering student who worked on the race car project. “The Herron students were very helpful and easy to work with.  It was a great experience.”

According to the description on the SAE website, the concept behind Formula SAE is that a fictional manufacturing company has contracted a design team to develop a small Formula-style race car for a non-professional weekend autocross racer. Each collegiate team designs, builds and tests a prototype based on a series of rules set up both to ensure onsite event operations and promote clever problem solving.

Motorsports engineering students developed the IUPUI race car’s basic shape using 3D computer modeling to fit a shape around the chassis, including an aerodynamic underbody which provides ground effects. The shape of the underside of the body creates down-force by channeling the airflow through a venturi shaped passageway, similar to what is done on IndyCar and Formula One racecars.

The IUPUI engineering students handed off their design to the Herron students who went to work using their school’s gantry mill — typically used to shape wood for furniture design projects — to shape the pieces which were assembled to form the car’s required body shape.

A fiberglass mold was then made of this shape, and finally a composite layup was made using that mold and it was cured with the help of Indy Performance Composites to complete the body parts.  These were then fitted to the chassis, which is a steel tube-frame configuration built with materials donated to the program by AED Motorsports of Indianapolis.

“We were able to make a much more complex shape by using the Herron gantry mill,” Hylton said. “We were able to design the car on the computer using 3D modeling and translate that to hardware using the gantry mill. Working with specialists from another (non-engineering) realm is excellent experience for our students….and very real world.”

The IUPUI vehicle completed its tech inspection Wednesday as one of less than 40 entries to accomplish that requirement on Day 1 of the four-day racing event.

Design judging took place Thursday. Dynamic competitions such as acceleration, skidpad, autocross, and endurance events will take place today and Saturday.

IUPUI last competed in Formula SAE in 2011 when the school was the top finishing rookie team at the event held at Michigan International Speedway.

For further information, contact Motorsports Engineering Director Pete Hylton or FSAE faculty advisor Andy Borme.