Humanities Intensive Teaching and Learning (HILT) Institute

HILT logoRegistration for the Annual Humanities Intensive Learning + Teaching 2014 Conference is now available.

The Keynote Speaker will be Tara McPherson. Tara McPherson is Associate Professor of Critical Studies at the University of Southern California’s School of Cinematic Arts. She is a core faculty member of the IMAP program, USC’s innovative practice based-Ph.D., and also an affiliated faculty member in the American Studies and Ethnicity Department. Her research engages the cultural dimensions of media, including the intersection of gender, race, affect and place. She has a particular interest in digital media. Here, her research focuses on the digital humanities, early software histories, gender, and race, as well as upon the development of new tools and paradigms for digital publishing, learning, and authorship.

Her Reconstructing Dixie: Race, Gender and Nostalgia in the Imagined South (Duke UP: 2003) received the 2004 John G. Cawelti Award for the outstanding book published on American Culture, among other awards. She is co-editor of Hop on Pop: The Politics and Pleasures of Popular Culture (Duke UP: 2003) and editor of Digital Youth, Innovation and the Unexpected, part of the MacArthur Foundation series on Digital Media and Learning (MIT Press, 2008.) Her writing has appeared in numerous journals, including Camera Obscura, The Velvet Light Trap, Discourse, and Screen, and in edited anthologies such as Race and Cyberspace, The New Media Book, The Object Reader, Virtual Publics, The Visual Culture Reader 2.0, and Basketball Jones. The anthology, Interactive Frictions, co-edited with Marsha Kinder, is forthcoming from the University of California Press, and she is currently working on a manuscript examining the digital transformation of the archive as it mutates into the database.

She is the Founding Editor of Vectors, a multimedia peer-reviewed journal affiliated with the Open Humanities Press, and is a founding editor of the MacArthur-supported International Journal of Learning and Media (launched by MIT Press in 2009.) She is a widely sought-out speaker on the digital humanities, digital scholarship, and feminist technology studies. Tara was among the founding organizers of Race in Digital Space, a multi-year project supported by the Annenberg Center for Communication and the Ford and Rockefeller Foundations. She is on the advisory board of the Mellon-funded Scholarly Communications Institute, has frequently served as an AFI juror, is a core board member of HASTAC , and is on the boards of several journals and other organizations. At USC, she co-directs (with Phil Ethington) the new Center for Transformative Scholarship and is a fellow at the Center for Excellence in Teaching. With major support from the Mellon Foundation, she is currently working with colleagues from leading universities and with several academic presses, museums, scholarly societies, and archives to explore new modes of scholarship for visual culture research. She is the lead PI on the new authoring platform, Scalar, and for the Alliance for Networking Visual Culture.

Courses for 2014 include:

Project Development led by Simon Appleford, Clemson University and Jennifer Guiliano, MITH
This course will explore the fundamentals of project planning and design including, but not limited to: formulating appropriate disciplinary questions for digital humanities research, investigating digital humanities tools and resources, structuring your first project, critical path scheduling, understanding roles and responsibilities, risk management, documenting your project work, writing your first grant proposal, budget setting and controls, building the project team, and selecting and implementing project management tools and software. This is an advanced course and, as such, you are expected to have an understanding of the definition of digital humanities. Materials will be covered through lectures, discussions, presentations, and hands-on activities. Participants will get the most of the course if they arrive with at least some sense of a potential digital humanities project that they would like to develop throughout the course.

Introduction to Web Development, Design, and Principles led by Jeremy Boggs, Scholars’ Lab, and Jeri Wierenga, George Mason University
This course introduces students to best practices and techniques for standards-based, accessible web design and development including, but not limited to: Current trends and issues in web design/development; Responsive design for a variety of platforms and devices; HTML, CSS, and JavaScript; Managing code using the Git version control system. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with steps and skills to conceive, design, develop, and publish a web site. Topics will be covered primarily through hands-on activities, with some supplementary lectures and discussions. By the end of the course, students will have a modest web site published on the Web. Prior experience with web design or development could be useful, but is not required.

Humanities Programming led by Wayne Graham, Scholars’ Lab, and Brandon Walsh, University of Virginia
This course focuses on introducing participants to humanities programming through the creation and use of the Ruby on Rails web application framework. This course will introduce programming and design concepts, project management and planning, workflow, as well as the design, implementation, and deployment of a web-based application. Technologies covered in this course will include git, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Ruby, Rails, and relational (and non-relational) data stores. Over the course of the week, we will work through the practical implementation of a developing and deploying a small-scale web application.

Games in the Humanities Classroom led by Anastasia Salter, University of Baltimore
Games can be a great way to add experiential and playful learning to the humanities classroom by integrating learning objectives with game mechanics. We’ll look at three main ways to integrate games into learning objectives: teaching and debriefing existing games, making games for students to play, and building games with your students. Along the way, we’ll discuss what makes an effective learning game and how integrating games can offer a gentle way to learn from failure while offering the opportunity for exploration, collaboration, and the probing of ideas through new lenses. Participants will engage in “critical play” of several examples of humanities board games, text games, and graphical games and learn simple tools for making games in these genres while building simple games. No programming experience is required or assumed.

Large-Scale Text Analysis with R led by Matt Jockers, University of Nebraska
Text collections such as the Google Books have provided scholars in many fields with convenient access to their materials in digital form, but text analysis at the scale of millions or billions of words still requires the use of tools and methods that may initially seem complex or esoteric to researchers in the humanities. Large-Scale Text Analysis with R will provide a practical introduction to a range of text analysis tools and methods. The course will include units on data extraction, stylistic analysis, authorship attribution, genre detection, gender detection, unsupervised clustering, supervised classification, topic modeling, and sentiment analysis. The main computing environment for the course will be R, “the open source programming language and software environment for statistical computing and graphics.” While no programming experience is required, students should have basic computer skills and be familiar with their computer’s file system and comfortable with the command line. The course will cover best practices in data gathering and preparation, as well as addressing some of the theoretical questions that arise when employing a quantitative methodology for the study of literature. Participants will be given a “sample corpus” to use in class exercises, but some class time will be available for independent work and participants are encouraged to bring their own text corpora and research questions so they may apply their newly learned skills to projects of their own.

Network Analysis and Visualization led by Elijah Meeks, Stanford University
This course will cover the principles of network analysis and representation with an emphasis on expressing network structures and measures using information visualization. The tool we’ll be using will be Gephi, which is freely available at gephi.org, with some time spent on learning how to deploy your network visualization in a dynamic or interactive manner on the web using a variety of frameworks. This course will introduce and explain a variety of traditional network statistics, such as various measures of centrality and clustering, and explain the appropriate use of network statistics to various classes of networks. The workshop will consist of lectures followed by discussion and hands-on activities. If participants can bring a sample of their network data, the activities will usually be applicable to all manner of networks, but a variety of sample network datasets will be available to explore different network phenomena. This workshop will cover traditional social networks, geographic networks, dynamic networks, and n-partite networks and will deal with issues of modeling networks, formatting data, and using information visualization best practices in representation of your network.

Born-Digital Forensics led by Kam Woods, University of North Carolina, and Porter Olsen, MITH
This course will introduce students to the role of digital forensics in the act of preserving, investigating, and curating born-digital culture artifacts. We will explore the technical underpinning and the physical materiality of the digital objects we frequently, in our screen-centric world, mistake as ephemeral. Using open source tools including Linux, The Sleuth Kit, and BitCurator, students will get hands-on training exploring a wide variety of digital media and learning how to look for deleted files, how to search and redact personally identifiable information, and how to produce information-rich metadata about a forensic disk image. In addition to practical skills, students will develop a theoretical understanding of digital storage media–and the forensics disk images produced from them–as objects of study in their own right and the importance of learning to read these objects as richly as we do more traditional texts. There are no essential prerequisite skills for this course; however, a working knowledge of Linux will be a great benefit. Students who have access to their own collection of born-digital materials to work with are encouraged to bring them to the course.

Crowdsourcing Cultural Heritage led by Ben Brumfield, Independent Developer, and Mia Ridge, Ph.D. Candidate, Open University
Successful crowdsourcing projects help organizations connect with audiences who enjoy engaging with their content and tasks, whether transcribing handwritten documents, correcting OCR errors, identifying animals on the Serengeti or folding proteins. Conversely, poorly-designed crowdsourcing projects find it difficult to attract or retain participants. This class will present international case studies of best practice crowdsourcing projects to illustrate the range of tasks that can be crowdsourced, the motivations of participants and the characteristics of well-designed projects. We’ll study crowdsourcing projects from the worlds of citizen science, investigative journalism, genealogy and free culture to look for lessons which might apply to humanities projects. We’ll discuss models for quality control over user-generated projects, explore the cross-overs between traditional in-house volunteer projects internet-enabled crowdsourcing, and look at the numbers behind real-world projects. Finally, the course will give students hands-on experience with several different crowdsourcing platforms for image annotation, manuscript transcription, and OCR correction. Students are encouraged to bring their project ideas and some scanned material for the lab sessions.

Critical Race and Gender in the Digital Humanities led by Jarah Moesh, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Maryland
The methods and tools used and produced by Digital Humanists function as organizing principles that frame how race, gender, sexuality, and ability are embodied and understood within and through projects, code-bases, and communities of practice. The very ‘making’ of tools and projects is an engagement with power and control. Through a critical theoretical exploration of the values in the design and use of these tools and methods, we begin to understand that these methods and practices are structures which are themselves marginalizing, tokenizing, and reductionist. By pairing hands-on learning/making with Critical Race Theory, Queer, and Gender Theories, we will interrogate the structures of the tools themselves while creating our own collaborative practices and methods for ‘doing’ (refracting) DH differently. To accomplish this, each day will focus on one tool or method. Mornings will be a combination of reading-based discussion and experimental structural/tools-based exercises, while afternoon sessions will focus on pulling it all together in collaborative analytical projects. While no prior technical experience is necessary, you will be experimenting with, and creating your own theoretical practice that incorporates key themes in critical race, gender and queer theories with digital humanities methods and tools. Therefore, the key requirement for this course is curiosity and a willingness to explore new ideas in order to fully engage with the materials. Students are also encouraged to bring their own research questions to explore through these theories and practices.

When: August 4-8, 2014
Where:
University of Maryland
Cost: Non-student: $950/ Student: $500

For group discounts, email here
For more information on HILT, visit their website here

Researching and Teaching Intercultural Competence and 8th Intercultural Rhetoric and Discourse Conference

Daniel C. Nützel

International scholars will headline an Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis conference, discussing the role of cultural knowledge and intercultural communication as well as the intersection of language and culture in community settings. The conference aims to help university teachers, school teachers and other professionals adapt the latest thinking about the integration of cultural studies into professional and second language learning settings.

The Researching and Teaching Intercultural Competence and Intercultural Rhetoric and Discourse Conference will take place June 6 and 7 at the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd, Indianapolis.

The conference is organized by the International Center for Intercultural Communication, the Department of World Languages and Cultures, and the Max Kade German-American Center in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

This year’s conference also celebrates the memory of professor Daniel C. Nützel, who died in April 2013 at the age of 50. Nützel was associate professor of German, the Hoyt-Reichmann Scholar of German-American Studies and director of the Max Kade German-American Center at IUPUI.

“Professor Nützel was a well-respected colleague, teacher and scholar,” said professor Claudia Grossmann, conference co-organizer and interim director of the Max Kade German-American Center. “He was a proponent of expanding cultural and intercultural competence in communication as an aspect of interest across a range of academic disciplines, and this conference is a fitting part of his legacy.”

The conference focuses on studies of how writers and speakers with various linguistic, cultural and social backgrounds negotiate communication. The conference seeks to bring together current discussions of intercultural competence in language education, rhetoric and discourse research, and application in English and other world language teaching settings.

“Presentations will feature theoretical and empirical investigations of topics along with discussion of practical applications, including classroom practices, writing in business and other professional settings,” said professor Marta Anton, chair of the Department of World Languages and Cultures and a conference organizer. “The conference addresses a variety of topics, from the importance of teaching metaphoric meanings as an essential part of developing linguistic proficiency in a second language, to the development of intercultural competence during study abroad or the expressions of ethnicity among German Americans in early-20th-century Indianapolis, to name a few, and highlights cultural contact and language development.”

Plenary talks include:

  • “The Present and Future of Intercultural Rhetoric,” Ulla Connor, IUPUI, and Dwight Atkinson, Purdue University
  • “Metaphor: The Integration of Culture, Cognition, and Communication,” James Lantolf, Pennsylvania State University
  • “The Intercultural Complex and Its Assessment in Healthcare Communication,” Srikant Sarangi, Aalborg University, Denmark
  • “Impacting Teacher Use of Critical Sociocultural Practices in K-12 Classrooms,” Annela Teemant, IUPUI

“The conference was established to further research in intercultural competence, and intercultural rhetoric, and to create collaborations among leading research universities and organizations,” said professor Ulla Connor, conference co-organizer and director of the International Center for Intercultural Communication. “It also is intended to build connections at IUPUI and within Indianapolis and Indiana among those who teach in a broad array of disciplines.”

Researchers and teachers of second/foreign languages as well as scholars in second language acquisition, communication, composition and multicultural education, among others, are encouraged to participate.

When: June 6 and 7, 2014
Where:
IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd, Indianapolis

For more information or to register, visit the conference website.

Conference explores service learning in the community

May 12-16, 2014
Indianapolis, IN

The Center for Service and Learning and Indiana Campus Compact, invite those interested in enhancing their service learning courses or advancing their research on service learning to the Connecting Campuses with Communities conference.

The conference is a two-part event that focuses on building a network of scholars and practitioners and offers the following opportunities:

The Service Learning Institute (May 12-14) is ideal for those interested in gaining strategies used to improve the quality of a service learning course;

The Research Academy (May 14-16) is designed to strengthen one’s research on service learning while advancing their scholarship of teaching and learning.

Visit the conference website for further details.

Call for proposals: Community College Humanities Association

The Community College Humanities Association’s Central Division invites proposals for the upcoming conference on the theme of “Humanities at the Crossroads.”

The humanities are situated at the crossroads of numerous and oftentimes competing interests on community college campuses nationwide. What is the place of the humanities on the community college campus, both now and in the future? How can the humanities navigate the crossroads at which they find themselves? The city of Indianapolis—the “Crossroads of America”—will provide the perfect setting for a discussion of these and related questions during the CCHA’s Central Division Conference on Nov. 20-22, 2014.

We welcome teachers and students of the humanities to share ideas, experiences, research, or artistic creations that speak to our theme broadly construed.

Extended Deadline for Proposals: May 19, 2014

For more information see the official Call for Proposals.

For online submissions go to the CCHA Conference Website.

Contact: Jack Cooney,Ivy Tech Community College, 50 W. Fall Creek Pkwy. North Drive, Indianapolis, IN 46208. Ph. 317-916-7930. Email: jcooney@ivytech.edu.

2014 Tobias Leadership Conference

Indiana University’s ninth annual Tobias Leadership Conference will take place from April 24-26 at the Alexander Hotel in downtown Indianapolis. The Conference brings together scholars and practitioners from the entire spectrum of leadership including corporate leadership, not-for-profit leadership, religious leadership, educational leadership, medical leadership, and political leadership. The Conference will feature papers, panels, and speakers from all academic disciplines. The registration fee of $195 includes all conference sessions, the Thursday evening reception and book fair, two lunches, Friday’s gala dinner, and two continental breakfasts. There is a $45 student rate that does not include meals. Plenary speakers include:

  • Data-Smart Leadership – Stephen Goldsmith, Professor of Government, Director of Data-Smart City Solutions at Harvard Kennedy School
  • Frankenstein’s Leadership Monster – Richard Gunderman, Chancellor’s Professor, Professor of Radiology, Pediatrics, Medical Education, Philosphy, Liberal Arts, Philanthropy, and in the Honors College at Indiana University
  • Spirituality and Leadership Effectiveness – George Houston, Center for Creative Leadership
  • Effective Leadership in Japan, the Case of Shibusawa Eiichi – Gil Latz, Associate Vice Chancellor for International Affairs, Professor of Geography and Philanthropy, IUPUI
  • A Conversation with Russ Mawby, 25 year CEO and Chairman Emeritus of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation – Russ Mawby and Gene Tempel, Founding Dean, Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy
  • Put Your Whole Self in: Leadership Beyond the Rules – Sandy Eisenberg Sasso, Rabbi Emerita, Director, Religion, Spirituality and the Arts Initiative, Butler University
  • Why Culture Matters – Jeff Smulyan, Chairman of the Board, President and CEO, Emmis Communications
  • Made for Each Other: Leading with Collaboration and Creativity – Jim Walker, Executive Director, Big Car Collaborative
  • Responsible Leadership: Stewardship for the Future – Sandra Waddock, Gilligan Chair of Strategy, Carroll School of Business, Boston College
  • Changing Minds in the Army: Why it is so Difficult and What to do About It – Leonard Wong, Research Professor, United States Army War College

To register, and to view the entire Conference program, please visit the conference website.

Call for papers: 2014 Purdue American Studies Symposium: American exceptionalism in the 21st century

Call for Papers: 39th Annual American Studies Graduate Symposium
“The Good, the Bad, and The Ugly: American Exceptionalism in the 21st Century”
Purdue University, April 17-18, 2014

Keynote Speaker: Kevin Gaines, Robert Hayden Collegiate Professor of History and Afroamerican and African Studies, University of Michigan

The election of our nation’s first Black president ushered in a discourse of Post-Blackness, suggesting that America’s race problems were behind us. Likewise, the repeal of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell, and the unconstitutionality of DOMA seem to suggest that discrimination against LGBT and queer persons was a thing of the past. However, recent political attacks on women’s rights, renewed fights to prevent LGBT persons from marrying, the government shutdown, the GOP war on voting rights aimed at disenfranchising people of color, as well as our extended global “war on terror,” have dispelled the notion that we are “post” anything. American exceptionalism, including intra-American exceptionalism, is in full effect. Still, we must ask, what’s good about America? What narratives of belonging, nation, and freedom bind us to our American identity? Is there anything left to love about America?

In accordance with this theme, we would be interested in tracing the resurgence of imperialism, white supremacy, economic disparity, and otherness within the turn of the century. Other possible sub-themes include:

  • Identity: What constitutes an American? Who is excluded and why?
  • Post-race, post-feminism, post-Civil Rights?
  • Commodification/Cooptation of American identity
  • Music/sound
  • Technology/Innovation
  • Media/Popular Culture/Representation
  • American Exceptionalism in a transnational context
  • Religion/spirituality
  • LGBT/Queer: Progression (or regression) of movements, visibility, etc.
  • Ecology/geography
  • Immigration and American identity
  • Urban/rural landscapes and communities
  • Dis(ability)
  • University/Public Education System
  • Nostalgia (Longing for a “halcyon” past, 1950s, The Old South, etc.)
  • How are these concepts tied to exceptionalism?
  • Love and Affect: How do we feel about America? What’s left to love? What constitutes a “good” life/nation?

The Symposium Committee invites all those interested to submit proposals no longer than one page in length for panels, individual papers, workshops, and performances no later than January 10, 2014. Please also submit a biography of no more than 250 words, a current CV with contact information, especially your email address, and a list of any audio and/or visual equipment necessary for presentation. Submissions may be made electronically to Stephanie A. Allen at amstsymposium@purdue.edu. Inquiries regarding the symposium may be made to the same email address.

The full flyer can be seen here.

Contact information: Stephanie A. Allen, Purdue University, 100 N. University St., (765) 496-9629, email: allen65@purdue.edu

Conference at IUPUI explores transdisciplinary approach to problems with earth’s river systems

Since the dawn of civilization, access to freshwater, especially in river environments, has helped determine where human populations have flourished on planet Earth.

Over the past two centuries — an age that many geologists are now calling the Anthropocene — humans have reshaped the planet’s biophysical systems, threatening the availability of freshwater and consequentially the stability of ecologies.

This situation has created one of the most important and complex problems that humans will face in the 21st century, according to an international group of researchers convening in Indianapolis this month to launch a seven-year study of how to mitigate the threat of water insecurity.

The researchers will hold the Rivers of the Anthropocene Conference on Jan. 23 and 24 in the Klipsch Theater, on the lower level of the Campus Center at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis in downtown Indianapolis.

The conference, which brings together 25 scientists, humanists, social scientists, artists, policy makers and community organizers from five countries, is open to the public and is the kickoff event for The Rivers of the Anthropocene Project, a long-range research effort. Leaders say the project will take a transdisciplinary approach to help us better understand the complex dynamics between humans and their river environments. Faculty from IUPUI are partnering with faculty from Newcastle University in the United Kingdom as project leaders. The IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute is organizing the event.

“The majority of the world’s population is threatened by water insecurity and biodiversity loss,” said Jason M. Kelly, IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute director and a Rivers of the Anthropocene Project director. “Even here in Indianapolis, we face potential water shortages in the next decades. We can solve these problems, but the solutions are not simply technological; they are cultural, social and political. They require experts from across the disciplines working hand-in-hand with communities and policy makers.”

By mapping the ecological, geographical, cultural, social, political and scientific histories of river systems, the Rivers of the Anthropocene Project will provide insight on issues of relevance to public policy, environmental conservation and heritage management.

For the January 2014 conference, presenters will offer case studies from around the globe, with particular emphasis on the Ohio and Tyne rivers. Topics for discussion and papers presented at the conference include human geography and river environments; the challenge of Anthropocene rivers; rivers on a human scale; earth systems; and the relationship between human systems and river systems.

Speakers include Bill Werkheiser, acting deputy director of the U.S. Geological Survey; and environmental artist Mary Miss.

Support for the conference comes from Keramida Inc., the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, Indiana Humanities, IUPUI School of Science, IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, the Center for Earth and Environmental Science at IUPUI, the Center for Urban Ecology at Butler University, the IUPUI Center for Urban Health, Newcastle University, the Newcastle Institute for Research on Sustainability, IU Office of the Vice President for Research, IUPUI Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and IUPUI Office of the Chancellor.

Admission is $45. Registrants may purchase lunch. Discounted parking will be available on the ground level of the adjacent Vermont Street Garage.

Art, Race, Space Symposium broadcasts available online

Archived Web broadcasts of the Art, Race, Space Symposium, sponsored Jan. 25 by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and the Museum Studies Program in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, are available for viewing on the WCTY Government Access Channel 16 website. Eight recorded presentations from the symposium are listed in the Special Events section of the Channel 16 On-Demand Video Archive.

The symposium, supported by a grant from the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, emerged out of the necessity to revisit artist Fred Wilson’s “E Pluribus Unum,” a proposed sculpture for the Indianapolis Cultural Trail. The project was canceled in 2011 because of controversy surrounding Wilson’s appropriation of a freed slave figure from the Soldiers and Sailors Monument in downtown Indianapolis.

Several artists and scholars from around the country joined leaders from Indianapolis’ arts and culture sector as symposium presenters, including Wilson, who discussed “Inspirations: Musing on What Monuments, Memorials, Public Art, and Public Space Inspire Me,” as the symposium’s opening session.

TEDxIUPUI Auditions on February 9: Raising the Next Generation

Have you ever watched a TED talk and been inspired to get up on stage and do the same thing yourself? Now’s your chance. The TEDxIUPUI team is canvassing Indianapolis to find some of the most remarkable voices to speak at the TEDxIUPUI conference devoted to “ideas worth spreading” – in the context of the theme Raising the Next Generation.

Auditions for TEDxIUPUI are on February 9, 2013 from 9-5

Location: Informatics and Communications Technology Complex Auditorium, 535 W. Michigan Street, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (Map It)

The independently produced event, operated under a license from TED, is aimed at creating dialogue and action as well as giving Indianapolis’ best and brightest a platform for sharing their thoughts, ideas and calls to action.

The best speakers at the auditions may be invited to give a talk at TEDxIUPUI on March 22, 2013.

Fill out this form to reserve your chance to be a part of this exciting event! Tell us, what do we need to do to “Raise the next Generation”?

More details and contact information at http://www.ted.com/tedx/events/6565

SNAAP at IU presenting unique conference on arts training and the creative workforce

Who are the 3 million arts graduates in America? What do we know about them? What is the state of arts training in higher education today?

The Strategic National Arts Alumni Project — a project of the Indiana University Center for Postsecondary Research in collaboration with the Curb Center for Art, Enterprise and Public Policy at Vanderbilt University — is organizing a one-of-a-kind three-day national conference on arts training and the creative workforce.

The event, “3 Million Stories: Understanding the Lives and Careers of America’s Arts Graduates,” will take place March 7 to 9 at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn.

The diverse group of speakers will include:

  • Lewis Black (MFA 1977, Yale School of Drama), Grammy Award-winning comedian, author, playwright, social critic and actor who will be interviewed by Academy Award-winning playwright and lyricist Willie Reale.
  • Elizabeth Currid-Halkett, author of “The Warhol Economy: How Fashion, Art and Music Drive New York City” (Princeton University Press, 2007), which has received attention in publications such as the Economist, Time, Forbes, The New Yorker, the Village Voice, National Public Radio and The New York Times.
  • Douglas Dempster, dean of the College of Fine Arts at the University of Texas at Austin and advocate of accountability in higher education.
  • James Heartfield, British journalist and author of numerous acclaimed publications, including The Creativity Gap.
  • Samuel Hoi, president of Otis College of Art and Design and chair of the board of United States Artists.
  • Sunil Iyengar, director of the Office of Research and Analysis at the National Endowment for the Arts.
  • Ann Markusen, author of numerous publications on the arts and director of the Arts Economy Initiative and the Project on Regional and Industrial Economics at the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey School of Public Affairs.
  • Robert and Michele Root-Bernstein, authors of the path-breaking book “Sparks of Genius: The Thirteen Thinking Tools of the World’s Most Creative People.”
  • R. Keith Sawyer, author of 12 books, including “Group Genius” and “Explaining Creativity,” and over 80 scientific articles.

According to Steven J. Tepper, associate director of the Curb Center for Art, Public Policy and Enterprise at Vanderbilt and the conference organizer, “The conference should be required attendance for anyone who is involved in arts training and supporting artistic careers; it will also have much to offer artists, researchers and others who share a broad interest in the 21st-century creative workforce.”

Registration is now open at www.3millionstories.com. The deadline for discounted hotel accommodation is Feb. 1.

Support for this event comes from the Surdna Foundation through its leadership grant for SNAAP.

The Strategic National Arts Alumni Project investigates the educational experiences and career paths of arts graduates nationally via an annual survey, and provides findings to educators, policymakers and the general public.