IUPUI University Library to cohost Digital Public Library of America’s national conference

With 90-plus digitized collections of unique and historically important materials accessible to any user via the Web, the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis University Library is gaining recognition as a national leader in digital scholarship.image courtesy of fotos.starmedia.com

That leadership role will expand this month as the library co-hosts the Digital Public Library of America’s national conference.

The conference, DPLAfest 2015 takes place April 17 and 18 in Indianapolis.

As co-hosts, IUPUI University Library, the Indianapolis Public Library, the Indiana State Library and the Indiana Historical Society are helping to organize and staff the event and will serve as meeting sites for conference workshops, presentations and discussions. The four local groups had submitted a proposal to host the conference, which 300 people from across the country are currently registered to attend.

“We are excited to be given the opportunity to share the city of Indianapolis with members of the Digital Public Library of America and showcase some of the work that we have done in preserving the history of Indianapolis,” said Jennifer A. Johnson, digital scholarship outreach librarian in the University Library Center for Digital Scholarship.

With its community partners, the IUPUI University Library has created over 90 digital collections, covering topics in local history such as Crispus Attucks High School, poet James Whitcomb Riley and Indiana artists.

The Digital Public Library of America offers open online access to almost 9 million items through partnerships with national-caliber content providers such as the HathiTrust and the Library of Congress, plus a network of member archives, museums, cultural heritage centers and libraries such as the IUPUI University Library, all of whom operate under state-based DPLA service hubs. As such, the two-year-old DPLA is a goldmine for researchers around the globe, making the riches of America’s libraries and museums freely available online to the worldwide public.

“For example, a basketball fan in Texas could view Oscar Robertson’s high school scrapbook about the 1954-55 Crispus Attucks state championship team by searching the Crispus Attucks Museum digital collection,” Johnson said.

The DPLAfest conference offers a mix of interactive workshops and hands-on activities, as well as presentations and discussions for a range of professionals including librarians, archivists, museum staff, developers, technologists, publishers and authors, teachers, students and others.

While the conference will feature several national speakers, the IUPUI and Bloomington campuses will be represented in a wide range of presentations.  Presenters include:

David Lewis, Kristi Palmer and Jenny Johnson, IUPUI University Library.

Andrea Copeland, IUPUI School of Informatics and Computing.

Jason Kelly, IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute.

Lea Shaver, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law.

Benjamin Keele, Ruth Lilly Law Library.

Robert McDonald, Indiana University associate dean for library technologies.

Dirk Herr-Hoyman, Indiana University Bloomington, HathiTrust Research Center operations manager.

Conference: DPLAfest 2015

On April 17th and 18th, Indianapolis Central Library, Indiana State Library, IUPUI University Library, and the Indiana Historical Society will host DPLAfest 2015.http://dp.la/

DPLAfest 2015, presented by the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA), brings hundreds together to discuss everything from technology and development, to (e)books, law, genealogy, and education. DPLAfest 2015 will appeal to teachers and students, librarians, archivists, museum professionals, developers and technologists, publishers and authors, genealogists, and members of the public alike who are interested in an engaging mix of interactive workshops, hands-on activities (including scanning stations to digitize your family treasures), discussions with community leaders, hackathons, fun events, and so much more. DPLAfest 2015 is open to the public; registration is required.

Price: $75/two-day, $50/one-day (open to the public)

Register here.

The Digital Public Library of America offers a single point of access to millions of items from libraries, archives, and The The Digital Public Library of America offers a single point of access to millions of items from libraries, archives, and museums around the United States. Users can browse and search DPLA’s collections by timeline, map, virtual bookshelf, and faceted search; save and share customized lists of items; explore digital exhibitions; and interact with DPLA-powered apps in the app library. DPLA currently provides free and open access to some 8.4 million digital items.

Herron School of Art and Design presents pop artist and surrealist Wayne White

Wayne WhiteKnown for his humor and distinct aesthetic, pop artist and surrealist Wayne White will be the keynote speaker at the Foundations in Art: Theory and Education’s national biennial conference, hosted in Indianapolis.

As sponsor of the biennial conference, Herron School of Art and Design is hosting the keynote address at 7 p.m. Friday, March 27, in Room 450 of the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Campus Center, 420 University Blvd.

White is a three-time Emmy Award winner for his set design and puppeteering work on “Pee-wee’s Playhouse.” He has also directed numerous music videos for various artists including Peter Gabriel and Smashing Pumpkins. The artist’s works are held in prominent permanent collections including New York’s New Museum of Contemporary Art and the Detroit Institute of Art.

The Foundations in Art: Theory and Education conference runs March 25 to 28. The conference theme, ‘Tectonic Shifts: Breaking New Ground,’ reflects plans to examine how the forces of change are shaping the foundation landscape. Organizers see the conference as a continuum of the conversation during the 2013 event, which attracted more than 500 artists, designers, historians and educators.

Foundations in Art: Theory and Education is a national association dedicated to the promotion of excellence in the development and teaching of college-level foundation courses in both studio and art history. Its members represent independent colleges of art and design, university art departments, and community colleges throughout the United States.

White’s lecture is free and open to the public.

Following the lecture, a reception will take place in Eskenazi Hall, 735 W. New York St.

China’s evolving philanthropy sector is focus of two-day summit in Indianapolis

Gene Tempel

Gene Tempel

Scott Kennedy

Scott Kennedy

Philanthropists, scholars and business people from around the world are gathering Friday and Saturday in Indianapolis for a summit on the present and future role of philanthropy in one of the world’s most rapidly growing economies, China.

The academic conference, at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis’ Hine Hall, attracted so much interest that registration had to be closed. Organizers are hoping to eventually present some of the sessions online.

Scott Kennedy, director of the Research Center for Chinese Politics and Business at IU Bloomington, said he was surprised by public interest in the topic. More often, he sees Americans’ interest in China driven by concerns over its growing military and economic influence.

“I thought there would be less interest in social activism in China and what could be done to make the country a better place, but obviously I was wrong,” said Kennedy, whose center is based within the School of Global and International Studies. “There are people who are concerned about the environment, health care and a lot of other issues that the Chinese government can’t solve on its own.

“It just so turns out that America is the home of the global philanthropic movement,” he added. “Americans, both individually and through organizations, contribute a lot to our country and have been quite involved in China as well.”

Conference organizers had planned for about 75 people, but nearly twice as many — about 140 — are registered for the China Philanthropy Summit.

The conference highlights a three-year Initiative on Philanthropy in China funded by the Henry Luce Foundation and the Ford Foundation, jointly carried out by the IU Research Center for Chinese Politics and Business and the IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy.

“We are pleased to welcome our distinguished colleagues from China and U.S. institutions, both those presenting and those learning along with us as attendees,” said Gene Tempel, founding dean of the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy.

“This is an exciting time in China and in the world of philanthropy. The summit is a continuation of our work to learn from and learn with our Chinese colleagues as we work together to strengthen and inform philanthropy in both countries,” Tempel said.

Researchers from several leading U.S. and Chinese universities and institutions, including the University of Wisconsin, the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Maryland, Tsinghua University and Sun Yat-Sen University, will present the findings from 11 research projects associated with the initiative.

In addition, panels of both young and seasoned practitioners from China’s philanthropic community will participate in a variety of panels. Among them will be Yang Peng, former president of the Shenzhen-based One Foundation, and Holly Chang, founder and president of the Beijing-based Golden Bridges Foundation. The co-founders of the Hong Kong-based organization Philanthropy in Motion also are participating.

Today in China, about 3,000 foundations and non-governmental organizations are rapidly expanding activities. Corporate social responsibility programs are proliferating and social enterprises are taking root. A substantial community of experts and activists with strong ties with the global philanthropic community has become increasingly active.

Although China’s economic development path has been very successful, a growing gap between the extent of problems facing society and the government’s ability to address them has developed, said Angela Bies, endowed associate professor of global philanthropy and nonprofit leadership at the University of Maryland’s School of Public Policy. Philanthropic activity could be a key way to fill that gap.

“China’s contemporary philanthropic sector is at a pivotal juncture where societal needs are complex and pressing,” Bies said. “And while philanthropic capacity is immense and social innovation and experimentation exciting, the institutional environment and organizational capacity for philanthropy remain emergent and in flux. In this regard, it is vital for scholars and practitioners to come together and jointly reflect on these issues.”

The Initiative on Philanthropy in China was announced last summer, and since then there have been nearly a dozen research projects and a workshop and conferences in China. Last spring, a new course on philanthropy in China was offered at IU Bloomington and IUPUI. Three students received internships in China, working with Cummins Inc., Mercy Corps and China Development Brief.

One highlight of the China Philanthropy Summit will be the conceptual presentation of “My Philanthropic Story,” a bilingual, user-driven website that will go live early next year. The site will be dedicated to promoting philanthropy in China through the personal stories of givers and recipients.

“It will be a way to promote philanthropy, not through academic research like the kinds we’re going to see this week, but through the voices of average people, which we think will be more powerful,” Kennedy said.

A mix of social media and connections from other key websites, combined with support from within the philanthropic sector in China, will draw attention to “My Philanthropic Story.”

Editors: As previously mentioned, registration for the conference is closed, but media are welcome. Contact George Vlahakis at IU Communications or Adriene Davis Kalugyer of the IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy to arrange for interviews.

The Ideology Problem in Teaching and Scholarship: U.S. Intellectual History Conference in Indianapolis, Oct. 9, 2014

S-USIH Conference Program ImageThe sixth annual U.S. Intellectual History Conference in Indianapolis, Oct. 9-12th, 2014, will open with a special two-hour plenary session on THE IDEOLOGY PROBLEM IN TEACHING AND SCHOLARSHIP. This event will be free and open to the public.

We are also happy to announce that RICK PERLSTEIN will be joining our distinguished panel to discuss this subject. The suggestion to add Rick to this panel came from S-USIH’s own Mike O’Connor who noted, as any native Hoosier should, the close proximity of Chicago to Indy. 

The panel will address a series of questions, including: Can the writer-educator avoid being “biased” in favor of a particular set of political or religious ideals? Are disciplinary norms of “objectivity” or “neutrality” themselves in service of partisan agendas? The “ideology problem” is one that has surfaced both explicitly and implicitly at the USIH Blog over the past few years, generating a lot of commentary. For example, see Andrew Hartman’s post of entitled Ideology and Teaching.  Or a post by Ben Alpers called,“Disrespect and the Teaching of Intellectual History.” Or L.D. Burnett’s The Reluctant Historian.

The conference chairs thought it would make a great subject for a plenary to integrate questions of pedagogy as well as research, writing, and the historian’s public role in the debate over ideology and the practice of history. Presenters plan to ask if ideology really is out-of-place in the classroom and to take up some practical questions such as various efforts to ban Howard Zinn’s writings in Indiana schools. You can learn more about our panelists below.

PANELISTS

Andrew Hartman is an associate professor of history at Illinois State University, and was the 2013-14 Danish Distinguished Fulbright Chair in American Studies. He is the author of Education and the Cold War: The Battle for the American School (Palgrave Macmillan, 2008), and A War for the Soul of America: A History of the Culture Wars (University of Chicago Press, 2015). Hartman is the founding president of S-USIH, one of the original USIH bloggers, and is chairing the 2015 S-USIH Conference to be held in Washington, DC.

David Sehat is associate professor of history at Georgia State University. His first book, The Myth of American Religious Freedom, won the Frederick Jackson Turner Award from the Organization of American Historians.  His second book, The Jefferson Rule: Why We Think the Founding Fathers Have All the Answers, will be published in May of next year.

Rick Perlstein is the author of Before the Storm: Barry Goldwater and the Unmaking of the American ConsensusNixonland: The Rise of a President and the Fracturing of America, and The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan. A frequent blogger and essayist for publications including the NationRolling Stone, and the New Republic, he lives in Chicago.

Michael J. Kramer holds a visiting assistant professorship at Northwestern University, where he teaches history, American studies, digital humanities, and civic engagement and works an editor in the Design, Publications, and New Media Department at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. His book, The Republic of Rock: Music and Citizenship in the Sixties Counterculture, was published by Oxford University Press in 2013. He is the co-founder of the Northwestern University Digital Humanities Laboratory and is currently developing a multimedia project about the Berkeley Folk Music Festival (1958-1970) and the history of technology and culture in the US folk revival. Additionally, he serves as director of the Chicago Dance History Project, a large-scale oral history and archival digital documentation of dance in the Chicago region, and he is the dramaturg for The Seldoms Contemporary Dance Company. He blogs about art, culture, and politics at Culture Rover.

Christopher Shannon is associate professor of history at Christendom College in Front Royal, Virginia.  He is the author of two book in the field of U.S. Intellectual History, Conspicuous Criticism:  Tradition, the Individual and Culture in Modern American Social Thought (Johns Hopkins, 1996) and A World Made Safe for Differences:  Cold War Intellectuals and the Politics of Identity (Rowman and Littlefield, 2001).  His forthcoming work, The Past as Pilgrimage:  Narrative, Tradition and the Renewal of Catholic History (Christendom Press, 2014), co-authored with Christopher Blum, addresses the relation between faith traditions and the ideology of secularism in the writing of history.

Susan Curtis is Professor of History and American Studies at Purdue University.  She is the author of A Consuming Faith(1991), Dancing to a Black Man’s Tune (1994), The First Black Actors on the Great White Way (1998), Colored Memories(2008), and the co-author of a letter to Purdue President Mitch Daniels challenging his support for efforts to ban the work of Howard Zinn from Indiana public schools (2013).

REPOSTED FROM S-USIH

35th Indiana Association of Historians Annual Meeting hosted by IUPUI

Indianapolis Skyline

Indianapolis Skyline

Rights, Riots, and Reactions

The Indiana Association of Historians (IAH) invites papers and panel proposals for its annual meeting to be held on the campus of IUPUI in Indianapolis, Indiana on February 28, 2015.

In the year 2015 we focus on civil rights, not only in the context of United States history, but also from a global view of the struggle for equal rights. Possible “anniversary” topics suggested by the year 2015 include the Battle of Waterloo, the Battle of New Orleans, the Congress of Vienna, the end of the Civil War, the passage of the 13th amendment, World War I, the creation of the United Nations (leading to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights), the end of World War II, and the passage of the Voting Rights Act.

While papers and panels from all fields and related to all topics of history are welcomed, the program committee is particularly interested in proposals that focus on civil rights, not only in the context of United States history, but also from a global view of the struggle for equal rights. Possible “anniversary” topics suggested by the year 2015 include the Battle of Waterloo, the Battle of New Orleans, the Congress of Vienna, the end of the Civil War, the passage of the 13th amendment, World War I, the creation of the United Nations (leading to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights), the end of World War II, and the passage of the Voting Rights Act. Events leading up to these milestones and reaction to them are also encouraged as the basis of papers.

The committee also welcomes submissions in the fields of K-12 history education and public history. Academic, public, and independent historians, as well as graduate students, are eligible to present papers. All presenters must be present at the conference.

Conference papers (approximately 10 pages/2,500 words) may be based on original research, synthesis of scholarship, or participant experience. Sessions will consist of two or three papers with comments.

To submit a proposal for a paper and/or session,send a one-page proposal for each presentation and a one-page c.v. Panel proposals should include a one-page proposal, which specifies the topic each participant will discuss, and a one-page c.v. per participant. The deadline for submitting paper and/or session proposals is November 10, 2014. E-mail submissions are encouraged and will be accepted until the deadline.

Submit proposals to:
IAH Program 2015
c/o IAH president, Nancy Conner
1500 N. Delaware Street,Indianapolis,IN 46202
Email: nconner@indianahumanities.org

Brian Dirck, Professor of History, Anderson University, will provide the keynote address. His first book, Lincoln and Davis: Imagining America,1809-1865, offered a comparative analysis of the two Civil War presidents’ lives and careers. He has since focused most of his attention on Abraham Lincoln. His publications include Lincoln the Lawyer, an overview of Lincoln’s legal career that was awarded the Benjamin Barondess Award from the New York Civil War Roundtable for the best book published on Abraham Lincoln in 2007. In 2012 he published Lincoln and the Constitution as part of the Concise Lincoln Library Series and Lincoln and White America, an analysis of Lincoln’s views concerning white supremacy and racism.

Founded in 1980, the IAH is the statewide organization of historians with a mission to furnish opportunities for persons within the state’s historical community to become acquainted, to share research and ideas, to promote and strengthen the historical profession, and to encourage the pursuit of history by the general public. IAH members include historians who live or work in Indiana and specialize in various fields of history, not just Indiana history. Visit their website for membership information.

Notre Dame historian and professor to discuss ‘The Bible Then and Now’ in public talk

Dr. Mark Noll

Dr. Mark Noll, Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame

Noted historian and National Endowment for the Humanities medal recipient Mark Noll will deliver a public talk Thursday, Aug. 7, as part of the IUPUI Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture’s The Bible and American Life Conference.

Noll will present “The Bible Then and Now” at 7:30 p.m. at Christ Church Cathedral, 125 Monument Circle in downtown Indianapolis. Registration is not required for this keynote talk, which is open to the entire Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus as well as the general public.

Noll is the Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. His numerous books include “The New Shape of World Christianity: How American Experience Reflects Global Faith” (InterVarsity Press, 2009); “God and Race in American Politics: A Short History” (Princeton University Press, 2008); and “The Civil War as a Theological Crisis” (University of North Carolina Press, 2006). He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; in 2006 he received the National Endowment for the Humanities medal at a White House ceremony.

The Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture is part of the Indiana University School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. The Bible and American Life Conference, taking place Wednesday through Friday at Sheraton Indianapolis City Centre, is the second stage of a project that seeks to provide the first large-scale investigation of the Bible in American life.

Earlier this year, the center released the first part of the project: a report based on a national survey of American Bible reading. Among its many findings, the study discovered:

  • There is a 50/50 split among Americans who read any form of scripture in the past year and those who did not.
  • Among those who read any form of scripture in the past year, 95 percent named the Bible as the scripture they read.
  • Despite the proliferation of Bible translations, the King James Version is the top choice — and by a wide margin — of Bible readers.
  • The strongest correlation with Bible reading is race, with African Americans reading the Bible at considerably higher rates than others.
  • Bible readers consult scripture for personal prayer and devotion three times more to learn about culture war issues such as abortion, homosexuality, war or poverty.

A conference schedule and registration information are available online.

Going Global 2015 Theme Announced

UntitledGoing Global 2015 takes place on 1 and 2 June 2015 at the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre in London, UK. The theme for the conference is “Connecting cultures: forging futures” with exploration into the fusion of diverse cultures; how networks of innovation evolve and grow; and what role universities and other tertiary institutions play globally in connecting diverse cultures and in anchoring and sustaining networks of innovation to produce a tangible return and measurable impact for the future. This theme will be explored through three perspectives:

  • National, regional and local cultures and the extent to which connecting people and ideas across these produces innovation and impact
  • Academic discipline and subject cultures including the impact of multi-disciplinary teams of sciences, arts, social sciences etc. Also different cultures of research, teaching and skills development
  • Organizational cultures – particularly those of universities and business; skills providers; NGOs; social and other enterprises.

Proposals can be submitted for paper or poster presentations or to facilitate a session. The call for proposals will open on August 27, 2014 and guidelines for submission are available on the British Council’s website. The session and chair call for proposals will close on Friday 31 October 2014, you have until early 2015 to submit a poster proposal.

Key dates

  • Call for proposals opens: Wednesday 27 August 2014
  • Registration opens: February 2015
  • Going Global 2015 conference: Monday 1 and Tuesday 2 June 2015

IU center to host national conference on civic literacy

ExhibitionThe Indiana University Center for Civic Literacy, a research center at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, has announced that its second annual conference will take place Aug. 22 to 24 at the Crowne Plaza Union Station in Indianapolis. The public is invited to attend.

“The data is depressing,” said Sheila Kennedy, director of the Center for Civic Literacy and professor of law and public policy at the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at IUPUI, which houses the center. “Only 36 percent of Americans can name the three branches of government. Only 21 percent of high school seniors can list two privileges that United States citizens have that noncitizens don’t. Fewer than a quarter of the nation’s 12th-graders are proficient in civics. How can uninformed people make the informed decisions that are critical in our society? That is what the Center for Civic Literacy addresses, and what we will discuss at our conference.”

The Center for Civic Literacy pursues an aggressive research agenda to identify and address the causes and civic consequences of Americans’ low levels of constitutional, economic and scientific knowledge. It hosts a website and blog, and publishes a quarterly newsletter and an online, peer-reviewed interdisciplinary journal.

The theme of this year’s conference, held in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Center’s National Advisory Committee, is “Connecting the Dots: The Impact of Civic Literacy Gaps on Democracy, the Economy and Society, and Charting a Path Forward.”

The program will open with a welcome from former Indiana Supreme Court Justice Theodore Boehm, who chairs the center’s National Advisory Committee, and will include addresses from Ted McConnell, executive director of the Civic Mission of Schools Campaign; David Schultz, professor of political science at Hamline University; Dallas Dishman, executive director of the Geffen Foundation; and Kim McLaurin, director of the Marshall-Brennan Constitutional Literacy Project, among others.

Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture offers conference on how Bible is used

391697_w296Registration is now underway for a national conference that will culminate a three-year Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis study of how — outside of religious services – – Americans use the Bible in their daily lives.

The Conference on the Bible in American Life will take place Wednesday Aug. 6, to Friday, Aug. 8, at the Sheraton Indianapolis City Centre, 31 W. Ohio St., in downtown Indianapolis.

The Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture at IUPUI is sponsoring the three-day event as part of the first large-scale investigation of the Bible in American life.

Noted historian Mark Noll of the University of Notre Dame will deliver a conference plenary address. Noll will present “The Bible: Then and Now” at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 7, at Christ Church Cathedral, 125 Monument Circle. Conference registration is not required for the plenary address, which is open to the public.

“While the Bible has been central to Christian practice throughout American history, many important questions remain unanswered in scholarship,” said Philip Goff, director of the Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture, which is part of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Those unanswered questions include how people read the Bible for themselves, how denominational and parachurch publications have influenced interpretation and application, and how clergy and congregations have influenced individual understandings of scripture, the director said.

“These questions are even more pressing today, as denominations are losing much of their traditional authority, technology is changing people’s reading and cognitive habits, and subjective experience is continuing to eclipse textual authority as the mark of true religion,” Goff said. “Understanding both the past and the future of Christian communities in the United States depends, even if only in part, on a serious analysis of how these cultural shifts are affecting Americans’ relationship to the Bible.”

Earlier this year, the Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture released a report about the Bible’s use based on a national survey of American Bible reading. During the upcoming conference, historians, sociologists, political scientists, seminary professors and religious leaders will offer analyses of the Bible in daily life that complement the report’s findings and will put those findings about the Bible’s use in a broader context.

Among the report’s many findings:

  • There is a 50/50 split among Americans who read any form of scripture (the Bible, the Quran, the Torah, etc.) in the past year and those who did not.
  • Among those who read any form of scripture in the past year, 95 percent named the Bible as the scripture they read.
  •  Despite the proliferation of Bible translations, the King James Version is the top choice — and by a wide margin — of Bible readers.
  •  The strongest correlation with Bible reading is race, with African Americans reading the Bible at considerably higher rates than others.

Seating for the three-day conference is limited, and advance registration is required. Registration before July 15 is $50; after July 15 it is $70.