Archive for Conference

2014 Tobias Leadership Conference

tobias conf

Indiana University’s ninth annual Tobias Leadership Conference will take place from April 24-26 at the Alexander Hotel in downtown Indianapolis. The Conference brings together scholars and practitioners from the entire spectrum of leadership including corporate leadership, not-for-profit leadership, religious leadership, educational leadership, medical leadership, and political leadership. The Conference will feature papers, panels, and speakers from all academic disciplines. The registration fee of $195 includes all conference sessions, the Thursday evening reception and book fair, two lunches, Friday’s gala dinner, and two continental breakfasts. There is a $45 student rate that does not include meals. Plenary speakers include:

  • Data-Smart Leadership – Stephen Goldsmith, Professor of Government, Director of Data-Smart City Solutions at Harvard Kennedy School
  • Frankenstein’s Leadership Monster – Richard Gunderman, Chancellor’s Professor, Professor of Radiology, Pediatrics, Medical Education, Philosphy, Liberal Arts, Philanthropy, and in the Honors College at Indiana University
  • Spirituality and Leadership Effectiveness – George Houston, Center for Creative Leadership
  • Effective Leadership in Japan, the Case of Shibusawa Eiichi – Gil Latz, Associate Vice Chancellor for International Affairs, Professor of Geography and Philanthropy, IUPUI
  • A Conversation with Russ Mawby, 25 year CEO and Chairman Emeritus of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation – Russ Mawby and Gene Tempel, Founding Dean, Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy
  • Put Your Whole Self in: Leadership Beyond the Rules – Sandy Eisenberg Sasso, Rabbi Emerita, Director, Religion, Spirituality and the Arts Initiative, Butler University
  • Why Culture Matters – Jeff Smulyan, Chairman of the Board, President and CEO, Emmis Communications
  • Made for Each Other: Leading with Collaboration and Creativity – Jim Walker, Executive Director, Big Car Collaborative
  • Responsible Leadership: Stewardship for the Future – Sandra Waddock, Gilligan Chair of Strategy, Carroll School of Business, Boston College
  • Changing Minds in the Army: Why it is so Difficult and What to do About It – Leonard Wong, Research Professor, United States Army War College

To register, and to view the entire Conference program, please visit the conference website.

Call for papers: 2014 Purdue American Studies Symposium: American exceptionalism in the 21st century

purdue logo
Call for Papers: 39th Annual American Studies Graduate Symposium
“The Good, the Bad, and The Ugly: American Exceptionalism in the 21st Century”
Purdue University, April 17-18, 2014

Keynote Speaker: Kevin Gaines, Robert Hayden Collegiate Professor of History and Afroamerican and African Studies, University of Michigan

The election of our nation’s first Black president ushered in a discourse of Post-Blackness, suggesting that America’s race problems were behind us. Likewise, the repeal of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell, and the unconstitutionality of DOMA seem to suggest that discrimination against LGBT and queer persons was a thing of the past. However, recent political attacks on women’s rights, renewed fights to prevent LGBT persons from marrying, the government shutdown, the GOP war on voting rights aimed at disenfranchising people of color, as well as our extended global “war on terror,” have dispelled the notion that we are “post” anything. American exceptionalism, including intra-American exceptionalism, is in full effect. Still, we must ask, what’s good about America? What narratives of belonging, nation, and freedom bind us to our American identity? Is there anything left to love about America?

In accordance with this theme, we would be interested in tracing the resurgence of imperialism, white supremacy, economic disparity, and otherness within the turn of the century. Other possible sub-themes include:

  • Identity: What constitutes an American? Who is excluded and why?
  • Post-race, post-feminism, post-Civil Rights?
  • Commodification/Cooptation of American identity
  • Music/sound
  • Technology/Innovation
  • Media/Popular Culture/Representation
  • American Exceptionalism in a transnational context
  • Religion/spirituality
  • LGBT/Queer: Progression (or regression) of movements, visibility, etc.
  • Ecology/geography
  • Immigration and American identity
  • Urban/rural landscapes and communities
  • Dis(ability)
  • University/Public Education System
  • Nostalgia (Longing for a “halcyon” past, 1950s, The Old South, etc.)
  • How are these concepts tied to exceptionalism?
  • Love and Affect: How do we feel about America? What’s left to love? What constitutes a “good” life/nation?

The Symposium Committee invites all those interested to submit proposals no longer than one page in length for panels, individual papers, workshops, and performances no later than January 10, 2014. Please also submit a biography of no more than 250 words, a current CV with contact information, especially your email address, and a list of any audio and/or visual equipment necessary for presentation. Submissions may be made electronically to Stephanie A. Allen at amstsymposium@purdue.edu. Inquiries regarding the symposium may be made to the same email address.

The full flyer can be seen here.

Contact information: Stephanie A. Allen, Purdue University, 100 N. University St., (765) 496-9629, email: allen65@purdue.edu

Conference at IUPUI explores transdisciplinary approach to problems with earth’s river systems

rivers image

Since the dawn of civilization, access to freshwater, especially in river environments, has helped determine where human populations have flourished on planet Earth.

Over the past two centuries — an age that many geologists are now calling the Anthropocene — humans have reshaped the planet’s biophysical systems, threatening the availability of freshwater and consequentially the stability of ecologies.

This situation has created one of the most important and complex problems that humans will face in the 21st century, according to an international group of researchers convening in Indianapolis this month to launch a seven-year study of how to mitigate the threat of water insecurity.

The researchers will hold the Rivers of the Anthropocene Conference on Jan. 23 and 24 in the Klipsch Theater, on the lower level of the Campus Center at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis in downtown Indianapolis.

The conference, which brings together 25 scientists, humanists, social scientists, artists, policy makers and community organizers from five countries, is open to the public and is the kickoff event for The Rivers of the Anthropocene Project, a long-range research effort. Leaders say the project will take a transdisciplinary approach to help us better understand the complex dynamics between humans and their river environments. Faculty from IUPUI are partnering with faculty from Newcastle University in the United Kingdom as project leaders. The IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute is organizing the event.

“The majority of the world’s population is threatened by water insecurity and biodiversity loss,” said Jason M. Kelly, IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute director and a Rivers of the Anthropocene Project director. “Even here in Indianapolis, we face potential water shortages in the next decades. We can solve these problems, but the solutions are not simply technological; they are cultural, social and political. They require experts from across the disciplines working hand-in-hand with communities and policy makers.”

By mapping the ecological, geographical, cultural, social, political and scientific histories of river systems, the Rivers of the Anthropocene Project will provide insight on issues of relevance to public policy, environmental conservation and heritage management.

For the January 2014 conference, presenters will offer case studies from around the globe, with particular emphasis on the Ohio and Tyne rivers. Topics for discussion and papers presented at the conference include human geography and river environments; the challenge of Anthropocene rivers; rivers on a human scale; earth systems; and the relationship between human systems and river systems.

Speakers include Bill Werkheiser, acting deputy director of the U.S. Geological Survey; and environmental artist Mary Miss.

Support for the conference comes from Keramida Inc., the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, Indiana Humanities, IUPUI School of Science, IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, the Center for Earth and Environmental Science at IUPUI, the Center for Urban Ecology at Butler University, the IUPUI Center for Urban Health, Newcastle University, the Newcastle Institute for Research on Sustainability, IU Office of the Vice President for Research, IUPUI Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and IUPUI Office of the Chancellor.

Admission is $45. Registrants may purchase lunch. Discounted parking will be available on the ground level of the adjacent Vermont Street Garage.

Art, Race, Space Symposium broadcasts available online

Fred Wilson

Archived Web broadcasts of the Art, Race, Space Symposium, sponsored Jan. 25 by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and the Museum Studies Program in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, are available for viewing on the WCTY Government Access Channel 16 website. Eight recorded presentations from the symposium are listed in the Special Events section of the Channel 16 On-Demand Video Archive.

The symposium, supported by a grant from the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, emerged out of the necessity to revisit artist Fred Wilson’s “E Pluribus Unum,” a proposed sculpture for the Indianapolis Cultural Trail. The project was canceled in 2011 because of controversy surrounding Wilson’s appropriation of a freed slave figure from the Soldiers and Sailors Monument in downtown Indianapolis.

Several artists and scholars from around the country joined leaders from Indianapolis’ arts and culture sector as symposium presenters, including Wilson, who discussed “Inspirations: Musing on What Monuments, Memorials, Public Art, and Public Space Inspire Me,” as the symposium’s opening session.

TEDxIUPUI Auditions on February 9: Raising the Next Generation

TEDxIUPUI

Have you ever watched a TED talk and been inspired to get up on stage and do the same thing yourself? Now’s your chance. The TEDxIUPUI team is canvassing Indianapolis to find some of the most remarkable voices to speak at the TEDxIUPUI conference devoted to “ideas worth spreading” – in the context of the theme Raising the Next Generation.

Auditions for TEDxIUPUI are on February 9, 2013 from 9-5

Location: Informatics and Communications Technology Complex Auditorium, 535 W. Michigan Street, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (Map It)

The independently produced event, operated under a license from TED, is aimed at creating dialogue and action as well as giving Indianapolis’ best and brightest a platform for sharing their thoughts, ideas and calls to action.

The best speakers at the auditions may be invited to give a talk at TEDxIUPUI on March 22, 2013.

Fill out this form to reserve your chance to be a part of this exciting event! Tell us, what do we need to do to “Raise the next Generation”?

More details and contact information at http://www.ted.com/tedx/events/6565

SNAAP at IU presenting unique conference on arts training and the creative workforce

SNAAP logo

Who are the 3 million arts graduates in America? What do we know about them? What is the state of arts training in higher education today?

The Strategic National Arts Alumni Project — a project of the Indiana University Center for Postsecondary Research in collaboration with the Curb Center for Art, Enterprise and Public Policy at Vanderbilt University — is organizing a one-of-a-kind three-day national conference on arts training and the creative workforce.

The event, “3 Million Stories: Understanding the Lives and Careers of America’s Arts Graduates,” will take place March 7 to 9 at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn.

The diverse group of speakers will include:

  • Lewis Black (MFA 1977, Yale School of Drama), Grammy Award-winning comedian, author, playwright, social critic and actor who will be interviewed by Academy Award-winning playwright and lyricist Willie Reale.
  • Elizabeth Currid-Halkett, author of “The Warhol Economy: How Fashion, Art and Music Drive New York City” (Princeton University Press, 2007), which has received attention in publications such as the Economist, Time, Forbes, The New Yorker, the Village Voice, National Public Radio and The New York Times.
  • Douglas Dempster, dean of the College of Fine Arts at the University of Texas at Austin and advocate of accountability in higher education.
  • James Heartfield, British journalist and author of numerous acclaimed publications, including The Creativity Gap.
  • Samuel Hoi, president of Otis College of Art and Design and chair of the board of United States Artists.
  • Sunil Iyengar, director of the Office of Research and Analysis at the National Endowment for the Arts.
  • Ann Markusen, author of numerous publications on the arts and director of the Arts Economy Initiative and the Project on Regional and Industrial Economics at the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey School of Public Affairs.
  • Robert and Michele Root-Bernstein, authors of the path-breaking book “Sparks of Genius: The Thirteen Thinking Tools of the World’s Most Creative People.”
  • R. Keith Sawyer, author of 12 books, including “Group Genius” and “Explaining Creativity,” and over 80 scientific articles.

According to Steven J. Tepper, associate director of the Curb Center for Art, Public Policy and Enterprise at Vanderbilt and the conference organizer, “The conference should be required attendance for anyone who is involved in arts training and supporting artistic careers; it will also have much to offer artists, researchers and others who share a broad interest in the 21st-century creative workforce.”

Registration is now open at www.3millionstories.com. The deadline for discounted hotel accommodation is Feb. 1.

Support for this event comes from the Surdna Foundation through its leadership grant for SNAAP.

The Strategic National Arts Alumni Project investigates the educational experiences and career paths of arts graduates nationally via an annual survey, and provides findings to educators, policymakers and the general public.

Art, Race, Space Symposium on 25 January 2013 at IUPUI

Art, Space, and Race Conference

Art, Race, Space Symposium

 

Date: January 25, 2013

Location: Campus Center, IUPUI Campus, 420 University Blvd.

Time: 8:00 am–5:30 pm

 

Artists and scholars from across the country will join leaders from Indianapolis’s arts and culture sector in an interdisciplinary daylong symposium dedicated to exploring the complicated relationships between art, race, and civic space.  Participants will begin by reflecting on artist Fred Wilson’s E Pluribus Unum, a public art commission for the Indianapolis Culture Trail that was cancelled in 2011 due to controversy surrounding Wilson’s appropriation of a freed slave figure from the Soldiers and Sailors Monument.  Building on the ideas about race, class, visual culture, and democratic debate that emerge from the Indianapolis project, presenters will also address related historical and contemporary examples from other parts of the United States.  In order to encourage public dialogue about art, race, and space, the symposium will provide an opportunity for audience members and presenters to engage in conversations about these matters throughout the day.

The symposium is free and open to the public.

Hosted by the IUPUI Museum Studies Program and the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Sponsored by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute.

Campus maps and parking information.

2012 Frederick Douglass Symposium, “Rediscovering the Life and Times of Frederick Douglass: A Public Symposium”

Frederick Douglass

Date:  October 4-5, 2012
Location: IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd.

A free two-day public event to observe and assess the significance of the publication of the first scholarly edition of Life and Times of Frederick Douglass, the third and most inclusive autobiography by the 19th century’s best-known African American by the Frederick Douglass Papers, a unit of the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indianapolis’ Institute for American Thought. Douglass (1818-1895), a runaway slave, rose to become an internationally recognized orator, reformer, journalist, and diplomat.
Event Schedule:

Keynote Address—by Professor David W. Blight, the Class of 1954 Professor of American History at Yale University. CE 450 – 5-6:30 pm, October, 4th

Public Reception and Book Launch Party Reception—4th Floor Terrace6:30-8:00 pm, October 4th

Scholarly Symposium on Rediscovering the Life and Times of Frederick Douglass—CE 450 – 8:30 am – 4:00 pm, October 5th.

 

Sponsored by the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indianapolis and its English and History departments, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, and the Indiana University Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion.

For additional information or to register for this free event, email douglass@iupui.edu

Event website: http://liberalarts.iupui.edu/douglass/

Fourteenth Annual Meeting: THE MIDWEST PRAGMATIST STUDY GROUP of The Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy, 22-­23 September 2012

John Dewey in 1902

 

DATE: 22-­23 September 2012

LOCATION: Cavanaugh Hall, Room 508; 425 University Blvd.; Indianapolis, IN 46202

No fee, no registration, open to the public

 

 

 

 

Program 

Saturday, September 22, 2012

 

1:00 PM­-2:15 PM:

 

Philosophy as Therapeutic Amelioration: Crisis and Reflection in the Thought of William James, David Rodick, Xavier University

 

2:30 PM-3:45 PM:

Photography and the Emotions, Richard Rubin

 

3:45 PM:

Refreshment Break

 

4:15 PM­-5:45 PM:

Key Texts Session: Racial Remediation: “An Historical Perspective on Current

Conditions” (1976/1977), “Racial Realism” (1992), and “The Space Traders”

(1992) by Derrick Bell; and “Democracy is Radical” (1937) and “Creative

Democracy: The Task Before Us” (1939) by John Dewey. Discussant: Tommy Curry,

Texas A&M University

 

5:45 PM:

Business Meeting

 

7:00 PM:

Dinner

 

 

Sunday, September 23, 2012

 

9:30 AM­-10:45 AM:

“Peirce and Frege on Logic,” Sergio Gallegos, Denison University

 

11:00 AM-­12:15 PM:

“We Who Must Fight in the Shade,” Tommy Curry, Texas A&M University

 

Support for this meeting of the Midwest Pragmatist Study Group comes from

the Institute for American Thought, the Santayana Edition, the Department of

Philosophy, and the American Studies Program in the IU School of Liberal

Arts at IUPUI.

 

Contact: M. A. Coleman <martcole@iupui.edu>

NEH “Shared Horizons: Data, Biomedicine, and the Digital Humanities” Symposium Scheduled for April 10-12

August 10, 2012 - The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) recently announced the first initiative of its partnership with the National Library of Medicine (NLM).  NEH’s Office of Digital Humanities, working in cooperation with NLM, the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities of the University of Maryland, and Research Councils UK, will be a part of “Shared Horizons: Data, Biomedicine, and the Digital Humanities,” an interdisciplinary symposium exploring the intersection of digital humanities and biomedicine.

Scheduled to take place April 10-12, 2013, Shared Horizons will provide a unique forum for  participants and their institutions to address questions about collaboration, research methodologies, and the interpretation of evidence arising from the interdisciplinary opportunities in this area of biomedical-driven humanities scholarship.

Shared Horizons aims to create opportunities for disciplinary cross-fertilization through a mix of formal and informal presentations combined with breakout sessions, all designed to promote a rich exchange of ideas about how large-scale quantitative methods can lead to new understandings of human culture. Bringing together researchers from the digital humanities and bioinformatics communities, the symposium will explore ways in which these two communities might collaborate on projects that bridge the humanities and medicine around the topics of sequence alignment and network analysis, two modes of analysis that intersect with “big data.”

Additional information is available on the Shared Horizons website.