The Ideology Problem in Teaching and Scholarship: U.S. Intellectual History Conference in Indianapolis, Oct. 9, 2014

S-USIH Conference Program ImageThe sixth annual U.S. Intellectual History Conference in Indianapolis, Oct. 9-12th, 2014, will open with a special two-hour plenary session on THE IDEOLOGY PROBLEM IN TEACHING AND SCHOLARSHIP. This event will be free and open to the public.

We are also happy to announce that RICK PERLSTEIN will be joining our distinguished panel to discuss this subject. The suggestion to add Rick to this panel came from S-USIH’s own Mike O’Connor who noted, as any native Hoosier should, the close proximity of Chicago to Indy. 

The panel will address a series of questions, including: Can the writer-educator avoid being “biased” in favor of a particular set of political or religious ideals? Are disciplinary norms of “objectivity” or “neutrality” themselves in service of partisan agendas? The “ideology problem” is one that has surfaced both explicitly and implicitly at the USIH Blog over the past few years, generating a lot of commentary. For example, see Andrew Hartman’s post of entitled Ideology and Teaching.  Or a post by Ben Alpers called,“Disrespect and the Teaching of Intellectual History.” Or L.D. Burnett’s The Reluctant Historian.

The conference chairs thought it would make a great subject for a plenary to integrate questions of pedagogy as well as research, writing, and the historian’s public role in the debate over ideology and the practice of history. Presenters plan to ask if ideology really is out-of-place in the classroom and to take up some practical questions such as various efforts to ban Howard Zinn’s writings in Indiana schools. You can learn more about our panelists below.

PANELISTS

Andrew Hartman is an associate professor of history at Illinois State University, and was the 2013-14 Danish Distinguished Fulbright Chair in American Studies. He is the author of Education and the Cold War: The Battle for the American School (Palgrave Macmillan, 2008), and A War for the Soul of America: A History of the Culture Wars (University of Chicago Press, 2015). Hartman is the founding president of S-USIH, one of the original USIH bloggers, and is chairing the 2015 S-USIH Conference to be held in Washington, DC.

David Sehat is associate professor of history at Georgia State University. His first book, The Myth of American Religious Freedom, won the Frederick Jackson Turner Award from the Organization of American Historians.  His second book, The Jefferson Rule: Why We Think the Founding Fathers Have All the Answers, will be published in May of next year.

Rick Perlstein is the author of Before the Storm: Barry Goldwater and the Unmaking of the American ConsensusNixonland: The Rise of a President and the Fracturing of America, and The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan. A frequent blogger and essayist for publications including the NationRolling Stone, and the New Republic, he lives in Chicago.

Michael J. Kramer holds a visiting assistant professorship at Northwestern University, where he teaches history, American studies, digital humanities, and civic engagement and works an editor in the Design, Publications, and New Media Department at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. His book, The Republic of Rock: Music and Citizenship in the Sixties Counterculture, was published by Oxford University Press in 2013. He is the co-founder of the Northwestern University Digital Humanities Laboratory and is currently developing a multimedia project about the Berkeley Folk Music Festival (1958-1970) and the history of technology and culture in the US folk revival. Additionally, he serves as director of the Chicago Dance History Project, a large-scale oral history and archival digital documentation of dance in the Chicago region, and he is the dramaturg for The Seldoms Contemporary Dance Company. He blogs about art, culture, and politics at Culture Rover.

Christopher Shannon is associate professor of history at Christendom College in Front Royal, Virginia.  He is the author of two book in the field of U.S. Intellectual History, Conspicuous Criticism:  Tradition, the Individual and Culture in Modern American Social Thought (Johns Hopkins, 1996) and A World Made Safe for Differences:  Cold War Intellectuals and the Politics of Identity (Rowman and Littlefield, 2001).  His forthcoming work, The Past as Pilgrimage:  Narrative, Tradition and the Renewal of Catholic History (Christendom Press, 2014), co-authored with Christopher Blum, addresses the relation between faith traditions and the ideology of secularism in the writing of history.

Susan Curtis is Professor of History and American Studies at Purdue University.  She is the author of A Consuming Faith(1991), Dancing to a Black Man’s Tune (1994), The First Black Actors on the Great White Way (1998), Colored Memories(2008), and the co-author of a letter to Purdue President Mitch Daniels challenging his support for efforts to ban the work of Howard Zinn from Indiana public schools (2013).

REPOSTED FROM S-USIH

35th Indiana Association of Historians Annual Meeting hosted by IUPUI

Indianapolis Skyline

Indianapolis Skyline

Rights, Riots, and Reactions

In the year 2015 we focus on civil rights, not only in the context of United States history, but also from a global view of the struggle for equal rights. Possible “anniversary” topics suggested by the year 2015 include the Battle of Waterloo,the Battle of New Orleans,the Congress of Vienna, the end of the Civil War, the passage of the 13th amendment, World War I,the creation of the United Nations (leading to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights), the end of World War II, and the passage of the Voting Rights Act.

Brian Dirck, Professor of History, Anderson University, will provide the keynote address. His first book, Lincoln and Davis: Imagining America,1809-1865, offered a comparative analysis of the two Civil War presidents’ lives and careers. He has since focused most of his attention on Abraham Lincoln. His publications include Lincoln the Lawyer, an overview of Lincoln’s legal career that was awarded the Benjamin Barondess Award from the New York Civil War Roundtable for the best book published on Abraham Lincoln in 2007. In 2012 he published Lincoln and the Constitution as part of the Concise Lincoln Library Series and Lincoln and White America, an analysis of Lincoln’s views concerning white supremacy and racism.

2015 IAH Annual Meeting Call for Papers

The Indiana Association of Historians (IAH) invites papers and panel proposals for its annual meeting to be held on the campus of IUPUI in Indianapolis, Indiana on February 28, 2015.

While papers and panels from all fields and related to all topics of history are welcomed, the program committee is particularly interested in proposals that focus on civil rights, not only in the context of United States history, but also from a global view of the struggle for equal rights. Possible “anniversary” topics suggested by the year 2015 include the Battle of Waterloo, the Battle of New Orleans, the Congress of Vienna, the end of the Civil War, the passage of the 13th amendment, World War I, the creation of the United Nations (leading to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights), the end of World War II, and the passage of the Voting Rights Act. Events leading up to these milestones and reaction to them are also encouraged as the basis of papers.

The committee also welcomes submissions in the fields of K-12 history education and public history. Academic, public, and independent historians, as well as graduate students, are eligible to present papers. All presenters must be present at the conference.

Conference papers (approximately 10 pages/2,500 words) may be based on original research, synthesis of scholarship, or participant experience. Sessions will consist of two or three papers with comments.

To submit a proposal for a paper and/or session,send a one-page proposal for each presentation and a one-page c.v. Panel proposals should include a one-page proposal, which specifies the topic each participant will discuss, and a one-page c.v. per participant.

The deadline for submitting paper and/or session proposals is November 10, 2014. E-mail submissions are encouraged and will be accepted until the deadline.

Founded in 1980, the IAH is the statewide organization of historians with a mission to furnish opportunities for persons within the state’s historical community to become acquainted, to share research and ideas, to promote and strengthen the historical profession, and to encourage the pursuit of history by the general public. IAH members include historians who live or work in Indiana and specialize in various fields of history, not just Indiana history. Visit their website for membership information.

Submit proposals to:
IAH Program 2015
c/o IAH president, Nancy Conner
1500 N. Delaware Street,Indianapolis,IN 46202
Email: nconner@indianahumanities.org

Notre Dame historian and professor to discuss ‘The Bible Then and Now’ in public talk

Dr. Mark Noll

Dr. Mark Noll, Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame

INDIANAPOLIS — Noted historian and National Endowment for the Humanities medal recipient Mark Noll will deliver a public talk Thursday, Aug. 7, as part of the IUPUI Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture’s The Bible and American Life Conference.

Noll will present “The Bible Then and Now” at 7:30 p.m. at Christ Church Cathedral, 125 Monument Circle in downtown Indianapolis. Registration is not required for this keynote talk, which is open to the entire Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus as well as the general public.

Noll is the Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. His numerous books include “The New Shape of World Christianity: How American Experience Reflects Global Faith” (InterVarsity Press, 2009); “God and Race in American Politics: A Short History” (Princeton University Press, 2008); and “The Civil War as a Theological Crisis” (University of North Carolina Press, 2006). He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; in 2006 he received the National Endowment for the Humanities medal at a White House ceremony.

The Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture is part of the Indiana University School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. The Bible and American Life Conference, taking place Wednesday through Friday at Sheraton Indianapolis City Centre, is the second stage of a project that seeks to provide the first large-scale investigation of the Bible in American life.

Earlier this year, the center released the first part of the project: a report based on a national survey of American Bible reading. Among its many findings, the study discovered:

•    There is a 50/50 split among Americans who read any form of scripture in the past year and those who did not.

•    Among those who read any form of scripture in the past year, 95 percent named the Bible as the scripture they read.

•    Despite the proliferation of Bible translations, the King James Version is the top choice — and by a wide margin — of Bible readers.

•    The strongest correlation with Bible reading is race, with African Americans reading the Bible at considerably higher rates than others.

•    Bible readers consult scripture for personal prayer and devotion three times more to learn about culture war issues such as abortion, homosexuality, war or poverty.
A conference schedule and registration information are available online.

Going Global 2015 Theme Announced

UntitledGoing Global 2015 takes place on 1 and 2 June 2015 at the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre in London, UK. The theme for the conference is “Connecting cultures: forging futures” with exploration into the fusion of diverse cultures; how networks of innovation evolve and grow; and what role universities and other tertiary institutions play globally in connecting diverse cultures and in anchoring and sustaining networks of innovation to produce a tangible return and measurable impact for the future. This theme will be explored through three perspectives:

  • National, regional and local cultures and the extent to which connecting people and ideas across these produces innovation and impact
  • Academic discipline and subject cultures including the impact of multi-disciplinary teams of sciences, arts, social sciences etc. Also different cultures of research, teaching and skills development
  • Organizational cultures – particularly those of universities and business; skills providers; NGOs; social and other enterprises.

Proposals can be submitted for paper or poster presentations or to facilitate a session. The call for proposals will open on August 27, 2014 and guidelines for submission are available on the British Council’s website. The session and chair call for proposals will close on Friday 31 October 2014, you have until early 2015 to submit a poster proposal.

Key dates

  • Call for proposals opens: Wednesday 27 August 2014
  • Registration opens: February 2015
  • Going Global 2015 conference: Monday 1 and Tuesday 2 June 2015

IU center to host national conference on civic literacy

ExhibitionINDIANAPOLIS — The Indiana University Center for Civic Literacy, a research center at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, has announced that its second annual conference will take place Aug. 22 to 24 at the Crowne Plaza Union Station in Indianapolis. The public is invited to attend.

“The data is depressing,” said Sheila Kennedy, director of the Center for Civic Literacy and professor of law and public policy at the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at IUPUI, which houses the center. “Only 36 percent of Americans can name the three branches of government. Only 21 percent of high school seniors can list two privileges that United States citizens have that noncitizens don’t. Fewer than a quarter of the nation’s 12th-graders are proficient in civics. How can uninformed people make the informed decisions that are critical in our society? That is what the Center for Civic Literacy addresses, and what we will discuss at our conference.”

The Center for Civic Literacy pursues an aggressive research agenda to identify and address the causes and civic consequences of Americans’ low levels of constitutional, economic and scientific knowledge. It hosts a website and blog, and publishes a quarterly newsletter and an online, peer-reviewed interdisciplinary journal.

The theme of this year’s conference, held in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Center’s National Advisory Committee, is “Connecting the Dots: The Impact of Civic Literacy Gaps on Democracy, the Economy and Society, and Charting a Path Forward.”

The program will open with a welcome from former Indiana Supreme Court Justice Theodore Boehm, who chairs the center’s National Advisory Committee, and will include addresses from Ted McConnell, executive director of the Civic Mission of Schools Campaign; David Schultz, professor of political science at Hamline University; Dallas Dishman, executive director of the Geffen Foundation; and Kim McLaurin, director of the Marshall-Brennan Constitutional Literacy Project, among others.

Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture offers conference on how Bible is used

391697_w296INDIANAPOLIS — Registration is now underway for a national conference that will culminate a three-year Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis study of how — outside of religious services – - Americans use the Bible in their daily lives.

The Conference on the Bible in American Life will take place Wednesday Aug. 6, to Friday, Aug. 8, at the Sheraton Indianapolis City Centre, 31 W. Ohio St., in downtown Indianapolis.

The Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture at IUPUI is sponsoring the three-day event as part of the first large-scale investigation of the Bible in American life.

Noted historian Mark Noll of the University of Notre Dame will deliver a conference plenary address. Noll will present “The Bible: Then and Now” at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 7, at Christ Church Cathedral, 125 Monument Circle. Conference registration is not required for the plenary address, which is open to the public.

“While the Bible has been central to Christian practice throughout American history, many important questions remain unanswered in scholarship,” said Philip Goff, director of the Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture, which is part of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Those unanswered questions include how people read the Bible for themselves, how denominational and parachurch publications have influenced interpretation and application, and how clergy and congregations have influenced individual understandings of scripture, the director said.

“These questions are even more pressing today, as denominations are losing much of their traditional authority, technology is changing people’s reading and cognitive habits, and subjective experience is continuing to eclipse textual authority as the mark of true religion,” Goff said. “Understanding both the past and the future of Christian communities in the United States depends, even if only in part, on a serious analysis of how these cultural shifts are affecting Americans’ relationship to the Bible.”

Earlier this year, the Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture released a report about the Bible’s use based on a national survey of American Bible reading. During the upcoming conference, historians, sociologists, political scientists, seminary professors and religious leaders will offer analyses of the Bible in daily life that complement the report’s findings and will put those findings about the Bible’s use in a broader context.

Among the report’s many findings:

  • There is a 50/50 split among Americans who read any form of scripture (the Bible, the Quran, the Torah, etc.) in the past year and those who did not.
  • Among those who read any form of scripture in the past year, 95 percent named the Bible as the scripture they read.
  •  Despite the proliferation of Bible translations, the King James Version is the top choice — and by a wide margin — of Bible readers.
  •  The strongest correlation with Bible reading is race, with African Americans reading the Bible at considerably higher rates than others.

Seating for the three-day conference is limited, and advance registration is required. Registration before July 15 is $50; after July 15 it is $70.

Annual urban education conference to focus on many factors affecting schools

5

Dr. Virginia Caine

unnamed

James Earl Davis

INDIANAPOLIS — The 16th annual Indiana Urban Schools Association summer conference on urban education is gathering experts from across the country and many from the Indiana University School of Education at IUPUI to examine the many factors impacting students, families, and educators this Wednesday, June 18. The conference, whose theme is “Schooling and the Ripple Effect: Emotional, Intellectual, Physical,” starts at 8:30 a.m. at the Chapel Hill 7th and 8th Grade Center in Indianapolis. Among the presenters are several Indiana school teachers and program leaders. They will share the latest program developments in place for the state’s urban schools.

The conference sessions and topics will focus on a variety of factors affecting K-12 education in urban schools. Some of the sessions will address meeting expectations in the midst of environmental distractions, how well students learn, and nutrition and physical well-being factors impacting student learning. “The ripple effect of schools reaches everyone, not simply students,” said Chuck Little, executive director of the Indiana Urban Schools Association (IUSA) and clinical professor or educational leadership at the IU School of Education at IUPUI. “At this conference, we will engage topics like health, instruction, politics, and teacher evaluation, all of which impact and shape the future.”

The keynote address will be delivered by James Earl Davis, professor of educational leadership and interim chair of the department of Teaching and Learning at Temple University. Davis is the author of Uneasy Ties: Race and Gender in Urban Education Reform. His research expertise covers gender and schooling outcomes, masculinity, sociology of higher education, and applied research methods.

The guest speaker for the conference is Dr. Virginia Caine, director of the Marion County Health Department and associate professor of medicine at the Indiana University School of Medicine’s Infectious Disease Division. Caine has served on many professional boards, including the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention Elimination of Health Disparities through Translation research panel, and the Council on Education for Public Health.

Also presenting at the conference is Doug Martin, an Indiana writer and educator who released his book Hoosier School Heist earlier this year. The work makes the case for what he calls the private corporate takeover of Indiana’s public schools. Martin says legislation and an extensive net of interlocking relationships have allowed this to happen, promoting private sector interests at the expense of public schools.

The IU School of Education at IUPUI will be part of several presentations throughout the day. Hardy Murphy, a research scholar with the School of Education, will be a panelist on two panels dealing with teacher evaluation, one focusing on how teacher evaluation is evolving and the other about developing a rubric for teacher evaluation standards. Murphy is conducting a statewide research project on Indiana’s teacher evaluation system. Three students from the Urban Education PhD program will present. Aly Elfreich and Brandon Currie will conduct two sessions of “School Counselors as Participatory Action Researchers in Urban High Schools,” one in the morning and the other in the afternoon. Tiffany Kyser will present “Design Shift, System Shift: a Design Thinker’s Brief Multimodal Approach to Urban Education.” Additionally, Dean Gerardo Gonzalez will provide opening remarks for the conference.

The Indiana Urban Schools Association was established to serve the needs of urban school children in Indiana by supporting a positive legislative agenda, providing a forum for considering urban school needs, cooperating with other organizations interested in urban school children, providing services and programs designed for urban schools, and supporting other programs designed to benefit all children in Indiana schools. More about this week’s conference is available here.

IUPUI researcher to host international conference exploring China’s ancient links to Africa

Ian McIntoshINDIANAPOLIS — Ian McIntosh, associate director of the Confucius Institute in Indianapolis and director of international partnerships at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, has been awarded a $17,800 grant from the Confucius Institute Headquarters Division of Sinology and China Studies to host a conference, “Exploring China’s Ancient Links to Africa.”

The conference will take place in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in October.

It will be attended by some of the world’s leading archaeologists in this field, including Sada Mire, director of antiquities in Somaliland, Felix Chami of Dar es Salaam University, Tanzania, and Qin Dashu of Peking University, China. IUPUI’s strategic partner in China, Sun Yat-sen University, will be represented by two leading archaeologists, professors Zhu Tiequan and Wensuo Liu.

“This conference will help to shed light on this early movement of peoples, especially Chinese navigators and traders, and their relationship with African merchants, especially from the Axumite Empire,” McIntosh said.

An Australian anthropologist, McIntosh is a co-founder of the Past Masters, an international team of heritage specialists, historians, anthropologists and archaeologists. The Past Masters received widespread media attention with their expedition to uncover the significance of medieval African coins from the long-abandoned Swahili settlement of Kilwa discovered in Tanzania on a remote island in northern Australia.

Participants at the conference will speak to connections between China and Africa, as far back as the Han Dynasty in the first century of the Common Era. Chinese coin and pottery finds from along the Red Sea and the Horn of Africa and also in East Africa, dating to the Tang, Song and Yuan Dynasties, will also be discussed.

For more information, contact McIntosh at imcintos@iupui.edu.

Humanities Intensive Teaching and Learning (HILT) Institute

HILT logo

 

August 4-8, 2014

University of Maryland

 

We’ve got an exciting slate of classes taught by incredible instructors.

 

Courses for 2014 include:

Project Development
led by Simon Appleford, Clemson University and Jennifer Guiliano, MITH
This course will explore the fundamentals of project planning and design including, but not limited to: formulating appropriate disciplinary questions for digital humanities research, investigating digital humanities tools and resources, structuring your first project, critical path scheduling, understanding roles and responsibilities, risk management, documenting your project work, writing your first grant proposal, budget setting and controls, building the project team, and selecting and implementing project management tools and software. This is an advanced course and, as such, you are expected to have an understanding of the definition of digital humanities. Materials will be covered through lectures, discussions, presentations, and hands-on activities. Participants will get the most of the course if they arrive with at least some sense of a potential digital humanities project that they would like to develop throughout the course.

Introduction to Web Development, Design, and Principles
led by Jeremy Boggs, Scholars’ Lab, and Jeri Wierenga, George Mason University
This course introduces students to best practices and techniques for standards-based, accessible web design and development including, but not limited to: Current trends and issues in web design/development; Responsive design for a variety of platforms and devices; HTML, CSS, and JavaScript; Managing code using the Git version control system. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with steps and skills to conceive, design, develop, and publish a web site. Topics will be covered primarily through hands-on activities, with some supplementary lectures and discussions. By the end of the course, students will have a modest web site published on the Web. Prior experience with web design or development could be useful, but is not required.

Humanities Programming
led by Wayne Graham, Scholars’ Lab, and Brandon Walsh, University of Virginia
This course focuses on introducing participants to humanities programming through the creation and use of the Ruby on Rails web application framework. This course will introduce programming and design concepts, project management and planning, workflow, as well as the design, implementation, and deployment of a web-based application. Technologies covered in this course will include git, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Ruby, Rails, and relational (and non-relational) data stores. Over the course of the week, we will work through the practical implementation of a developing and deploying a small-scale web application.

Games in the Humanities Classroom

led by Anastasia Salter, University of Baltimore
Games can be a great way to add experiential and playful learning to the humanities classroom by integrating learning objectives with game mechanics. We’ll look at three main ways to integrate games into learning objectives: teaching and debriefing existing games, making games for students to play, and building games with your students. Along the way, we’ll discuss what makes an effective learning game and how integrating games can offer a gentle way to learn from failure while offering the opportunity for exploration, collaboration, and the probing of ideas through new lenses. Participants will engage in “critical play” of several examples of humanities board games, text games, and graphical games and learn simple tools for making games in these genres while building simple games. No programming experience is required or assumed.

Large-Scale Text Analysis with R
led by Matt Jockers, University of Nebraska
Text collections such as the Google Books have provided scholars in many fields with convenient access to their materials in digital form, but text analysis at the scale of millions or billions of words still requires the use of tools and methods that may initially seem complex or esoteric to researchers in the humanities. Large-Scale Text Analysis with R will provide a practical introduction to a range of text analysis tools and methods. The course will include units on data extraction, stylistic analysis, authorship attribution, genre detection, gender detection, unsupervised clustering, supervised classification, topic modeling, and sentiment analysis. The main computing environment for the course will be R, “the open source programming language and software environment for statistical computing and graphics.” While no programming experience is required, students should have basic computer skills and be familiar with their computer’s file system and comfortable with the command line. The course will cover best practices in data gathering and preparation, as well as addressing some of the theoretical questions that arise when employing a quantitative methodology for the study of literature. Participants will be given a “sample corpus” to use in class exercises, but some class time will be available for independent work and participants are encouraged to bring their own text corpora and research questions so they may apply their newly learned skills to projects of their own.

Network Analysis and Visualization
led by Elijah Meeks, Stanford University
This course will cover the principles of network analysis and representation with an emphasis on expressing network structures and measures using information visualization. The tool we’ll be using will be Gephi, which is freely available at gephi.org, with some time spent on learning how to deploy your network visualization in a dynamic or interactive manner on the web using a variety of frameworks. This course will introduce and explain a variety of traditional network statistics, such as various measures of centrality and clustering, and explain the appropriate use of network statistics to various classes of networks. The workshop will consist of lectures followed by discussion and hands-on activities. If participants can bring a sample of their network data, the activities will usually be applicable to all manner of networks, but a variety of sample network datasets will be available to explore different network phenomena. This workshop will cover traditional social networks, geographic networks, dynamic networks, and n-partite networks and will deal with issues of modeling networks, formatting data, and using information visualization best practices in representation of your network.

Born-Digital Forensics
led by Kam Woods, University of North Carolina, and Porter Olsen, MITH
This course will introduce students to the role of digital forensics in the act of preserving, investigating, and curating born-digital culture artifacts. We will explore the technical underpinning and the physical materiality of the digital objects we frequently, in our screen-centric world, mistake as ephemeral. Using open source tools including Linux, The Sleuth Kit, and BitCurator, students will get hands-on training exploring a wide variety of digital media and learning how to look for deleted files, how to search and redact personally identifiable information, and how to produce information-rich metadata about a forensic disk image. In addition to practical skills, students will develop a theoretical understanding of digital storage media–and the forensics disk images produced from them–as objects of study in their own right and the importance of learning to read these objects as richly as we do more traditional texts. There are no essential prerequisite skills for this course; however, a working knowledge of Linux will be a great benefit. Students who have access to their own collection of born-digital materials to work with are encouraged to bring them to the course.

Crowdsourcing Cultural Heritage
led by Ben Brumfield, Independent Developer, and Mia Ridge, Ph.D. Candidate, Open University
Successful crowdsourcing projects help organizations connect with audiences who enjoy engaging with their content and tasks, whether transcribing handwritten documents, correcting OCR errors, identifying animals on the Serengeti or folding proteins. Conversely, poorly-designed crowdsourcing projects find it difficult to attract or retain participants. This class will present international case studies of best practice crowdsourcing projects to illustrate the range of tasks that can be crowdsourced, the motivations of participants and the characteristics of well-designed projects. We’ll study crowdsourcing projects from the worlds of citizen science, investigative journalism, genealogy and free culture to look for lessons which might apply to humanities projects. We’ll discuss models for quality control over user-generated projects, explore the cross-overs between traditional in-house volunteer projects internet-enabled crowdsourcing, and look at the numbers behind real-world projects. Finally, the course will give students hands-on experience with several different crowdsourcing platforms for image annotation, manuscript transcription, and OCR correction. Students are encouraged to bring their project ideas and some scanned material for the lab sessions.

Critical Race and Gender in the Digital Humanities
led by Jarah Moesh, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Maryland
The methods and tools used and produced by Digital Humanists function as organizing principles that frame how race, gender, sexuality, and ability are embodied and understood within and through projects, code-bases, and communities of practice. The very ‘making’ of tools and projects is an engagement with power and control. Through a critical theoretical exploration of the values in the design and use of these tools and methods, we begin to understand that these methods and practices are structures which are themselves marginalizing, tokenizing, and reductionist. By pairing hands-on learning/making with Critical Race Theory, Queer, and Gender Theories, we will interrogate the structures of the tools themselves while creating our own collaborative practices and methods for ‘doing’ (refracting) DH differently. To accomplish this, each day will focus on one tool or method. Mornings will be a combination of reading-based discussion and experimental structural/tools-based exercises, while afternoon sessions will focus on pulling it all together in collaborative analytical projects. While no prior technical experience is necessary, you will be experimenting with, and creating your own theoretical practice that incorporates key themes in critical race, gender and queer theories with digital humanities methods and tools. Therefore, the key requirement for this course is curiosity and a willingness to explore new ideas in order to fully engage with the materials. Students are also encouraged to bring their own research questions to explore through these theories and practices.

The costs to attend HILT are:

Non-student/Regular: $950
Student: $500

Group discounts are available by contacting dhinstitute@umd.edu

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The Keynote Speaker for Humanities Intensive Learning + Teaching 2014 will be Tara McPherson.

Tara McPherson is Associate Professor of Critical Studies at the University of Southern California’s School of Cinematic Arts. She is a core faculty member of the IMAP program, USC’s innovative practice based-Ph.D., and also an affiliated faculty member in the American Studies and Ethnicity Department. Her research engages the cultural dimensions of media, including the intersection of gender, race, affect and place. She has a particular interest in digital media. Here, her research focuses on the digital humanities, early software histories, gender, and race, as well as upon the development of new tools and paradigms for digital publishing, learning, and authorship.

Her Reconstructing Dixie: Race, Gender and Nostalgia in the Imagined South (Duke UP: 2003) received the 2004 John G. Cawelti Award for the outstanding book published on American Culture, among other awards. She is co-editor of Hop on Pop: The Politics and Pleasures of Popular Culture (Duke UP: 2003) and editor of Digital Youth, Innovation and the Unexpected, part of the MacArthur Foundation series on Digital Media and Learning (MIT Press, 2008.) Her writing has appeared in numerous journals, including Camera Obscura, The Velvet Light Trap, Discourse, and Screen, and in edited anthologies such as Race and Cyberspace, The New Media Book, The Object Reader, Virtual Publics, The Visual Culture Reader 2.0, and Basketball Jones. The anthology, Interactive Frictions, co-edited with Marsha Kinder, is forthcoming from the University of California Press, and she is currently working on a manuscript examining the digital transformation of the archive as it mutates into the database.

She is the Founding Editor of Vectors, www.vectorsjournal.org, a multimedia peer-reviewed journal affiliated with the Open Humanities Press, and is a founding editor of the MacArthur-supported International Journal of Learning and Media (launched by MIT Press in 2009.) She is a widely sought-out speaker on the digital humanities, digital scholarship, and feminist technology studies. Tara was among the founding organizers of Race in Digital Space, a multi-year project supported by the Annenberg Center for Communication and the Ford and Rockefeller Foundations. She is on the advisory board of the Mellon-funded Scholarly Communications Institute, has frequently served as an AFI juror, is a core board member of HASTAC , and is on the boards of several journals and other organizations. At USC, she co-directs (with Phil Ethington) the new Center for Transformative Scholarship and is a fellow at the Center for Excellence in Teaching. With major support from the Mellon Foundation, she is currently working with colleagues from leading universities and with several academic presses, museums, scholarly societies, and archives to explore new modes of scholarship for visual culture research. She is the lead PI on the new authoring platform, Scalar, and for the Alliance for Networking Visual Culture, scalar.usc.edu.


For more information on HILT, visit http://www.dhtraining.org/hilt

Researching and Teaching Intercultural Competence and 8th Intercultural Rhetoric and Discourse Conference

Nuetzel_Daniel_2010 June 6 and 7, 2014

 IUPUI Campus Center

 420 University Blvd, Indianapolis

INDIANAPOLIS — International scholars will headline an Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis conference, discussing the role of cultural knowledge and intercultural communication as well as the intersection of language and culture in community settings. The conference aims to help university teachers, school teachers and other professionals adapt the latest thinking about the integration of cultural studies into professional and second language learning settings.

The Researching and Teaching Intercultural Competence and Intercultural Rhetoric and Discourse Conference will take place June 6 and 7 at the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd, Indianapolis.

The conference is organized by the International Center for Intercultural Communication, the Department of World Languages and Cultures, and the Max Kade German-American Center in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

This year’s conference also celebrates the memory of professor Daniel C. Nützel, who died in April 2013 at the age of 50. Nützel was associate professor of German, the Hoyt-Reichmann Scholar of German-American Studies and director of the Max Kade German-American Center at IUPUI.

“Professor Nützel was a well-respected colleague, teacher and scholar,” said professor Claudia Grossmann, conference co-organizer and interim director of the Max Kade German-American Center. “He was a proponent of expanding cultural and intercultural competence in communication as an aspect of interest across a range of academic disciplines, and this conference is a fitting part of his legacy.”

The conference focuses on studies of how writers and speakers with various linguistic, cultural and social backgrounds negotiate communication. The conference seeks to bring together current discussions of intercultural competence in language education, rhetoric and discourse research, and application in English and other world language teaching settings.

“Presentations will feature theoretical and empirical investigations of topics along with discussion of practical applications, including classroom practices, writing in business and other professional settings,” said professor Marta Anton, chair of the Department of World Languages and Cultures and a conference organizer. “The conference addresses a variety of topics, from the importance of teaching metaphoric meanings as an essential part of developing linguistic proficiency in a second language, to the development of intercultural competence during study abroad or the expressions of ethnicity among German Americans in early-20th-century Indianapolis, to name a few, and highlights cultural contact and language development.”

Plenary talks include:

  • “The Present and Future of Intercultural Rhetoric,” Ulla Connor, IUPUI, and Dwight Atkinson, Purdue University
  • “Metaphor: The Integration of Culture, Cognition, and Communication,” James Lantolf, Pennsylvania State University
  • “The Intercultural Complex and Its Assessment in Healthcare Communication,” Srikant Sarangi, Aalborg University, Denmark
  • “Impacting Teacher Use of Critical Sociocultural Practices in K-12 Classrooms,” Annela Teemant, IUPUI

“The conference was established to further research in intercultural competence, and intercultural rhetoric, and to create collaborations among leading research universities and organizations,” said professor Ulla Connor, conference co-organizer and director of the International Center for Intercultural Communication. “It also is intended to build connections at IUPUI and within Indianapolis and Indiana among those who teach in a broad array of disciplines.”

Researchers and teachers of second/foreign languages as well as scholars in second language acquisition, communication, composition and multicultural education, among others, are encouraged to participate.

For more information or to register, visit the conference website.