Upcoming construction at IUPUI will strengthen ties to community, renovate IU Natatorium

394504_w308Change is coming to the IUPUI campus, thanks to a partnership between IUPUI, the city of Indianapolis and Lilly Endowment.

Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard announced the joint $30 million deal Monday, along with IU President Michael A. McRobbie, representatives from Lilly Endowment and other organizations involved in the project. The partnership is designed to strengthen IUPUI’s ties to the surrounding neighborhoods and make critical renovations to the IU Natatorium.

The IU Natatorium will be undergoing significant renovations.

Under terms of the agreement, the city will turn Michigan and New York streets into two-way roads from West Street, through the campus and across the bridges into the Haughville neighborhood. Part of that project will include improvements to pedestrian crossings, sidewalks, bicycle lanes, medians and other features.

The work will require rerouted traffic patterns beginning in 2015, officials said.

During Monday’s announcement, Ballard cited numerous advantages to the IUPUI campus, the city and its residents.

“Thousands of people enter and exit IUPUI for work, class and access to medical care every day,” the mayor said. “These streets improvements will make it safer and easier for people to access campus and encourage investment and development in Haughville, Hawthorne and Stringtown from companies seeking to be near IUPUI and the growing IU Health complex.”

Funding will include support from the downtown tax increment financing district, plus support from IUPUI and the endowment for upgrades to the natatorium.

“Just as the IUPUI campus has been an integral part of downtown Indianapolis for decades, the IU Natatorium has become one of the city’s signature sports venues of the last 30 years,” said McRobbie. “Indiana University’s investment in the future of the natatorium is emblematic of our commitment to the city of Indianapolis. The planned improvements will allow the natatorium to provide swimmers and divers of all levels — as well as fans of the sports — with a world-class facility for years to come, further strengthening the strong partnership between IU and the city.”

The natatorium is scheduled to host the 2016 U.S. Olympic Diving Trials.

“This project involves several partners coming together to benefit the city of Indianapolis and the IUPUI campus,” IUPUI Director of Athletics Mike Moore said. “The natatorium is a special place in our community and these improvements will impact swimmers and divers of all ages, including our student-athletes.”

The infrastructure changes are expected to attract new development and increase the number of residents interested in the opportunities that will be available on the Near Westside. That could include a growing number of students interested in living in apartments and rental units in the affected neighborhoods.

City leaders are hopeful that the growth will help the Westside neighborhoods follow the path of other communities (like Fountain Square and the Old Northside) as “hot spots” in the center of Indianapolis.

The changes will help IUPUI become more a part of the city neighborhoods that surround the campus. City officials also hope that increasingly attractive housing options will help continue recent trends of college graduates deciding to stay in Indianapolis, both as residents and employees.

by Ric Burrous

IU experts discuss federal court rulings concerning same-sex marriage bans in Indiana and Utah

25868212_BG1A federal district judge has ruled that Indiana’s ban on same-sex marriage was unconstitutional, allowing for the immediate issuance of marriage licenses Wednesday in a state that earlier this year saw a contentious debate in the legislature about amending the Indiana constitution to include the ban. A federal appeals court also ruled on Wednesday that Utah must allow same-sex couples to marry, making it the first time a federal appeals court has taken action on the controversial issue.

Experts from Indiana University offer the following insights:

A historic event for same-sex couples, families in Indiana
A strategy of ‘shock and awe’
Consistent with a trend across the nation
Rulings likely to increase Americans’ support of same-sex marriage
Question is no longer whether but when

A historic event for same-sex couples, families in Indiana

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Deborah Widiss, associate professor at Indiana University’s Maurer School of Law, said that the striking down of Indiana’s same-sex marriage ban is a historic event for same-sex couples and their families in Indiana.

“Indiana now joins the quickly growing number of states where courts have held that state bans are unconstitutional,” Widiss said.

She said the court correctly held that marriage is fundamentally important, and that there is not a good reason to deny same-sex couples access to marriage. Since Judge Richard Young did not issue a stay on his ruling, Indiana same-sex couples have already been issued marriage licenses in Marion County throughout the day, as well as in other Indiana counties, paving the way for equal marriage rights for all in Indiana.

Widiss conducts research on employment law, family law, legislation, gender and gender stereotypes. To speak with her, contact Ken Turchi at 812-856-4044 or kturchi@indiana.edu, or Tracy James at 812-855-0084 or traljame@iu.edu. Top

A strategy of ‘shock and awe’

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Steve Sanders, associate professor of law at the Maurer School of Law, said states like Indiana have had only one remaining argument to justify their bans against same-sex marriage: that the purpose of marriage is to incentivize heterosexuals not to procreate irresponsibly.

“Historians and family law scholars have regarded this argument as dubious,” Sanders said. “And today it was rejected by [Federal District] Judge Young as well as the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals.

“The movement for legal same-sex marriage has been pursuing a strategy of shock and awe, filing as many lawsuits as possible and racking up an unbroken string of victories in the federal courts. Today’s rulings in Indiana and the 10th Circuit are part of this larger landscape. Indeed, it may have been more noteworthy if the decisions had gone the other way.”

Sanders can be reached at 734-904-2280 or stevesan@indiana.edu. For additional assistance, contact Ken Turchi at 812-856-4044 or kturchi@indiana.edu, or Tracy James at 812-855-0084 or traljame@iu.edu. Top

Consistent with a trend across the nation

INDIANAPOLIS — Jennifer Drobac, professor of law at the Robert H. McKinney School of Law at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, said today’s federal court decision to strike down Indiana’s gay marriage ban is completely consistent with the direction in which other U.S. court decisions are headed.

“[Indiana] is about a year behind from what the federal government is doing,” Drobac said. “This is a decision that could have been predicted based on the fact that so many courts have been ruling in this way across the nation and in the Supreme Court’s strike down of DOMA last summer. There’s nothing surprising or shocking here.”

Drobac said the ruling provides significant changes in Indiana family law. It allows married same-sex couples to protect their families in a way that all other married couples can in Indiana. In turn, this avoids numerous problems with legal orphans or children left without child support in same-sex dissolutions of marriage.

“This is simply consistent with a trend across the nation: recognizing marriage as a fundamental right of all loving couples that want to formalize their commitment and protect their families,” she said.

Drobac is a professor at the Robert H. McKinney School of Law. Her research areas include family law, juvenile law and sexual harassment law. She can be reached at jdrobac@iu.edu  or at 317-278-4777. Top

Rulings likely to increase Americans’ support of same-sex marriage

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Indiana is not the first state to have its same-sex marriage ban struck down by a federal judge, yet the ruling here is all the more significant considering the contentious debate earlier this year about making Indiana’s ban a constitutional amendment, said Indiana University sociology professor Brian Powell.

“If you look at Indiana and nearby states, you see a stark difference,” he said. “While Illinois legislators approved legislation allowing same-sex marriage, Indiana legislators were debating about becoming the last state to move toward a constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage.”

Powell has conducted several nationally representative surveys of Americans’ opinions of family and same-sex marriage, beginning in 2003, and has watched support for same-sex unions grow 2 percent to 2.5 percent a year, which he describes as surprisingly speedy for such a controversial social issue. According to Powell, “court decisions such as today’s ruling likely will serve to further increase Americans’ support for same-sex marriage.”

He also noted that “same-sex marriage may prove to be an economic boon for the state of Indiana.” Same-sex marriage could generate millions of dollars in spending for the Indiana economy and could be important in the recruitment and retention of highly skilled employees, especially in businesses such as Eli Lilly and Cummins and in universities.

The reasons states give to justify their constitutional bans have often focused on the benefits to children. Powell’s public opinion research has found, however, that opposition to same-sex marriage does not stem from concerns about children but instead is mostly rooted in religious and moral beliefs. Because groups of people cannot legally be treated differently based on moral or religious beliefs, states had to offer other justifications for their same-sex marriage bans.

“The great irony is that during the political debates, the people who are opposed to same-sex marriage express moral disapproval, but that cannot be a legal basis for law.”

Powell is the Rudy Professor of Sociology in the College of Arts and Sciences at IU Bloomington and can be reached at 812-360-0474 or powell@indiana.edu. For additional assistance, contact Tracy James at 812-855-0084 or traljame@iu.edu. Top

Question is no longer whether but when

INDIANAPOLIS — With Wednesday’s ruling on same-sex marriage, it is becoming increasingly clear that the question is not whether same-sex marriage will be recognized nationwide, but when that will happen, according to IU McKinney School of Law professor David Orentlicher.

“Since December, federal judges in Utah, Oklahoma, Virginia, Texas — and now Indiana — have ruled that same-sex marriage bans violate the U.S. Constitution, and past decisions by the U.S. Supreme Court indicate that arguments against same-sex marriage ultimately will fall short,” Orentlicher said.

“Although the Supreme Court once deferred to a legislature’s moral judgment about personal relationships and other social practices, that is no longer the case. The government needs to identify tangible harm from the conduct. A ban on same-sex marriage must rest on something more than public morality.

“Opponents of same-sex marriage have wrongly argued that children are better off being raised by opposite-sex couples than by same-sex couples. That argument misreads the empirical evidence on parenting, misjudges the role of government, and it misconceives the function of marriage.”

David Orentlicher is the Samuel R. Rosen Professor of Law at IU Robert McKinney School of Law and co-director of the William S. and Christine S. Hall Center for Law and Health, a unit of the McKinney School of Law, which is on the campus of Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. Orentlicher holds an M.D. from Harvard Medical School and a J.D. from Harvard Law School. He is an adjunct professor of medicine at Indiana University School of Medicine, also at IUPUI. To reach Orentlicher for interviews, call 317-658-1674 or email dorentli@iu.edu.

CDC selects Stephan Viehweg for second term as Act Early Ambassador

46700085INDIANAPOLIS — Stephan Viehweg, associate director of the Riley Child Development Center at the IU School of Medicine and interim director of the IUPUI Center for Translating Research Into Practice, has been selected a second time to serve as an Act Early Ambassador for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s “Learn the Signs. Act Early” program.

He will play an important role in educating Indiana’s parents, health care professionals and early educators about early childhood development; warning signs of autism and other developmental disabilities; and the importance of acting early on concerns about a child’s development.

Developmental disabilities are common in the United States. A recent study shows that about 1 in 6 children has been diagnosed with a developmental disability. It’s important that these children are identified early and that they and their families receive the services and support they need.

“This campaign seeks to help parents and their caregivers to identify developmental delays at the youngest age possible to help these kids catch up to be ready for school,” Viehweg said. “As Indiana’s ambassador, I will be promoting the use of the free materials and learning opportunities.

“I will be offering workshops at various statewide conferences and meetings; working with systems to include the ‘Learn the Signs. Act Early.’ materials to parents, families and community members; and collaborating with Indiana’s network of programs, providers and parent organizations in a collective effort to increase awareness of autism and other developmental delays and link children and their families to assessment and services.”

Viehweg completed an 18-month term as an Act Early Ambassador in April. He was selected recently through a competitive process to complete a second, two-year term.

According to the CDC, Viehweg was selected because of his commitment to improving the lives of children and families and increasing access to services for children with developmental disabilities. The Act Early Ambassadors project is designed to develop a network of state-level experts to improve early identification of developmental delay and disability. It is a collaborative project of CDC’s National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Maternal and Child Health Bureau, the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, and the Association of University Centers on Disabilities.

IUPUI to significantly bolster its journalism/public relations program

Indianapolis bachelor’s/master’s program moves from Bloomington-based School of Journalism management to IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI

SLA at IUPUI logoINDIANAPOLIS — Graduate and undergraduate journalism and public relations students at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will have access to an array of new resources beginning July 1, when the long-established Indianapolis location of the IU School of Journalism shifts management from IU Bloomington to the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. The program will be known as the IU Department of Journalism and Public Relations at IUPUI.

The move comes as the IU School of Journalism at Bloomington merges on July 1 with the Department of telecommunications and Department of Communication and Culture to form The Media School.

With the transition to local oversight, the IUPUI journalism department will now offer students and faculty additional resources in academic and career advising, curriculum development, research funding, alumni engagement, philanthropic support and more.

School officials also envision partnerships with other departments and schools on campus — such as telecommunications, informatics, event management, medicine and athletics — to further enhance journalism and public relations programs focusing on sports and health/life sciences, and to give students the versatility needed in a rapidly changing profession.

“We’re honored to have our roots in the 100-year-old IU School of Journalism,” said Jonas Bjork, who will become the first chair of the new department. “But as one of IUPUI’s smallest schools, we didn’t have the depth of resources we needed to take our program to the next level. This move — reinforced by unanimous support from our faculty and staff — will help us achieve that.”

Bill Blomquist, dean of the School of Liberal Arts, said the merger is tailor-made for an urban-serving institution in a capital city ripe with professional opportunities.

“The skills and thinking we teach in journalism and public relations –– the ability to search out and explain information — are much in demand among all kinds of employers,” Blomquist said. “Developing those professional skills, along with the versatility instilled by liberal learning, will help prepare our graduates not only for their first jobs but also for the careers that follow.

“What’s more, in this city full of sports, health, life science, government and other communication opportunities, our classroom learning is supplemented and complemented by real-world learning — internships, service projects, guest speakers and more — that you can’t match anywhere else in this state and in few places around the nation.”

Bjork said the name change — to include public relations — is a decision based on the changing nature of the profession and the marketplace.

“While journalists and public relations professionals are, in many places, treated as adversaries, many of the theories and practices we teach journalists and public relations professionals are, in fact, complementary,” Bjork said. “Often, the two groups of professionals must work together, so it helps that we teach them together here at IUPUI with faculty members who bring real-world experience to the table.”

The new Department of Journalism and Public Relations will offer bachelor’s degrees, master’s degrees and certificates in journalism and public relations with specializations available in sports journalism, health/life science public relations, advertising and other areas.

IU joins new education technology services partnership

unizin-logo1Indiana University has joined with three other leading U.S. research universities to form the Unizin consortium to provide a suite of services for courses, online learning and big data analytics aimed at significantly improving the way educational content is shared across institutions and ultimately delivered to students.

Unizin, a partnership among IU, Colorado State University, the University of Florida and the University of Michigan, will provide a common technological infrastructure that will allow member universities to work locally and together to strengthen their traditional missions of education and research using the most innovative digital technology available today.

“Leading universities are continuously working to enhance the great value of both a residential and a digital education,” said Brad Wheeler, vice president for information technology and chief information officer at Indiana University.

“By coming together to create Unizin, IU and our partners are ensuring a cost-efficient path for the best tools to serve students whether resident, online or through education to our many alumni.

“And just as universities created Internet2 nearly two decades ago to serve our research mission, the founding universities — with others to join soon — are creating Unizin to serve our educational mission by empowering our faculty with the best tools. The Unizin consortium is an extensible and scalable collaboration that is anchored in the deepest and best values of the academy to advance highly effective education.”

For instructors, Unizin will provide powerful content storing and sharing services that give faculty greater control and options over the use of their intellectual property. Their courses can span residential, online, badges or MOOC delivery models from a single software service.

Students will benefit by gaining access to course materials from some of the best minds in higher education in formats that best serve their individual needs — from massive open online courses (MOOCs) and flipped classrooms, where lectures are given online and class time is reserved for discussion and group work, to traditional in-person courses.

The tools and services eventually provided through Unizin also will allow partner institutions to collect and analyze large amounts of data on student performance within the policies of the member universities. These analytics will enable faculty researchers to gain valuable insight into the ways students best learn, thus shaping future approaches to teaching.

IU discussions around the concept of Unizin began more than a year ago following President Michael A. McRobbie’s announcement of the creation of IU Online in 2012. The consortium is being formed to enable individual campus learning strategies and approaches that are powered by the scale gained from the joint capabilities of leading universities for digital education.

“With Unizin, Indiana University is once again at the forefront of the digital revolution in higher education,” said Barbara Bichelmeyer, executive associate vice president for university academic and regional campus affairs and senior director of IU’s Office of Online Education. “Unizin combines the power of platform, content and analytics so we will be able to better share the great work of our faculty across all of our campuses and provide the high-quality courses people expect from IU at greater scale, while improving economies of scale.”

Each investing institution has signed the Unizin charter and committed $1 million over the next three years to develop and shape the shared services. These combined investments will provide a more efficient path to providing educational services than one-off investments by each institution.

Unizin has been created as an unincorporated association within Internet2, a leading not-for-profit global technology organization with more than 500 member institutions across the higher education, government and business communities. The Unizin platform will be delivered over the ultra-high-speed national research and education network operated by Internet2 on behalf of the U.S. research university members.

Unizin will operate under the direction of a soon-to-be-named chief executive officer, who will report to a board of directors comprising representatives from each of the investing member universities as well as Internet2. As a services-providing organization, Unizin will operate with a professional staff and contracts for evolving services.

“The intent of Unizin is to create a community, akin to Internet2, of like-minded institutions who are willing to invest time and resources into creating a service grounded in openness and collaboration that will allow all members to leverage the tremendous power of today’s digital technologies,” said James Hilton, dean of libraries and vice provost for digital education at the University of Michigan. “Unizin is a service organization in support of its members, and in that spirit, we look forward to welcoming additional members to the Unizin consortium.”

Canvas selected as Unizin learning management system platform

As part of its launch, Unizin has selected Canvas by Instructure to provide a common learning management system for use by member institutions. Canvas is a cloud-based technology platform that provides a wide range of functions associated with university classroom administration, including assignments, grading, student-teacher communication, collaborative learning tools and more.

Unizin members will receive access to Canvas as part of the Unizin service. The Unizin partners selected Canvas in large part because of its commitment to implementing IMS Global open standards and to providing most of its system as open-source software. These values and partnership align well with Unizin’s commitment to both speed in execution and open standards that can help further universities’ missions over time.

“We are excited to have witnessed the formation of Unizin,” said Joel Dehlin, chief technology officer at Instructure. “This team of CIOs and institutions are open, progressive, data-loving and passionate about user adoption — the very things that drive the engineering and product teams at Canvas.”

“Canvas is the first of many technology-related services that Unizin plans to provide to its members that will allow them to take greater control over how the content universities create is used and shared,” said Stacy Morrone, associate professor of educational psychology and associate vice president for learning technologies. “These tools, along with faculty-led research, can enable greater insight from learner analytics that will lead to improved student outcomes.”

Canvas was made available to all IU campuses in April, and Unizin services begin July 1. Teams among the founding and prospective institutions have been meeting to shape additional Unizin services for the next year.

Donut Anthropologist Answers All of Your Burning Donut Questions

Paul Mullins 1

June 6 was National Doughnut Day, the day when Krispy Kreme gives away donuts, and artisan shops debut a new wacky creation like “zombie donuts” with cheddar larvae. Time Magazine interviewed Dr. Paul R. Mullins, Chair of the Department of Anthropology at Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis, and author of Glazed America: A History of the Doughnut, which explores the pastry as a way to look at the evolution of American consumer culture.

“In pop culture, the donut symbolism begins and ends with Homer Simpson. I suspect he made consumers more receptive to eating donuts because he does what we want to do — owns up to his bodily desires and doesn’t care if he’s carrying a little extra luggage in the center. But we’ve been disciplined to look at donuts as being bad foods, and Homer almost makes them not seem so bad,” Mullins explained.

For more of the interview, read the article here.

 

The Center for Digital Scholarship: Preserving the past and preparing for the future

UntitledThe online, digital environment is changing the way scholars communicate, access scholarly resources, and share the products of their research. In recent years, the University Library’s program of digital scholarship has grown so much that we were prompted to formalize our efforts by creating the IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship.

The Center for Digital Scholarship can help faculty, staff, and students navigate this fast-changing environment. The Center will enable faculty to share articles, data, images, learning objects, posters, presentations and working papers with students. In addition, it can be used as a means of engaging students in primary research and knowledge creation.

Much like the library itself, the Center will benefit community members as well as IUPUI faculty, staff and students. The Center functions as an important bridge through which we co-create collections with community organizations, providing access and preserving the stories of many of Central Indiana’s leading cultural institutions.

Engagement with the Indianapolis and Indiana community is one of the core principles of IUPUI, and a significant point in the current draft of the IUPUI Strategic Plan. While the library has been engaging with the community through digital collection creation for over 12 years (the majority of our historical digital collections are physically owned by other cultural heritage institutions, including libraries, historical societies, and community organizations), the Center offers an additional connection to our community partners.

We have the technology and expertise to digitize and provide access to historic collections that would otherwise be accessible only to those able to visit the cultural heritage institutions. We are making Indianapolis history visible to the world. We are also creating trusting relationships in the community that have proved fruitful for ventures outside of digitization.

The Center for Digital Scholarship represents the next chapter in the library’s enduring commitment to technology. We encourage you to take advantage of the Center and all of the resources it has to offer.

Previously unseen photos of 1989 Tiananmen Square movement are online as IUPUI digital collection

tiananmen squareINDIANAPOLIS — University Library at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis is making public more than 400 previously unseen black-and-white photographs of the historic student-led 1989 Tiananmen Square pro-democracy movement. The library has digitized photographs taken by an IUPUI professor and added them to the library’s online digital collections.

It was April 15, 1989, when Hu Yaobang, the ousted general secretary of the Chinese Communist Party, died in Beijing. Thousands of people went to Tiananmen Square to mourn his death. College students in Beijing universities soon turned the mourning into a grassroots movement that called for political reform, including an end to government corruption and a guarantee of freedom of speech. The movement ended abruptly with the killing of hundreds of protesting Chinese citizens during a military crackdown on June 4, 1989.

Thousands of media professionals, along with ordinary citizens, captured the events of the student-led movement on camera. Nevertheless, relatively few of these images survived since the Chinese government confiscated cameras and film in its crackdown on the movement and its leaders.

The photographs in the University Library digital collection, “Tiananmen Square, 1989,” are exhibited in memory of those who died during the movement. The collection can also serve as an educational tool for younger generations to learn about that period of history visually.

The photographer, Edgar Huang, a faculty member from the IU School of Informatics and Computing on the Indianapolis campus, was then a university instructor and a documentary photographer in Beijing. He traveled almost every day to different university campuses and different locations in Beijing, especially Tiananmen Square, to record with his Nikon F3 all the exciting, frustrating and sad moments.

After the government crackdown, some of Huang’s negatives were confiscated, but more than 90 percent of his 54 rolls of 36mm film were carefully hidden in different locations in Beijing to avoid possible raids.

“Many young people in China have no recollection of what happened in Beijing in the spring/summer of 1989,” Huang said. “These photographs will serve as a reminder of numerous ordinary Beijing citizens’ bravery and are exhibited in memory of those who died.

“Thanks to my beloved late wife, Lily Sun, who brought the negatives to the United States in 1994, these photographs are now possible to be exhibited to the public.”

Huang expressed appreciation for the work of IUPUI University Library staff, especially Kristi L. Palmer, Jennifer Ann Johnson and Ann Lys Proctor, in making the digitization of all the negatives and eventually this online exhibition possible.

Located at 755 W. Michigan St. in the heart of the IUPUI campus, the University Library is a public library, serving nearly 1 million visitors a year, 10 percent of them community users. University Library supports students and faculty across all of IUPUI’s more than 200 degree programs with research expertise and a wide array of resources. Any resident of Indiana is eligible for an IUPUI University Library card.

Even major works of art need dusting, including Chihuly’s masterpiece at IU School of Medicine

dna towerIt rises 19 feet from the atrium floor of one of the busiest laboratory and classroom buildings on the Indiana University School of Medicine Indianapolis campus. This unique sculpture created by renowned glass artist Dale Chihuly is, well, dusty; it needs cleaning.

The luminous structure composed of more than 1,000 glass spheres in shades of blue, green, mauve and yellow can’t simply be vacuumed or spritzed with window cleaner and buffed with paper towel. The process is more complex, and only one firm in the United States is authorized to handle the maintenance and cleaning of Chihuly’s artwork. These professionals from Denny Park Fine Arts travel the globe delicately and skillfully disassembling, cleaning and reassembling Chihuly’s masterpieces.

Denny Park Fine Arts has been commissioned to clean the IU School of Medicine DNA Tower, modeled after the so-called blueprint for life. They will be working on the project June 1 and 2 in the Morris Mills Atrium of the VanNuys Medical Science Building on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus.

The sculpture was installed in 2003 to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the founding of the IU School of Medicine and the 50th anniversary of the discovery of the DNA molecule by IU alumnus James D. Watson and colleague Francis Crick. The DNA Tower was unveiled Sept. 30, 2003, and this will be its first thorough cleaning.

 

Art legends inspire creative miniature golf course for Herron student scholarship fundraiser

unnamed     June 7, 2014

   Indianapolis, IN

 

Andy Warhol’s soup can paintings and Picasso’s bull series are among the inspirations for a nine-hole miniature golf course created for a fundraiser at Herron School of Art and Design on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus.

“The Herron Open: Mini Golf Mega Art” takes place from 6 to 9 p.m. on Saturday, June 7 on the first floor of the art school building, Eskenazi Hall, 735 W. New York St.
Tickets for the evening of miniature golf, food and drinks, along with music and a silent auction, are $35 to $125. The event is open to the general public, and proceeds will help fund scholarships for Herron students.
Reagan Furqueron, director of foundation studies at Herron and faculty coordinator for the Herron Open, is spearheading the construction projects needed to transform Eskenazi Hall classrooms into one of the most creative miniature golf courses Hoosiers will ever play.
Nine student-faculty teams representing  the school’s academic programs — art history, sculpture, foundation studies, art education, print and painting, visual communication design, ceramics, and furniture design — and the school’s alumni association, have each built a hole, clocking in a total of at least 200 hours on the three-month project.
“None of us have ever built a mini golf course, so we have been making up the rules as we have gone along; but as artists, we are pretty well-prepared for that,” Furqueron said. “I gave them two rules to follow: One was that each hole had to be well-made. And the other was that (a hole) had to be playable. Then they could do whatever they wanted to from there.”
The builders played some mini golf around town to get a feel for what should happen along the course. While miniature golf enthusiasts will see some similarities with other courses, there are some creative twists to the Eskenazi course.
“It is a little more dimensional than what you are used to … the (course) at the mall is pretty flat. There are some challenges in this one that are pretty interesting, some tricks,” he said.
Although the event can be seen as a “really great cocktail party with mini-golf,” its value goes beyond entertainment.
“The fundraiser is for student scholarships, which is why many of our faculty wanted to get involved,” Furqueron said. “We know our students give a lot to come to school. All IUPUI students do. And this is a way for us to give back to them.”
The project has provided opportunities for freshmen to collaborate with faculty as peers outside a classroom setting, and it has provided graduate students the opportunity to practice their project management skills. The event also provides the community an opportunity to visit Herron’s first-class facility.
Tickets are available online.