Bradbury center to celebrate master storyteller’s birthday and legacy with August events

Photo taken from new.iupui.eduAugust 22nd marks the 95th anniversary of visionary science fiction and fantasy writer Ray Bradbury’s birth. The Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will hold three special events in August to celebrate the Midwestern-born author who went on to become one of the best-known storytellers of our time.

From Aug. 3 to 28, the center will present a free exhibit, “Miracles of Rare Device: Treasures of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies,” in the Cultural Arts Gallery on the first floor of the IUPUI Campus Center. Summer hours for the exhibition are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday until Aug. 19, when gallery hours extend from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday.

The exhibit will feature art, artifacts, books and rare magazines from Bradbury’s own collection, gifted to the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI in 2013 by the Bradbury Estate and by Donn Albright, Bradbury’s close friend and bibliographer.

“These new collections include the author’s papers, his working library, 40 years of his correspondence, his entire office, and a lifetime of awards and mementos,” said Jonathan R. Eller, Chancellor’s Professor of English and director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies.

“The August gallery show allows us to exhibit examples of these one-of-a-kind gifts for students and the broader Indianapolis community in ways that reflect Bradbury’s abiding international legacy as a champion of literacy, libraries, freedom of the imagination and the exploration of outer space.”

Eller and the IU School of Liberal Arts are working to expand the Bradbury archives and artifacts into a permanent public display, teaching and research resource on the IUPUI campus.

Two related public events will coincide with the exhibition’s run. At 6 p.m. Aug. 19, Eller will deliver the Second Annual Ray Bradbury Memorial Lecture in the Riley Meeting Room at Indianapolis Public Library’s Central Library. The lecture, “Ray Bradbury’s October Country,” reveals the timeless creativity and somewhat controversial publishing history of one of Bradbury’s most popular story collections on the 60th anniversary of its original publication.

At 5 p.m. Aug. 27, the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies will host a reception in the Campus Center Atrium outside the Cultural Arts Gallery, followed by Eller’s lecture on the collection’s amazing journey from California to IUPUI and the importance of Bradbury’s legacy in the 21st century. Both the lecture and reception are free and open to the public.

The Campus Center is at 420 University Blvd., between Michigan and New York streets. Visitor parking is available for a fee in the adjacent Vermont Street Garage and in the Sports Garage on New York Street.

Eller first met Ray Bradbury in 1989, developing a working friendship that lasted until Bradbury’s death in June 2012. Eller has authored several books, including “Becoming Ray Bradbury” and “Ray Bradbury Unbound” (University of Illinois Press). He also edits the Bradbury Center’s multivolume “Collected Stories of Ray Bradbury” (Kent State University Press).

A number of organizations are providing planning and resource support for the “Miracles of Rare Device” gallery exhibition, including the IU School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI’s Museum Studies Program, IUPUI’s Center for Digital Scholarship, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, and the Indiana Historical Society.

2015 Outstanding Student Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Awards goes to Herron’s Yasmine K. Kasem

Image courtesy of the artist, Yasmine K. KasemThe International Sculpture Center has announced that Yasmine K. Kasem (B.F.A. in Sculpture, ’15) is a recipient of the Outstanding Student Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award for 2015 for her work El Qamesha El Wahida (The Lonely Cloth).

In a letter notifying associate professors of sculpture Eric Nordgulenand Greg Hull, Kasem’s faculty nominators, a center representative said there were “an exceptional number of nominees this year; 423 students … .” The nominees came from more than 158 college and university sculpture programs in North America and abroad.

The judges, all from New York, included sculptor Chakaia Booker, Dia Art Foundation assistant curator Kelly Kivland, and professor of fine arts, CUNY, Maki Hajikano. They selected Kasem’s sculpture after deliberating over 952 images of sculptural works, the letter said.

The award includes an exhibition with catalog at Grounds for Sculpture—a sculpture garden on the former New Jersey State Fairgrounds in Trenton. The exhibition will take place October 2015 through March 2016 with an opening reception for honorees and their faculty sponsors on October 24. Sculpture magazine will also feature the awards in its October issue. Kasem’s work will be added to an archive of winners on the International Sculpture Center’s website.

“It’s very good for an undergraduate student to get this award,” said Nordgulen. Although Kasem joins recipients from Herron including alumni Emily Stergar (B.F.A. in Sculpture, ‘04) and James Darr(B.F.A. in Sculpture, ‘03), they had already graduated from Herron and were nominated by the graduate schools they were attending at the universities of Arizona and Delaware, respectively.

Kasem said her experiences at Herron have been among the best of her life. “The faculty and facilities gave me the guidance and resources I needed to explore and develop. But not only that, I saw that Herron genuinely cares about its students and their ability to succeed. I owe so much of my success to Herron, my professors and peers. I’ve gotten the wonderful opportunity to work alongside so many talented artists and grow with them in the studio as well.”

“I’m truly grateful for being selected for this award,” she said. “If you would have told me four years ago that I would’ve accomplished what I have, I wouldn’t have believed you. I was so insecure about what I was making and how it held up in comparison to my peers. But all of the positive support, honest critiques and conversations I’ve had with friends, faculty and staff at Herron is what motivated me to keep working hard through any obstacle I encountered.”

As she got closer to applying for college, Kasem said, “I realized that I felt much stronger about visual art and that it would be a better fit for me than studying jazz,” as had been her initial intent.

Once she decided on Herron, there was no question she wanted to study sculpture. “Growing up I always looked for ways to keep myself occupied,” she said, “which usually led me to building something in the back yard, or playing with the leftover clay my mom had from making beads for her jewelry.” Kasem loved making something beautiful out of nothing, but “wanted to work with even more materials, so sculpture was the logical choice.”

Kasem has applied for residencies in Egypt and Switzerland and sees her future at an as yet undetermined graduate school. She’s making new work for a group show in the fall.

“Now that I’ve graduated, I haven’t slowed down at all,” Kasem said. “After that, just continuing my process and hoping I can get my message across to as many people as I can” is the plan.

“Career wise, I’d love to teach, and that’s something I’ve discovered more recently. On the other hand, working at the Herron Galleries has really instilled a deep interest in what goes into running a gallery. But beyond all of that, I want to be a successful artist. That’s what I’m working towards and that’s what gets me up in the morning.”

The Genetic Portrait Project: Herron Professor documents people’s perceptions of genetic research through photographs

Stefan Petranek

Stefan Petranek

Stefan Petranek, assistant professor of photography and intermedia at IUPUI’s Herron School of Art and Design, has taken an unusual approach to collecting people’s thoughts on science. With a marker and poster board in hand, Petranek asks individuals from a diverse range of backgrounds to consider “how the future will be affected by genetic research.” He then photographs his volunteers holding their message. In the last four years, Petranek has photographed over 400 individuals creating a noteworthy catalogue of responses that reflect the diversity of ethical concerns and technological promise this expansive field of science offers society.

As researchers’ ability to manipulate DNA for a wide array of biological issues, from human health to agricultural production advance, the influence of DNA-based technologies on our daily lives has grown exponentially. Yet there is little research which tracks Americans’ perceptions of these technologies. The Genetic Portrait Project grew out of Petranek’s ongoing artwork about the pyscho-social implications of a genetically advanced world and his interest in how others were grappling with the same issues. The project represents the first-ever visual documentary of individuals’ perceptions on science.

Petranek has photographed several high profile individuals for the project including Dr. Eric Green, Director of the National Human Genomic Research Institute at NIH, and internationally known artist, Mark Dion. He has also photographed individuals from a variety of backgrounds, including soliciting people off the streets from cities like Indianapolis, Boston, and Portland, OR to participate. Recently, Petranek has focused on creating interactive initiatives at genetic and bioethics conferences. In 2014, he photographed attendees at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) Annual Meeting, the world’s largest genetics conference. His photographs have been exhibited nationally and were recently published in Frontline Genomic Magazine’s March issue. To see more portraits you can visit Petranek’s website and the Project’s Facebook page.

In the near future, Petranek plans to create a website that will allow people to participate autonomously, creating an international repository of photographic portraits dedicated to documenting thoughts on genetics at this moment in history.

Professor Publishes Second Volume of Authoritative Biography

Ray-Bradbury-UnboundFully established in the slick magazines, award-winning, and on the brink of placing Fahrenheit 451 in the American canon, Ray Bradbury entered the autumn of 1953 as a literary figure transcending fantasy and science fiction. In Ray Bradbury Unbound, Jonathan R. Eller continues the story begun in his acclaimed Becoming Ray Bradbury, following the beloved writer’s evolution from a short story master to a multi-media creative force and outspoken visionary.

Drawn into screenwriting by the chance to adapt Moby Dick for film, Bradbury soon established himself in Hollywood’s vast and overlapping film and television empires. The work swallowed up creative energy once devoted to literary pursuits and often left Bradbury frustrated with studio executives.

Yet his successes endowed him with the gravitas to emerge as a much sought after cultural commentator. His passionate advocacy in Life and other media outlets validated the U.S. space program’s mission — a favor repaid when NASA’s astronauts gathered to meet Bradbury during his 1967 visit to Houston. Over time, his public addresses and interviews allowed him to assume the role of a dreamer of futures voicing opinions on technology, the moon landing, and humanity’s ultimate destiny.

Eller draws on many years of interviews with Bradbury as well as an unprecedented access to personal papers and private collections to portray the origins and outcomes of Bradbury’s countless creative endeavors. The result is the definitive story of how a great American author helped shape his times.

“A thorough documentation of Bradbury’s career. . . . This warm, informative biography depicts him as a thoughtful and disciplined writer who helped make science fiction a respected literary genre.”–Kirkus

“Eller captures the joy of creations that new forms allowed Bradbury, such as the intensely visual interpretation of Moby Dick that he wrote for director John Huston. . . . Fans who know Bradbury only for his fiction are likely to enjoy this diverse look at his work and creative process.”–Publishers Weekly

“Intimate, conscientious, and triumphant, a truly profound examination of Bradbury’s accomplishments and legacy. Highly recommended for all sf lovers and those with an appreciation for non-fiction and literature.”–Library Journal

“Engaging. . . . Eller’s second volume of Bradbury’s biography is ultimately a melancholy and cautionary tale.”–Washington Post

“Few contemporary authors have been written about as extensively as Ray Bradbury, but no one has surpassed Jonathan Eller. In his previous study, Becoming Ray Bradbury, he captured the odd nature of Bradbury’s imagination perfectly in the context of his life and age — keeping a myriad of influences and ambitions in perspective. With the publication of Ray Bradbury Unbound, Eller not only confirms his position as the great comprehensive Bradbury scholar. He has also written what may be the best single account of a major science fiction author’s rise to fame and achievement.”–Dana Gioia, author of Pity the Beautiful and former chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts

Jonathan R. Eller is a Chancellor’s Professor of English at Indiana University-Purdue University in Indianapolis, the senior textual editor of the Institute for American Thought, and director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at IUPUI. Becoming Ray Bradbury was a runner-up for the 2011 Locus Award for best nonfiction book in the science fiction and fantasy field.

NEH Summer Stipends

NEH Logo provided by neh.govNEH Summer Stipends
Limited Submission URL: here.
IU Internal Deadline: 7/1/2015
NEH Online Application Deadline: 10/1/2015

Brief Description:
Summer Stipends support individuals pursuing advanced research that is of value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Recipients usually produce articles, monographs, books, digital materials, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly resources. Summer Stipends support continuous full-time work on a humanities project for a period of two consecutive months. Summer Stipends support projects at any stage of development.

The Common Good:  The Humanities in the Public Square
NEH invites projects related to its new initiative, The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square. This initiative seeks to connect the study of the humanities to the current conditions of national life. Many of today’s challenges require more than ever the forms of understanding and knowledge represented by the humanities. They require the broadest possible engagement of scholars and the public with the resources of the humanities, including but not limited to the study of language, literature, history, philosophy, comparative religion, and ethics. The study of the humanities can help illuminate the complexity of many contemporary challenges while enriching our understanding of the common good.

Summer Stipends may not be used for:
• projects that seek to promote a particular political, religious, or ideological point of view;
• projects that advocate a particular program of social action;
• specific policy studies;
• research for doctoral dissertations or theses by students enrolled in a degree program;
• the preparation or revision of textbooks;
• curriculum development;
• the development of pedagogical tools (including teaching methods or theories);
• educational or technical impact assessments;
• empirical social science research, unless part of a larger humanities project;
• inventories of collections;
• the writing of guide books, how-to books, or self-help books;
• the writing of autobiographies, memoirs, or works of creative nonfiction; or
• works in the creative or performing arts (for example, painting, fiction or poetry, or dance performance).

Award Amount:
Summer Stipends provide $6,000 for two consecutive months of full-time research and writing. Recipients must work full-time on their projects for these two months and may hold other research grants supporting the same project during this time. Summer Stipends normally support work carried out during the summer months, but arrangements can be made for other times of the year. NEH Summer Stipends are awarded to individuals, not to institutions. They do not require cost sharing and do not include indirect costs.

Eligibility:
• Faculty members teaching full-time at colleges or universities must be nominated by their institutions.
• All applicants must have completed their formal education by the application deadline. While applicants need not have advanced degrees, individuals currently enrolled in a degree-granting program are ineligible to apply.
• Individuals who have been awarded a major fellowship or research grant or its equivalent within the three academic years prior to the deadline are ineligible. (Applicants who have held such fellowships or research grants are eligible only if their award period ended at least three years before the deadline for Summer Stipends applications.) . A “major fellowship or research grant”; is a postdoctoral research award that provides a stipend of at least $15,000. Sabbaticals and grants from an individual’s own institution and stipends and grants from other sources supporting study and research during the summer are not considered major fellowships. See Program details.
• Individuals who have received Summer Stipends may apply to support a new stage of their projects.
• See Program details for more specific information.
INTERNAL COMPETITION NECESSARY: TWO FACUTLY MEMBERS PER CAMPUS
Each college and university in the United States and its jurisdictions (campus) may nominate two faculty members. Any faculty member teaching full-time is eligible for nomination.

APPLICANTS EXEMPT FROM NOMINATION / NO INTERNAL COMPETITION NEEDED
The following individuals may apply online without a nomination or internal competition:
• independent scholars not affiliated with a college or university;
• college or university staff members who are not faculty members and will not be teaching during the academic year preceding the award tenure
• emeritus faculty; and
• adjunct faculty, part-time faculty, and applicants with academic appointments that terminate by the summer of the award tenure.

IUPUI Internal competition:
For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward,emward@iupui.edu by July 1, 2015 for internal competition.
Format pages with one-inch margins and with a font size no smaller than eleven point.
The narrative should not assume specialized knowledge and should be free of technical terms and jargon. The narrative limitation does not include references.

1. Provide a 1-3 page narrative that includes the following:
• Project Title
• Project Director Name and Credentials
• Research and contribution: Describe the intellectual significance of the proposed project, including its value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Provide an overview of the project, explaining the basic ideas, problems, or questions examined by the study. Explain how the project will complement, challenge, or expand relevant studies in the field.
• Methods and work plan: Describe your method(s) and clarify the part or stage of the project that will be supported by the Summer Stipend. Provide a work plan, describing what you will accomplish during the award period. Your work plan must be based on a full-time commitment to the project; part-time work is not allowed. If you do not anticipate finishing the entire project during the award period, discuss your plan for doing so. For book projects, explain how the final project will be organized. If possible, provide a brief chapter outline. For digital projects, describe the technologies that will be used and developed, and how the scholarship will be presented to benefit audiences in the humanities.
• Competencies, skills, and access: Explain your competence in the area of your project. If the area of inquiry is new to you, explain your reasons for working in it and your qualifications to do so. Specify your level of competence in any language or digital technology needed for the study. Describe where the study will be conducted and what research materials will be used.
• Final product and dissemination: Describe the intended audience and the intended results of the project. If relevant, explain how the results will be disseminated and why these means are appropriate to the subject matter and audience.

2. A Letter from the Chair or Dean

3. 1-2 page abbreviated CV which includes:
• Current and Past Positions
• Education: List degrees, dates awarded, and titles of theses or dissertations
• Awards and Honors: Include dates. If you have received support from NEH, indicate the dates of these grants and any resulting publications.
• Publications: Include full citations for publications and presentations
• Other Relevant Professional Activities & Accomplishments

WONDER AND THE NATURAL WORLD: A Call for Grant Proposals

Logo for CSRES courtesy of News.iupui.eduCALL FOR GRANT PROPOSALS: Symposia, workshops, performances, and seminar series for departments, institutes, and research centers at all IU campuses
Deadline for submission: June 15, 2015
Awards announced by mid-July 2015

The IU Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics, and Society (CSRES) announces a grant competition on the theme of Wonder and the Natural World. Departments, research centers, and institutes across all IU campuses may apply for funds to support or supplement symposia, workshops, seminar series, performances, or small conferences during the 2015-2016 academic year that align with the Consortium’s two-year theme of Wonder and the Natural World. This call for proposals is part of a two-year thematic initiative sponsored by CSRES.

Wonder has been framed as a key moral disposition, as well as an aesthetic, emotional, or cognitive response; depending on its objects and orientation, it may display both salutary and sinister dimensions. Wonder at nature is prompted by the odd and uncanny, the strange and novel, the transcendent and sublime, as well as encounters with the monstrous and horrific. It has variously been associated with, or dissociated from, curiosity, awe, intimations of divinity, infinity, the sublime, the miraculous or supernatural, feelings of astonishment and puzzlement. We welcome projects that explore wonder or its cognate terms in relation to nature or the natural, broadly construed. Proposals should clearly relate the project to the announced theme.

Grants will be awarded in amounts up to $2500, $5000, and $7500 depending on the scope of the proposed project. Funds can be used for travel and honoraria for external speakers, as well as hospitality expenses in keeping with university regulations. IU faculty may not receive honoraria. Applications for funding should include:

• summary of the project (750 words max.)
• a list of invited presenters
• a detailed budget
• letter of support from department chair or school/unit dean (included with the application or emailed separately)
• evidence of other funding obtained or requested (for requests over $2000)

Questions about the grant competition, and complete grant proposals may be emailed to CSRES Director Lisa Sideris at lsideris@indiana.edu.

The Indiana University Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics, and Society is an interdisciplinary association of scholars, academic programs, and research centers from the eight campuses of Indiana University. Their mandate is to aid in the development of research and scholarship to better understand religion, ethics, values, and spirituality in society. An initiative of the IU Vice President for Research Office, CSRES is also supported by the Office of the President, The Office of the Executive Vice President and Chancellor, IUPUI, and the College of Arts and Sciences at IU Bloomington.

15 teams to share $1 million in collaborative grants through IU Research program

IU Vice President of Research Jorge JosIU Vice President of Research Jorge JoséBLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Indiana University Vice President for Research Jorge José has announced over $1 million in collaborative research grants to be shared among 15 newly formed research teams. Members of the teams represent 21 departments from eight schools on three IU campuses.

The IU Collaborative Research Grants program, initiated by José and now in its fifth year, awards teams of researchers up to $75,000 to support collaborative, innovative projects with a high likelihood of securing external funding. Each project team includes faculty members from different campuses, schools, departments or disciplines.

“As it was envisioned to do, the Collaborative Research Grants program continues to increase the capacity for our investigators to do meaningful and innovative work through new partnerships,” José said. “This increased capacity for collaboration is an especially important outcome of this program.”

This year, 44 investigators make up 15 teams that represent departments and schools from Indiana University Bloomington, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and IU Southeast, in addition to one team that had a member from Purdue University.

IU President Michael A. McRobbie called the program and the most recent round of awards integral to stimulating new opportunities for sharing knowledge and expertise that lead to discovery.

“Vice President José has energetically promoted and supported this program to encourage faculty to contribute their expertise in shared, innovative ways,” McRobbie said. “As the end of his tenure draws near, Indiana University can reflect positively on the distinct successes that have been achieved by this program: New and highly productive partnerships have been forged that have already led to new discoveries; the university’s investment has been realized more than ten-fold thanks to subsequent related funding; and a new framework has been developed for our faculty that stimulates creative, passionate investigation through shared knowledge.”

Since a collaboration funded by the inaugural round of grants in 2010-11, Giovanna Guidoboni, an associate professor of mathematics at IUPUI, and Alon Harris, professor of cellular and integrative physiology at the IU School of Medicine, have seen their initial round of work on modeling glaucoma result in enormous benefits.

Following their original round of research, the pair received three external grants, including one from the National Science Foundation for over $275,000. They have also founded a new scientific journal, the Journal for Modeling in Ophthalmology; established an agreement of international cooperation with the Polytechnic University of Milan (Italy); and co-organized an international workshop in Europe.

“That 2011 collaborative research grant has indeed led to an incredible number of great successes,” Guidoboni said.

Craig Pikaard, the Carlos O. Miller Professor and Distinguished Professor of Biology at IU Bloomington, was funded in 2011 with Haixu Tang, an associate professor in the School of Informatics and Computing at IU Bloomington. Pikaard said spin-out benefits from that original grant continue to this day.

“This is a valuable university program that helped jump-start the collaboration between my lab and the group Haixu Tang leads,” he said “It also helped me obtain a highly coveted Howard Hughes Medical Institute-Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation investigator position. Haixu and I continue to collaborate, and we hold regular meetings of our groups.”

In total, it is estimated that the $3 million distributed by IU during just the first three years of the grants program has thus far helped Collaborative Research Grant-funded investigators earn more than $88 million in new external funding. This figure is expected to grow as those funded more recently pursue external funding opportunities.

“The idea behind the program was to create incentives for researchers to initiate new collaborations to address important problems in transformative ways,” José said. “While we can fund only about 15 percent of the applications, just the process of preparing applications has created some new partnerships across the university. The program has been a success so far, and we believe it will continue to be in the future.”

The 15 projects awarded funding this year are:

Single Cell Studies With Scanning Sniffer Patch Microscopy:
Lane Allen Baker, Department of Chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington; and Theodore Cummins, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, IU School of Medicine.

Investigating the Relationship Between Cumulative Disadvantage and Telomere Length as a Contributor to Cancer Disparities:
Silvia Bigatti, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, IUPUI; Brittney-Shea Herbert, Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, IU School of Medicine; Kenzie Latham, Department of Sociology, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI; and Anna Maria Storniolo, Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, IU School of Medicine.

Mechanism of the Regulation of DNA Replication by PIF1 Family Helicases:
Matthew L. Bochman, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington; Yuichiro Takagi, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, IU School of Medicine; and Amber Mosley, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, IU School of Medicine.

Matrix Engineering With Adipose Stem Cells to Promote Islet Function and Longevity: Robert V. Considine, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, IU School of Medicine; Raghu Mirmira, Department of Pediatrics, IU School of Medicine; and Sherry L. Voytik-Harbin, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University.

Using in vivo Microscopy to Build Predictive Models of Drug-induced Liver Injury: Kenneth Dunn, Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, IU School of Medicine; Richard Day, Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology, IU School of Medicine; and Steve Pressé, Department of Physics, School of Science, IUPUI.

Understanding Naturalistic Bicyclist Behavior for Safety and Sustainability:
David Good, School of Public and Environmental Affairs, IU Bloomington; Lauren Christopher, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI; Stanley Chien, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI; Jiang Zheng, Department of Computer and Information Science, School of Science, IUPUI; and Yaobin Chen, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI.

Neurotherapeutic Potential of Adipose Stem Cell-Conditioned Medium in ALS:
Kathryn Jones, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, IU School of Medicine; and Keith March, Department of Medicine, Krannert Institute of Cardiology, IU School of Medicine.

The Impact of the Public Investment in Education in the Academic Performance of K-12 English Language Learners in Southern Indiana:
Haeil Jung, SPEA, IU Bloomington; Magdalena Herdoíza-Estévez, School of Education, IU Southeast; Cathy Johnson, School of Education, IU Southeast; and Jacquelyn Singleton, School of Education, IU Southeast.

Developing Remote Sensing Techniques for Detection of Toxin-Producing Cyanobacteria:
Lin Li, Department of Earth Sciences, School of Science, IUPUI; Kevin Mandernack, Department of Earth Sciences, School of Science, IUPUI; and David Kehoe, Department of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington.

Effect of Antarctic Weathering on Global Climate:
Kathy Licht, Department of Earth Sciences, School of Science, IUPUI; and David Bish, Department of Geological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington.

A Novel Approach to Discover Drug Resistance Genes in Breast Cancer Cells:
Tao Lu, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, IU School of Medicine; and Lang Li, Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, IU School of Medicine.

Induction and Maintenance of Chronic Migraine: Regulation of TRP Channels by Endogenous N-acyl Amide Lipids:
Gerry Oxford, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, IU School of Medicine; Heather Bradshaw, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington; and Joyce Hurley, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, IU School of Medicine.

Optical-Based, Label-Free Multiplex Assay for Direct Quantification of microRNAs in Serum and Cancer Cells:
Rajesh Sardar, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, School of Science, IUPUI; and Murray Korc, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, IU School of Medicine.

Developmental Adaptation to Chronic Hypoxia:
Robert Tepper, Department of Pediatrics, IU School of Medicine; Mircea Ivan, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, IU School of Medicine; and Kenneth Nephew, Medical Sciences Program, IU School of Medicine-Bloomington.

Hippo/YAP Signaling Controls Protein Redistribution and Organ Size in Critical Illness:
Clark Wells, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biochemistry, IU School of Medicine; Teresa Zimmers, Department of Surgery, IU School of Medicine; and Leonidas Koniaris, Department of Surgery, IU School of Medicine.

Indiana University launches search for new vice president for research

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — A search committee has been formed to identify candidates for 225910_w296the position of Indiana University vice president for research, the university has announced.

Bernice Pescosolido, Distinguished Professor of Sociology in the College of Arts and Sciences at IU Bloomington, and David B. Burr, associate vice chancellor for research at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, will co-chair the 18-member committee. The group includes faculty, administrators and students representing IU’s Bloomington, Indianapolis and regional campuses.

The new vice president will succeed Jorge José, who will step down when his five-year appointment ends July 31, 2015. José will serve as Rudy Professor of Physics at IU Bloomington and a member of the Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology at the IU School of Medicine in Indianapolis.

To build on the success achieved by José, the committee will conduct an internal search within Indiana University. It will make its recommendations to McRobbie. The university hopes to have a new vice president identified by the time José steps down.

José oversaw an 18 percent increase in federally funded research by Indiana University faculty members in his first four years as vice president for research. The strategic plan for research at IU, the development of which was overseen by his office, helped shape IU’s bicentennial strategic priorities approved by the IU Board of Trustees in December 2014.

He also prioritized efforts to decrease the administrative burden on researchers through increased efficiency, including the implementation of new grants administration software and of an online research compliance review system that greatly reduced turnaround times for research protocols.

Pescosolido, in addition to her Department of Sociology appointment, is director of the Indiana Consortium for Mental Health Services Research. Burr is also a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology in the IU School of Medicine and an adjunct professor of biomedical engineering in the IUPUI School of Engineering and Technology.

The vice president for research works with various university offices, campus leaders and deans to increase and diversify research and creative works at IU, attract external funding and develop public-private partnerships, technology transfer, graduate education and intercampus research opportunities.

In addition to being responsible for research administration and research compliance, the vice president oversees and is responsible for the Office of the Vice Provost for Research at IU Bloomington and the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research at IUPUI.

More information about the search is available online.

Chicagoans more likely to give to charity, IU study finds

CHICAGO – Chicagoans are more likely to give to charity on average than are people elsewhere in the U.S., according to a new report being released today by The Chicago Community Trust and the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, which conducted the study.philanthropy

The report, Giving in Chicago, is the first comprehensive study of individual, corporate and foundation giving in the six-county metropolitan Chicago region. It examines patterns of charitable giving by households and corporations across the region in 2013, and grant making by foundations and public charities in the region for 2012, the latest year for which data are available.

The Trust’s Centennial year begins on May 12, 2015 with On the Table 2015. Starting on this date and for the entire year after, the Trust will celebrate philanthropy in all its forms – not just monetary gifts, but also the contributions of volunteers that strengthen the region and impact the lives of others in countless ways.

Among the study’s key findings:

  • Chicagoans give to charity at higher rate than the national average. Nearly three-quarters (73 percent) of households in the Chicago metro area donated to nonprofit organizations in 2013. Nationally, 59 percent of households contributed in 2010 (the latest year for which national data are available), other research by the school finds. Approximately two-thirds of households contributed in any given year between 2000 and 2008.
  • Almost 70 percent of households in the region reported giving $100 or more to charity in 2013, and more than half reported giving $500 or more. On average, Chicago-area donor households contributed about 3 percent of their annual income to nonprofits in 2013.
  • Chicagoans are motivated to help those in need. Most Chicago-area donor households (76 percent) said “helping individuals meet their basic needs” was their top motivation for giving, followed by “feeling that those who have more should help those who have less” (70 percent) and “personal values or beliefs” (67 percent).
  • Chicagoans give their time as well as their money. Approximately half (49 percent) of area households volunteered in 2013, and among those, about half (47 percent) volunteered once a week or more.
  • Most of Chicagoans’ giving helps people close to home. A large majority – 78 percent – of charitable dollars donated by Chicago metro area households stayed within the region in 2013.

The study indicated that local corporations also give back and support local causes. In 2012, corporate foundations in the Chicago region made approximately 3,500 grants of $4,000 or above, totaling $158 million. About 44 percent of grants and over half (51 percent) of the grant dollars awarded stayed in the area. Almost all companies surveyed (97 percent, or 68 companies) reported making charitable donations to nonprofits in fiscal year 2013, and 81 percent of surveyed donor companies gave to nonprofits in the Chicago metro region.

Corporations cited “needs in local communities,” particularly in communities where the corporation operates, as their highest priority (62 percent) for giving in the survey, and 29 percent cited it as at least a minor influence on their giving. Seventy-six percent of donor companies indicated they focus their giving on human services (including basic needs and a wide range of other social services). Beyond their charitable giving, a majority of companies surveyed reported that they invest in their communities in other ways as well. Among those, the most popular (82 percent) was employee volunteerism.

Foundations are also a crucial part of Chicagoland giving, according to the report. More than 2,000 grant making organizations located in the Chicago metro area made nearly 39,000 grants of $4,000 or more in 2012, with an estimated total value of $2.6 billion. Grant recipients in the Chicago metro area received more than 19,000 grants of $4,000 or more from more than 1,300 Chicago-area grant makers, accounting for about $1 billion or about 39 percent of total grant dollars made by Chicago-area grant makers in 2012.

View the full report and graphic overview.

About the Chicago Community Trust

The Chicago Community Trust, our region’s community foundation, partners with donors to leverage their philanthropy in ways that transform lives and communities. Since our founding in 1915, the Trust has awarded approximately $2.3 billion in grants to thousands of local and national nonprofits, including $164.5 million in 2014. Throughout our Centennial year, the Trust will celebrate how philanthropy in all its forms – time, treasure and talent – strengthens our region and impacts the lives of others in countless ways.

About the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy

The Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy is dedicated to improving philanthropy to improve the world by training and empowering students and professionals to be innovators and leaders who create positive and lasting change. The school offers a comprehensive approach to philanthropy through its academic, research and international programs and through The Fund Raising School, Lake Institute on Faith & Giving, and the Women’s Philanthropy Institute.

NEH awards IUPUI-Ivy Tech partnership $119,009 grant to create world religions curriculum

With funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will work in partnership with Ivy Tech Community College faculty to create 150 course modules on world religions for Ivy Tech humanities classes.Photo courtesy of Center for Interfaith Cooperation.

The NEH, in Washington, D.C., recently announced it has awarded IUPUI $119,009 to conduct “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis,” a two-year study program on contemporary religious traditions in greater Indianapolis for 15 faculty members at the Indianapolis campus of Ivy Tech Community College.

Led by IUPUI professors Edward Curtis and Arthur Farnsley and Ivy Tech humanities chair Jack Cooney, the program will help the Ivy Tech faculty develop course modules on five world religions for the existing Ivy Tech humanities core, including courses on history, literature and cultural anthropology.

“This NEH grant for ‘World Religions in Greater Indianapolis’ exemplifies all we reach for at Ivy Tech Community College as we provide our students with learning opportunities which lead them to flourishing lives as well-educated citizens and as resourcefully nimble employees,” Cooney said. “We are both honored and proud to partner with our teacher colleagues at IUPUI whose vision for this substantial NEH grant is not without regard to our possibilities.”

The Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture, a unit of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, will operate the program, which will connect Ivy Tech faculty to experts on Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism at IUPUI, Indiana University Bloomington, Butler University and Marian University.

The program seeks not only to bolster humanities content at Ivy Tech but also to create more understanding of Central Indiana’s religious diversity, especially of recent immigrant communities.

“This project will aid faculty in helping students understand the breadth of religious traditions in America and in central Indiana,” IUPUI Chancellor Charles R. Bantz said. “At a time when there are far too many examples of misunderstandings about religions, this is a vital project. I am pleased that the Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture, one of our outstanding research and public outreach centers, is willing to lead this project.”

Ivy Tech faculty in the program will be introduced to world religious traditions and their sacred texts, and study their significance to U.S. history and culture. After their study of a particular tradition, the faculty will then arrange discussions with members of a recent immigrant community from that tradition. The faculty will create the Ivy Tech course modules as capstone projects based on their comprehensive studies.

Participating religious communities from Central Indiana include Jews from the former Soviet Union, Russia and Ukraine; Spanish-speaking Roman Catholic Christians from Latin America; Muslims from West Africa; Hindus from India; and Buddhists from Vietnam.

“We are grateful to all of our community partners for making it possible to bring together Central Indiana’s academic experts and its rich immigrant cultures in a program for Ivy Tech faculty,” said Bill Blomquist, dean of the IU School of Liberal Arts.

NEH grants are among the most prestigious research awards in the humanities. The “World Religions in Greater Indianapolis” program received one of only four grants awarded in the NEH’s “Bridging Cultures at Community Colleges” category, for which there were 46 applications.

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the NEH supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation.