Nasser H. Paydar installed as IUPUI’s fifth chancellor

INDIANAPOLIS — On Nov. 17, hundreds gathered to celebrate the installation of Indiana Nasser H. Paydar ImageUniversity-Purdue University Indianapolis Chancellor and Indiana University Executive Vice President Nasser H. Paydar at the IUPUI Campus Center, the hub of student life in the heart of campus.

IU President Michael A. McRobbie presided over the ceremony, which featured remarks from Purdue University President Mitch Daniels, Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard, and campus and community representatives.

Witnesses to the installation of IUPUI’s fifth chancellor included IU executives and trustees; IUPUI faculty, staff, students, alumni, emeritus chancellors Gerald L. Bepko and Charles R. Bantz, and Board of Advisors members; Purdue Board of Trustees representatives; community, civic and business leaders; Paydar’s family — including his mother, who traveled from Iran for the momentous occasion; and close friends.

Paydar, whose appointment began Aug. 16, has been a faculty member for 30 years and has held various administrative and executive leadership positions since he joined IUPUI in 1985 as an assistant professor of mechanical engineering. He has been executive vice chancellor since 2012; he served as vice chancellor and dean of Indiana University-Purdue University Columbus from 2004 to 2007 and as chancellor at IU East in Richmond from 2007 to 2012.

“During his 30 years with Indiana University, Nasser has time and again demonstrated outstanding leadership,” McRobbie said. “Nasser is a man of great integrity and conviction who is dedicated to the values at the heart of the very best liberal education. We are most fortunate to count him among the leadership of this great university at this historic time as IUPUI prepares to celebrate its 50th anniversary as a campus in 2019, and as all of us at Indiana University recommit ourselves to building the foundation for the university’s enduring strength.”

As a part of his installation address, Paydar outlined several specific goals critical to IUPUI’s success:

  • Increasing the number of African-American students at IUPUI by more than 50 percent over the next five years: “Diversity is directly tied to our pursuit of academic excellence and benefits all students, faculty and staff.”
    Increasing the amount of need-based aid IUPUI offers by 100 percent within one year: “Access is fundamental to student success, and a key element in our recruitment strategy has been, and will continue to be, scholarships and financial aid.”
  • Continuing to develop and improve IUPUI’s academic offerings, including increasing the number of hybrid, online, interdisciplinary and accelerated programs: “This will save students time and money and prepare them for the challenges of the contemporary workforce.”
  • Developing an action plan to increase IUPUI’s success in securing funding and opportunities for faculty to develop their scholarship and creative work: “As a research institution, our collaborative approaches will be crucial as we address some of the most urgent challenges facing Indiana and the world.”
  • Designing and supporting professional and leadership programs that help staff members continuously improve their careers: “Our staff ensures that IUPUI runs efficiently and remains responsive to our stakeholders.”

Paydar also spoke of the need to significantly increase experiential learning and community-engaged research, the importance of community engagement and the necessity for IUPUI to work closely with community partners and the city of Indianapolis to address critical urban needs, the desire to strengthen campus community and create a more vibrant student life, and the need to shine a spotlight on IUPUI’s innovative and entrepreneurial spirit.

Paydar concluded his remarks by saying, “As we look to the future together, we will continue to aim for academic excellence, ever-stronger connections with our partners across the city and state, and a more well-defined campus community. Working together, we can build on IUPUI’s great strengths as a destination for engaged scholars and students from Indiana and beyond and as an engine for positive change.”

Parents of firstborn boys and only-child girls give more, Women’s Philanthropy Institute study finds

INDIANAPOLIS — Parents’ charitable giving is affected by the sex of their first child, women give flyeraccording to a new report released today by the Women’s Philanthropy Institute at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, located on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus.

“The sex of the firstborn child affects the likelihood that the parents will give to charity, the amount they give, and the types of causes and organizations they support,” said Debra Mesch, the Eileen Lamb O’Gara Chair in Women’s Philanthropy and director of WPI. “This is an important factor influencing charitable giving that was previously unknown.”

The study provides the first evidence that the sex of the firstborn child influences the parents’ giving. In addition, the researchers found that the firstborn’s sex affects the giving for parents in two-parent families, but not in single-parent families.

Among other key findings of the “Women Give 2015” study are:

  • Parents who have a firstborn son and have two or more children are more likely to give, and they give 14.3 percent larger amounts than people whose firstborn child is a daughter.
  • Parents who have a daughter who is an only child are more likely to give to charity, and they give 20.3 percent higher amounts than parents of a son who is an only child.
  • People whose only child is a daughter give more to education and basic needs.
  • People whose firstborn child is a son give more to education, youth and family services.

“Research in several fields has examined how the sex of a child affects parents’ behavior, but this is the first study to ask this question about philanthropy,” said Mark Otttoni-Wilhelm, the co-principal investigator and professor of economics and philanthropic studies at IUPUI. “Finding that the sex of the child does have an impact on the parents’ philanthropy is one of those special moments of discovery.”

Many previous studies have found that parents influence their children’s generosity. The new research expands that sphere of influence to include children’s effect on their parents’ generosity. The researchers found that the children’s effect was shaped by other family characteristics, including the number of children, the partnership status of the parents (partnered or not), the parents’ partnership history and whether any children are still living at home.

“Today, there is more knowledge than ever about the effect gender has on philanthropy,” said Amir Pasic, the Eugene R. Tempel Dean of the school. “Even so, research has barely begun to scratch the surface. The ‘Women Give’ series uncovers key insights, including this latest revelation, that are helping to advance understanding of the complex role gender plays in influencing how and why women and men give.”

“Women Give 2015” is the sixth in a series of signature research reports conducted at the Women’s Philanthropy Institute that focus on gender differences in giving to charitable organizations. Previous reports have examined differences between male- and female-headed households, looking at gender differences in charitable giving across income levels, marital status, age/generation and types of charitable organizations receiving the giving.

“Women Give 2014” investigated the nexus of religiosity, gender and giving. “Women Give 2013” assessed whether the gender differences observed in adult charitable giving begin to emerge at younger ages. The reports find significant gender differences in philanthropic behavior. The “Women Give” reports are available online.

IUPUI University Library honored for digital archiving of 120-year-old African-American newspaper

INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis University Library was unnamedamong the honorees as the nation’s fourth-oldest surviving African-American newspaper celebrated its 120th anniversary.

The Indianapolis Recorder, a weekly newspaper, marked 12 decades of publication with an awards ceremony and a reception Oct. 15 at the Indiana State Museum. More than 200 people attended the public event, “The Art of Storytelling.”

The newspaper presented 20 awards honoring “the legacy of those individuals who have played a monumental role in the continuing mission and vision of the paper to educate and inform generations of readers to come.” Honorees included the paper’s creators, columnists and staffers, and longtime community supporters.

University Library’s award recognized its service in digitizing the archives of the Indianapolis newspaper. The Indianapolis Recorder Digital Collection provides access to the paper’s 1899-2003 editions. The Recorder is the longest-published African-American paper in Indiana.

“We believe we are one of the first African-American papers in the nation to be digitized,” said Victoria Davis, the Recorder’s newsroom manager.

Newspapers and print publications in general, especially black publications, have faced challenges with digitalization, Davis said. Having the University Library collection has been invaluable to the Recorder’s readers, who have been able to look up family history, research community events and reflect on historical events through the collection, she said.

“A lot of people use it, and they are really excited that they can do that from the comfort of their own home using the computer,” said Davis, who anticipates the library-newspaper collaboration producing a second project.

“We hope to have our sister publication, The Indiana Minority Business Magazine, digitized as well,” Davis said.

The Indianapolis Recorder Digital Collection currently is the library’s most popular digital collection, averaging about 50 visits and 1,000 pages downloaded each day, according to a library audit. The Recorder collection is one of more than 80 digitized cultural-heritage collections available online through the University Library Center for Digital Scholarship.

The Recorder was founded in 1899 by George P. Stewart and William H. Porter as a two-page church bulletin.

University Library Dean David W. Lewis and Jenny Johnson, digital scholarship outreach librarian, attended the event and accepted the award for the library.

“We are really honored to be a part of such an important community resource. The Indianapolis Recorder is the most significant resource that documents the African-American community in Indiana,” Lewis said. “The award is a recognition of a really good partnership. They trusted us with their content in a way that is not typical. The award shows that we earned the trust they put in us. ”

The library’s award is a framed collage including the cover of the Recorder’s commemorative book, the ceremony invitation and a replica of the paper’s front page with a story thanking the library for its contribution.

Other Recorder anniversary honorees included Amos Brown, award-winning radio host and columnist; Arthur Carter, Tuskegee airman; Mari Evans, poet and author; Wilma Moore, archivist with the Indiana Historical Society; and Barbara Turner, descendant of founder George Stewart.

Updates for Humanities Indicators

Over the past few months, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences has been active inAmerican_Academy_of_Arts_and_Sciences_logo-prv its support for the humanities, with new reports on the employment status and earnings of humanities majors, the financial health of not-for-profit humanities organizations, metrics on the qualifications of school teachers, international comparisons of levels of adult literacy, and trends in public reading rates.

Key findings:

  • In 2013, the median annual earnings for humanities majors were $50,000 for those who held only a bachelor’s degree and $71,000 for those with an advanced degree (in any field). Both amounts were $7,000 below the median for graduates from all fields with similar degree attainment (but still well above the median of $42,000 for all U.S. workers).
  • The salary differential between humanities majors and graduates from most other fields shrinks with time in the workforce.
  • Humanities majors had somewhat higher rates of unemployment than graduates from all fields. The gap in unemployment narrows with time in the workforce and an advanced degree.
  • A comparatively large share of humanities graduates go into education-related occupations—especially among those with terminal bachelor’s degrees, where humanities majors are second only to education graduates.
  •  Among the 42% of undergraduate humanities majors who had gone on to earn an advanced degree, workers were more evenly distributed across occupational categories than majors in most of the other fields.
  • Revenues of humanities not-for profits have largely recovered from recession, but not all organizations survived.
  •  Less than 70% of students in each of several types of high school humanities classes were taught by a teacher with both a college major in the subject and state certification to teach it.
  •  While a growing number of recent humanities PhDs report their research was “interdisciplinary,” most confined their work within the humanities.
  •  The median time to PhD for students who paid for their education with personal savings or employer support was two years longer than the median for those who relied on scholarships, grants, and assistantships.
  •  An international study finds that literacy and occupational skill levels are highly correlated.

New in the Academy Data Forum:                                                                       

  • Christine Henseler (Union College) argues for a more expansive view of the value of the humanities.John Dichtl (American Association for State and Local History) and
  • Carole Rosenstein (George Mason University) discuss gaps in what we know about humanities nonprofits.
  • Barbara Cambridge National Council for Teachers of English) and Nancy McTygue (California History-Social Science Project) fill in gaps between the numbers on teacher on teacher credentials and classroom experience.
  • Jamie Carroll and Chandra Muller (University of Texas at Austin) assess what recent changed in the intended majors of college-bound seniors might portend for the humanities.


  •  The Lincoln Project releases a new publication to examine state funding of higher education and describes challenges that state governments face. (And in case you missed it, the first Lincoln Project publication was Public Research Universities: Why They Matter.
  •  50 years of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)In response to a bipartisan Congressional request, the Academy is initiating the first national study on foreign language learning in more than 30 years.
  •  We are pleased to mark the 50th anniversary of the National Endowment for the Humanities—a vital sponsor for our work. The co-chair of the Academy’s Commission on the Humanities, Richard H. Brodhead (Duke Univ.), delivered the keynote address “On the Fate and Fortunes of Public Goods” at a symposium commemorating the event.

Bradbury center to celebrate master storyteller’s birthday and legacy with August events

Photo taken from new.iupui.eduAugust 22nd marks the 95th anniversary of visionary science fiction and fantasy writer Ray Bradbury’s birth. The Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will hold three special events in August to celebrate the Midwestern-born author who went on to become one of the best-known storytellers of our time.

From Aug. 3 to 28, the center will present a free exhibit, “Miracles of Rare Device: Treasures of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies,” in the Cultural Arts Gallery on the first floor of the IUPUI Campus Center. Summer hours for the exhibition are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday until Aug. 19, when gallery hours extend from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday.

The exhibit will feature art, artifacts, books and rare magazines from Bradbury’s own collection, gifted to the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI in 2013 by the Bradbury Estate and by Donn Albright, Bradbury’s close friend and bibliographer.

“These new collections include the author’s papers, his working library, 40 years of his correspondence, his entire office, and a lifetime of awards and mementos,” said Jonathan R. Eller, Chancellor’s Professor of English and director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies.

“The August gallery show allows us to exhibit examples of these one-of-a-kind gifts for students and the broader Indianapolis community in ways that reflect Bradbury’s abiding international legacy as a champion of literacy, libraries, freedom of the imagination and the exploration of outer space.”

Eller and the IU School of Liberal Arts are working to expand the Bradbury archives and artifacts into a permanent public display, teaching and research resource on the IUPUI campus.

Two related public events will coincide with the exhibition’s run. At 6 p.m. Aug. 19, Eller will deliver the Second Annual Ray Bradbury Memorial Lecture in the Riley Meeting Room at Indianapolis Public Library’s Central Library. The lecture, “Ray Bradbury’s October Country,” reveals the timeless creativity and somewhat controversial publishing history of one of Bradbury’s most popular story collections on the 60th anniversary of its original publication.

At 5 p.m. Aug. 27, the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies will host a reception in the Campus Center Atrium outside the Cultural Arts Gallery, followed by Eller’s lecture on the collection’s amazing journey from California to IUPUI and the importance of Bradbury’s legacy in the 21st century. Both the lecture and reception are free and open to the public.

The Campus Center is at 420 University Blvd., between Michigan and New York streets. Visitor parking is available for a fee in the adjacent Vermont Street Garage and in the Sports Garage on New York Street.

Eller first met Ray Bradbury in 1989, developing a working friendship that lasted until Bradbury’s death in June 2012. Eller has authored several books, including “Becoming Ray Bradbury” and “Ray Bradbury Unbound” (University of Illinois Press). He also edits the Bradbury Center’s multivolume “Collected Stories of Ray Bradbury” (Kent State University Press).

A number of organizations are providing planning and resource support for the “Miracles of Rare Device” gallery exhibition, including the IU School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI’s Museum Studies Program, IUPUI’s Center for Digital Scholarship, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, and the Indiana Historical Society.

2015 Outstanding Student Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Awards goes to Herron’s Yasmine K. Kasem

Image courtesy of the artist, Yasmine K. KasemThe International Sculpture Center has announced that Yasmine K. Kasem (B.F.A. in Sculpture, ’15) is a recipient of the Outstanding Student Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award for 2015 for her work El Qamesha El Wahida (The Lonely Cloth).

In a letter notifying associate professors of sculpture Eric Nordgulenand Greg Hull, Kasem’s faculty nominators, a center representative said there were “an exceptional number of nominees this year; 423 students … .” The nominees came from more than 158 college and university sculpture programs in North America and abroad.

The judges, all from New York, included sculptor Chakaia Booker, Dia Art Foundation assistant curator Kelly Kivland, and professor of fine arts, CUNY, Maki Hajikano. They selected Kasem’s sculpture after deliberating over 952 images of sculptural works, the letter said.

The award includes an exhibition with catalog at Grounds for Sculpture—a sculpture garden on the former New Jersey State Fairgrounds in Trenton. The exhibition will take place October 2015 through March 2016 with an opening reception for honorees and their faculty sponsors on October 24. Sculpture magazine will also feature the awards in its October issue. Kasem’s work will be added to an archive of winners on the International Sculpture Center’s website.

“It’s very good for an undergraduate student to get this award,” said Nordgulen. Although Kasem joins recipients from Herron including alumni Emily Stergar (B.F.A. in Sculpture, ‘04) and James Darr(B.F.A. in Sculpture, ‘03), they had already graduated from Herron and were nominated by the graduate schools they were attending at the universities of Arizona and Delaware, respectively.

Kasem said her experiences at Herron have been among the best of her life. “The faculty and facilities gave me the guidance and resources I needed to explore and develop. But not only that, I saw that Herron genuinely cares about its students and their ability to succeed. I owe so much of my success to Herron, my professors and peers. I’ve gotten the wonderful opportunity to work alongside so many talented artists and grow with them in the studio as well.”

“I’m truly grateful for being selected for this award,” she said. “If you would have told me four years ago that I would’ve accomplished what I have, I wouldn’t have believed you. I was so insecure about what I was making and how it held up in comparison to my peers. But all of the positive support, honest critiques and conversations I’ve had with friends, faculty and staff at Herron is what motivated me to keep working hard through any obstacle I encountered.”

As she got closer to applying for college, Kasem said, “I realized that I felt much stronger about visual art and that it would be a better fit for me than studying jazz,” as had been her initial intent.

Once she decided on Herron, there was no question she wanted to study sculpture. “Growing up I always looked for ways to keep myself occupied,” she said, “which usually led me to building something in the back yard, or playing with the leftover clay my mom had from making beads for her jewelry.” Kasem loved making something beautiful out of nothing, but “wanted to work with even more materials, so sculpture was the logical choice.”

Kasem has applied for residencies in Egypt and Switzerland and sees her future at an as yet undetermined graduate school. She’s making new work for a group show in the fall.

“Now that I’ve graduated, I haven’t slowed down at all,” Kasem said. “After that, just continuing my process and hoping I can get my message across to as many people as I can” is the plan.

“Career wise, I’d love to teach, and that’s something I’ve discovered more recently. On the other hand, working at the Herron Galleries has really instilled a deep interest in what goes into running a gallery. But beyond all of that, I want to be a successful artist. That’s what I’m working towards and that’s what gets me up in the morning.”

The Genetic Portrait Project: Herron Professor documents people’s perceptions of genetic research through photographs

Stefan Petranek

Stefan Petranek

Stefan Petranek, assistant professor of photography and intermedia at IUPUI’s Herron School of Art and Design, has taken an unusual approach to collecting people’s thoughts on science. With a marker and poster board in hand, Petranek asks individuals from a diverse range of backgrounds to consider “how the future will be affected by genetic research.” He then photographs his volunteers holding their message. In the last four years, Petranek has photographed over 400 individuals creating a noteworthy catalogue of responses that reflect the diversity of ethical concerns and technological promise this expansive field of science offers society.

As researchers’ ability to manipulate DNA for a wide array of biological issues, from human health to agricultural production advance, the influence of DNA-based technologies on our daily lives has grown exponentially. Yet there is little research which tracks Americans’ perceptions of these technologies. The Genetic Portrait Project grew out of Petranek’s ongoing artwork about the pyscho-social implications of a genetically advanced world and his interest in how others were grappling with the same issues. The project represents the first-ever visual documentary of individuals’ perceptions on science.

Petranek has photographed several high profile individuals for the project including Dr. Eric Green, Director of the National Human Genomic Research Institute at NIH, and internationally known artist, Mark Dion. He has also photographed individuals from a variety of backgrounds, including soliciting people off the streets from cities like Indianapolis, Boston, and Portland, OR to participate. Recently, Petranek has focused on creating interactive initiatives at genetic and bioethics conferences. In 2014, he photographed attendees at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) Annual Meeting, the world’s largest genetics conference. His photographs have been exhibited nationally and were recently published in Frontline Genomic Magazine’s March issue. To see more portraits you can visit Petranek’s website and the Project’s Facebook page.

In the near future, Petranek plans to create a website that will allow people to participate autonomously, creating an international repository of photographic portraits dedicated to documenting thoughts on genetics at this moment in history.

Professor Publishes Second Volume of Authoritative Biography

Ray-Bradbury-UnboundFully established in the slick magazines, award-winning, and on the brink of placing Fahrenheit 451 in the American canon, Ray Bradbury entered the autumn of 1953 as a literary figure transcending fantasy and science fiction. In Ray Bradbury Unbound, Jonathan R. Eller continues the story begun in his acclaimed Becoming Ray Bradbury, following the beloved writer’s evolution from a short story master to a multi-media creative force and outspoken visionary.

Drawn into screenwriting by the chance to adapt Moby Dick for film, Bradbury soon established himself in Hollywood’s vast and overlapping film and television empires. The work swallowed up creative energy once devoted to literary pursuits and often left Bradbury frustrated with studio executives.

Yet his successes endowed him with the gravitas to emerge as a much sought after cultural commentator. His passionate advocacy in Life and other media outlets validated the U.S. space program’s mission — a favor repaid when NASA’s astronauts gathered to meet Bradbury during his 1967 visit to Houston. Over time, his public addresses and interviews allowed him to assume the role of a dreamer of futures voicing opinions on technology, the moon landing, and humanity’s ultimate destiny.

Eller draws on many years of interviews with Bradbury as well as an unprecedented access to personal papers and private collections to portray the origins and outcomes of Bradbury’s countless creative endeavors. The result is the definitive story of how a great American author helped shape his times.

“A thorough documentation of Bradbury’s career. . . . This warm, informative biography depicts him as a thoughtful and disciplined writer who helped make science fiction a respected literary genre.”–Kirkus

“Eller captures the joy of creations that new forms allowed Bradbury, such as the intensely visual interpretation of Moby Dick that he wrote for director John Huston. . . . Fans who know Bradbury only for his fiction are likely to enjoy this diverse look at his work and creative process.”–Publishers Weekly

“Intimate, conscientious, and triumphant, a truly profound examination of Bradbury’s accomplishments and legacy. Highly recommended for all sf lovers and those with an appreciation for non-fiction and literature.”–Library Journal

“Engaging. . . . Eller’s second volume of Bradbury’s biography is ultimately a melancholy and cautionary tale.”–Washington Post

“Few contemporary authors have been written about as extensively as Ray Bradbury, but no one has surpassed Jonathan Eller. In his previous study, Becoming Ray Bradbury, he captured the odd nature of Bradbury’s imagination perfectly in the context of his life and age — keeping a myriad of influences and ambitions in perspective. With the publication of Ray Bradbury Unbound, Eller not only confirms his position as the great comprehensive Bradbury scholar. He has also written what may be the best single account of a major science fiction author’s rise to fame and achievement.”–Dana Gioia, author of Pity the Beautiful and former chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts

Jonathan R. Eller is a Chancellor’s Professor of English at Indiana University-Purdue University in Indianapolis, the senior textual editor of the Institute for American Thought, and director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at IUPUI. Becoming Ray Bradbury was a runner-up for the 2011 Locus Award for best nonfiction book in the science fiction and fantasy field.

NEH Summer Stipends

NEH Logo provided by neh.govNEH Summer Stipends
Limited Submission URL: here.
IU Internal Deadline: 7/1/2015
NEH Online Application Deadline: 10/1/2015

Brief Description:
Summer Stipends support individuals pursuing advanced research that is of value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Recipients usually produce articles, monographs, books, digital materials, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly resources. Summer Stipends support continuous full-time work on a humanities project for a period of two consecutive months. Summer Stipends support projects at any stage of development.

The Common Good:  The Humanities in the Public Square
NEH invites projects related to its new initiative, The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square. This initiative seeks to connect the study of the humanities to the current conditions of national life. Many of today’s challenges require more than ever the forms of understanding and knowledge represented by the humanities. They require the broadest possible engagement of scholars and the public with the resources of the humanities, including but not limited to the study of language, literature, history, philosophy, comparative religion, and ethics. The study of the humanities can help illuminate the complexity of many contemporary challenges while enriching our understanding of the common good.

Summer Stipends may not be used for:
• projects that seek to promote a particular political, religious, or ideological point of view;
• projects that advocate a particular program of social action;
• specific policy studies;
• research for doctoral dissertations or theses by students enrolled in a degree program;
• the preparation or revision of textbooks;
• curriculum development;
• the development of pedagogical tools (including teaching methods or theories);
• educational or technical impact assessments;
• empirical social science research, unless part of a larger humanities project;
• inventories of collections;
• the writing of guide books, how-to books, or self-help books;
• the writing of autobiographies, memoirs, or works of creative nonfiction; or
• works in the creative or performing arts (for example, painting, fiction or poetry, or dance performance).

Award Amount:
Summer Stipends provide $6,000 for two consecutive months of full-time research and writing. Recipients must work full-time on their projects for these two months and may hold other research grants supporting the same project during this time. Summer Stipends normally support work carried out during the summer months, but arrangements can be made for other times of the year. NEH Summer Stipends are awarded to individuals, not to institutions. They do not require cost sharing and do not include indirect costs.

• Faculty members teaching full-time at colleges or universities must be nominated by their institutions.
• All applicants must have completed their formal education by the application deadline. While applicants need not have advanced degrees, individuals currently enrolled in a degree-granting program are ineligible to apply.
• Individuals who have been awarded a major fellowship or research grant or its equivalent within the three academic years prior to the deadline are ineligible. (Applicants who have held such fellowships or research grants are eligible only if their award period ended at least three years before the deadline for Summer Stipends applications.) . A “major fellowship or research grant”; is a postdoctoral research award that provides a stipend of at least $15,000. Sabbaticals and grants from an individual’s own institution and stipends and grants from other sources supporting study and research during the summer are not considered major fellowships. See Program details.
• Individuals who have received Summer Stipends may apply to support a new stage of their projects.
• See Program details for more specific information.
Each college and university in the United States and its jurisdictions (campus) may nominate two faculty members. Any faculty member teaching full-time is eligible for nomination.

The following individuals may apply online without a nomination or internal competition:
• independent scholars not affiliated with a college or university;
• college or university staff members who are not faculty members and will not be teaching during the academic year preceding the award tenure
• emeritus faculty; and
• adjunct faculty, part-time faculty, and applicants with academic appointments that terminate by the summer of the award tenure.

IUPUI Internal competition:
For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward, by July 1, 2015 for internal competition.
Format pages with one-inch margins and with a font size no smaller than eleven point.
The narrative should not assume specialized knowledge and should be free of technical terms and jargon. The narrative limitation does not include references.

1. Provide a 1-3 page narrative that includes the following:
• Project Title
• Project Director Name and Credentials
• Research and contribution: Describe the intellectual significance of the proposed project, including its value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Provide an overview of the project, explaining the basic ideas, problems, or questions examined by the study. Explain how the project will complement, challenge, or expand relevant studies in the field.
• Methods and work plan: Describe your method(s) and clarify the part or stage of the project that will be supported by the Summer Stipend. Provide a work plan, describing what you will accomplish during the award period. Your work plan must be based on a full-time commitment to the project; part-time work is not allowed. If you do not anticipate finishing the entire project during the award period, discuss your plan for doing so. For book projects, explain how the final project will be organized. If possible, provide a brief chapter outline. For digital projects, describe the technologies that will be used and developed, and how the scholarship will be presented to benefit audiences in the humanities.
• Competencies, skills, and access: Explain your competence in the area of your project. If the area of inquiry is new to you, explain your reasons for working in it and your qualifications to do so. Specify your level of competence in any language or digital technology needed for the study. Describe where the study will be conducted and what research materials will be used.
• Final product and dissemination: Describe the intended audience and the intended results of the project. If relevant, explain how the results will be disseminated and why these means are appropriate to the subject matter and audience.

2. A Letter from the Chair or Dean

3. 1-2 page abbreviated CV which includes:
• Current and Past Positions
• Education: List degrees, dates awarded, and titles of theses or dissertations
• Awards and Honors: Include dates. If you have received support from NEH, indicate the dates of these grants and any resulting publications.
• Publications: Include full citations for publications and presentations
• Other Relevant Professional Activities & Accomplishments

WONDER AND THE NATURAL WORLD: A Call for Grant Proposals

Logo for CSRES courtesy of News.iupui.eduCALL FOR GRANT PROPOSALS: Symposia, workshops, performances, and seminar series for departments, institutes, and research centers at all IU campuses
Deadline for submission: June 15, 2015
Awards announced by mid-July 2015

The IU Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics, and Society (CSRES) announces a grant competition on the theme of Wonder and the Natural World. Departments, research centers, and institutes across all IU campuses may apply for funds to support or supplement symposia, workshops, seminar series, performances, or small conferences during the 2015-2016 academic year that align with the Consortium’s two-year theme of Wonder and the Natural World. This call for proposals is part of a two-year thematic initiative sponsored by CSRES.

Wonder has been framed as a key moral disposition, as well as an aesthetic, emotional, or cognitive response; depending on its objects and orientation, it may display both salutary and sinister dimensions. Wonder at nature is prompted by the odd and uncanny, the strange and novel, the transcendent and sublime, as well as encounters with the monstrous and horrific. It has variously been associated with, or dissociated from, curiosity, awe, intimations of divinity, infinity, the sublime, the miraculous or supernatural, feelings of astonishment and puzzlement. We welcome projects that explore wonder or its cognate terms in relation to nature or the natural, broadly construed. Proposals should clearly relate the project to the announced theme.

Grants will be awarded in amounts up to $2500, $5000, and $7500 depending on the scope of the proposed project. Funds can be used for travel and honoraria for external speakers, as well as hospitality expenses in keeping with university regulations. IU faculty may not receive honoraria. Applications for funding should include:

• summary of the project (750 words max.)
• a list of invited presenters
• a detailed budget
• letter of support from department chair or school/unit dean (included with the application or emailed separately)
• evidence of other funding obtained or requested (for requests over $2000)

Questions about the grant competition, and complete grant proposals may be emailed to CSRES Director Lisa Sideris at

The Indiana University Consortium for the Study of Religion, Ethics, and Society is an interdisciplinary association of scholars, academic programs, and research centers from the eight campuses of Indiana University. Their mandate is to aid in the development of research and scholarship to better understand religion, ethics, values, and spirituality in society. An initiative of the IU Vice President for Research Office, CSRES is also supported by the Office of the President, The Office of the Executive Vice President and Chancellor, IUPUI, and the College of Arts and Sciences at IU Bloomington.