Artist brings his brand of war to IUPUI campus

'OH YEAH!' Tank

‘OH YEAH!’ Tank

Artist Chris Dacre

Artist Chris Dacre

Mixed media artist Chris Dacre will bring his humorous, yet satirical depiction of the complexities of war to the IUPUI campus in January.

His “OH YEAH!” solo exhibit, featuring soft sculptures of military personal and equipment, screen-printed, surplus army tents, drones-printed kites, videos and audio recordings will run Jan. 16 to Feb. 16 at the Herron School of Art and Design.

Exhibit visitors in their 30s and 40s could have flashbacks to Saturday mornings spent watching “G.I. Joe” and other cartoons interrupted by commercials featuring the Kool-Aid Man breaking through walls and uttering “Oh yeah!”

In the Herron exhibit, “a big, soft sculpture tank and its driver — has replaced the Kool-Aid Man, breaking through a wall into a young boy’s room . . . while outside the room, life-sized sculptures of soldiers wage war,” Dacre said during a phone interview.

The subject of war has always fascinated the Denver-based artist who spent eight years in the U.S. Air Force before earning a bachelor’s degree in graphic design and a master of fine arts degree in studio art and printmaking.

“What interests me most about war, is the way that we recruit for, stockpile and wage it around the globe, oftentimes in the name of freedom and liberty or some other guise,” wrote Dacre in an online artist statement.

His goal for his art is to spark conversation about the realities of war and the military-industrial-entertainment complex which surrounds it.  While he isn’t an expert in military history, his art, along with talks he gives based on his research, provide food for thought for exhibit goers.

“My job is to disseminate information that most people won’t get in everyday news. My art exhibit can become a platform to have a discussion about these issues,” Dacre said.

For example, the tank and its driver bring to mind the hundreds of inflatable tanks crafted for use in World War II. It provides an opportunity to discuss the little known history of the Ghost Army, a secret unit of soldier artists — including then budding fashion design Bill Blass — who employed the tanks and recorded sound effects to deceive enemy soldiers.

And many of the images of soldiers aren’t human in form. For example, the tank driver resembles a cartoon wolf. Making the players less human, serves to reduce the emotionalism often inherent in dialogue about war and violence, Dacre said.

“I try to take the human element out of it,” Dacre said. War “is a very depressing subject.  I am trying to make it lighter . . . I am trying to make it easier for us to talk about it.”

While viewers could come away from the exhibit thinking that Dacre is either pro-war or a pacifist, the artist believes that those who are willing to come “with an open-mind and take some time to figure it out, they can see what I am trying to say.”

Part of the exhibit’s message is that in a world where wars are often fought over the rights to natural resources needed to fuel our transnational consumer culture, we all play a role in world conflicts, Dacre said.

Dacre’s work is in the permanent collections of Denver Art Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; National Palace of Culture, Sofia, Bulgaria; Brazilian American Institute, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Museum of Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX; and several other museums.

He has held exhibitions at numerous galleries and universities, including the Ohio  University Art Gallery, the University of Wisconsin, and the LuLuBell Toy Bodega and Gallery, Tucson, Az., just to name a few.

“War will be a topic for me for a long time,” Dacre said. “I’m always learning something new that I can share.”

Herron offers hands-on experiences for prospective undergraduate students

Herron Discovery Day

Herron Discovery Day

What is it like to create art as an undergraduate student working alongside internationally recognized faculty in nationally acclaimed studios?

Herron School of Art and Design faculty and current students invite prospective students and their parents to discover first-hand what awaits them as the school opens its doors for tours, hands-on workshops and information sessions.

The art school, on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus, will host Discovery Day 2015 from 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 22. Registration for the event has been extended through Jan. 15.

Morning sessions include tours of the Herron buildings — Eskenazi Hall,  735 W. New York St., and Eskenazi Fine Arts Center, 1410 Indiana Ave.  – and presentations by students and faculty.

Afternoon workshop projects include building simple wooden boxes in the Herron Furniture Design Lab;  creating a small sculpture in an intro to welding session; creating a print using the basic techniques of monotype;  and constructing a miniature book from beginning to finish, to name a few.

As an alternative to attending workshops, Discovery Day attendees may choose to attend actual classes and shadow current students throughout the day.

2015 Spring Colloquium Series Presentation

Nate William, Ph.D. Candidate IU School of Education, IUPUI

Nate William

Please join us for the 2015 Spring Colloquium Series Presentation, hosted by the Center for Urban and Multicultural Education (CUME), and the School of Education. You will have the opportunity to experience a series of innovative research presentations by Ph.D. students, colleagues and community members. Join us for creative yet critical conversations on research that’s relevant to today’s society.  We thank all of those who attended our last sessions and look forward to seeing you at this one. Please mark this time on your calendar in support of our students and colleagues.

Invited Presenter: Mr. Nate William, Ph.D. Candidate, IU School of Education, IUPUI

Racial disparities in school discipline: A function of Systemic Racism?

The primary focus of my research centers on the overrepresentation of Black students in discipline, in particular, the exploration of how, if at all, the “school-to-prison pipeline” acts a function of systemic racism. Specifically, my research draws from critical scholarship to examine how teachers’ and administrators’ dispositions, their biases and beliefs, and philosophies of education and discipline, intersect with macro level social systems to contribute or interrupt the school-to-prison pipeline and/or act as means of protecting whiteness. Using an embedded multi-case study (Yin, 2013) of four middle schools differing on dimensions of disproportionality and school locale, I analyze isolated and intersections of subunits of inquiry using a conceptual framework comprised of color-blind racism, post-colonialism, and critical race theory . Subunits of this inquiry include classroom dynamics, the disposition of teachers, their philosophies of education and discipline, discipline techniques, the referral process, and the overall discipline policy. Working in combination with my conceptual framework I will examine the subunits of this inquiry from three data points 1) ethnographic observations, 2) interviews, and 3) school level referral rates.

Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor (DRL) Fostering Civil, Political, and Labor Rights in Cuba Applications Now Available

imagesDRL invites organizations to submit SOIs for programs that promote internationally-recognized individual, civil, political, and labor rights – as set forth in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international agreements – in Cuba.

The Cuban government fails to respect freedom of speech and the press, restricts internet access, maintains a monopoly on political power and media outlets, circumscribes academic freedom, and maintains some restrictions on the ability of religious groups to meet and worship. The government refuses to recognize non-governmental human rights groups or permit them to function legally. The government continues to prevent workers from forming independent unions and otherwise exercising their labor rights. Common human rights abuses on the island include those involving the abridgement of the right of citizens to participate in their government, including through periodic and genuine elections, as well as the use of government threats, extrajudicial physical violence, intimidation, organized mobs, harassment, and detentions to prevent free expression and peaceful assembly. In addition, the government continues to engage in or permit the following abuses: short-term, arbitrary unlawful detentions and arrests, harsh prison conditions, selective prosecution, and denial of fair trial. Authorities also interfere with privacy, engaging in pervasive monitoring of private communications without legal authority and with impunity.

Award Amount:
Lower: $500,000 – Upper: $2,000,000
Eligibility:
Organizations may form consortia and submit a combined SOI. However, one organization should be designated as the lead applicant.
Limitation: Two per Indiana University
An organization may submit no more than two applications.
IU Internal Deadline: 1/14/2015
DRL Statement on Interest Deadline: 2/5/2015
To apply for IU Internal competition:  For consideration as an institutional nominee, submit the following documents electronically to limited submission, limsub@iu.edu, by January 14, 2015 for internal coordination. It is highly recommended that you contact Donna Carter at limsub.iu.edu indicating your interest in this program to help expedite the review process.

  1. 1-2 page Statement of Interest (limitation does not include references) that includes:
    • A statement of work or synopsis of the program, including a brief statement on how the project will have a demonstrated impact;
    • A concise breakdown explicitly identifying the project’s objectives and the activities and expected results that contribute to each objective; and,
    • A brief description of the applicant(s) that demonstrates applicant(s) expertise and capacity to implement the program and manage a U.S. government award.
  2.  A letter of support from Chair or Dean
  3. Abbreviated CV for the PI (not to exceed 3 pages)

Limited Submission 

IUPUI applicants must copy Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, on submissions.

Developing Diverse Researchers with InVestigative Expertise (DRIVE) Applications Available Now

imagesThe DRIVE program is designed to enhance the diversity and research and creative activity mission of IUPUI. Faculty from historically underrepresented populations, usually defined as African-American, Latino-American, Native American, Pacific Islanders, and women are particularly encouraged to apply. The DRIVE program supports projects that have the potential for sustainability through external funding.

Deadline: March 2, 2015 (SLA Internal Deadline February 23), 5 pm

Guidelines and Application

Release Time for Research (RTR) Applications Available Now

images

IUPUI maintains a robust research enterprise. To support faculty in having adequate time to prepare competitive proposals, the IUPUI Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research has developed the Release Time for Research (RTR) internal funding mechanism. This funding program allows IUPUI faculty a “buy out” of teaching time to prepare high quality grant/contract proposals for submission to external funding agencies. It also supports non-tenure track faculty who are full-time senior lecturers or clinical track faculty possessing terminal degrees relevant to their fields, and who have a desire to engage in research or creative activity in an area that directly relates to their teaching or service mission.

Deadline: February 2, 2015 (SLA Internal January 26), 5 pm

 Guidelines and Application

New Frontiers Exploratory Travel Fellowships Applications Available Now

imagesIndiana University New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities
Indiana University is pleased to announce the 2014-2015 New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities seed funding program. The objective of this opportunity is to help Indiana University faculty members by supporting the initial stages of path-breaking and transformative programs of scholarly investigation or creative activity.

Exploratory Travel Fellowship funding up to $3,000 is available to support national and international travel for scholars and researchers pursuing new and innovative research or artistic projects in the arts and humanities. The grants will allow travel to museums, libraries, laboratories, art galleries, and cultural sites; travel and participation in conferences, workshops, symposia, and performances; and visits to collaborators. Exploratory travel fellowships prioritize travel that is a crucial element of new projects which are themselves potentially significant to the larger scholarly or creative community.

Travel to present or support work that is already well advanced is not eligible for support; travel to give short conference presentations of exploratory work, or to participate in conferences that have limited impact in the field have low priority for New Frontiers. Because overall New Frontiers funding is limited, multiple fellowships for the same project are not possible, and funding is not available for projects that have already been supported through other New Frontiers programs. For the same reason, faculty members are limited to one Exploratory Travel Fellowship award every 18 months (calculated from the submission deadline of the most recent award).

Deadline: February 15 (SLA Internal Deadline February 8), 5 pm

Guidelines

IUPUI Arts and Humanities Internal Grant (IAHI) Applications Available Now

iahi-logo-2-mediumThe IAHI Grant Program exists to support campus-wide attainment of excellence in research and creative activity in arts and humanities. It is designed to enhance the research and creative activity mission of IUPUI by supporting research projects and scholarly activities that are conducted by arts and humanities faculty. The program is intended to stimulate existing and new research and creative activity, and to support faculty in becoming competitive in securing external funding and sponsorship.

The three funding programs are:

  • Category A (up to $15,000). This program is designed to enhance research projects conducted by arts and humanities faculty. It allows for things such as up to one month of salary, release time, research assistant support or conference or workshop participation. This grant requires a 1 to 2 match by the faculty member’s department, center or school.
  • Category B (up to $5,000). This is a travel and research support grant that covers travel, equipment, materials, etc. and does not require a match.
  • Category C (up to $30,000). This is a collaborative research grant to support projects conducted by a teams of two or three faculty from different units on campus. May be used for release time, summer salary, research assistant support, etc. This does not require a match.

Deadline: February 15, 2015 (SLA Internal Deadline February 8), 5 pm

Guidelines and Application

NEH Creates New “Public Scholar” Grant Program Supporting Popular Scholarly Books in the Humanities

thThe National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) today announced a new grant opportunity that encourages the publication of nonfiction books that apply serious humanities scholarship to subjects of general interest and appeal.

The new NEH Public Scholar awards support well-researched books in the humanities conceived and written to reach a broad readership. Books supported through this program might present a narrative history, tell the stories of important individuals, analyze significant texts, provide a synthesis of ideas, revive interest in a neglected subject, or examine the latest thinking on a topic. Most importantly, they should open up important and appealing subjects for wider audiences by presenting significant humanities topics in a way that is accessible to general readers.

“At the Endowment we take very seriously the idea, expressed in our founding legislation, that the humanities belong to all the people of the United States,” said NEH Chairman William D. Adams.  “In announcing the new Public Scholar program we hope to challenge humanities scholars to think creatively about how specialized research can benefit a wider public.”

The NEH Public Scholar program represents a long-term commitment at NEH to encourage scholarship in the humanities for general audiences. The grant program forms part of a new agency-wide initiative, The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square, which seeks to demonstrate and enhance the role and significance of the humanities and humanities scholarship in public life.

The Public Scholar program is open to both independent scholars and individuals affiliated with scholarly institutions. It offers a stipend of $4,200 per month for a period of six to twelve months. The maximum stipend is $50,400 for a twelve-month period. Applicants must have previously published a book or monograph with a university or commercial press, or articles and essays that reach a wide readership.

Application guidelines and a list of F.A.Q.’s for the Public Scholar program are available online at www.neh.gov. The application deadline for the first cycle of Public Scholar grants is March 3, 2015.

About the National Endowment for the Humanities

Created in 1965 as an independent federal agency, the National Endowment for the Humanities supports research and learning in history, literature, philosophy, and other areas of the humanities by funding selected, peer-reviewed proposals from around the nation. Additional information about the National Endowment for the Humanities and its grant programs is available at: www.neh.gov.

Media Contacts: Paula Wasley at (202) 606-8424 or pwasley@neh.gov

Mitchell Douglas’s Sabbatical Lecture Examines a Pivotal Time in Rock History

Mitchell Douglass

Mitchell Douglass

The Rolling Stones concert at Altamont Speedway in December 1969 was marred by an alcohol-fueled security force of Hells Angels and the gang’s murder of a Berkeley teen. This year, Dec. 6, marked the 35th anniversary of the Altamont free concert. While Meredith Hunter’s killer, Hells Angel Alan Passaro, is long gone, Hunter’s story has never been fully explored. Mitchell Douglas, assistant professor of English at IUPUI, will explore the events of that night through lyric and persona poetry. Douglas will present his sabbatical talk December 9, 2014 to discuss his process for creating poems based on historical events, writing persona poems in the voices of historical figures, and how research can be an integral part of a creative project.

About the Liberal Arts Sabbatical Series Lectures

The Sabbatical Speaker Series was established to provide a venue for sharing research completed by Liberal Arts faculty while on sabbatical leaves. It is a sampling of the diverse work and excellence of IUPUI faculty, and an opportunity to come together for an hour of intellectual exploration with students, alumni, faculty, staff, retirees and friends from the community.

About the speaker

Mitchell Douglas is an Associate Professor of Creative Writing and Literature at the IUPUI School of Liberal Arts. His areas of academic interest include the Black Arts Movement, ethnic poetry collectives, and art for social change. He received the Lexi Rudnitsky Editor’s Choice Award and has been a finalist for the NAACP Image Award (Outstanding Literary Work-Poetry), thee Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, the Wick Poetry Prize, the Crab Orchard Series in Poetry First Book Award for his debut book, Cooling Board: A Long-Playing Poem, and was a Pushcart Prize Nominee in 2006. Douglas is also a founding member of the Affrilachian Poets, a Cave Canem fellow, and Poetry Editor for PLUCK!: the Journal of Affrilachian Arts & Culture. Mitchell L. H. Douglas’s second book of poems, \blak\ \al-fə bet\, is available from amazon.com.