Director of Art Therapy Juliet King appointed to professorship in Department of Neurology

Juliet King

Juliet King

Juliet King, assistant professor and director of Art Therapy, has been appointed to an adjunct assistant professorship in the School of Medicine Department of Neurology.

In announcing the groundbreaking joint appointment, Robert M. Pascuzzi, M.D., professor and chair of neurology, wrote “Ms. King’s professional background and current activities relate closely to those of the Department of Neurology and associated departments within the IU Neuroscience Center. As such, a secondary appointment for Ms. King in Neurology will foster collaborative research related to art and the brain with an emphasis on the development of therapeutic strategies for broad application.”

King is a licensed professional counselor and currently serves on the American Art Therapy Associations board of directors. Her current research focuses on helping veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder through Art Therapy.

Her participation in medical student education in a variety of clinical departments at the School of Medicine and IU Health and her work in Indianapolis and surrounding communities to build 30 clinical internship programs for Herron Art Therapy students has built bridges between art and medicine on the IUPUI campus and beyond since the Graduate Art Therapy Program’s inception in 2011.

“The scope of neurological and psychiatric disorders affecting the general population is staggering,” said Dr. Pascuzzi. “Traumatic brain injury represents a common daily challenge for the clinician, be it related to sports concussion, auto accidents, the effects of military combat, epilepsy, stroke, depression or other causes.

“Each of these disorders presents major challenges to patients, families and communities,” he continued. “Currently, each has limited therapeutic options. Thus, it is essential that any opportunity to improve our ability to prevent and manage these common disorders be identified and perfected. Juliet King’s focus on the neuro-scientific basis for art therapy provides our institution with the opportunity to clarify mechanisms for effective art therapy, optimize treatment strategies and clinical applications, establish an optimal educational program for such treatment and, ultimately, improve the outcomes of our patients.”

Herron announces the Think It Make It Lab, where art, design and technology converge

The new Think It Make It Lab at Herron will include equipment and projects like these and more (clockwise): Art work from Herron's 2013 Undergraduate Student exhibition, printed with a 3-D printer; A Stratasys Objet 30 3-D printer; detail from a bench created by then Herron graduate student Vincent Edwards using a CNC router; an EZ Router CNC router. (images: Herron staff, Michelle Pemberton, Stratasys and EZ router)

The new Think It Make It Lab at Herron will include equipment and projects like these and more (clockwise): Art work from Herron’s 2013 Undergraduate Student exhibition, printed with a 3-D printer; A Stratasys Objet 30 3-D printer; detail from a bench created by then Herron graduate student Vincent Edwards using a CNC router; an EZ Router CNC router. (images: Herron staff, Michelle Pemberton, Stratasys and EZ router)

With the aim of merging technology with traditional creative processes, Herron School of Art and Design announces The Think It Make It Lab, a new physical space that will help art and design students, and others on the IUPUI campus, become better informed about the broad applications of design, production and fabrication in a variety of fields.

“We are so excited at the prospect of providing a collaborative environment for research and experimentation at the intersection of art, design, technology and culture,” said Herron’s dean, Valerie Eickmeier. “Centers like this are common in Silicon Valley, but there are few housed in schools of art and design and they are scarce in the Midwest.”

“The Think It Make It Lab promotes the creative use of new technologies in a collaborative environment for research and experimentation. The Lab expands Herron’s capability to educate students to work on concept design and prototyping using a variety of digital fabrication methods. Students and faculty working in this lab engage in research, design, digital fabrication and production methodologies that will be invaluable to their own creative and professional development and to 21st century industry,” she said. “It will also be interesting to see how the center helps to foster collaborations between programs on the IUPUI campus.

“Herron already has formed solid partnerships on campus with the IU School of Medicine, the Fairbanks School of Public Health, the School of Informatics and Computing and departments such as motorsports engineering. We look forward to seeing how this lab accelerates exploration and furthers the appreciation of art and design expertise across many types of applications.

“The resources and practices of the Think It Make It Lab will enhance the fundamentals Herron already teaches in its studio concentrations. The Lab will also equip Herron students with the knowledge to design and make, guided by an informed literacy about technology and a skill set that is in very high demand in the job market.”

Eickmeier said that associate vice president for learning technologies at IUPUI, Anastasia (Stacy) Morrone, Ph.D., was instrumental in bringing Herron’s vision for the Think It Make It Lab to life. “She grasped how our vision meshed with her mission of transformative teaching through the innovative use of technology. She advocated for the commitment of important startup funding.”

Morrone said, “This lab will be a new kind of learning space for students, and the first of its kind at Indiana University. A huge part of IU’s mission, and the mission of University Information Technology Services (UITS), is to provide the technology that our faculty and students need to learn, innovate and discover—key tenets of the maker culture. We are pleased to have played a part in ensuring that IUPUI students and faculty will have access to these exciting technologies.”

Recent additions to Herron’s equipment—a 3-D scanner, 3-D printers and a CNC (computer numeric control) router—started the ball rolling, quickly making a significant impact on the curriculum and training of Herron students.

The Lab will add a new design studio with the newest computers, cameras, scanners and printers—adjacent to a digital fabrication lab containing equipment including large-format CNC routers and laser cutters, plasma cutters and milling machines.

This combination, housed in Herron’s Eskenazi Hall in close proximity to the Basile Center for Art, Design and Public Life, will accelerate exploration of digital production techniques, rapid prototyping and people-centered design research for undergraduates and graduates alike. The faculty and students currently using digital design and fabrication processes understand that the possibilities and applications in industry are boundless.

The Purdue School of Engineering and Technology on the IUPUI campus already has identified several courses that will benefit from the Lab. The School’s dean, David Russomanno said, “It will give students the ability to design for manufacturability, test their prototypes and become familiar with this equipment much earlier in their college careers. The faculty are seeking closer collaboration between research in engineering design and art. Aesthetics play an important role in mechanical design.”

The Think It Make It Lab also is expected to serve as a catalyst for visiting artist workshops, regional symposia and community based lectures and demonstrations, all of which will help establish connections that may spark exciting new partnerships with industries. Visiting speakers will be chosen from a diverse range of fields including art, architecture, engineering and manufacturing. These industry experts and scholars will expand the dialogue surrounding contemporary issues at the intersection of aesthetic expression, culture and emerging technologies.

Herron’s Community Learning Programs, which offer educational experiences to the general public, will also use the Think It Make It Lab to provide opportunities for teens to have project-based learning experiences in art and technology—experiences that help make connections to post high school careers and education.

“The space is under construction now. Faculty are very excited and they are developing curricula for fall,” said Peggy Frey, Herron’s assistant dean for fiscal and administrative affairs. “Some of the courses will be cross-listed with other schools. Additional equipment will begin arriving in January. We anticipate completion of the Think It Make It Lab by the end of the spring semester.”

The initial costs of the Think It Make It Lab are estimated $1.3 million and the project is Herron’s highest fundraising priority in 2015.

Alumnus Jason Ramey selected for $12,000 fellowship as 2014-2015 Jerome Foundation Emerging Artist

Jason Ramey welcomed his daughter, Eva Rae, on December 5. Other recent creations include It's Not Bulletproof. OSB siding, paint, found furniture. 60"x24"x70", 2013. (images courtesy Jason Ramey)

Jason Ramey welcomed his daughter, Eva Rae, on December 5. Other recent creations include It’s Not Bulletproof. OSB siding, paint, found furniture. 60″x24″x70″, 2013.
(images courtesy Jason Ramey)

Life’s been proceeding at a fast pace for Jason Ramey (B.F.A. ‘08 in Furniture Design) since he left Herron. He moved to the University of Wisconsin, Madison to complete a master’s degree and currently teaches furniture design and 3-D foundations as a visiting full time faculty member at the Minnesota College of Art and Design (MCAD).

In 2014, Ramey discovered that he is among a five-person cadre of Minnesotans named to a 2014-2015 Jerome Foundation Fellowship for Emerging Artists. The honor comes with a $12,000 award for each recipient. (To round out the year, his daughter Eva Rae, all eight pounds and 20 inches of her, chose to make her arrival on December 5. He may be a little sleep deprived of late.)

According to MCAD’s website, the Jerome Fellows “…were selected out of a pool of 252 applicants by a panel of arts professionals that included Candida Alvarez, artist and professor in the painting and drawing department at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago; Shannon Fitzgerald, curator, writer and executive director of Rochester Art Center; and David Norr, independent curator and writer currently based in New York City.

Art Critic Michelle Grabner has described Ramey as admirably staking out “…. a psychological landscape taut with existential metaphors and personal narratives. At the same time, he unflinchingly confronts the problematic historical debates between the visual arts and crafts, furniture and props, display and architecture by employing the tropes of these dichotomies in his work”—the sorts of debates that occasionally can be found in the furniture design studios at Herron.

Ramey’s artist’s statement attributes his work to his youthful curiosity “about who might have constructed the walls in my family home, and what type of people they were. … These walls weren’t just inane parts of my childhood home, they were my childhood,” he said. His current work still explores these and other domestic themes as it binds up memory “in the space that enfolds our material world.”

Ramey characterizes Herron as “a huge part of my development as an artist. “I had very little experience before coming to Herron,” he said, “I was lucky to work with Cory Robinson, Phil Tennant and David Lee on the basics of design and fabrication. I continue to be amazed at the work I see coming from Herron students.”

In addition to a Jerome Fellows group show at MCAD in the fall, Ramey also has solo exhibitions in Cleveland and the Weber Gallery at Winona State University in the works for late 2015.

NEA Literature Fellowships: Prose, FY 2016 Applications Now Available

thThe Arts Endowment’s support of a project may begin any time between January 1, 2016, and January 1, 2017, and extend for up to two years. The NEA Literature Fellowships program offers $25,000 grants in prose (fiction and creative nonfiction) and poetry to published creative writers that enable recipients to set aside time for writing, research, travel, and general career advancement. Applications are reviewed through an anonymous process in which the only criteria for review are artistic excellence and artistic merit. To review the applications, the NEA assembles a different advisory panel every year, each diverse with regard to geography, race and ethnicity, and artistic points of view. The NEA Literature Fellowships program operates on a two-year cycle with fellowships in prose and poetry available in alternating years. For FY 2016, which is covered by these guidelines, fellowships in prose (fiction and creative nonfiction) are available. Fellowships in poetry will be offered in FY 2017 and guidelines will be available in the fall of 2015. You may apply only once each year. Competition for fellowships is extremely rigorous. We typically receive more than 1,000 applications each year in this category and award fellowships to fewer than 5% of applicants. You should consider carefully whether your work will be competitive at the national level.

Deadline: Mar 11, 2015 You must submit your application electronically through Grants.gov, the federal government’s online application system. The Grants.gov system must receive your validated and accepted application no later than 11:59 p.m., Eastern Time, on March 11, 2015.

Ganci’s study of ubiquitous computing attracts Springer Family Innovative Faculty Award

Aaron Ganci was selected by his peers for the 2015 Springer Award.(image: Herron staff)

Aaron Ganci was selected by his peers for the 2015 Springer Award.(image: Herron staff)

Whether you’re resentful of being monetized by your apps or unconcerned about the data you provide with your every keystroke, Aaron Ganci’s research findings will likely be relevant to you.

Ganci, assistant professor of visual communication design, has been chosen by his peers as the 2015 recipient of the Frank C. Springer Family Innovative Faculty Award. The award is Herron School or Art and Design’s most prestigious and largest faculty research prize.

Ganci’s specialty is experience design—a subset of visual communication—that he weaves into his students’ coursework. His curiosity led him to propose a research project that will examine the potential of ubiquitous computing, that is, the integration of data gathering technology into everyday objects, to “enable extremely powerful interaction experiences and a new breed of smart digital interfaces,” he said.

The burgeoning capability to gather data about users and their actions “will enable designers to achieve new levels of engagement, personalization and usefulness through digital interfaces,” Ganci predicted.

It is those kinds of interfaces that enable the bookseller on your device to make recommendations on what you might like to read, based on the types of titles you have already ordered, comments you have made about them and people with whom you’ve shared them.

Ganci said ubiquitous computing will impact many more facets of our lives. “Smart environments are growing exponentially. As this technology becomes more available in the mass market, connected environments—virtual and physical—will become much more prevalent.” A big part of what Herron Visual Communication Design graduates will be creating in the next five or ten years is experience design for all manner of digital interfaces.

Thanks to the Springer Prize, Ganci will do a deep dive into what this means for tomorrow’s designers through a very specific project that he was inspired to undertake by fellow faculty members Craig McDaniel and Jean Robertson.

In their soon to be published book, McDaniel and Robertson assert that a standardized alphabet has outlived its usefulness for expressive visual communication through text. They propose that people should have the ability to customize their own personal alphabet to better align with their communication needs.

Ganci will use this assertion as the basic premise for his work, integrating ubiquitous computing into a user interface that will make alphabetic translations passive and seamless. “This project is an important first step in understanding how and why designers might use this technology to create more engaging, personalized or useful experiences,” he said.

In the experiment, text translated into a personalized alphabet identified with a specific individual will be displayed on a smart wall in a room that can sense who is present. When the smart wall senses an individual is near, it will translate the displayed text to that person’s personalized alphabet. As more people begin interacting with the wall, only the area nearest them will translate. This will create a public-yet-personalized experience that would be impossible without ubiquitous computing technology.

The Springer family created the award to inspire Herron faculty members to expand their artistic, creative and scholarly work in memory of Frank C. Springer Jr., a long-time friend to Herron and beloved Indianapolis philanthropist.

Technology and Art Team’s website design contributes to spike in student visits at the Math Assistance Center

from left: Kevin Berkopes, Levi Hadley, Kelly Nauert, Josh Ragsdell, Miriah Remy and Patrick Burton in the MAC. (image: Herron staff)

from left: Kevin Berkopes, Levi Hadley, Kelly Nauert, Josh Ragsdell, Miriah Remy and Patrick Burton in the MAC. (image: Herron staff)

When a visitor walks into the IUPUI Mathematics Assistance Center—the MAC—housed in Taylor Hall at IUPUI’s University College, math anxiety does not come to mind.

It kind of looks like a party is going on at the United Nations. The place is full. Students are grinning and playing with markers on wall-to-wall white boards. There’s lots of excited conversation. Upon closer examination, it becomes apparent that the white boards are full of formulas and math problems and that some of the students are teaching their peers.

This is a fresh approach to getting math help—not textbook driven, hierarchical, isolated or intimidating.

Of course the MAC’s executive director, Kevin Berkopes, Ph.D., looks for employees with high mathematical abilities to be the center’s mentors and tutors. He also makes hiring decision based on their personalities and communications skills. There are 22 countries represented by the 95 students he has on his payroll.

Berkopes is smart enough to know when he needs expertise he does not possess. He recognized that the MAC’s branding should convey its welcoming atmosphere, expressed in part through website design. He turned to students for help, in part to provide them with professional practice experiences, a hallmark of IUPUI.

He hired Herron School of Art and Design students Levi Hadley, Kelly Nauert and Miriah Remy—all juniors majoring in Visual Communication Design—and computer science students Patrick Burton and Josh Ragsdell. The five formed a team called META—MAC Experience: Technology and Art—to focus on the look and feel of MAC services, including the redesign of its website.

“Kevin is hiring mentors and tutors from across programs as well, in the hopes that their presence will make IUPUI students more inclined to seek academic support if they need it,” said Shannon McCullough, Herron’s director of admissions and student services. “Art and design is very mathematical, but a lot of art students fear it. He is really making efforts to ease that, and the MAC gets positive reviews from Herron students who go there.”

Not only that,” McCullough continued, “but for our students to have gained experiences in design and branding for a client, including building a website, as sophomores, what a resume builder!”

Berkopes said the team that brought his branding vision together, as well has his army of tutors and mentors is “a group of kids that are phenomenal in what they do.”

Remy characterized the website and other design projects thus far as “exciting and almost overwhelming at times. It is incredible to be able to say that I’m part of creating something that did not exist before. I have had a good time collaborating with Kelly and Levi on the design of the project. Working with Josh and Patrick to implement the design is great. I believe we have the perfect set of skills combined into one group.”

“As a designer, I judge almost everything I see, especially websites,” she said. “I want our interface to be the best that the users have seen. Overall, I have loved the opportunity to participate in such an interesting project, and I look forward to continuing it.”

Launched in summer 2014, the new website went a long way toward creating a virtual space that complements the MAC’s physical space and personality. Over a short time, the MAC has improved its service overall through a variety of initiatives, including synchronous online tutoring through the website. As of last semester, student visits had increased from 9,000 to 40,000.

Taylor Symposium at IUPUI shares city’s religious diversity through performances

2015 Joseph T. Taylor Symposium Flyer

2015 Joseph T. Taylor Symposium Flyer

The practice of one’s religion isn’t limited to beliefs and sacred texts, according to contemporary religious studies scholars.

The 2015 Joseph T. Taylor Symposium at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis offers participants the opportunity to explore Indianapolis’ religious diversity through performances inherent in the practices of various religious groups.

The symposium, “Encountering Religions Through Performance,” takes place from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 17, in the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd.
“Much of the recent scholarship on religion has emphasized that religious traditions are not just about beliefs and texts,” said IU School of Liberal Arts professor Peter Thuesen, event co-organizer and chair of the Department of Religious Studies in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

“Religions are also expressed through performances. These performances may involve such activities as singing, dancing, drumming or chanting, but they can also consist of devotional rituals observed either publicly or privately,” Thuesen said.
Symposium presenters include:

  • Light of the World Gospel Ensemble
  • Mohamad Saltagi, an IU School of Medicine student who has memorized the entire Quran
  • Anil Bajpai, Hindu Temple of Central Indiana board of trustees member

In lieu of a luncheon speaker, Sancocho Music will perform and participate in a facilitated discussion. Sancocho is dedicated to researching and performing African-derived music and dance from Spanish-speaking cultures of the Caribbean.

“We’re thrilled with the lineup of speakers and performers. … And we’ve paired each guest with one of our own religious studies professors, who will serve as moderator and interviewer,” Thuesen said. “Each session will be like a mini introduction to what we study in the field of religious studies.”

The 2015 Taylor symposium is presented by the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI in partnership with its Department of Religious Studies. The annual event honors the late Joseph T. Taylor, the first dean of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, for his many contributions to the university and to the greater Indianapolis community. The event highlights topics of interest to urban communities, particularly communities of color.
“Indianapolis is a city of remarkable cultural diversity, but many local residents are unfamiliar with the range of religious groups represented here,” Thuesen said. “We hope through this year’s symposium to highlight the ways performance factors into several of the religious traditions that thrive in our city. In seeking to understand other people and traditions, we build community, which was one of Dr. Taylor’s goals as an educator.”

Morning symposium sessions, held in the theater on the lower level of the Campus Center, are free and open to the public, but advance registration is requested.

The noon luncheon will take place in Campus Center Room 450. Luncheon seating is limited and requires registration and pre-payment. Luncheon tickets are $35 each, if purchased by Jan. 26, or $40 after Jan. 26. Organizations are also invited to become table patrons for the luncheon ($550 for a table of 10).

For symposium registration and additional information, visit the Taylor Symposium website.