ACLS Digital Innovation Fellowships

Fellowship Details

  • Amount (for stipends): up to $60,000
  • Amount (for project costs): up to $25,000
  • Tenure: one academic year, to be initiated between July 1, 2014 and September 1, 2015
  • Completed applications must be submitted through the ACLS Online Fellowship Application system (ofa.acls.org) no later than 9 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time, September 26, 2013.
  • Notifications will be sent by early February 2014.

ACLS invites applications for the ninth annual competition for the ACLS Digital Innovation Fellowships, thanks to the generous assistance of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This program supports digitally based research projects in all disciplines of the humanities and related social sciences. It is hoped that projects of successful applicants will help advance digital humanistic scholarship by broadening understanding of its nature and exemplifying the robust infrastructure necessary for creating such works.

ACLS Digital Innovation Fellowships are intended to support an academic year dedicated to work on a major scholarly project that takes a digital form. Projects may:

  • Address a consequential scholarly question through new research methods, new ways of representing the knowledge produced by research, or both;
  • Create new digital research resources;
  • Increase the scholarly utility of existing digital resources by developing new means of aggregating, navigating, searching, or analyzing those resources;
  • Propose to analyze and reflect upon the new forms of knowledge creation and representation made possible by the digital transformation of scholarship.

ACLS will award up to six Digital Innovation Fellowships in this competition year. Each fellowship carries a stipend of up to $60,000 towards an academic year’s leave and provides for project costs of up to $25,000. ACLS does not support creative works (e.g., novels or films), textbooks, straightforward translations, or purely pedagogical projects.

This year’s successful applicants may take up the fellowship in 2014-2015 or at any time up to September 1, 2015, with tenure completed by June 30, 2016. Fellowship tenure may be one continuous year, or two semesters taken over two years, but candidates must commit themselves firmly to their preferred timeframe on their completed applications.

ACLS Digital Innovation Fellowships are intended as salary replacement and may be held concurrently with other fellowships and grants and any sabbatical pay up to an amount equal to the candidate’s current academic year salary.

Given the nature of the program, proposals need to explicitly state the means and tools (software, applications, interfaces) to be used to accomplish the project’s goals. Furthermore, a project plan and budget are required. These fellowships also include provision for additional project costs, which may be used for project-related expenses such as software, equipment, travel, or consultant fees. (See sample budget.) Institutional indirect costs will not be covered.

Objectives

The aim of this program is to provide scholars the means to pursue intellectually significant projects that deploy digital technologies intensively and innovatively.

The fellowship therefore includes a stipend to allow an academic year’s leave from teaching, and funds that may be used for purposes such as:

  1. Access to tools and personnel for digital production. This could include acquiring hardware and software, engaging consultants, or purchasing access to digital collections. Preference will be given to project plans that make the most efficient use of existing cyberinfrastructure, either on the applicant’s campus, host institution, or beyond.
  2. Collaborative work. Applications are encouraged that include, where appropriate, plans for contact with centers for humanities computing or with disciplinary and interdisciplinary research centers (such as campus and national humanities centers).
  3. Dissemination and Preservation. Applicants must specify how their projects will be presented and preserved. Applicants should also outline strategies for raising the visibility of their projects at workshops, seminars, conferences, and meetings of their field or discipline.

While demonstration of scholarly excellence will be the primary criterion for selection, such excellence should be manifest in the digital context. Applicants should discuss both the intellectual ambitions of the project and its technological underpinnings. Proposals should specify how digital technologies add value to humanistic study.

Further, proposals will be evaluated relative to the technical requirements for completing a successful research project; evidence of significant preliminary work already completed; the comparative advantage of the proposed project as measured against other related or similar projects; and (as appropriate) those features of the proposal that would promote teamwork and collaboration in the course of the project. Successful applicants should also indicate how their projects articulate with the local infrastructure at their home institutions or the institution hosting the project.

Applicants must present a coherent plan for development of their project, including a description of tasks to be accomplished within the period of the fellowship, and the budget required for those tasks. The project budget is an essential element of the application and its evaluation will weigh in the overall selection process. The project plan should reflect a thoughtful approach to the project’s sustainability, scalability, dissemination, and preservation, and include a statement addressing intellectual property issues.

All applications must include the endorsement of a senior administrator of the applicant’s institution or the institution hosting the project. This endorsement should include discussion of how the institution’s existing cyberinfrastructure complements and supports the technologies to be developed for the specified project.

Eligibility

  1. This program is open to scholars in all fields of the humanities and the humanistic social sciences.
  2. Applicants must have a Ph.D. degree conferred prior to the application deadline. (An established scholar who can demonstrate the equivalent of the Ph.D. in publications and professional experience may also qualify.)
  3. U.S. citizenship or permanent resident status is required as of the application deadline.

Application Requirements

Applications must be submitted online and must include:

  • Completed application form
  • 10-page Proposal (double spaced, in Times New Roman 11-point font). The proposal should explain your research plan in relation to the objectives of the Digital Innovation Fellowship Program. The narrative statement should explain, briefly but specifically, what you plan to do and why, as well as describe progress already made, make clear the relevance of the project to your professional experience, and discuss the significance of this work within your specific and general fields. Please balance the description of specific work plans against an overview of your goals and the contribution this project will make to digital scholarship generally and to the particular scholarly field(s) it engages. Furthermore, proposals should explicitly state the means and tools (software, applications, interfaces) to be used to accomplish the project’s goals. Proposals should present plans for how the project will be sustained and preserved over time, and how the applicant will disseminate notice of its availability.  Please give your proposal a brief, descriptive title, and label sections of your narrative as appropriate to assist readers.   In addition, if your project is part of a collaborative undertaking, it is essential to explain that context and describe your relationship to the other participants. Please also list the names of your colleagues and indicate whether or not those individuals are also applying for ACLS fellowships in the current competition.
  • 3-page Bibliography providing an overview of the publications central to advancing the project; annotation may be provided to accompany certain items
  • Publications list (no more than two pages)
  • Project plan (no more than three pages) providing a coherent plan for development of the project, including a description of tasks to be accomplished within the period of the fellowship. This plan should reflect a thoughtful approach to the project’s sustainability, scalability, dissemination, and preservation, and include a statement addressing intellectual property issues.
  • Budget plan (no more than two pages) providing a detailed account of the proposed use of the research funds. (See sample budget.)
  • 3 reference letters
  • Institutional statement from a senior official of your home institution or the institution hosting the project (dean, provost, president, or other appropriate person). The provided form asks the institutional representative to confirm that the institution’s existing cyberinfrastructure complements and supports the technologies to be developed for the specified project.

Criteria Used in Judging ACLS Digital Innovation Fellowship Applications

Peer reviewers in this program are asked to evaluate all eligible proposals on the following five criteria:

  1. Scholarly excellence, in terms of the project’s intellectual ambitions and technological underpinnings.
  2. The project’s feasibility.
  3. The project’s intellectual, technological, and institutional sustainability.
  4. The project’s portability, accessibility, and scalability. Will it be widely used by the scholarly field it concerns?
  5. The project’s articulation with local infrastructure at the applicant’s home institution or at the institution hosting the project.

For more details, visit http://www.acls.org/grants/Default.aspx?id=508

IUPUI professor pens book making systematic, positive case for the European Union

In “Why Europe Matters: The Case for the European Union,” IUPUI professor John McCormick makes a clear and unequivocal case for how the European Union, in spite of its problems, has made Europe a more peaceful and prosperous place.

McCormick, who teaches political science in the School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, debunks the prevailing myths surrounding the European Union and puts forward a compelling case for the benefits of European integration. In his new book, McCormick shows how the EU gives Europeans a greater role on the world stage, as well as more peaceful and productive ways of living and doing business.

“’Why Europe Matters’ will inform and enlighten Euro enthusiasts and skeptics alike (and) could not have been more timely for the new debate about Britain’s role in a changing union,” said John Palmer, former European editor of The Guardian and founding political director of the European Policy Centre.

McCormick’s book is “a must-read for citizens, professionals, students and policy-makers alike by one of the most respected authorities on European affairs,” said Alexander Stubb, Finland’s minister for European affairs and foreign trade.

In a stark challenge to skeptics and critics, McCormick “shows that the story of European Union has been, above all, one of progress in mutual understanding between peoples, of the benefits of cooperation and of the pooling of sovereignty between nations, and of a growing solidarity and cohesion in practice that could provide a model too for those looking for a more peaceful and cooperative form of organization on a global scale,” said Jacques Delors, former president of the European Commission.

Palgrave Macmillan published “Why Europe Matters” on June 28. For more information, or to request a review copy, commission an article or interview McCormick, contact Louise Crawford at l.crawford@palgrave.com.

National audiences eager to hear about Herron School of Art and Design’s unique approach to Art Therapy

This summer and fall, professionals at national conferences from Seattle to Chicago and Louisville to New York will listen to Juliet King, Herron School of Art and Design’s director of art therapy, share tales from the frontier.

She’ll be speaking about art therapists’ pioneering work in developing sound clinical interventions that help people get better. She ought to know. She’s doing some pioneering of her own; for starters, by building an art therapy program housed in an art school.

Her speaking engagements include a June American Art Therapy Association Conference in Seattle; October presentations at the Illinois Art Therapy Association Conference in Chicago, and the Coalition for Urban and Metropolitan Universities in Louisville; and a November appearance at the Expressive Therapies Summit in New York.

Creative arts therapies are hot—whether visual, kinetic or musical—like a rock band laboring in obscurity, honing its chops for years before bursting onto the scene “overnight”. After decades of research, scientific evidence is forming a critical mass pointing toward art therapy’s efficacy. Continuing and deepening this research is important in a world where only outcomes-based evidence will do for healthcare and insurance providers.

Public awareness has preceded some of the science, but governments have not caught up with the public. “We as professionals are facing a practical and existential crisis regarding employment and authenticity of professional identity,” said King. “In some states, anyone still can hang up a shingle and call themselves an art therapist, even though Art Therapy is a master’s-level medical and healthcare profession.” She continued, “We are eligible to be licensed as professional counselors and are actively advocating for independent licensure. We have a lot more work to do in educating the public on what to look for in their practitioner.”

Despite a lag in ideal licensure requirements, strides on the clinical side continue. Wounded warriors are seeing the benefits of art therapy applied to their own struggles with sense of self and re-entry into civilian life. King’s presentations will include discussion of her work with combat veterans at the Richard L. Roudebush VA Medical Center in Indianapolis.

“Veterans returning from Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom volunteered to be part of a mindfulness-based art therapy group,” King said. “Originally developed as a pilot project to provide a service that does not yet exist at the VA, indicators are encouraging that from this group our participants felt ‘some’ or ‘great’ positive change in hopefulness, and also in the belief that they could improve their own emotional health.”

King also will be sharing highlights from her graduate students’ experiences working alongside clinical staff, developing and providing art therapy in Indianapolis-area settings from prisons to hospice programs.

“With the technological resources and expertise Herron has available by being part of a large, urban, life sciences campus, we are poised to make significant research contributions to the study of Art Therapy as it relates to Neuroscience,” said King. “Intervening with Art Therapy and being able to assess its impact—especially on post-traumatic stress in veterans and children who are victims of abuse and neglect—is an exciting prospect for our graduate students and clinicians alike. There is so much promise for helping people in this field.”

For more information about Herron’s Art Therapy graduate program, visit www.herron.iupui.edu/art-therapy.

Connect your City, Connect your Neighborhood 5×5 Competition

From the Harrison Center for the Arts:

“Pitch your idea to build community through the arts and innovation!

The Harrison Center for the Arts invites you to Connect Your City:  Connect Your Neighborhood, the last in a series of four 5×5 events. The 5×5: Indianapolis Arts and Innovation Prize is a contest designed to foster community building and art-focused innovations in central Indiana. Project applications can be submitted from June 30-July 31.  Five applicants will be selected to present an innovative idea that involves the arts and Indianapolis urban neighborhoods with five slides in five minutes.   The winning project will receive $10,000 to make it happen.

Connect Your City is a free event, taking place Friday, September 6 at 6:30 p.m. in the historic sanctuary at the Harrison Center for the Arts.

To download a submission form, click here.

Since our inception, the Harrison Center for the Arts has sought to be catalyst for renewal in Indianapolis. Our mission has always been bigger than art for art’s sake. Today, we’re fostering the creation of new art, building a community among artists and emerging art patrons, creating new partnerships, and providing a forum for public conversations between artists and the community.  In short, we’re using art to change the world. We’re using “cultural development” to change the community in which we live and work.

HCA is grateful for our connections in the city who are helping us with this event:

Lacy Leadership Association, Pattern Magazine, two21, The Platform and Urban Times. These groups will select and judge submissions.

Funded by CICF, the Efroymson Family Fund and the Christel DeHaan Family Foundation, this year-long idea-pitching series awards $10,000 to the winning idea at each of four events. Previous 5×5 events: Big Car’s “Revolutionize Your City: Arts + Technology = Innovation” was February 8, and Craig Mince of the Indy Film Fest took home $10k in winnings for his Pop-Up Roving Cinema idea. People for Urban Progress hosted “Make Your City: Make It Happen” on April 12, where Kirstin Northenscold and”The Cool Bus,” a moveable classroom/library retrofitted inside an old school bus, grabbed the prize.  Indy Hub hosted “Face your City: An Urban Love Affair” on June 28. $10,000 went to Malina Jeffers and her “I Am an Artist” project.”

http://harrisoncenter.org/connect-your-city-connect-your-neighborhood-5×5-competition/

Karen Dace to be appointed IUPUI vice chancellor for diversity, equity and inclusion

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Chancellor and IU Executive Vice President Charles R. Bantz has announced Karen Dace as IUPUI’s next vice chancellor for diversity, equity and inclusion effective Sept. 3, pending approval by the Indiana University Board of Trustees.

Dace, who most recently served as deputy chancellor in the Division of Diversity, Access and Equity at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, was selected after an extensive national search, chaired by IU School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Dean Augustine Agho. Dace fills the role currently held in an interim capacity by Zebulun Davenport, vice chancellor for student life.

As vice chancellor for diversity, equity and inclusion, Dace will serve as the campus’ senior diversity officer and oversee the Multicultural Success Center and Adaptive Educational Services. Additionally, Dace will facilitate the institutionalization of structures that advance equity and diversity within IUPUI units and initiate change in the cultures and climate of IUPUI.
“Having a senior-level administrator focused at the campus level on matters of diversity, equity and inclusion has already produced gains for IUPUI in recent years,” Bantz said. “Professor Dace has 14 years’ experience as a chief diversity officer at two public universities, published research on diversity-related topics and demonstrated an exceptional ability to build relationships across constituencies. She is a thoughtful, experienced and dedicated leader whose definition of diversity is as broad as it is inclusive — just what a campus as large as IUPUI needs to advance our diversity goals.”

In addition to her role as deputy chancellor at UMKC, Dace is also an associate professor in the Department of Communications. She was recently asked by colleagues in the School of Education to teach a class titled “Race and Diversity in Higher Education.” While at UMKC, Dace has received nearly $1.7 million in grants to enhance a supportive environment for diversity.

Dace is the District 5 regional director for the Commission on Access, Diversity and Excellence with the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities, and she has authored or co-authored 12 publications since 1987. Before her work at UMKC, Dace was the associate vice president for diversity at the University of Utah.

“I am excited about the opportunity to become part of the IUPUI effort to enhance diversity through collaborations on and off campus,” Dace said. “My meetings with IUPUI leadership, students, faculty and staff; the diversity, equity and inclusion professionals already in place; and members of the surrounding community demonstrated a great commitment and vision for this initiative, and I look forward to working with everyone as we, together, strive to make IUPUI a leader in diversity, equity and inclusion.”

Dace received her Bachelor of Arts in liberal arts and her Master of Arts in mass communication at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and her Ph.D. in communication studies from the University of Iowa.

Rivers of the Anthropocene Featured in IUPUI Center for Research and Learning Newsletter

CRL Feature: A MURI Team

This month, the CRL would like to feature a Multidisciplinary Undergraduate Research Institute (MURI) team.  We are very excited to have a team led by Dr. Jason M. Kelly, Dr. Phil Scarpino and Dr. Owen Dwyer.  The students are working on “Rivers of the Anthropocene – Stage 1: A Comparative Study of the Ohio River and Tyne River Systems Since 1750” 

The team will create a methodological and conceptual framework that better integrates Earth Systems Science with the human sciences and the humanities.  Secondly, it will provide a model for interdisciplinary and comparative studies of Anthropocene rivers systems.  Students will create:

  • a 3-day academic symposium/workshop
  • open-source data sets of historical GIS data relating to the Ohio and Tyne River Systems
  • an open-access, peer-reviewed edited volume featuring articles, revised from papers given at the symposium
  • a co-written research paper submitted to a major academic science journal

The students participating on this project are: Anthony Bozzo (Anthropology), Jeremy Maxwell (History), Keenan Salla (History), Lynette Taylor (History) and Andrew Townsend (History).  Andrew Townsend said “I joined the MURI team to get experience working in a group doing real world work.  Also, I thought it would look good on my resume for grad school. We are researching the human impact on the Ohio River system and compiling information that will be made available to future researchers investigating human efforts to purposely transform their environment according to culturally dictated plans.”

Lynette Taylor went on to describe the project, “Our overall project is addressing the needs for interdisciplinary communication between humanities and sciences in regard to the human influence on the environment and climate change with a special focus on the riverine systems of the world. The current narrow focus is on a comparison of the River Tyne and the Ohio River as these two rivers are somewhat similar in geographic latitude, weather, and use. This first phase of the project is concerned with creating a searchable metadata database that contains a comprehensive collection of available data on the river watershed foci. This database will be incredibly helpful to people in nearly every discipline from history through geology in providing a one-stop repository of information.”

Jeremy Maxwell stated, “The mentors that I’m working with are great. Dr. Scarpino is experienced and really knows his stuff Dr. Dwyer is really chill and great to work with. Dr. Kelly is a genius. He also wears colorful socks, so he has that going for him.”

IUPUI professor provides retrospective as Rockefeller Foundation turns 100

INDIANAPOLIS — Before there was a Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation or a Ford Foundation, there was the Rockefeller Foundation, whose philanthropic muscle dominated scientific and medical research for four decades.

The Rockefeller Foundation on May 14 announced its 100 Resilient Cities Centennial Challenge, a $100 million effort to help 100 cities around the world prepare to weather and rebound from either natural or manmade disasters. The campaign continues a visionary approach to “promoting the well-being of mankind throughout the world” that began with the foundation’s creation 100 years ago this month.

“Rockefeller is a well-known name, but most people aren’t familiar with the family’s specific contributions,” said Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis professor William H. Schneider. “Researchers get grants and fellowships. Those are things that didn’t exist before the Rockefeller Foundation.”

The Rockefellers’ contributions went beyond funding to creating the mechanisms for dispersing or awarding funds. Lessons learned by the Rockefeller Foundation could well serve today’s leading philanthropic giants, said Schneider, head of the Medical Humanities and Health Studies program in the School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

The May 16 issue of Nature magazine provides a historic perspective on the Rockefeller Foundation in an article written by Schneider, “Philanthropy: The difficult art of giving.” Schneider is a professor of history in the School of Liberal Arts and a professor of philanthropic studies in the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy at IUPUI.

The IUPUI professor is the editor of “Rockefeller Philanthropy and Modern Biomedicine,” published by Indiana University Press in 2002. The content is the work of experts gathered for a conference at the Rockefeller Archives Center in Tarrytown, N.Y.

Schneider is also author of the forthcoming book, “The History of Blood Transfusions in Sub-Saharan Africa.”

To reach Schneider for interviews about the history of the Rockefeller Foundation and its impact on philanthropy, email whschnei@iupui.edu; call 317-274-4740; or contact Diane Brown, at 317-274-2195 or habrown@iu.edu.

 

National Art Education Foundation (NAEF) Grant

The National Art Education Foundation invites proposals to support research in art education that advances knowledge in the field of art education and that promulgates the goals outlined in Creating a Visual Arts Research Agenda Toward the 21st Century. Funds are awarded to selected art educators whose proposals specifically focus on issues relating to one of the recommendations identified in this document. NAEF invites proposals to support research in art education that advances knowledge in the field of art education. Grants are awarded to art educators to pursue a broad range of research topics that are aligned with the NAEA Strategic Goals: advocacy, learning, research and knowledge, and organizational vibrancy. NAEF encourages the submissions of proposals that conduct research that supports the impact and importance of arts education in student learning and provides hard data to support the findings of the research. Eligible applicants are welcome to submit proposals in all areas of research. In addition, as part of NAEF’s collaboration with the NAEA Research Commission, NAEF encourages submissions of the following proposals: – Proposals that support the creation of communities of learners, including both researchers and practitioners, working together to explore a research question and/or project. – Proposals that support the identification of best practice and research that leads to further understanding of the impact and importance of arts education to student learning in and through the visual arts in a variety of settings, with an interest in research that provides quantitative data to support its findings.

For more information see
http://www.arteducators.org/grants/national-art-education-foundation

British ambassador to promote free trade in speech at IUPUI

During a visit to Indianapolis this week to meet with corporate and civic leaders to promote free trade, British Ambassador Sir Peter Westmacott will deliver a speech at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

In his talk titled “Brits and Hoosiers: Partners in Prosperity,” the ambassador will reflect on the implications of the G8 summit, the potential trans-Atlantic trade agreement and trade opportunities for Hoosiers with the United Kingdom. The presentation takes place at 10 a.m. Friday, June 21, at IUPUI Hine Hall, formerly University Place Conference Center and Hotel, 850 W. Michigan St. The event is free of charge and open to the public.

In his first visit to the Hoosier state, the ambassador will highlight the United Kingdom’s role in Indiana’s economy, which exports more than $1 billion in goods to the U.K. and benefits from more than 29,000 jobs supported by British companies.

Westmacott will arrive in Indiana shortly after Britain hosts President Barack Obama and other world leaders June 17 and 18 at the G8 summit in Northern Ireland. International trade will be a central issue at the G8 summit.

While in Indianapolis, the ambassador also will visit Rolls-Royce, which employs more than 6,000 people at the British company’s global headquarters for helicopters and small gas turbine engines.

Follow along with the Ambassador’s visit online at www.gov.uk/world/usa, on Facebook and on Twitter.

Those who cannot attend the event can follow live tweets from the ambassador’s speech on the @IUPUI Twitter handle and through the #globalIndy hashtag. The ambassador will also take questions sent to @IUPUI on Twitter.

Develop Indy and IUPUI have provided support for the ambassador’s visit.

 

Britain and Indiana by the numbers

* In 2011, Indiana exported about $1.1 billion in goods to the United Kingdom.

* British companies including Rolls-Royce, BP, BAE Systems and GKN employ 29,100 Indiana residents, more than a fifth of all Indiana jobs created by foreign companies.

Learn more about the British-American trade relationship at www.ukustrade.com.

 

About the British Consulate-General in Chicago

The British Consulate-General in Chicago represents the United Kingdom throughout 13 states, including Indiana. Led by British Consul General Robert Chatterton Dickson, the Consulate-General’s 25 staff work to support British businesses in the region and help American businesses interested in doing business in Britain. The Consulate-General also supports British nationals, communicates news from the British government and facilitates exchanges between leaders in politics, education, science and the arts.

For media queries, please contact Jonathan Daniel, vice consul for policy and communications at the British Consulate-General in Chicago: jonathan.daniel@fco.gov.uk or 312-970-3808.