Grant Writing Workshop: IAHI and New Frontiers Grants Programs

This session will provide participants with an overview of the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Grant Program and the IU New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities Grant Program. It will offer information on how to apply and, more importantly, on how to develop a competitive proposal. Faculty recipients and members of the grants’ advisory groups will be present to answer questions.

The Ideology Problem in Teaching and Scholarship: U.S. Intellectual History Conference in Indianapolis, Oct. 9, 2014

S-USIH Conference Program ImageThe sixth annual U.S. Intellectual History Conference in Indianapolis, Oct. 9-12th, 2014, will open with a special two-hour plenary session on THE IDEOLOGY PROBLEM IN TEACHING AND SCHOLARSHIP. This event will be free and open to the public.

We are also happy to announce that RICK PERLSTEIN will be joining our distinguished panel to discuss this subject. The suggestion to add Rick to this panel came from S-USIH’s own Mike O’Connor who noted, as any native Hoosier should, the close proximity of Chicago to Indy. 

The panel will address a series of questions, including: Can the writer-educator avoid being “biased” in favor of a particular set of political or religious ideals? Are disciplinary norms of “objectivity” or “neutrality” themselves in service of partisan agendas? The “ideology problem” is one that has surfaced both explicitly and implicitly at the USIH Blog over the past few years, generating a lot of commentary. For example, see Andrew Hartman’s post of entitled Ideology and Teaching.  Or a post by Ben Alpers called,“Disrespect and the Teaching of Intellectual History.” Or L.D. Burnett’s The Reluctant Historian.

The conference chairs thought it would make a great subject for a plenary to integrate questions of pedagogy as well as research, writing, and the historian’s public role in the debate over ideology and the practice of history. Presenters plan to ask if ideology really is out-of-place in the classroom and to take up some practical questions such as various efforts to ban Howard Zinn’s writings in Indiana schools. You can learn more about our panelists below.

PANELISTS

Andrew Hartman is an associate professor of history at Illinois State University, and was the 2013-14 Danish Distinguished Fulbright Chair in American Studies. He is the author of Education and the Cold War: The Battle for the American School (Palgrave Macmillan, 2008), and A War for the Soul of America: A History of the Culture Wars (University of Chicago Press, 2015). Hartman is the founding president of S-USIH, one of the original USIH bloggers, and is chairing the 2015 S-USIH Conference to be held in Washington, DC.

David Sehat is associate professor of history at Georgia State University. His first book, The Myth of American Religious Freedom, won the Frederick Jackson Turner Award from the Organization of American Historians.  His second book, The Jefferson Rule: Why We Think the Founding Fathers Have All the Answers, will be published in May of next year.

Rick Perlstein is the author of Before the Storm: Barry Goldwater and the Unmaking of the American ConsensusNixonland: The Rise of a President and the Fracturing of America, and The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan. A frequent blogger and essayist for publications including the NationRolling Stone, and the New Republic, he lives in Chicago.

Michael J. Kramer holds a visiting assistant professorship at Northwestern University, where he teaches history, American studies, digital humanities, and civic engagement and works an editor in the Design, Publications, and New Media Department at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. His book, The Republic of Rock: Music and Citizenship in the Sixties Counterculture, was published by Oxford University Press in 2013. He is the co-founder of the Northwestern University Digital Humanities Laboratory and is currently developing a multimedia project about the Berkeley Folk Music Festival (1958-1970) and the history of technology and culture in the US folk revival. Additionally, he serves as director of the Chicago Dance History Project, a large-scale oral history and archival digital documentation of dance in the Chicago region, and he is the dramaturg for The Seldoms Contemporary Dance Company. He blogs about art, culture, and politics at Culture Rover.

Christopher Shannon is associate professor of history at Christendom College in Front Royal, Virginia.  He is the author of two book in the field of U.S. Intellectual History, Conspicuous Criticism:  Tradition, the Individual and Culture in Modern American Social Thought (Johns Hopkins, 1996) and A World Made Safe for Differences:  Cold War Intellectuals and the Politics of Identity (Rowman and Littlefield, 2001).  His forthcoming work, The Past as Pilgrimage:  Narrative, Tradition and the Renewal of Catholic History (Christendom Press, 2014), co-authored with Christopher Blum, addresses the relation between faith traditions and the ideology of secularism in the writing of history.

Susan Curtis is Professor of History and American Studies at Purdue University.  She is the author of A Consuming Faith(1991), Dancing to a Black Man’s Tune (1994), The First Black Actors on the Great White Way (1998), Colored Memories(2008), and the co-author of a letter to Purdue President Mitch Daniels challenging his support for efforts to ban the work of Howard Zinn from Indiana public schools (2013).

REPOSTED FROM S-USIH

Reception and Lecture | “Cadaver, Speak: Poems from the Dissection Lab” by Marianne Boruch on Oct. 30

Cadaver SpeakMarianne Boruch, “Cadaver, Speak: Poems from the Dissection Lab”
October 30, 2014
Reception: 6:00, Performance: 7:00-8:30
IUPUI Emerson Hall, Auditorium, EH 304
545 Barnhill Dr.

Some books begin as a dare to the self. Marianne Boruch’s newest collection, Cadaver, Speak, is an unsettling double, a heart of two chambers. The first half is attuned to history — how time hits us, and grief — and to art and its making. The second half, the title sequence, is spoken by a ninety-nine-year-old who donated her body for dissection by medical students, a laboratory experience in which the poet, duly silenced, was privileged to take part. Born from lyric impulse, which is Boruch’s scalpel, her work examines love, death, beauty, and knowledge—the great subjects of poetry made new by a riveting reimagining.

Marianne Boruch was born in Chicago in 1950. She is the author of seven collections of poetry including The Book of Hours (Copper Canyon Press, 2011), two volumes of essays on poetry, and a memoir. After receiving her MFA from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, she founded the MFA program at Purdue University in 1987. In addition to teaching at Purdue University, she also teaches at the low-residency MFA program for Writers at Warren Wilson College. Her recent awards include the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award (2013), and a Fulbright/Visiting professorship at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.

Co-sponsored by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the Literature and Medicine Student Interest Group and the Department of Anatomy (IU School of Medicine), the Medical Humanities & Health Studies Program, and the Department of English (IU School of Liberal Arts).

Mike O’Connor presents “Two Santas: The Intellectual Roots of Conservative Tax Cutting”

A Commercial Republic Book Cover

Date: October 8, 2014
Time: 12:00-1:00
Location: IUPUI University Library 4115S (IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute)

“Tax-cutting is such a prominent concern among conservatives today that one could understandably believe it to be central to the meaning of conservatism. Yet this is not the case: during the middle of the twentieth century, conservatives were defined economically less by their hostility to taxes than by their commitment to balancing the federal budget. The shift between these two positions is largely the result of the influence of ‘supply-side’ economics, an intellectual orientation that arose in the 1970s as a response to a very specific set of economic circumstances. Once some conservatives noticed a political constituency for this position, however, their call to relieve the burden of taxes on the citizenry began to harden into an ideological position. The talk will explain the genesis of supply-side economics in the ‘stagflation’ of the 1970s and its conversion from an economic to a political doctrine in subsequent decades.”

Mike O’Connor is the author of A Commercial Republic: America’s Enduring Debate over Democratic Capitalism (Kansas, 2014). He has also published articles in Contemporary Pragmatism and The Sixties. O’Connor teaches at Georgia State University in Atlanta, and holds a Ph.D. in American studies from the University of Texas at Austin. He was one of the original bloggers at the U.S. Intellectual History website, and served as a founding officer of the Society for U.S. Intellectual History.

Upcoming Grant Deadlines for New Frontiers in the Arts & Humanities

IU Limestone SymbolThe IU Vice President for Research invites  proposals for the 2014-15 New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities grants program. The objective of the New Frontiers program is to help faculty members from all Indiana University campuses by supporting the initial stages of path-breaking and transformative programs of scholarly or creative activity in the arts and humanities.

In 2014–2015 there will be four funding programs:

New Frontiers of Creativity and Scholarship grants of up to $50,000 to assist in the development of innovative works of scholarship or creative activity (deadline October 15, 2014).

New Frontiers Experimentation grants of up to $15,000 to fund the very preliminary stages of new trajectories in research or creative activity (deadline January 15, 2015 and June 15, 2015).

New Frontiers/New Currents grants of to $20,000 to fund workshops, symposia, or small conferences with major distinguished thinkers on timely topics of significant and broad interest (deadlines February 2, 2015 and August 1, 2015).

New Frontiers Exploratory Travel Fellowships of up to $3,000 to support national and international travel for faculty pursuing new and innovative research projects (deadlines October 15, December 15, February 15, April 15).

The full Request for Proposals, with further information about each of these programs, is available on-line at: http://research.iu.edu/funding_newfrontiers.shtml

All proposals must be submitted electronically, via the online application form at the address above.

If you have questions about the New Frontiers program, please review the RFP and the Frequently Asked Questions available at http://research.iu.edu/funding_newfrontiers.shtml, or contact Faith Kirkham Hawkins, Chief of Staff to the Vice President for Research (fhawkins@iu.edu).

If you would like help preparing your proposal or if are looking for collaborators, please feel free to contact the Director of the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, Jason M. Kelly, at iahi@iupui.edu

TEDxIndianapolis and the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute Team Up for Free Ticket Giveway

TEDxIndianapolis and Entanglements LectureTEDxIndianapolis and the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute have teamed up for a free ticket giveaway for two inspiring and entertaining events during the month of October.

Just tweet or retweet this announcement between September 3 and September 8 with the hashtag #IAHITEDx, and you will be entered into our drawing to win a ticket to the Entanglements Lecture on October 8 and a ticket to TEDxIndianapolis on October 21.

The Entanglements Lecture is a new series that brings together scientists, humanists, and artists to discuss “big questions” that affect all of us.  At the inaugural event on October 8, E.O. Wilson, two-time Pulitzer Prize winning biologist and recipient of the TED Prize, will join Katherine Hayles, specialist in the culture of cyborgs and virtual bodies, in a conversation that will take us on a journey to answer one of humanity’s most fundamental questions: “What makes us human?”

TEDxIndianapolis is a self-organized, local platform to share big, TED-like ideas. Organized by Jim Walker with the incredible support of partners, sponsors, and volunteers, this year’s TEDxIndianapolis will explore the theme Get Outside IN at Hilbert Circle Theatre on October 21, 2014. Tickets are on sale now. More than 500 people attended the first TEDxIndianapolis, DESIGN LEARNING, at the Indianapolis Museum of Art in 2012 (photos here/videos here). And more than 1,200 people converged at last year’s TEDxIndianapolis, held on October 22, 2013, at the Hilbert Circle Theatre. It was a day of Big Ideas, conversation, and inspiration related to the theme of MIX IT UP, a rousing mashup of local and national speakers and performers, plus recorded TED talks and engaging interactive experiences. Read more about the 2013 TEDxIndianapolis in last year’s event wrap-up.

More event details are below.


Entanglements Lecture Series
E.O. Wilson and Katherine Hayles, “What Makes us Human?”
October 8, 2014 | 7:00-8:45
Indianapolis Central Library, Clowes Auditorium
$35 general admission | $15 students

When did we become human? Are human and animal societies that much different? Do we already live in an age of cyborgs?

E.O. Wilson and Katherine Hayles visit Indianapolis as part of the new IAHI Entanglements Lecture Series.  Entanglements brings together scientists, humanists, and artists to discuss “big questions” that affect all of us.

At our inaugural event, E.O. Wilson, two-time Pulitzer Prize winning biologist, will join Katherine Hayles, specialist in the culture of cyborgs and virtual bodies, in a conversation that will take us on a journey to answer one of humanity’s most fundamental questions: “What makes us human?”

Over the course of this evening, Wilson and Hayles will discuss the evolution of human consciousness, the relationship between biology, society, culture, and technology, and the future of humanity.  This will be an event that changes the way you think about yourself and your world.

EO WilsonDr. E.O. Wilson is Professor Emeritus and Honorary Curator in Entomology at Harvard University.  He is a two time Pulitzer Prize winner, a National Medal of Science awardee, a Crafoord Prize recipient (given by the Academy in fields of science it does not cover by the Nobel Prize), and a TED Prize Winner.  In fact, he has received over 100 awards throughout his career. He is the author of numerous books, including SociobiologyThe AntsThe Diversity of Life,ConsilienceThe Social Conquest of Earth, and Letters to a Young Scientist.  During his career he has explored the biggest questions through the littlest creatures — ants. He is a prominent environmental advocate, and in March 2014, the government of Mozambique opened the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Laboratory in Gorongosa National Park — a tribute to Wilson’s worldwide impact.

Katherine HaylesDr. Katherine Hayles is Professor of Literature at Duke University.  Her book, How We Became Posthuman, published in 1999, was named one of the best 25 books of 1999 by The Village Voice and received the Rene Wellek Prize for Best Book in Literary Theory.  She is the author of multiple books, including The Cosmic Web, Chaos Bound, Writing Machines, How We Think, and My Mother Was a Computer.  A recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, two NEH Fellowships, a Rockefeller Residential Fellowship, and a National Humanities Center Fellowship, Dr. Hayles  is a leading social and literary critic with interests in cyborg anthropology, digital humanities, electronic literature, science and technology, science fiction, and critical theory.

The Entanglements Lecture Series is made possible through the generous support of the Efroymson Family Fund, the IU School of Dentistry, and the Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute.

This event is a collaboration between the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, Indiana Humanities, and the Spirit and Place Festival.

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TEDxIndianapolis
October 21, 2014 | 8:00-5:30
Hilbert Circle Theater
$69 early bird admission | $79 after Sept. 30

Like all TEDx events, TEDxIndianapolis is a self-organized, local platform to share big, TED-like ideas. Organized by Jim Walker with the incredible support of partners, sponsors, and volunteers, this year’s TEDxIndianapolis will explore the theme Get Outside IN at Hilbert Circle Theatre on October 21, 2014.Tickets are on sale now. 

More than 500 people attended the first TEDxIndianapolis, DESIGN LEARNING, at the Indianapolis Museum of Art in 2012 (photos here/videos here). And more than 1,200 people converged at last year’s TEDxIndianapolis, held on October 22, 2013, at the Hilbert Circle Theatre. It was a day of Big Ideas, conversation, and inspiration related to the theme of MIX IT UP, a rousing mashup of local and national speakers and performers, plus recorded TED talks and engaging interactive experiences. Read more about the 2013 TEDxIndianapolis in last year’s event wrap-up.

 

Claire Potter on Academics and the University of Facebook

DATE: 13 October 2014
TIME:
11:00-12:00
LOCATION:
IUPUI Campus Center, Room 268
Tickets are free, but registration is required.

Dr. Claire Potter, “The University of Facebook”

What role does social media play in our careers as activist academics who are, to paraphrase psychologist Sherry Turkle, increasingly “alone together?” Social media is playing a crucial role in weaving together networks of academics across the oundaries of region, institutional status, and field. Conversations on Facebook simulate the comfort zone of the faculty lounge or the cocktail party after a Dr. Claire Potterdistinguished lecture. People share gossip, humor and express political views that merge with their scholarly interests.  But if crowd-sourcing a syllabus has the enormous advantage of staying in minute-by-minute contact with colleagues, what are the rules? And, if one’s house is no longer easily separated from one’s work space, under what conditions do we need to imagine our utterances on social media as occurring in the workplace too? Do academics have a lot to learn from teenagers?

About Dr. Claire Potter

Dr. Claire Bond Potter has been Professor of History at The New School for Public Engagement since 2012. She has a BA in English Literature from Yale University and a Ph.D. in History from New York University.

Dr. Potter is the author of War on Crime: Bandits, G-Men and the Politics of Mass Culture (Rutgers University Press, 1998) and an editor, with Renee Romano, of Doing Recent History: On Privacy, Copyright, Video Games, Institutional Review Boards, Activist Scholarship, and History That Talks Back (University of Georgia Press, 2012).  She is currently writing a political history of anti-pornography campaigns, Beyond Pornography: Feminism, the Reagan Revolution and the Politics of Gender Violence, and a collection of essays on academia in the digital age, Digital U: Why Crowdsourcing, Social Media, Word Press and Google Hangouts Could Save the Historical Profession.

Since 2007 Dr. Potter has written at Tenured Radical, a blog that moved to The Chronicle of Higher Education in July 2011.

With Renee Romano of Oberlin College, Dr. Potter edits a book series, Since 1970: Histories of Contemporary America, for the University of Georgia Press. Dr. Potter also serves on the editorial board of the Journal of the History of Sexuality and is a co-director of OutHistory.org, re-launching its new website in October 2013.

E.O. Wilson and Katherine Hayles “What Makes us Human?”

Entanglements Lecture Series
E.O. Wilson and Katherine Hayles, “What Makes us Human?”
October 8, 2014 | 7:00-8:45
Indianapolis Central Library, Clowes Auditorium
Click here for free tickets

When did we become human? Are human and animal societies that much different? Do we already live in an age of cyborgs?

E.O. Wilson and Katherine Hayles visit Indianapolis as part of the new IAHI Entanglements Lecture Series.  Entanglements brings together scientists, humanists, and artists to discuss “big questions” that affect all of us.

At our inaugural event, E.O. Wilson, two-time Pulitzer Prize winning biologist, will join Katherine Hayles, specialist in the culture of cyborgs and virtual bodies, in a conversation that will take us on a journey to answer one of humanity’s most fundamental questions: “What makes us human?”

Over the course of this evening, Wilson and Hayles will discuss the evolution of human consciousness, the relationship between biology, society, culture, and technology, and the future of humanity.  This will be an event that changes the way you think about yourself and your world.

EO WilsonDr. E.O. Wilson is Professor Emeritus and Honorary Curator in Entomology at Harvard University.  He is a two time Pulitzer Prize winner, a National Medal of Science awardee, a Crafoord Prize recipient (given by the Academy in fields of science it does not cover by the Nobel Prize), and a TED Prize Winner.  In fact, he has received over 100 awards throughout his career. He is the author of numerous books, including Sociobiology, The Ants, The Diversity of Life, Consilience, The Social Conquest of Earth, and Letters to a Young Scientist.  During his career he has explored the biggest questions through the littlest creatures — ants. He is a prominent environmental advocate, and in March 2014, the government of Mozambique opened the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Laboratory in Gorongosa National Park — a tribute to Wilson’s worldwide impact.

Katherine HaylesDr. Katherine Hayles is Professor of Literature at Duke University.  Her book, How We Became Posthuman, published in 1999, was named one of the best 25 books of 1999 by The Village Voice and received the Rene Wellek Prize for Best Book in Literary Theory.  She is the author of multiple books, including The Cosmic Web, Chaos Bound, Writing Machines, How We Think, and My Mother Was a Computer.  A recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, two NEH Fellowships, a Rockefeller Residential Fellowship, and a National Humanities Center Fellowship, Dr. Hayles  is a leading social and literary critic with interests in cyborg anthropology, digital humanities, electronic literature, science and technology, science fiction, and critical theory.

The Entanglements Lecture Series is made possible through the generous support of the Efroymson Family Fund, the IU School of Dentistry, and the Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute.

This event is a collaboration between the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, Indiana Humanities, and the Spirit and Place Festival.

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Randa Jarrar, Award-Winning Novelist, Coming to IUPUI

A Map of HomeAs part of the Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here Symposium, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute in collaboration with the IUPUI Library and the Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series invites you to join us on the evening of November 17 for a presentation by Randa Jarrar.

Time: 7:00-8:30 pm
Date: November 17, 2014
Location: Basile Auditorium, Eskenazi Hall (Herron School of Art and Design)
Tickets are free, but registration is required.

Randa Jarrar is an award-winning novelist, short story writer, essayist, and translator. In 2010, a collaborative project between the Hay Festival, Beirut UNESCO’s World Book Capital 2009 celebrations, Banipal magazine and the British Council recognized her as a member of the Beirut39 — 39 of the world’s most promising Arab writers under the age of 39.

Jarrar grew up in Kuwait and Egypt, and moved to the US after the first Gulf War.  Her first novel, A Map of Home, has been published in half a dozen languages and won a Hopwood Award, an Arab-American Book Award, and was named one of the best novels of 2008 by the Barnes and Noble Review.

Her work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The Utne Reader, Salon.com, Guernica, The Rumpus, The Oxford American, Ploughshares, Five Chapters, and others. She has received fellowships from the Civitella Ranieri Foundation, Hedgebrook, Caravansarai, and Eastern Frontier.

About Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here at IUPUI

On March 5, 2007, in the middle of the Iraq war, a car bomb killed dozens and injured over a hundred people.  It also devastated al-Mutanabbi Street, a busy avenue of cafés and bookstores that had served as a meeting place for generations of writers and thinkers.  In response to the attack, San Francisco bookseller Beau Beausoleil rallied a community of international artists and writers to produce “Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here,” a collection of letterpress-printed broadsides (poster-like works on paper), artists’ books (unique works of art in book form) and an anthology of writing focused on expressing solidarity with Iraqi booksellers, writers and readers.

“Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here” includes 260 artists’ books; a publication titled “Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here: Poets and Writers Respond to the March 5, 2007, Bombing of Baghdad’s ‘Street of the Booksellers,’” plus 130 broadsides — one for every person killed or injured in the bombing.  Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will serve as one of only three repositories in the world to hold the complete collection.  It will also sponsor three biennial conferences to explore the themes and implications of the collection through papers, panels, posters and presentations with international scholars, artists and writers from a range of disciplines.