The Mirror of Landscape: An Interactive Discussion with Rebecca Allan and Jason M. Kelly

The Mirror of Landscape AdvertDate: June 4, 2015
Time: 7 pm
Location: DeBoest Lecture Hall, Indianapolis Museum of Art
Tickets are free and available here

Landscape painting has long provided humans with an artistic form for contemplating the relationship between nature, society, and culture. It is a profoundly engaging and intellectually powerful mode of expression that has served a host of purposes over the last 300 years — from buttressing social hierarchy to criticizing injustice to highlighting scientific discovery to expressing human hopes and anxieties.

In this interactive discussion, New York based artist Rebecca Allan and Dr. Jason M. Kelly, Associate Professor of History and Director of the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, will engage the audience in a conversation about the role of landscape painting in mediating our relationship with the environment and with each other. We will explore five paintings, created between 1750 and 2015. The discussion will end in a visit to the IMA’s Pont-Aven gallery to examine Paul Gauguin’s Flageolet Player on the Cliff.

Presented by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the Indianapolis Museum of Art, and the Rivers of the Anthropocene Project.

Pleasant Run Walk and Sketch

Rebecca AllanIn this engaging nature walk, New York based artist Rebecca Allan and Tom Swinford, Assistant Division Director of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, will lead participants in creating nature drawings and poetry while learning about the ecology of Pleasant Run. Encouraging us to connect to and reflect on this important Indianapolis waterway, this event will culminate in the on-site creation of an electronic book of artwork, photos, and poetry.

We will meet at the Barth Avenue Bridge along the Pleasant Run Trail at 10:00 am. Street parking is available along Barth Avenue. A map is available here.

This event is free and all materials will be provided to participants.

This event is sponsored by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the Rivers of the Anthropocene Project, Big Car, Reconnecting to Our Waterways, Prizm: The Artist’s Supply Store, the Butler University Center for Urban Ecology, Earth Charter Indiana, and the da Vinci Pursuit.

Register here:

Co-sponsors:

Scholarships Available for the 2015 Humanities Intensive Learning and Teaching (HILT) Institute

We are pleased to announce that the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute will offer four full scholarships to the 2015 Humanities Intensive Learning and Teaching (HILT) Institute which will take place on IUPUI’s campus from Monday, July 27th through Friday, July 31st.

To apply for the scholarship, please send a 1-2 page letter of application to iahi@iupui.edu by May 22. In the letter, clearly outline how attendance at the HILT Institute will assist you in your current or future research or professional development in the arts or humanities. Please attach a 2-page CV to the email.

All full-time tenured and tenure-eligible faculty from all schools and units at IUPUI are eligible to apply. Under certain circumstances, non-tenure-track faculty members whose evaluation criteria include research or creative activity may also be eligible with an explanation in a letter of support from their chair or dean.

Please see the list of courses below. For additional information and detail on the events and schedule, click here.

HILT 2015 is sponsored by the Center for Digital Scholarship at the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis University Library, the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities at the University of Maryland, and MATRIX: Center for Digital Humanities and Social Sciences at Michigan State University.     

 

HILT LogoCROWDSOURCING CULTURAL HERITAGE

led by Mia Ridge and Ben BrumfieldSuccessful crowdsourcing projects help organizations connect with audiences who enjoy engaging with their content and tasks, whether transcribing handwritten documents, correcting OCR errors, identifying animals on the Serengeti or folding proteins. Conversely, poorly-designed crowdsourcing projects find it difficult to attract or retain participants. This class will present international case studies of best practice crowdsourcing projects to illustrate the range of tasks that can be crowdsourced, the motivations of participants and the characteristics of well-designed projects. We’ll study crowdsourcing projects from the worlds of citizen science, investigative journalism, genealogy and free culture to look for lessons which might apply to humanities projects. We’ll discuss models for quality control over user-generated projects, explore the cross-overs between traditional in-house volunteer projects internet-enabled crowdsourcing, and look at the numbers behind real-world projects. Finally, the course will give students hands-on experience with several different crowdsourcing platforms for image annotation, manuscript transcription, and OCR correction. Students are encouraged to bring their project ideas and some scanned material for the lab sessions.

DE/POST/COLONIAL DIGITAL HUMANITIES

led by Roopika Risam and micha cárdenas

“…we must discuss, we must invent…”
—Frantz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth

From Sandra Harding’s interventions in postcolonial science studies to Radhika Gajjala’s articulation of digital subalternity to Kavita Philip’s work on postcolonial computing, postcolonial approaches to technology have provoked lively discussion. New conversations have emerged around essential questions: can the digital be “decolonized?”; what are the limits of decolonial, postcolonial, or anti-colonial approaches to digital cultures?; and how can these theoretical approaches be marshaled to build communities, tools, and justice?Together, we will explore these questions at the intersections of theory and praxis as we consider how tools can be theorized, hacked, and used in service of decolonization. This course undertakes this task through three goals: 1) learning about, understanding, analyzing the history and present processes of colonization, decolonization, neocolonialism and the postcolonial, with attention to local, hemispheric and global contexts; 2) analyzing digital technologies, with attention to how they intersect with humanities disciplines such as art, literature and performance, and how they produce, reproduce or enact processes of colonization; and 3) inventing new and/or alternative technologies, or new uses of existing technologies, that work against colonization and post-colonial legacies that maintain social injustice.

Our days will be spent engaging with theory, hands-on experimentation, and reflection on practice. Theoretical topics may include digital labor, subalternity, embodiment, and aesthetics. Applied activities may include Scalar-based game design, mobile media/film/photography, digital exhibits, and mapping. In the spirit of our theoretical approach, we emphasize accessiblity and low-cost technology, as well as creativity and interpretation. Therefore, no prior experience with theory or practice is required, just an openness to discuss and invent the theories and practices of De/Post/Colonial Digital Humanities.

DIGITAL ACCESSIBILITY: DESIGNING AND ADAPTING PROJECTS FOR ALL USERS

led by George Williams and Erin Templeton

In order to successfully reach a wide audience, digital projects must take into account the variety of potential users and their diverse needs.. Not everyone accesses information in the same way, though we often assume otherwise. For example, people with disabilities of many different kinds–sensory, physical, and cognitive–represent a significant percentage of users for many digital projects, but most of these projects are designed without thinking about accessibility. However, digital humanists can ensure that they are designing for all users by taking accessibility into account from the beginning of a project. And existing projects can be adapted to improve their accessibility.

This course will take a two-fold approach: students will read and discuss key works from disability studies scholarship in order to consider various applications for the digital humanities; these readings will form a critical framework for students’ hands-on work with tools that enable them to evaluate and create scholarly digital resources. Mornings will involve readings-based discussions on topics such as emerging standards for accessibility in digital environments, the social model of disability, user-centered design, and embodiment. Afternoons will be reserved for guided individual exercises and small-group work. Students are encouraged to bring their own projects or project ideas in order to evaluate them for accessibility and to make or plan changes as appropriate. Knowledge of and experience with web design is not required, but curiosity and a willingness to learn are a necessity.

DIGITAL PEDAGOGY AND NETWORKED LEARNING

led by Lee Skallerup-Bessette and Jesse Stommel

Many argue digital humanities is about building stuff and sharing stuff, reframing the work we do in the humanities as less consumptive and more curatorial—less solitary and more collaborative. In this workshop, participants will experiment with ways technology can be used to build learning communities within the classroom, while also thinking about how we can connect our students to a much larger global classroom. We’ll start at the level of the syllabus, thinking about how we organize and structure hybrid courses and digital assignments, before delving into specific tools and critical orientations to technology.

Participants should expect that the workshop will be hands-on, collaborative, and iterative; we will be using and building, experimenting with the pedagogy we are learning, making our learning environment as we go. The course has no prerequisites. We will work together across skill levels, experimenting with new tools, while adapting and remixing our pedagogies. This isn’t about digital tricks or gimmicks, but a profound re-examination of how we teach. The best digital tools inspire us, often to use them in ways the designer couldn’t anticipate. The worst digital tools attempt to dictate our pedagogies, determining what we can do with them and for whom. The digital pedagogue teaches her tools, doesn’t let them teach her.

DIGITAL STORYTELLING

led by Jarom McDonald

When YouTube launched to the public in 2005, the now-ubiquitous red play-button logo contained a simple yet powerful tagline, “Broadcast Yourself.” Inherent in such an imperative is a concept that’s at the core of this course — in today’s wired world, digital video is a powerful storytelling medium, one that can influence constructions of identity, community, culture, and the nature of narrative itself. In this course, we’ll explore the interactivity and narrative of digital video by positioning it as a tool for seeing, exploring, expressing and critiquing within the digital Humanities.

We will look at the various forms of dynamic storytelling, investigate the history of the video medium and what bearing it plays on the broadcast zeitgeist of today, explore formal techniques of digital storytelling including subjectivity, sequencing and transitioning, rhythm and repetition, interactivity, linearity, and meta-narration, tackle analytic tasks such as video annotation and video data analysis, and grapple with the physics of representing moving images in digital form. We will also emphasize, in addition to understanding the theories and specificities of digital video, how we might start acquiring production skills — including exposure to multimedia editing tools, working with codecs and compression, and, of course, leveraging online video dissemination channels such as YouTube. Ultimately, this class allows for students to begin to develop a critical perspective of engaging with digital video in the Humanities as a way to articulate fundamental, narrative-driven application of these rapidly changing paradigms.

Students will need to bring with them a new-ish laptop and a cell-phone (or other portable device) capable of shooting video, but no other equipment is needed nor knowledge assumed.

GETTING STARTED WITH DATA, TOOLS, AND PLATFORMS

led by Brandon Locke, Thomas Padilla, and Dean Rehberger

Starting a digital humanities research project can be quite intimidating. This course is designed to make that process less so by exploring tools and platforms that support digital humanities research, analysis, and publication. We will begin by reframing sources as data that enable digital research. We will work throughout the week on approaches to (1) finding, evaluating, and acquiring (2) cleaning and preparing (3) exploring (4) analyzing (5) communicating and sharing data. Emphasis will be placed across all stages on how to manage a beginner digital research project in such a way that helps to ensure that your project remains accessible, that the process is well documented, and that the data are reusable.

Throughout this course, we will examine several existing projects, and move through the process of collecting, cleaning, and structuring humanities data and sources and plugging them into tools and platforms to analyze, visualize, share, and publish the data and analysis. Exploration of these stages of project-building will include a technical walk-through, as well as an examination of the tools and their underlying methodologies. Participants are strongly encouraged to bring their own research material to work with, but sample data will be provided.

HUMANITIES DATA CURATION PRAXIS

led by Trevor Muñoz and Katie Rawson

This course is for people who have or are making textured, rich humanities data and want to be able to use, share, and preserve their information. We will take a multi-faceted approach to the challenges of curating data that integrates

* immediate, practical concerns of preparing, transforming, and analyzing data,
* strategic tasks of mapping data models and developing maintenance plans,
* and foundational thinking about the role of data curation in research.

We will move between hands-on work with data sets and tools to discussions about the nature of data curation. Working with the tools like IPython notebooks and OpenRefine and with open data sets in a variety of formats from institutions like the Metropolitan Museum and the Digital Public Library of America, we will explore topics such as defining data quality and identifying data problems; translating data models between different systems; developing best practices for data reuse and interchange. Participants will be able to use data from their own research or work with practice sets we will supply.

We ask that people who take this course have some experience using open source software, including reading technical documentation and help forums, and that they have a basic understanding of programming (e.g. what is a variable, some familiarity with loops, etc.). Please contact the instructors if you need guidance in attaining these prerequisites in time for HILT.

HUMANITIES PROGRAMMING

led by Brandon Walsh and Wayne Graham

This course focuses on introducing participants to humanities programming through the creation and use of the Ruby on Rails web application framework. This course will introduce programming and design concepts, project management and planning, workflow, as well as the design, implementation, and deployment of a web-based application. Technologies covered in this course will include git, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Ruby, Rails, and relational (and non-relational) data stores. Over the course of the week, we will work through the practical implementation of a developing and deploying a small-scale web application.

LARGE-SCALE TEXT ANALYSIS WITH “R”

led by Mark Algee-Hewitt

Text mining, the practice of using computational and statistical analysis on large collections of digitized text, is becoming an increasingly important way of extracting meaning from writing. Whether working on survey data, medical records, political speeches or even digitized collections of historical writing, we are now able to use the power of computational algorithms to extract patterns from vast quantities of textual data. This technique gives us information we could never access by simply reading the texts. But determining which patterns have meaning and which answer key questions about our data is a difficult task, both conceptually and methodologically; particularly for those who work in the humanities who are able to benefit the most from these methods.

Large-Scale Text Analysis with R will provide an introduction to the methods of text mining using the open source software Environment “R”. In this course, we will explore the different methods through which text mining can be used to “read” text in new ways: including authorship attribution, sentiment analysis, genre studies and named entity extraction. At the same time, our focus will also be on the analysis and interpretation of our results. How do we formulate research questions and hypothesis about text that can be answered quantitatively? Which methods fit particular needs best? And how can we use the numerical output of a text analysis to explain features of the texts in ways that make sense to a wider audience?

While no programming experience is required, students should have basic computer skills and be familiar with their computer’s file system. Participants will be given a “sample corpora” to use in class exercises, but some class time will be available for independent work and participants are encouraged to bring their own text corpora and research questions so they may apply their newly learned skills to projects of their own.

PROJECT DEVELOPMENT

led by Simon Appleford and Jennifer Guiliano

This course will explore the fundamentals of project planning and design including, but not limited to: formulating appropriate disciplinary questions for digital humanities research, investigating digital humanities tools and resources, structuring your first project, critical path scheduling, understanding roles and responsibilities, risk management, documenting your project work, writing your first grant proposal, budget setting and controls, building the project team, and selecting and implementing project management tools and software.

This is an advanced course and, as such, you are expected to have an understanding of the definition of digital humanities. Materials will be covered through lectures, discussions, presentations, and hands-on activities. Participants will get the most from the course if they arrive with at least some sense of a potential digital humanities project that they would like to develop throughout the week.

Workshop: Introduction to Databases for the Digital Humanities

Michael Mandiberg. Database at Postmasters, March 2009. CC BY-SA 2.0 https://www.flickr.com/photos/theredproject/3332644561/sizes/lMay 19, 2015
2-4 pm
IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, IUPUI Library room UL 4115P
Free Registration

Databases are becoming increasingly important to research projects in the humanities. From storing to structuring to analyzing our digitized corpuses and data sets, databases provide humanists with a powerful tool to ask new questions and to discover new answers to old questions. But, where does the scholar who is new to databases begin?

This workshop will introduce you to the basics of database design for humanities research. You will learn on SQLite (http://sqlite.org), a flexible and versatile open source database engine that is the most widely deployed SQL database engine in the world.

What will you learn in this workshop

  • Database concepts
  • How common data manipulation/cleaning tasks can be accomplished in SQLite
  • How to import vast amounts of data in SQLite
  • How to query data from SQLite
  • How to use SQLite’s full feature set (e.g. full-text search and geospatial data store) to simplify analysis

What will you need?

  • A personal laptop with internet connection
  • Data used for the demonstration will be provided. You are welcome to bring your own data sets

Gallery Talk and Reception for Rebecca Allan: Fjord/Glacier/River

Rebecca Allan's ArtworkReception
April 2, 2015 | 5:30-7:30
Basile Gallery, Eskenazi Hall

Gallery Talk
April 2, 2015 | 6:30-7:00
Basile Gallery, Eskenazi Hall

Fjord/Glacier/River presents Rebecca Allan’s most recent paintings which have emerged from her travels in Norway. In Geirangerfjord, Allan made extensive drawings and studies of the waterfalls, rocks, and night skies that distinguish this majestic World Heritage site. These paintings reflect a response to the Norwegian landscape which is both exuberant and joyful but also reminds us of how urgent it is to preserve and protect our Earth’s natural resources, especially its water. Fjord/Glacier/River is presented by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute (iahi.iupui.edu) and the Rivers of the Anthropocene Project (rivers.iupui.edu).

Known for her richly layered and chromatically nuanced abstract paintings, Rebecca Allan has for many years concentrated on rivers and watershed environments as primary sources of investigation. Her work explores the ecology, meteorology, and geology of the Northeast, Pacific Northwest, and the Gulf Coast, among other sites. Working from a studio that overlooks the confluence of the Harlem and Hudson Rivers in The Bronx, Allan is inspired by a deep appreciation for the beauty of the natural environment overlaid with an awareness of its fragility and endangerment.

Exhibiting in the United States and abroad for more than 25 years, Allan’s most recent solo exhibitions were presented at Hudson Opera House Gallery (Hudson, New York), ArtLab78 (New York), The American Church in Paris, Ringling College of Art and Design/Longboat Key Center for the Arts; Seattle Art Museum Gallery; John Davis Gallery (Hudson, NY); and Gallery 2/20 (New York).  Allan has been a Fellow at the Hermitage Artist Retreat, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, and Dorland Mountain Arts Colony.  She received her MFA from Kent State University and BA from Allegheny College. From 2006 to 2014 she was Head of Education at the Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, Design History, and Material Culture in New York City.

Artist’s Statement

“My paintings are rooted in the dramatic cycles of nature as well as a deep curiosity about science, and the forces underlying what we observe on the surface of things. Even when it is grounded in the visible world, a painting is a sensual invention that conflates real and conjured experiences. Rivers, glaciers, and fjords are central to this dialogue with nature and culture. They are complex arteries of history, culture, commerce, and ecology. This exhibition explores my relationship to particular landscapes from Norway to the Atlantic Northeast.

My process involves mixing pigments and layer color over time, in response to observed and felt experience. The language of color is a sanctuary within which the questions and problems of artmaking — indeed, of life — are confronted. I work within a transcendental American landscape tradition that includes painters such as Frederic Church, Charles Burchfield, Joan Mitchell, and Neil Welliver but I also draw from the works of Renaissance masters such as Giovanni di Paola and Pieter Breughel in my desire to invent a new, cosmological landscape.”

Co-sponsored by the Herron School of Art and Design and Sun King Brewing.

Workshop: Social Media for Scholars

Ray HaberskiMarch 11, 2015 | 12:00-2:30
University Library, Room 2120
755 W. Michigan St.

Twitter. Facebook. Instagram. Reddit.  What do these platforms have to do with scholarly research?  As it turns out, quite a bit.  Scholars are turning to these platforms to expand the reach of their work — communicating with networks of specialists, students, and non-specialists alike.  In this workshop, attendees will learn about the various social media platforms and how to use them in a scholarly capacity.  Skills learned in this workshop will have relevance to research, teaching, and public engagement.

Dr. Ray Haberski, Director of the American Studies Program and a Professor of History in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, will lead this workshop.

Co-sponsored by the IUPUI Library Center for Digital Scholarship.

Jürgen Overhoff, “On Benjamin Franklin, Clemens Vonnegut, and other Transatlantic Travelers: Why German-American Educational History Matters”

Juergen OverhoffMarch 10, 2015 | 12:00-2:00
IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, IUPUI Library, UL 4115P
755 W Michigan St.
Free tickets below

Contemporary education ideals in the United States and Germany are the product of a set of key values propagated in the age of enlightenment: self-responsibility and autonomy of the citizen, religious toleration, individual rights of freedom and a broad general education available to all people as a sign of their human dignity. This lecture examines the genesis and development of these ideals through the multifaceted interrelationships between German and American pedagogues, school founders, and educational theorists from the colonial period up to the 21st century. This common history helps us understand the shared values of a transatlantic community committed to common educational ideals in theory and practice.

Dr. Jürgen Overhoff is Professor of the History of Education in the Institute of Educational Sciences at the Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster

Co-sponsored by the Center for German-American Educational History (CGAEH), University of Münster, the IUPUI American Studies Program, the Max Kade Center at IUPUI, and the IUPUI German Department.

Lecture: Jacob Darwin Hamblin, “Arming Mother Nature: The Birth of Catastrophic Environmentalism”

Jacob HamblinApril 1, 2015 | 6:00-7:30
PrintText; 652 East 52nd Street, Indianapolis, IN 46205
Free tickets available below

When most Americans think of environmentalism, they think of the political left, of vegans dressed in organic-hemp fabric, lofting protest signs. In reality, writes Jacob Darwin Hamblin, the movement–and its dire predictions–owe more to the Pentagon than the counterculture. In Arming Mother Nature, Hamblin argues that military planning for World War III created “catastrophic environmentalism”: the idea that human activity might cause global natural disasters. This awareness, Hamblin shows, emerged out of dark ambitions, as governments poured funds into environmental science after World War II, searching for ways to harness natural processes–to kill millions of people. Proposals included the use of nuclear weapons to create artificial tsunamis or melt the ice caps to drown coastal cities; setting fire to vast expanses of vegetation; and changing local climates. Oxford botanists advised British generals on how to destroy enemy crops during the war in Malaya; American scientists attempted to alter the weather in Vietnam. This work raised questions that went beyond the goal of weaponizing nature. By the 1980s, the C.I.A. was studying the likely effects of global warming on Soviet harvests. Driven initially by strategic imperatives, Cold War scientists learned to think globally and to grasp humanity’s power to alter the environment. Arming Mother Nature changes our understanding of the history of the Cold War and the birth of modern environmental science.

Dr. Jacob Darwin Hamblin is Associate Professor of History of Science, Technology, and Environmental History at Oregon State University. His most recent publication is Arming Mother Nature: The Birth of Catastrophic Environmentalism, published by Oxford University Press in 2013. He has also published Poison in the Well: Radioactive Waste in the Oceans at the Dawn of the Nuclear Age, published by Rutgers University Press in 2008, and Oceanographers and the Cold War, published by University of Washington Press in 2005. Dr. Hamblin’s current work explores the promotion of nuclear-related science and technology so-called developing countries, blending the histories of science, environment, and international relations.

Co-sponsored by Earth Charter Indiana, PrintText, and NUVO.

The Future of the Arts and Humanities Roundtable: Keira Amstutz, William Blomquist, John Dichtl, Valerie Eickmeier, Jonathan Elmer, David Lawrence

Indiana Humanities LogoMarch 5, 2015 | 12:00-1:30
Location: Indiana Humanities, 1500 N. Delaware
Free tickets available soon (boxed lunches available for purchase)

Are the arts and humanities in crisis? What do financial cuts ultimately mean for arts and humanities institutions and their publics? What role should governments play in supporting the arts and humanities? What does the future look like for arts and humanities in this country and around the world? What functions do the arts and humanities provide in sustaining a democratic society?

This roundtable will discuss these and many other questions in this can’t-miss event featuring several of central Indiana’s leaders in the arts and humanities.

Keira Amstutz is the President and CEO of Indiana Humanities.

Dr. William Blomquist is the Dean of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Dr. John Dichtl is the Executive Director of the National Council on Public History and an Adjunct Assistant Professor in History in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Dr. Valerie Eickmeier is the Dean of the Herron School of Art and Design.

Dr. Jonathan Elmer is the Director of the College of Arts and Humanities Institute and a Professor of English at IU Bloomington.

David Lawrence is the President and CEO of the Arts Council of Indianapolis.

Digital Humanities Workshop: Caitlin Pollock, “Introduction to TEI”

February 11, 2015 | 12:00-2:30
Location: IUPUI University Library, Room 2120
Free tickets available below

Co-sponsored by the IUPUI Library Center for Digital Scholarship

The Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) sets the standards for text-encoding, born-digital editing, and digital humanities projects. It is the preferred format for granting agencies such as the National Endowment for the Humanities. TEI’s guidelines (TEI) define an XML format for textual materials represented in a digital form.

This workshop provides attendees with a hands-on introduction to basic text encoding with TEI. It assumes attendees have some basic knowledge of XML or other markup languages.