Upcoming Grant Deadlines for New Frontiers in the Arts & Humanities

IU Limestone SymbolThe IU Vice President for Research invites  proposals for the 2014-15 New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities grants program. The objective of the New Frontiers program is to help faculty members from all Indiana University campuses by supporting the initial stages of path-breaking and transformative programs of scholarly or creative activity in the arts and humanities.

In 2014–2015 there will be four funding programs:

New Frontiers of Creativity and Scholarship grants of up to $50,000 to assist in the development of innovative works of scholarship or creative activity (deadline October 15, 2014).

New Frontiers Experimentation grants of up to $15,000 to fund the very preliminary stages of new trajectories in research or creative activity (deadline January 15, 2015 and June 15, 2015).

New Frontiers/New Currents grants of to $20,000 to fund workshops, symposia, or small conferences with major distinguished thinkers on timely topics of significant and broad interest (deadlines February 2, 2015 and August 1, 2015).

New Frontiers Exploratory Travel Fellowships of up to $3,000 to support national and international travel for faculty pursuing new and innovative research projects (deadlines October 15, December 15, February 15, April 15).

The full Request for Proposals, with further information about each of these programs, is available on-line at: http://research.iu.edu/funding_newfrontiers.shtml

All proposals must be submitted electronically, via the online application form at the address above.

If you have questions about the New Frontiers program, please review the RFP and the Frequently Asked Questions available at http://research.iu.edu/funding_newfrontiers.shtml, or contact Faith Kirkham Hawkins, Chief of Staff to the Vice President for Research (fhawkins@iu.edu).

If you would like help preparing your proposal or if are looking for collaborators, please feel free to contact the Director of the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, Jason M. Kelly, at iahi@iupui.edu

TEDxIndianapolis and the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute Team Up for Free Ticket Giveway

TEDxIndianapolis and Entanglements LectureTEDxIndianapolis and the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute have teamed up for a free ticket giveaway for two inspiring and entertaining events during the month of October.

Just tweet or retweet this announcement between September 3 and September 8 with the hashtag #IAHITEDx, and you will be entered into our drawing to win a ticket to the Entanglements Lecture on October 8 and a ticket to TEDxIndianapolis on October 21.

The Entanglements Lecture is a new series that brings together scientists, humanists, and artists to discuss “big questions” that affect all of us.  At the inaugural event on October 8, E.O. Wilson, two-time Pulitzer Prize winning biologist and recipient of the TED Prize, will join Katherine Hayles, specialist in the culture of cyborgs and virtual bodies, in a conversation that will take us on a journey to answer one of humanity’s most fundamental questions: “What makes us human?”

TEDxIndianapolis is a self-organized, local platform to share big, TED-like ideas. Organized by Jim Walker with the incredible support of partners, sponsors, and volunteers, this year’s TEDxIndianapolis will explore the theme Get Outside IN at Hilbert Circle Theatre on October 21, 2014. Tickets are on sale now. More than 500 people attended the first TEDxIndianapolis, DESIGN LEARNING, at the Indianapolis Museum of Art in 2012 (photos here/videos here). And more than 1,200 people converged at last year’s TEDxIndianapolis, held on October 22, 2013, at the Hilbert Circle Theatre. It was a day of Big Ideas, conversation, and inspiration related to the theme of MIX IT UP, a rousing mashup of local and national speakers and performers, plus recorded TED talks and engaging interactive experiences. Read more about the 2013 TEDxIndianapolis in last year’s event wrap-up.

More event details are below.


Entanglements Lecture Series
E.O. Wilson and Katherine Hayles, “What Makes us Human?”
October 8, 2014 | 7:00-8:45
Indianapolis Central Library, Clowes Auditorium
$35 general admission | $15 students

When did we become human? Are human and animal societies that much different? Do we already live in an age of cyborgs?

E.O. Wilson and Katherine Hayles visit Indianapolis as part of the new IAHI Entanglements Lecture Series.  Entanglements brings together scientists, humanists, and artists to discuss “big questions” that affect all of us.

At our inaugural event, E.O. Wilson, two-time Pulitzer Prize winning biologist, will join Katherine Hayles, specialist in the culture of cyborgs and virtual bodies, in a conversation that will take us on a journey to answer one of humanity’s most fundamental questions: “What makes us human?”

Over the course of this evening, Wilson and Hayles will discuss the evolution of human consciousness, the relationship between biology, society, culture, and technology, and the future of humanity.  This will be an event that changes the way you think about yourself and your world.

EO WilsonDr. E.O. Wilson is Professor Emeritus and Honorary Curator in Entomology at Harvard University.  He is a two time Pulitzer Prize winner, a National Medal of Science awardee, a Crafoord Prize recipient (given by the Academy in fields of science it does not cover by the Nobel Prize), and a TED Prize Winner.  In fact, he has received over 100 awards throughout his career. He is the author of numerous books, including SociobiologyThe AntsThe Diversity of Life,ConsilienceThe Social Conquest of Earth, and Letters to a Young Scientist.  During his career he has explored the biggest questions through the littlest creatures — ants. He is a prominent environmental advocate, and in March 2014, the government of Mozambique opened the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Laboratory in Gorongosa National Park — a tribute to Wilson’s worldwide impact.

Katherine HaylesDr. Katherine Hayles is Professor of Literature at Duke University.  Her book, How We Became Posthuman, published in 1999, was named one of the best 25 books of 1999 by The Village Voice and received the Rene Wellek Prize for Best Book in Literary Theory.  She is the author of multiple books, including The Cosmic Web, Chaos Bound, Writing Machines, How We Think, and My Mother Was a Computer.  A recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, two NEH Fellowships, a Rockefeller Residential Fellowship, and a National Humanities Center Fellowship, Dr. Hayles  is a leading social and literary critic with interests in cyborg anthropology, digital humanities, electronic literature, science and technology, science fiction, and critical theory.

The Entanglements Lecture Series is made possible through the generous support of the Efroymson Family Fund, the IU School of Dentistry, and the Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute.

This event is a collaboration between the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, Indiana Humanities, and the Spirit and Place Festival.

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TEDxIndianapolis
October 21, 2014 | 8:00-5:30
Hilbert Circle Theater
$69 early bird admission | $79 after Sept. 30

Like all TEDx events, TEDxIndianapolis is a self-organized, local platform to share big, TED-like ideas. Organized by Jim Walker with the incredible support of partners, sponsors, and volunteers, this year’s TEDxIndianapolis will explore the theme Get Outside IN at Hilbert Circle Theatre on October 21, 2014.Tickets are on sale now. 

More than 500 people attended the first TEDxIndianapolis, DESIGN LEARNING, at the Indianapolis Museum of Art in 2012 (photos here/videos here). And more than 1,200 people converged at last year’s TEDxIndianapolis, held on October 22, 2013, at the Hilbert Circle Theatre. It was a day of Big Ideas, conversation, and inspiration related to the theme of MIX IT UP, a rousing mashup of local and national speakers and performers, plus recorded TED talks and engaging interactive experiences. Read more about the 2013 TEDxIndianapolis in last year’s event wrap-up.

 

Claire Potter on Academics and the University of Facebook

DATE: 13 October 2014
TIME:
11:00-12:00
LOCATION:
IUPUI Campus Center, Room 268
Tickets are free, but registration is required.

Dr. Claire Potter, “The University of Facebook”

What role does social media play in our careers as activist academics who are, to paraphrase psychologist Sherry Turkle, increasingly “alone together?” Social media is playing a crucial role in weaving together networks of academics across the oundaries of region, institutional status, and field. Conversations on Facebook simulate the comfort zone of the faculty lounge or the cocktail party after a Dr. Claire Potterdistinguished lecture. People share gossip, humor and express political views that merge with their scholarly interests.  But if crowd-sourcing a syllabus has the enormous advantage of staying in minute-by-minute contact with colleagues, what are the rules? And, if one’s house is no longer easily separated from one’s work space, under what conditions do we need to imagine our utterances on social media as occurring in the workplace too? Do academics have a lot to learn from teenagers?

About Dr. Claire Potter

Dr. Claire Bond Potter has been Professor of History at The New School for Public Engagement since 2012. She has a BA in English Literature from Yale University and a Ph.D. in History from New York University.

Dr. Potter is the author of War on Crime: Bandits, G-Men and the Politics of Mass Culture (Rutgers University Press, 1998) and an editor, with Renee Romano, of Doing Recent History: On Privacy, Copyright, Video Games, Institutional Review Boards, Activist Scholarship, and History That Talks Back (University of Georgia Press, 2012).  She is currently writing a political history of anti-pornography campaigns, Beyond Pornography: Feminism, the Reagan Revolution and the Politics of Gender Violence, and a collection of essays on academia in the digital age, Digital U: Why Crowdsourcing, Social Media, Word Press and Google Hangouts Could Save the Historical Profession.

Since 2007 Dr. Potter has written at Tenured Radical, a blog that moved to The Chronicle of Higher Education in July 2011.

With Renee Romano of Oberlin College, Dr. Potter edits a book series, Since 1970: Histories of Contemporary America, for the University of Georgia Press. Dr. Potter also serves on the editorial board of the Journal of the History of Sexuality and is a co-director of OutHistory.org, re-launching its new website in October 2013.

E.O. Wilson and Katherine Hayles “What Makes us Human?”

Entanglements Lecture Series
E.O. Wilson and Katherine Hayles, “What Makes us Human?”
October 8, 2014 | 7:00-8:45
Indianapolis Central Library, Clowes Auditorium
Click here for free tickets

When did we become human? Are human and animal societies that much different? Do we already live in an age of cyborgs?

E.O. Wilson and Katherine Hayles visit Indianapolis as part of the new IAHI Entanglements Lecture Series.  Entanglements brings together scientists, humanists, and artists to discuss “big questions” that affect all of us.

At our inaugural event, E.O. Wilson, two-time Pulitzer Prize winning biologist, will join Katherine Hayles, specialist in the culture of cyborgs and virtual bodies, in a conversation that will take us on a journey to answer one of humanity’s most fundamental questions: “What makes us human?”

Over the course of this evening, Wilson and Hayles will discuss the evolution of human consciousness, the relationship between biology, society, culture, and technology, and the future of humanity.  This will be an event that changes the way you think about yourself and your world.

EO WilsonDr. E.O. Wilson is Professor Emeritus and Honorary Curator in Entomology at Harvard University.  He is a two time Pulitzer Prize winner, a National Medal of Science awardee, a Crafoord Prize recipient (given by the Academy in fields of science it does not cover by the Nobel Prize), and a TED Prize Winner.  In fact, he has received over 100 awards throughout his career. He is the author of numerous books, including Sociobiology, The Ants, The Diversity of Life, Consilience, The Social Conquest of Earth, and Letters to a Young Scientist.  During his career he has explored the biggest questions through the littlest creatures — ants. He is a prominent environmental advocate, and in March 2014, the government of Mozambique opened the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Laboratory in Gorongosa National Park — a tribute to Wilson’s worldwide impact.

Katherine HaylesDr. Katherine Hayles is Professor of Literature at Duke University.  Her book, How We Became Posthuman, published in 1999, was named one of the best 25 books of 1999 by The Village Voice and received the Rene Wellek Prize for Best Book in Literary Theory.  She is the author of multiple books, including The Cosmic Web, Chaos Bound, Writing Machines, How We Think, and My Mother Was a Computer.  A recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, two NEH Fellowships, a Rockefeller Residential Fellowship, and a National Humanities Center Fellowship, Dr. Hayles  is a leading social and literary critic with interests in cyborg anthropology, digital humanities, electronic literature, science and technology, science fiction, and critical theory.

The Entanglements Lecture Series is made possible through the generous support of the Efroymson Family Fund, the IU School of Dentistry, and the Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute.

This event is a collaboration between the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, Indiana Humanities, and the Spirit and Place Festival.

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Randa Jarrar, Award-Winning Novelist, Coming to IUPUI

A Map of HomeAs part of the Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here Symposium, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute in collaboration with the IUPUI Library and the Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series invites you to join us on the evening of November 17 for a presentation by Randa Jarrar.

Time: 7:00-8:30 pm
Date: November 17, 2014
Location: Basile Auditorium, Eskenazi Hall (Herron School of Art and Design)
Tickets are free, but registration is required.

Randa Jarrar is an award-winning novelist, short story writer, essayist, and translator. In 2010, a collaborative project between the Hay Festival, Beirut UNESCO’s World Book Capital 2009 celebrations, Banipal magazine and the British Council recognized her as a member of the Beirut39 — 39 of the world’s most promising Arab writers under the age of 39.

Jarrar grew up in Kuwait and Egypt, and moved to the US after the first Gulf War.  Her first novel, A Map of Home, has been published in half a dozen languages and won a Hopwood Award, an Arab-American Book Award, and was named one of the best novels of 2008 by the Barnes and Noble Review.

Her work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The Utne Reader, Salon.com, Guernica, The Rumpus, The Oxford American, Ploughshares, Five Chapters, and others. She has received fellowships from the Civitella Ranieri Foundation, Hedgebrook, Caravansarai, and Eastern Frontier.

About Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here at IUPUI

On March 5, 2007, in the middle of the Iraq war, a car bomb killed dozens and injured over a hundred people.  It also devastated al-Mutanabbi Street, a busy avenue of cafés and bookstores that had served as a meeting place for generations of writers and thinkers.  In response to the attack, San Francisco bookseller Beau Beausoleil rallied a community of international artists and writers to produce “Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here,” a collection of letterpress-printed broadsides (poster-like works on paper), artists’ books (unique works of art in book form) and an anthology of writing focused on expressing solidarity with Iraqi booksellers, writers and readers.

“Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here” includes 260 artists’ books; a publication titled “Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here: Poets and Writers Respond to the March 5, 2007, Bombing of Baghdad’s ‘Street of the Booksellers,’” plus 130 broadsides — one for every person killed or injured in the bombing.  Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will serve as one of only three repositories in the world to hold the complete collection.  It will also sponsor three biennial conferences to explore the themes and implications of the collection through papers, panels, posters and presentations with international scholars, artists and writers from a range of disciplines.

 

Grant Writing Workshop: IU New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities Grant Program

DATE: September 3, 2014
TIME: 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM
LOCATION: IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, Conference Room, University Library 4th Floor

This session will provide participants with an overview of the IU New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities Grant Program. It will offer information on how to apply and, more importantly, on how to develop a competitive proposal. Faculty recipients and members of the New Frontiers grants advisory groups will be present to answer questions.

Register here:

Digital Arts & Humanities Workshops for 2014-15

Digital Arts and Humanities Workshop LogoAre you interested in creating a professional blog but don’t know where to start? Have you ever wished that you had the skills to visualize your research data? Do you want to know how to use social media to share your work with the public? The Digital Arts and Humanities Workshop is a new series presented by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and the IUPUI Center for Digital Scholarship. It will provide hands-on training in skills such as scholarly social media and blogging, data mining, data visualization, online exhibitions, and more. This year, our workshops are targeted to beginners, so please take this opportunity to plunge into the fascinating world of the digital arts and humanities. Workshop events are free to IUPUI faculty, research staff, graduate students, and local non-profit professionals. Space is limited, so be sure to reserve your place as soon as possible.


 

“Introduction to Data Visualization I: Visualization with Gephi” 9 September 2014, 12:00-2:30, UL 2120

Gephi is a popular open source program that facilitates network analysis and data visualization. It is a powerful tool used by universities and news organizations, including the New York Times. However, it can be a bit imposing for beginners. This workshop provides novices with a hands-on introduction to basic data visualization with Gephi. Attendees will become familiar with the Gephi interface and will emerge with basic of Gephi’s applications. Skills learned in this workshop will have relevance to basic research as well as teaching and public engagement. Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/introduction-to-data-visualization-i-visualization-with-gephi-tickets-12090774833


“Introduction to Data Visualization II: Data Normalization for Network Analysis in Gephi” 16 September 2014, 12:00-2:30, UL 2120

Gephi is a popular open source program that facilitates network analysis and data visualization. It is a powerful tool used by universities and news organizations, including the New York Times. However, it can be a bit imposing for beginners. This workshop provides novices with a hands-on introduction to network analysis with Gephi. Network analysis allows researchers to analyze and visualize qualitative and quantitative relationships between objects, people, and groups. This workshop will focus on how to capture and organize data so that Gephi can visualize network relationships. Skills learned in this workshop will have relevance to basic research as well as teaching and public engagement. Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/intro-to-data-visualization-ii-network-analysis-in-gephi-tickets-12090929295


“Introduction to Scholarly Blogging” 6 November 2014, 12:00-2:00, UL 2120

There is a robust and growing community of scholars who share their research through blogging platforms such as WordPress, Blogger, and Drupal. Not only is blogging a way to engage with the public, but it is becoming increasingly important in creating and sustaining scholarly networks and communication. By the end of this workshop, attendees will have a blog up and running on WordPress.com, and they will understand the fundamentals of sharing information, building networks, and engaging with the public. Skills learned in this workshop will have relevance to research, teaching, and public engagement. Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/introduction-to-scholarly-blogging-tickets-12090995493


“Social Media for Scholars” 11 March 2015, 12:00-1:30, UL 2120

Twitter. Facebook. Instagram. Reddit. What do these platforms have to do with scholarly research? As it turns out, quite a bit. Scholars are turning to these platforms to expand the reach of their work — communicating with networks of specialists, students, and non-specialists alike. In this workshop, attendees will learn about the various social media platforms and how to use them in a scholarly capacity. Skills learned in this workshop will have relevance to research, teaching, and public engagement. Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/social-media-for-scholars-tickets-12091039625

Story 17: Digital Bridges from the IUPUI University Library

21 years. 21 stories.
Over the course of 2014 the IUPUI Library will be sharing these stories with you.

Story 17: Digital Bridges

From the Indianapolis Motor Speedway to the Indiana Law Review, the IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship is connecting the city with the campus every day. We support the city by creating digital collections of images, newspapers, artifacts, and public records.

Missed a story? Want to read one again? All stories can be found here.

Hoosier Bard Presents: Arden of Fevershame

Hoosier Bard Productions, the theatrical arm of Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis’ New Oxford Shakespeare, will stage its fourth play next month at the Indianapolis Public Library’s Central Library branch.

Directed by Terri Bourus, “Arden of Fevershame” will begin at 7:30 p.m. April 3 to 5 and 11 to 12 at the library, 40 East St. Clair St.

“Arden of Fevershame” encompasses elements of passion, intrigue, murder and suspense, tempered with comedy. Bourus said her version will employ a “film noir atmosphere of fog and shadow” to reflect the theme: the tension of the crime.

“The increasing nervousness of the young wife and her lover, the ultimate crime and what happens afterwards are all part of the mystery,” Bourus said. “It’s the first domestic tragedy and the very first black comedy in English drama.”

Bourus, founding director of Hoosier Bard, is an Equity actor as well as a professor of English drama in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. Explaining Hoosier Bard’s mission, she said, “Every play we do has an editorial crux linked to it: a crux that can only be solved through performance.”

Each of the plays Bourus has directed — “Young Hamlet,” “History of Cardenio,” “Measure for Measure” and now “Arden” — is considered editorially problematic in some important way. Hoosier Bard stages these plays to test those editorial problems. Using the stage as a kind of laboratory for theater experiments, editors can make important inroads — changing the way they emend the text, making the edition that the NOS team is even now creating, ever more valuable to scholars, theater practitioners, and students. This singular approach has garnered international attention, a phenomenon Bourus attributes to the company’s singular vision: “edit and do theater, which makes us very unique.”

An aspect that makes this production of “Arden” unique, and that led Bourus to change the traditionally used title to the play, is also the kind of pun and word-play for which Shakespeare is known.
“I realized as I was reading the [earliest extant] text, printed in 1592, that the running head did not say ‘Faversham.’ It said ‘Fevershame,’” Bourus said. “True to form, Shakespeare seems to have twisted the title. Rather than ‘Faversham,’ the name of the town where the action actually happened, he penned ‘Fevershame.’”

Tickets are available by credit card online.: $10 for students with a valid ID, $10 for seniors and $20 for general admission. Tickets will also be available by check or cash at the door.

There will be two performances using ASL interpreters. Parking is free of charge in the Central Library lot. Click here for event updates.