Upcoming Lectures at IU Bloomington

April 5 to 19, 2013

Indiana Journal of Law & Social Equality symposium
WHEN: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, April 5
WHERE: Law School Room 335 Faculty Conference Room, Bloomington
WHAT: Indiana Journal of Law & Social Equality Annual Symposium: “Social Equality: Looking Forward and Looking Back”
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: smithco@indiana.edu

From Philosophy to Paleography, or The Annoying Duty to Share History With the Past
WHEN: Noon to 1:15 p.m. Friday, April 5
WHERE: 1020 E. Kirkwood Ave., Ballantine Hall, Room 004, Bloomington
WHAT: Keynote speaker: Bob Eno, Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at IU Bloomington
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: 812-855-3765 or easc@indiana.edu

The Chairs of Chester Cornett
WHEN: 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Saturday, April 6
WHERE: Mathers Museum of World Cultures, 416 N. Indiana Ave., Bloomington
WHAT: As part of its 50th anniversary celebrations, the Mathers Museum of World Cultures will present a series of conversations with curators, researchers, students and scholars from a variety of disciplines who study and explore the museum’s rich collections.
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: 812-855-6873 or mathers@indiana.edu

A Life in the Law: From Military Commissions to the Indiana Supreme Court
WHEN: Noon Monday, April 8
WHERE: IU Maurer School of Law Room 123, Bloomington
WHAT: Keynote speaker: Indiana Supreme Court Justice Steven David
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: 812-856-4044 or kturch@indiana.edu

I manoscritti provenzali in Italia
WHEN: 4 p.m. Monday, April 8
WHERE: Slocum Room, Lilly Library, 1200 E. Seventh St., Bloomington
WHAT: Keynote speaker Carlo Pulsoni, professor of romance philology at the University of Perugia, will discuss the Italian manuscripts containing works in Old Occitan.
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: 812-855-7035 or hstorey@indiana.edu

Innovations in Law School Pedagogy
WHEN: 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 9
WHERE: Wynne Courtroom (Room 100), Inlow Hall, 530 W. New York St., Indianapolis
WHAT: Keynote speaker: Provost Lauren Robel
COST: Free and open to the public; Reception will be held at 5:30 p.m., in the Law School Atrium
INFORMATION: cleavera@iupui.edu

LL.M. 10th Anniversary Celebration: International Legal Education in the 21st Century: Preparing Lawyers to Meet Global Challenges
WHEN: 2 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 9
WHERE: Wynne Courtroom (Room 100), Inlow Hall, 530 W. New York St., Indianapolis
WHAT: Keynote speaker: Honorable Judge Patricia Riley, Indiana Court of Appeals
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: pcaparas@iu.edu

Louise Melling, ACLU: “The New Age of Abortion Restrictions: Listen Up! It’s About You”
WHEN: Noon Wednesday, April 10
WHERE: IU Maurer School of Law Room 123, Bloomington
WHAT: Louise Melling, American Civil Liberties Union deputy legal director and director of the ACLU Center for Liberty, will discuss the status of abortion restrictions and how they compromise our rights and well-being today, 40 years after the U.S. Supreme Court decided Roe v. Wade — as well as what is to come.
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: 812-856-4044 or kturchi@indiana.edu

Principles in Drug Discovery
WHEN: 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 10
WHERE: Indiana University MSBII Building 702 N. Walnut Grove Ave., Bloomington
WHAT: Keynote speaker: Dr. Betty Bei Yao, associate director at Abbvie (formerly Abbott Laboratories), where she has more than 15 years of experience in developing neuroscience-related therapeutic targets.
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: 812-856-1930 or mtheodor@indiana.edu

Three Remarkable Women
WHEN: 5:15 p.m. Thursday, April 11
WHERE: Henry Radford Hope School of Fine Arts, Room 102, Indiana University 1201 E. Seventh St. Bloomington
WHAT: Keynote speaker: Mary D. Sheriff
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: 812-855-2597 or nritsma@indiana.edu

Human Rights and Authorship Norms: Comparative Traditions
WHEN: 5 p.m. Thursday, April 11
WHERE: Wynne Courtroom 100, Inlow Hall, 530 W. New York St., Indianapolis
WHAT: Keynote speaker: Roberta Rosenthal Kwall, Raymond P. Niro Professor of Intellectual Property Law and the co-director of DePaul University College of Law Center for Jewish Law and Judiac Studies
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: kgalster@iupui.edu

The Rufus & Louise Reiberg Reading Series
WHEN: 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 11
WHERE: University Library Lilly Auditorium, 755 W. Michigan St., Indianapolis
WHAT: Keynote speaker: Donald Ray Pollockauhor of the story collection Knockemstiff
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: 317-274-8929 or tkirts@iupui.edu

Law & Society Center Workshop
WHEN: 4 p.m. Thursday, April 11
WHERE: IU Maurer School of Law Room 335, Bloomington
WHAT: Keynote speaker: Kathie Hendley, University of Wisconsin
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: 812-856-0434 or jkrishna@indiana.edu

Business and Human Rights: What’s the Board Got to Do With It?
WHEN: 11:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Friday, April 12
WHERE: Wynne Courtroom (Room 100), Inlow Hall, 530 W. New York St., Indianapolis
WHAT: Keynote speaker: Professor Jena martin, West Virginia University college of Law
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: pcaparas@iu.edu

Memories & Reminiscences
WHEN: 4 to 5 p.m. Friday, April 12
WHERE: Fine Arts 015, Indiana University, Bloomington
WHAT: Keynote speaker: Judy Dater, recipient of numerous photography awards, has exhibited her work throughout the United States and internationally, and her photographs are widely published.
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: 812-855-7686 or catjohns@indiana.edu

Bizarre Foods Fair
WHEN: 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Saturday, April 13
WHERE: Mathers Museum of World Cultures, Bloomington
WHAT: Presentations and demonstrations highlighting the students’ research will be complemented by a variety of food.
COST: Free and open to the public, but tickets are required and must be picked up at the museum by April 12.
INFORMATION: 812-855-1696 or mathers@indiana.edu

Fuchs Lecture Series Speaker: Former Indiana Supreme Court Chief Justice Randall T. Shepard
WHEN: Noon Monday, April 15
WHERE: IU Maurer School of Law Room 335, Bloomington
WHAT: Former Indiana Supreme Court Chief Justice Randall T. Shepard will deliver the Ralph F. Fuchs Lecture, “Does the Country Have Too Many Lawyers, or Not Enough?” Shepard was recently named chair of the American Bar Association’s new Task Force on the Future of Legal Education, so his remarks will be especially timely and useful.
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: 812-855-2075 or ivanderc@indiana.edu
Engaging North Korea and Iran: A public forum exploring what a strategy of engagement looks like
WHEN: 5 to 6:45 p.m. Thursday, April 18
WHERE: Wynne Courtroom 100, Inlow Hall, 530 W. New York St., Indianapolis
WHAT: The IU McKinney School of Law, IUPUI Office of International Affairs, Indiana University Pan-Asia Institute and Portland State University welcome a panel of experts from the US, Europe, Asia & Australia to explore what a strategy of engagement looks like.
COST: Free and open to the public; pending approval CLE: 1.75 hours
INFORMATION: pcaparas@iu.edu

Toxic Symbiosis: Achieving Structural Justice in the Healthcare System
WHEN: 4 to 5:30 p.m., Thursday, April 18
WHERE: The Poynter Center, 618 E. Third St., Bloomington
WHAT: Keynote speaker: Milton Fisk, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy
COST: Free and open to the public
INFORMATION: 812-855-0261 or eayoung@indiana.edu

Sherlock Holmes and Victorian Forensic Science

“Sherlock Holmes and Victorian Forensic Science” will be presented by practicing forensic scientist David Zauner at the Indiana Medical History Museum on Saturday, April 20th, at 4PM.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s immensely popular Victorian character, Sherlock Holmes, was the first fictional detective to explicitly base his solutions of cases on observation, science, and deductive reasoning. Many of the stories include accounts of Holmes’ detailed examinations of crime scenes and pieces of evidence.

David Zauner, a member of the Indianapolis Sherlock Holmes society, The Illustrious Clients, and a practicing forensic scientist, will explore how the Holmes stories reflect applications of scientific principles to criminal investigations in the late Victorian era and how forensic science has developed since that time to its present state.

 

Email HoosierVSA@gmail.com to RSVP or with any questions.

Medical Humanities & Health Studies Program

New exhibit at IUPUI Cultural Arts Gallery highlights long and contested history of Guantánamo

Nicknamed GTMO, the United States naval station at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, has a history that is infamous and yet unknown to most Americans. A new traveling exhibit running April 10 through May 12 at the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Cultural Arts Gallery reveals that history.

Developed by more than 100 students from IUPUI and 11 other universities, the exhibition, Why Guantánamo?,  explores GTMO’s history from the US occupation of Guantánamo Bay in 1898 to today’s debates about its future.

This traveling exhibition is a program of the Guantánamo Public Memory Project which seeks to build public awareness of the century-long history of the naval station.

An opening day reception takes place from 6 to 7 p.m. at the gallery, located on the second floor of the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd.

In 2012, 21 IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI graduate students in the museum studies and public history programs created two panels for Why Guantánamo?  Students were responsible for researching, writing, and selecting the photographs for the panels.  Those in the Introduction to Museum Studies class produced the panel “Arts of Detention,” and students in the Guantánamo Project class produced the panel “Guantánamo Hits Home.” Students who helped develop these panels in the traveling exhibit will be on hand to talk to guests at the reception on April 10.

Following the reception, a lecture featuring Indiana Supreme Court Justice Steven H. David and Indianapolis attorney Richard Kammen as speakers takes places place from 7 to 8:30 p.m. in Room 450A of the Campus Center. David and Kammen will discuss their experiences with post-9/11 Guantanamo detainees.

David was the chief defense counsel to the Office of Military Commissions from 2007-2010.  He oversaw the defense team for post-9/11 detainees in Guantánamo. Kammen is the civilian learned counsel responsible for defending Abd al-Rahim Hussein Mohammed Al-Nashiri. Al-Nashiri is accused of masterminding the 2000 bombing of the USS Cole.

IU McKinney School of Law professor George Edwards will moderate the lecture.

Edwards, director of the law school’s program in international human rights law, was an expert witness in the Guantánamo Bay U.S. Military Commission case against Australian David Hicks. Edwards and his students also provided research assistance for the defense of Hicks and for Omar Khadr, a Canadian who was 15 years old when taken to Guantanamo Bay.

Sponsors of the exhibit’s appearance at IUPUI include: the museum studies program, the public history program, the history department, and the international studies program, all units of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

The IUPUI Cultural Arts Gallery is free and open to the public Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Sunday 1 to 7 p.m.

Paid parking is available in the Vermont Street parking garage, which is connected to the IUPUI Campus Center.

 

For additional information, contact:

Liz Kryder-Reid, Director, Museum Studies Program, Associate Professor, Anthropology and Museum Studies, IUPUI

ekryderr@iupui.edu

317- 274-1406

Modupe Labode, Assistant Professor History and Museum Studies, IUPUI,

mlabode@iupui.edu

317-274-2839

 

Opening reception for the exhibition Why Guantánamo? and lecture “Speaking of Guantánamo”

Wednesday, April 10, 2013
IUPUI Campus Center: Cultural Arts Gallery and Room 450A
Indiana Supreme Court Justice Stephen H. David and Indianapolis attorney Richard Kammen discuss their experiences defending post-9/11 Guantánamo detainees  and discuss the issues raised in these cases.
Opening Reception: 6:00-7:00 p.m., Wednesday, April 10, 2013, Cultural Arts Gallery, 2ndfloor of the IUPUI Campus Center. View the exhibition and meet the IUPUI students who created it.
“Speaking of Guantanamo”: 7:00 p.m.-8:30 p.m., Wednesday, April 10, 2013, IUPUI Campus Center, Room 450A
Graduate students from the museum studies and public history programs at the  IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI were among the 100 students at 11 universities across the country that  developed the exhibition, Why Guantánamo?    The exhibition explores the century-long history of the US naval station at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, and is a project of the Guantánamo Public Memory Project, which seeks to build public awareness of, and foster dialogue on the future of this place and the policies it shapes.
The lecture “Speaking of Guantánamo” will mark the exhibition’s opening and feature two Indiana jurists who have extensive experience defending detainees held in Guantánamo Bay. Indiana Supreme Court Justice Steven H. David was the Chief Defense Counsel to the Office of Military Commissions from 2007-2010.  He oversaw the defense team for post-9/11 detainees in Guantánamo. Indianapolis attorney Richard Kammen is the civilian learned counsel responsible for defending Abd al-Rahim Hussein Mohammed Al-Nashiri. Al-Nashiri is accused of masterminding the 2000 bombing of the USS Cole. IU McKinney School of Law professor George Edwards will moderate the discussion.
     In 2012, 21 IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI graduate students in the Museum Studies and Public History programs created two panels for Why Guantánamo?  Students were responsible for researching, writing, and selecting the photographs for the panels.  Those in the “Introduction to Museum Studies” class produced the panel “Arts of Detention,” and students in the “Guantánamo Project” class produced the panel “Guantánamo Hits Home.” Students who helped develop these panels in the traveling exhibit will be on hand to talk to guests.
Paid parking is available in the Vermont Street parking garage, which is connected to the IUPUI Campus Center:http://parking.iupui.edu/visitors.do
The IUPUI Cultural Arts Gallery is free and open to the public Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-7 p.m., and Sunday 1-7 p.m.
Why Guantánamo? will be on exhibition from April 10 – May 12, 2013
Sponsors of the exhibit’s appearance at IUPUI include: the museum studies program, the public history program, the history department, and the international studies program, all units of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, and the Museum Studies Club.
The Guantánamo Public Memory Project seeks to build public awareness of the century-long history of the US naval station at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, and foster dialogue on the future of this place and the policies it shapes. Coordinated from Columbia University’s Institute for the Study of Human Rights, the Project has developed a traveling exhibit, online story collection, curricula,  public dialogues, and more through  collaboration and debates with diverse stakeholders. First launched in 2009 by the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience, the Project is now developed by a growing number of universities, organizations, and individuals according to common principles while engaged in ongoing debate on the possibilities and pitfalls of “remembering” Guantánamo. The project was supported by the participating universities and by the Open Society Foundations, Libra Foundation, and the New York Council on the Humanities.

Indy Reads Books Weekly Calendar Update

March 26th 7 pm – Performer Chris Arnott brings his acclaimed storytelling series, “Get to the Point,” all the way from New Haven to the Indy Reads Books stage. Here’s how Arnott describes the series: “I want to honor the current idea of what storytelling means—the cathartic personal anecdotes and amusing modern adventures which fuel The Moth and This American Life—but I’m also a theater guy, a history buff, a voracious reader and the son of a Classicist. So I want to open the series to monologues, myths, orations, poetry, performance art and, as they say, more.”

March 27th 7 pm – IUPUI Student Reading Series. Terry Kirts presents the latest installment in the series featuring student and community writers performing fiction, nonfiction and poetry.

April 1st 7 pm - Indy Word Lab presents a creative writing workshop, open to the public. Participants will be met each month with a special guest writer, who will put attendees to the test with craft exercises. Afterward, small group workshops will come together for an end discussion about writing and the work produced that evening.

April 5th 7 pm – Indy Jazz Fest brings a unique, all-ages show to be performed for First Friday. Join us as Indy Reads Books turns into the city’s only underage jazz club, with some of the best young performers you’ll ever see.

April 6th 2 – 4 pm – Indy Type hosts their second ever meeting to talk typography. Amateurs, professionals, and typography enthusiasts of all stripes are encouraged to attend for an afternoon of discussion and exercises.

April 9th 7 – 8:15 pm – Mandy Vickery, of the Dromtonpa Kadampa Buddhist Center, will lead a meditation class. Everyone is invited to attend this class, titled “Work Without Worry” and free to the public. More on Mandy Vickery and the Buddhist Center can be found online at meditation-indianapolis.org.

April 11th 6 pm – In conjunction with the Dyslexia Institute of Indianapolis, Ray Boomhower will present his newest book, “The People’s Choice: Congressman Jim Jontz of Indiana.” Focusing on Jontz’s life and career, Boomhower will also speak on how he came to write this book and his research process. Come hear the unique story of how Jontz grew up in Indianapolis and came to be involved in the environmental movement, his three terms in congress, and his ultimate career fighting for the working people and environment of Indiana.

April 15th 7 pm – Indy Actor’s Playground performs at Indy Reads Books. Hosted by Lou Harry and Bill Simmons, this play reading features a rotating cast of local actors from the IRT, Phoenix Theater, Theater on the Square, and many others, performing a play reading in an intimate setting. No props, no preparation, just great actors selecting and reading the plays they’ve always wanted to perform.

April 18th 6 pm – 8 pm – Indiana Young Writers present a student reading.

April 25th 7 pm – IUPUI Student Reading Series. Terry Kirts presents the latest installment in the series featuring student and community writers performing fiction, nonfiction and poetry.

April 27th 4 pm – Professional origami artist Brian K. Webb visits Indy Reads Books! Whether you’re an experienced origami artist or are still trying to perfect your first paper crane, come learn tips and tricks about the fascinating art of paper folding!

May 3rd 7 pm – The Indy Jazz Fest High School All-Stars perform for First Friday. Join us as Indy Reads Books turns into the city’s only underage jazz club, with some of the best young performers you’ll ever see.

May 6th 7 pm – Indy Word Lab presents a creative writing workshop, open to the public. Participants will be met each month with a special guest writer, who will put attendees to the test with craft exercises. Afterward, small group workshops will come together for an end discussion about writing and the work produced that evening.

May 10th 7:30 – “A Film to Decrease Worldsuck – The Nerdfighters Documentary” has its Indianapolis premier at Indy Reads Books. Author John Green and his brother Hank, known online as the beloved VlogBrothers, have developed a massive following through their postings on YouTube. Using their influence for good, the VlogBrothers have encouraged their fans to ‘decrease worldsuck,’ and make the world a more awesome place to be. This documentary follows the Nerdfighters (how VlogBrothers fans are collectively known) and how they’ve striven to make the world a better place to be.

May 17th, 7 pm – Restoration Press presents an evening of poetry with a group of renowned local poets, including JL Kato, Mary Sexson, Dan Carpenter, and Thomas Alan Orr.

June 1st 6 – 9 pm – Help Trade School Indy kick off their next great year of the most diverse, interesting classes in the city! Everyone is welcome, whether you’ve previously participated in a class or are interested in learning more about teaching and participating in this barter based program operating around Indianapolis.

Alex Mattingly
Indy Reads Books - Manager
317-384-1496

Gaza 2050 A Visioning Exercise

February 26, 2013 – June 19, 2013

Gaza 2050, a visioning exercise, provides an opportunity for Gaza students to envision an ideal future for the Gaza Strip and the strategies for achieving that vision. This is a FREE MOOC course open to ANYONE. Click below to start working with students from Gaza University, contributing your ideas and supporting the visioning process.

About the Course

Imagine that you are a time traveler and you travel into the future to the year 2050 to the Gaza of your dreams. In this ideal future, you are amazed at the transformation, and the first objective is to take detailed notes about what you see and hear to share with others back in 2013. What you don’t see, however, is the steps that needed to be taken in order to realize that future. We are not just talking about a wish list! How did you achieve this vision? Identifying the many pathways to that much desired future is the second objective in this class. As the late actor Christopher Reeves once remarked, at first dreams been impossible, then improbable, and finally inevitable. In this visioning exercise, you will describe ‘The Gaza We Want,’ and then consider the preconditions and stages for success.

Remember: Nothing is too small, too big, or too crazy for consideration if it can help us achieve our vision for the future!

 

There are two aspects in visioning. One side of the coin is the ‘hardware’ of peace and development, describing the nuts and bolts of the ideal Gaza in 2050. Hardware includes the roads, buildings, parks, fountains, bridges, housing, energy supplies, and so on. The other side of the coin is the ‘software’ of peace and development, and this is related to the laws, values, and social characteristics of the ideal Gaza. Will the future Palestinian state be religious or secular in nature? Will there be a spirit of unity in diversity and tolerance for difference? How will liberty, freedom, and justice, be defined, and what will be the relationship between men and women? These are just a sample of the types of questions that will arise in the discussions in this class.

 

This class, which is being offered to students at Gaza University, is also free and open to the general public. All those who have signed on to this MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) course can fully participate in the lectures, readings, and post reflections.

For more info and registration visit: http://www.thecn.com/mooc101

 

Workshop Invitation: Teaching Skills in International Research Ethics (TaSkR) Workshop (IU Center for Bioethics)

On behalf of the faculty and staff of the Indiana University Center for Bioethics, we invite you to participate in the fifth annual Teaching Skills in International Research Ethics (TaSkR) Workshop taking place April 17–19, 2013 at the Health Information and Translational Sciences (HITS) Building, 410 W. 10th Street, Room 1110, Indianapolis, IN 46202.

TaSkR is part of the Indiana University-Moi University Academic Research Ethics Partnership (IU-Moi AREP), a program supported by a recently renewed grant from the Fogarty International Center at the National Institutes of Health. The TaSkR workshop is an annual highlight of IU-Moi AREP and is designed to build research ethics capacity at both universities.

The overall objective of TaSkR is to enable participants to enrich their knowledge of intellectual foundations, pedagogical methods and skills for teaching international research ethics. Typical participants have been faculty and graduate students involved (or intending to become involved) in teaching and mentoring students in international research settings. TaSkR instructors are experts in international research ethics. Different pedagogical approaches have been used at TaSkR itself, including group work, panel discussions, light lectures, debates, and other formats.

Woven throughout each TaSkR program is a theme in international research ethics selected for its relevance. The theme allows participants to augment their knowledge in the field as they acquire pedagogical skills and allows for previous TaSkR participants to gain exposure to novel content each year. The theme for this year is “Individuality, Community and Personhood in International Research Ethics: The African Context.” This theme is of central importance in international research ethics, having implications for such issues as informed consent, community engagement, privacy, and perception of risk and harm. Speakers presenting on the theme will include Segun Gbadegesin (Howard University), Isaac Mwase (Tuskegee University National Center for Bioethics (2004-2008), National Cancer Institute (2008-2010)), Joseph Kahiga (Moi University) and Rachel Vreeman (Indiana University).

Although there is no cost to register for TaSkR V, we urge you to do so promptly. There are a limited number of spots available on a “first come, first served” basis. Please register online at
http://bioethics.iu.edu/programs/arep/taskr/ <http://bioethics.iu.edu/programs/arep/taskr/%20> below the “TaSkR V” overview.

We certainly hope you are able to join us for an engaging and productive workshop.

IUPUI Museum Studies program offers “roadshow” on caring for family heirlooms

INDIANAPOLIS — Few people have treasures in the attic that could command top dollar at the “Antique Roadshow.”

But almost everyone has family heirlooms with personal value making them worthy of preservation for future generations.

Why not fold your great-great grandparents’ marriage certificate four times and stuff it into a shoe box? Or how bad is it to hang a 1910 christening gown in the closet inside a plastic dry cleaning bag?

The museum studies program in the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University, in partnership with the IUPUI Museum Studies Club, is sponsoring a roadshow-type event to offer guidance on such issues.

The IUPUI Museum Studies Collections Care Fair will take place from 1 to 3 p.m., Saturday, April 6 at the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art, 500 W. Washington St.

The public is invited to bring in beloved heirlooms and meet with a professional conservator for one-on-one conversations on how to better store, care for, and preserve family treasures.  Participants should be able to carry objects into the fair safely. Over-sized objects will be discussed by appointment only. No guns or weapons are permitted.

“This really is a unique opportunity to get one-on-one advice from highly trained museum conservators,” said Holly Cusack-McVeigh, assistant professor of anthropology and museum studies at IUPUI.

IUPUI museum studies students will work alongside the professionals, Cusack-McVeigh said. The fair will allow the students as emerging museum professionals to share the specialized knowledge they have learned in class.

“This project embodies the museum studies program’s core values by encouraging civic engagement, applied learning, integration, collaboration, inclusion, and leadership,” Cusack-McVeigh said. “Objects carry the experience of meaning for all people everywhere.  Through community-wide events such as this comes a new understanding of this shared legacy and the responsibility that we all have in seeing our history into the future.”

Admission to the fair is free to all. Free parking is also available in the White River State Parking Garage.  Museum admission, required for entrance to museum galleries, is free to IUPUI staff, students and faculty with a Jag Tag.

For appointments, or additional information, contact Holly Cusack-McVeigh at hmcusack@iupui.edu.

Dr. Samuel Kahn-Side Constraints and Hazy People: What Ethics is Really About

The Philosophy Club at IUPUI presents:
Side Constraints and Hazy People: What Ethics is Really About
Dr. Samuel Kahn
Department of Philosophy
IUPUI

This talk is aimed at a general audience. I begin by taking aim at ethical optimizers, people who believe that we ought always to choose the action that maximally produces some good such as happiness. I offer two arguments, one about suiting an action to an actor and one about positioning, to show that optimizing often produces sub-optimific results. I suggest that accepting these arguments leads one down the road of seeing ethics as providing general heuristics and side constraints rather than rigorist prescriptions. But general heuristics and side constraints about what? I use this question to transition into the second part of the talk, in which I discuss vagueness with regard to our most basic ethical concept, personhood, and how we ought to behave to the hazy and not-quite persons in our lives.
Friday 22 March
4:00 PM-5:45 PM
CE 307

John Hope Franklin Research Center, Duke University, Travel Grants 2013-2014

The John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture, thanks to generous funding from GlaxoSmithKlein, is offering travel grants for scholarly research in the collections of the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Duke University.

The John Hope Franklin Research Center collects and makes available materials that document the experience of African and African Americans in a wide range of subspecialties. Primary source collections of personal papers, family papers, and organizational records are augmented with numerous print sources like books and periodicals. Areas of strength within the holdings of the Rubenstein Library include but are not limited to: history of South Africa, travel and exploration of the African continent, slavery in the American South, Jim Crow in America, Civil Rights, the African American experience in Durham, and 20th century African American intellectuals.

Any faculty, graduate or undergraduate student, or independent scholar with a research project requiring the use of materials held by the John Hope Franklin Research Center is eligible to apply. Grant money may be used for travel and living expenses while pursuing research at the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library. All applicants must reside outside of a 100-mile radius from Durham, NC. The maximum award per applicant is $1,000.

**Applicants are encouraged to search the Rubenstein Library catalogue to ascertain if collections match with their research topics**:
http://library.duke.edu/rubenstein/

The deadline for application is March 29, 2013 by 5:00 PM EST. Recipients will be announced in April 2013. Grants must be used between May 1, 2013 and June 30, 2014.

For more information and to download a copy of the application form, please visit:
http://library.duke.edu/rubenstein/franklin/grants/index.html