21st Century Great Conversations in Neuroscience, Art, and Related Therapeutics

OVERVIEW

A range of global and local experts will present their insights on how brain science and artistic processes inform one another during a one-and-half day symposium, 21st Century Great Conversations in Neuroscience, Art, and Related Therapeutics. The symposium will take place on April 8 from 8am-4pm and April 9 from 9am-12pm in Hine Hall Auditorium. Seating is limited, so please register for the symposium if you plan to attend.

This international symposium, organized by Juliet King, MA, ATR-BC, LPC, LMHC, of the Herron School of Art and Design and the Indiana University School of Medicine, will feature presentations by three international experts and three panel discussions with a mix of Indianapolis-based and global leaders in the fields of neuroscience, art, and related therapeutics.

Aimed at supporting the overall health and amelioration of disease for patients and their caregivers, families, and friends, the symposium highlights the collaborative approach of the IUPUI schools of Art and Design, Medicine, Engineering, Informatics, Health and Rehabilitation Services, Nursing, and Liberal Arts.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Anjan Chatterjee, MD is the Elliot Professor and Chief of Neurology at Pennsylvania Hospital. In 2002 he was awarded the Norman Geschwind Prize in Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology by the American Academy of Neurology. His current research focuses on spatial cognition, language, neuroethics, and neuroaesthetics.

Arne Dietrich, PhD is a cognitive neuroscientist and Professor of Psychology at the American University of Beirut, in Lebanon. Professor Dietrich’s research focuses on the neuroscience of creativity, altered states of consciousness, and the psychological effects of exercise.

Klaus Gramann, PhD is the Head of the Department of Biological Psychology and Neuropsychology Ergonomics at the Berlin Institute of Technology in Berlin, Germany. With a  doctorate in Psychology, Dr. Gramann has a concerted interest in the neuroscience of embodied and spatial cognition. His particular specialty is in Mobile Brain/Body Imaging.

ARTWORK

Presented for the first time, the artwork will feature slow-motion video portraits of four brain tumor patients from Indiana as they speak about how their diagnoses have changed their outlook on life. The artwork, funded by Indiana University’s New Frontiers Exploratory Grant, is part of a unique study bridging art, science, and medicine to generate both scientific data and artistic documentation of the human condition for patients being treated for brain tumors. 

Kate Harris