IUPUI Center for Digital Scholarship goes 3D

View the original press release by reporter Vanessa Richards at the IUPUI newsroom.

Jenny Johnson demonstrates 3D scanner

The handheld Creaform 3D scanner looks like an old-school video game controller, a clunky throwback to the early days of Atari. But these mobile 3D scanners used by the staff in the IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship are very advanced, and they are changing the way we record recent history, ancient history, and even the future.

“About two years ago, we decided to explore 3D technology and what scanning could look like,” said Jenny Johnson, head of digitization services for the Center for Digital Scholarship. “Every community and cultural heritage institution that we work with has 3D objects. As the technology has gotten better, computer processing has gotten better, and because costs have been reduced a little bit with the technology, we decided to dive into the specifics and see what we could do. The Benjamin Harrison team was really interested in this, and they’ve got an eCollection initiative to document more of their items.”

This statue of Harrison has been 3D printed using the 3D scan file

The Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site houses a large collection of former U.S. President Benjamin Harrison’s belongings in his former home, including furniture, pottery, silver, plates, and dresses. In collaboration with the Center for Digital Scholarship, these items will soon be scanned, and the digital files will be available online to view and to download. This means that anyone with access to a 3D printer will be able to create copies of the collection items. The Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site eCollection initiative is planned to go online around November.

Archaeologists are using the technology, as well. The Lawrenz Gun Club is a Mississippian Period fortified Native American village and mound complex in the central Illinois River Valley, active between the years 1150 and 1425. Jeremy Wilson, associate professor of anthropology at IUPUI, studies it; he and his team have been working on the site since 2010. He works with the IUPUI 3D digital archivists to record what they have found. Wilson’s ultimate goal, in partnership with associate professor Dan Johnson from the geography department, is to build a virtual representation of the site and how the village changed over time.

 

The digital renderings of these items are available in the IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship’s online collection.

IAHI to host grant-writing workshop for faculty

Dr. Jason Kelly, IAHI Director

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis faculty can learn about writing and submitting applications for the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute Grant Program from peers and Dr. Jason M. Kelly, the institute’s director, during a free workshop on August 31st.

The IAHI grant program supports campuswide attainment of excellence in research and creative activity in the arts and humanities. This activity can impact people’s lives not only on campus, but throughout Indianapolis and the state in the forms of new scholarship and cultural exhibits.

“The grant program is designed to enhance the research and creative-activity mission of IUPUI by supporting research projects and scholarly activities that are conducted by arts and humanities faculty,” he said. “The program is intended to stimulate existing and new research and creative activity and to support faculty in becoming competitive in securing external funding and sponsorship.”

Grants range in size from $500 to support travel to $30,000 to support research projects and scholarly activities conducted by a team of two or more faculty.

The workshop is scheduled from noon to 1:30 p.m. at the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, University Library Room 4115P, 755 W. Michigan St.

Information will include guidelines on applying for the grant program, including how to apply, deadlines and scope of projects, best practices for grant writing that are relatable to other funding agencies’ grants, and a Q&A session with Dr. Kelly.

Workshop registration can be completed online. The original press release for this event can be found at the IU Newsroom.

 

Polio: A Look at America’s Most Successful Public Health Crusade

Join Pulitzer Prize winning author and New York University professor David Oshinsky for an in-depth look at the largest public health experiment in American history. Oshinsky will focus on the events leading up to the 1954 Salk polio vaccine trials and the ways in which the polio crusade revolutionized philanthropy and medical research. Oshinsky’s book Polio: An American Story won the Pulitzer Prize for History, among other awards, and influenced Bill Gates to make polio eradication the top priority of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

A part of the “History Talks! Engage the Past, in the Present, about the Future” presented by IUPUI Department of History, with support from IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, IU School of Medicine, Spirit and Place, and JBS Society. The talk will be held from 4-5:30pm on Thursday, October 19 at the Frank and Katrina Basile Theater of the Eugene and Marilyn Glick Indiana History Center, 450 W Ohio Street. Reserve your free tickets now before they run out!

New Residency Program Helps Create a More Welcoming Campus at IUPUI

Indianapolis SkylineThe IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute (IAHI) is pleased to announce the IAHI Welcoming Campus Artist Residency. Artists and designers are invited to apply for two residencies that will take place during 2018.

In consultation with the IAHI director and advisory team, residents will develop a public artwork for the IUPUI campus. They will also participate in studio visits and public programs.

The IAHI Welcoming Campus Artist Residency is part of the IUPUI Welcoming Campus Initiative, a program designed to transform IUPUI into a more inspiring destination for faculty, staff, students, and visitors.

The IAHI Welcoming Campus Residencies are funded by the IUPUI Welcoming Campus Fund, the School of Engineering and Technology, and the Office of the Vice President for Research. They are offered in collaboration with the City State residency program. City State is a collaboration of Central State Mansion, the IAHI, Ignition Arts, iMOCA, People for Urban Progress, and PRINTtEXT.

For more details about the IAHI Welcoming Campus Artist Residency and the application form, click here.