IAHI Grant Deadline

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The IAHI Grant Program supports campus-wide attainment of excellence in research and creative activity in arts and humanities. It is designed to enhance the research and creative activity mission of IUPUI by supporting research projects and scholarly activities that are conducted by arts and humanities faculty. The program is intended to stimulate existing and new research and creative activity and to support faculty in becoming competitive in securing external funding and sponsorship.

The next deadline is February 15, 2017.

To learn more about the grant program and how to apply, click here.

OVCR offers the Proposal Development and Submission for Humanities Scholars Presentation Series

Beginning on Friday, January 27th, this series of three presentations addresses the value of funded research for career development for faculty working in the humanities. The presentations should give participants a basic understanding of the principles of preparing and submitting funding proposals and will culminate in the start of an actual proposal. Participants are urged to attend all three workshops, and we anticipate that the series will be repeated during fall semester 2017. This series is sponsored by the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research (OVCR) and the IUPUI School of Liberal Arts.

Presentations will include “Preliminary Considerations,” “Top 10 Successes and Blunders,” and “Developing Your Proposal: Turn Ideas into Funding.”

For more details and to register for these sessions, please click here.

Spring Seminars in Medical Humanities and Health Studies

The Medical Humanities and Health Studies Programs prepare undergraduates to understand the broader role and determinants of health and medicine in today’s world. These seminars, which are open to all, cover various topics that are exceedingly relevant in today’s world.

The first is Paul Helft’s discussion of “Prognosis Related Communication and End of Life Care Outcomes in Advanced Cancer” and will be held in CE 309 on Wednesday, February 15th. The second is Sharra Vostral’s talk on “Testing Tampons: Toxic Shock Syndrome, Feminist Advocates, and Absorbency Standards” and will be held in CE 307 on Wednesday, March 22nd. The final talk of the semester will be Zeynep Salih’s discussion of “Attending to Emotion by Verbalizing Empathy – A Core Physician Skill” and will take place in CE 307 on Tuesday, April 18th. All of the talks are held from noon to 1 pm.

Applications now open for Charles R. Bantz Chancellor’s Community Fellowship

In 2015 in recognition of the leadership and contributions of Charles R. Bantz to the IUPUI campus and Indianapolis community, IUPUI established the Charles R. Bantz Chancellor’s Community Fellowship. This fellowship reflects Charles Bantz’s dedication to research that creates university-community partnerships and results in community impact.

The Charles R. Bantz Chancellor’s Community Fellowship aligns with IUPUI’s strategic goals to deepen IUPUI’s commitment to community engagement.  The fellowship is funded through charitable gifts and campus support and is jointly supported by the Office of the Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and the Office of Community Engagement.

The Bantz Community Fellowship supports community-engaged research and scholarly activities that:

  1. Reinforce and deepen campus-community engagement and research partnerships;
  2. Leverage the knowledge, skills, and innovative talents of IUPUI faculty, students, and community partner(s) in a year-long scope of work that is of mutual value and interest;
  3. Result in meaningful community impact.

Eligibility:  The Bantz Community Fellowship provides one year of support for a collaborative research team (i.e., faculty, student(s), community partner/members) to address a community issue in Central Indiana.  Research teams must be led by a full-time faculty member who will serve as the Primary Investigator on the project.  To be eligible to serve as PI on a Bantz Community Fellowship team, the faculty member must have a full-time appointment (Tenured, Tenure-track, Clinical Faculty or Lecturer).  Collaborative teams will include graduate and/or undergraduate students (full-time enrollment in an IUPUI program, in good academic standing), and a designated community partner/organization.

The Bantz Community Fellowship will be awarded through a competitive application process on an annual basis.  Proposals may request up to $50,000, with a required additional cash or in-kind match (minimum 20%) from the school, community partner, and/or other grants and partners.

Applicants to the Charles R. Bantz Chancellor’s Community Fellowship must complete all sections of the application form.  Applications are due by 5:00 pm on Wednesday, March 6, 2017

Awards and Event Recognition:  Applicants will be recognized at the Bringle Civic Engagement Showcase on Tuesday, April 11, 2017.  Awards will be made at the Chancellor’s Academic Honors Convocation on Friday, April 21, 2017.

Click here to view previous recipients, and click here for additional information or to begin your application.

The Engaged Scholars’ Roundtable presents Art History as Public Practice

There is a growing movement to define and expand how art history can operate as a publicly oriented, community-engaged practice. Curatorial work is a logical mode of engaged art history because of the already-public nature of exhibitions. This session will be anchored in a discussion of We Are City and ArtX Fit, two engaged art history projects that the presenter, Laura Holzman, has undertaken since 2013. In addition to discussing the structure, process, and outcomes of these collaborative projects, this talk will reflect on the opportunities, challenges, and future directions of a publicly engaged art history.

The talk will be held on Friday, February 3rd from noon to 1:15pm in the CSL Conference Room, Hine Hall 234D. The Engaged Scholars’ Roundtable showcases scholarly practice and innovations that honor tenets of Ernest Boyer’s concept of the Scholarship of Engagement. The roundtable is intended to:

  • Increase awareness of and engagement with the tenets of engaged scholarship among IUPUI faculty, administrators, and staff;
  • Bring publicly disseminated work, developing research, and scholarship to the awareness of local campus and community audiences;
  • Nurture interdisciplinary/transdisciplinary community-campus collaboration and learning;
  • Build capacity for the growth and development of engaged scholarship as a dimension of faculty work; and
  • Promote a sense of community among IUPUI’s engaged faculty and staff.

National Endowment for the Arts 2017 Funding Guidelines Posted

PrintGuidelines and application materials for three National Endowment for the Arts funding categories—Art Works, Challenge America, and Creative Writing Fellowships—have posted on the NEA’s website. The NEA will again offer funding for Creativity Connects projects through the Art Works category.

The 2017 Art Works and Challenge America programs support projects taking place beginning in 2018. Guidelines and application materials can be found in the Apply for a Grant section of the NEA website.

In addition, guidelines for 2017 Creative Writing Fellowships: Prose are posted for application by published creative writers. Guidelines and application materials for the fellowships are also in the Apply for a Grant section of the NEA website.

DATES AND DEADLINES 

Art Works

  • Application Deadlines
    • February 16, 2017
    • July 13, 2017
  • Recent Art Works grants are posted on the NEA website.
  • Guidelines workshop webinar is scheduled for January 18, 2017.

Art Works: Creativity Connects

  • Application Deadline: May 4, 2017
  • Recent Creativity Connects grants are posted on the NEA website.
  • Guidelines workshop webinar is scheduled for March 22, 2017 (Details will be posted soon.)

Challenge America

  • Application Deadline: April 13, 2017
  • Recent Challenge America grants are posted on the NEA website.
  • Guidelines workshop webinar is scheduled for March 1, 2017 (Details will be posted soon.)

Creative Writing Fellowships: Prose

Martin Luther King Jr. Day Celebration at IUPUI

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In commemoration of the living legacy of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Indiana University will host its annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day Celebration with a number of activities across each of IU’s campuses. IU students will also take part in the MLK Day of Service, a student-driven effort to give back to the surrounding communities.

“The breadth of activities taking place illustrates not only how the Indiana University community can come together in goodwill but also how individuals can make a difference through Dr. King’s values of courage and compassion,” said James Wimbush, vice president of diversity, equity and multicultural affairs and dean of the University Graduate School. “Many of IU’s students, faculty and staff are leaders and agents of change who have positively impacted others through their actions, which is something the university seeks to nurture through a welcoming and inclusive learning environment.”

At Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, the 48th Annual IUPUI Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Dinner, the longest-running Martin Luther King Day-related event in the Indianapolis community, takes place at 6 p.m. Jan. 15. Organized by the IUPUI Black Student Union in conjunction with IUPUI’s Multicultural Center, the dinner will take place at the Indiana Roof Ballroom in downtown Indianapolis, 140 W. Washington St. Tickets may be purchased online.

IUPUI’s Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service 2017 will take place from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Jan. 16. Participants will meet for breakfast at the IUPUI Campus Center and then volunteer together at community sites across Indianapolis as a way to honor King’s commitment to service and social justice.

More information about IU’s Martin Luther King Jr. Day Celebration is available online.

Visiting scholar Dr. Timothy Eatman discusses Artists and Scholars in Public Life

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Dr. Timothy Eatman

Please join us for Visiting Scholar Dr. Timothy Eatman, an essential voice for teaching and encouraging IUPUI’s faculty and graduate students engaged in Public Scholarship. IUPUI has declared community engagement one of its central goals, and therefore, Dr. Eatman’s voice in knowledge creation in higher education can catalyze community engaged research at IUPUI. Dr. Eatman will be available for three workshops on public scholarship and promotion and tenure. Dr. Eatman’s work and that of Imagining America is toward improving conditions for current engaged faculty, and is a valuable resource for graduate education, pipeline, and campus diversity.

Dr. Eatman will be available for three workshops on public scholarship and promotion and tenure:

 

Timothy K. Eatman, Ph.D. is the inaugural dean of the Honors Living Learning Community (HLLC) and professor of urban education at Rutgers University Newark. He also serves as Faculty Co-Director of Imagining America: Artists and Scholars in Public Life (IA). A national consortium of over 100 higher education institutions and community based partners working at the nexus of the cultural disciplines (humanities, arts and design) and community engagement, IA founded and initially headquartered at the University of Michigan and now at Syracuse University has been Tim’s primary network of operation and leadership for over a decade.

An educational sociologist who earned the 2010 Early Career Research Award from the International Association for Research on Service Learning and Community Engagement (IARSLCE) Tim was elected to its board of directors in 2016. He is a widely sought after speaker, workshop facilitator, and collaborator who has earned local, national and international recognition for his leadership in advancing our understanding of the multi-faceted impact of publicly engaged scholarship in the university of the 21st century.

Tim has published in such venues as the Journal of Educational Finance and Readings on Equal Education, Diversity and Democracy, The Huffington Post, and has written several other book chapters and reports including the widely cited Scholarship in Public: Knowledge Creation and Tenure Policy in the Engaged University, a seminal IA research report on faculty rewards and publicly engaged scholarship. This work extends to a study of the aspirations and decisions of graduate students and early career scholars. He is co-editor of The Cambridge Handbook of Service Learning and Community Engagement. The core of Dr. Tim’s research takes up questions of equity in higher education and the larger society. Most recently he has been appointed to the design team for Truth Racial Healing & Transformation, a W.K. Kellogg Foundation multiyear Initiative.

Navigating a range of conversations and collaborations critical to the amelioration of higher education, Tim strategically focuses his energy to participate in important efforts like The Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U) Summer Institute on High Impact Practices which he has served as a faculty member for since its inception in 2011. He sits on the editorial board of University of Michigan Press – The New Public Scholarship book seriesUrban Education, Diversity, and Democracy and reviews for several scholarly journals and publications. Tim is a member of the Advisory Panel for the Carnegie Engagement Classification for Community Engagement.

Tim received his Ph.D. in educational policy studies at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, a master’s degree in college student development at Howard University, and a bachelor’s degree in early childhood development at Pace University. For more information about Dr. Eatman please see his webpages at http://timothykeatman.com.

Reading at the Table Series to feature Megan Musgrave

9781137602725Digital Citizenship in Twenty-first Century Young Adult Literature:  Imaginary Activism 

Jan. 17, 2017, 11:30am-1:00pm

University Place Conference Center, Room 200

Megan Musgrave, Ph.D., Department of English

This book is a study of the evolving relationships between literature, cyberspace, and young adults in the 21st century. Megan L. Musgrave explores the ways that young adult fiction is becoming a platform for a public conversation about the great benefits and terrible risks of our increasing dependence upon technology in public and private life. Drawing from theories of digital citizenship and posthuman theory, Digital Citizenship in Twenty-First-Century Young Adult Literature considers how the imaginary forms of activism depicted in literature can prompt young people to shape their identities and choices as citizens in a digital culture.

The annual Reading at the Table series provides an opportunity for members of the IUPUI community to celebrate published books written by IUPUI faculty or staff. During each luncheon, the featured author/editor will read from his or her work and open the floor to discussion. Seating is limited; registration is encouraged and can be completed on the campus Events Page. Walk-ins will be handled on a first-come, first-served basis—if space is available. Purchase of a buffet-style lunch for $13.00 (dessert and soft drinks not included) is required to attend this event.