Workshop: Applying for National Science Foundation Funding

Date: November 13, 2015
Time: 9:00 AM–11:00 AM
Location: University Library, Lilly AuditoriumIUPUI Library

Join the “Ins and Outs of Applying for NSF Funding” workshop from 9 to 11 a.m. on Friday, Nov. 13, in University Library’s Lilly Auditorium. The workshop will provide an overview of the foundation, its mission, its priorities and NSF programs that cut across disciplines. Specific topics include a description of various funding mechanisms and their appropriateness for each career stage, attributes of high-quality proposals, and resources available within the university to support proposal development.

Representatives from the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research, the Office of Research Administration and NSF awardees on the IUPUI faculty will focus on how to prepare and submit grant proposals to the NSF. Highlighting the event is a panel discussion by current NSF reviewers who will provide an in-depth look into the peer-review process.

$100,000 Transformational Impact Fellowship goes to Herron Professor Greg Hull for patient-based digital art project

Herron School of Art and Design Professor Greg Hull’s collaborative proposal for the Installation of a work by senior Jenn Brown (in scissor shirt) at IUPUI University Library.“Touchstone Project,” which would produce digital works made of light and controlled by input from hospital patients, earned a $100,000 Transformational Impact Fellowship from the Arts Council of Indianapolis.

Hull, whose work has often included the use of projected light, teaches sculpture. He is one of the first two people to earn the new two-year fellowship, funded by Lilly Endowment Inc., announced at the Arts Council’s annual Start With Art luncheon on September 4.

Hull’s collaborators include Assistant Professor Juliet King, director of Herron’s graduate Art Therapy Program, and Dr. Robert Pascuzzi, chair of the Department of Neurology at the Indiana University School of Medicine.

The project will provide a way for patients—including those with limited mobility because of neurological conditions such as ALS and Parkinson’s disease—“to interact with and generate engaging imagery that they can experience and change in real time, as well as potentially share with a larger audience,” said Hull.

He and his partners hope to give the patients who participate a sense of identity, autonomy and confidence through the art, as a way to combat the depression and anxiety that often come with such a diagnosis.

The project outcome will be works created in response to data collected from patient sensors and translated through an artist-designed interface. The works can be displayed on monitors or projected at varying scales and experienced privately by the patient or publicly in an installation space.

“This project will open new avenues for partnership across disciplines. It’s an honor to be part of pioneering work that can help people, and perhaps, with further research, become a tool for art therapists everywhere,” said King.

Shannon Linker, vice president of the Arts Council said, “The new Fellowship gives artists the opportunity to be at the center of the project, not brought in as an afterthought. Many artists have an altruistic nature that constantly seeks to better their surroundings. These partnership-based projects allow artists to create something meaningful in keeping with their art practice, but also fulfill their need to positively impact their community.”

Linker said that the Arts Council collected “63 submissions from artists and artist teams working in literary and visual arts, dance, music and theater. Within those submissions there were hundreds of artists and partner groups involved in thinking about amazing ways art can help transform a place or idea.”

Colleagues from arts service organizations in Miami Beach, Baltimore, Chicago, Cincinnati and South Miami Beach formed an e-panel to select the finalists. They did not know the fellowship applicants.

“The e-panel narrowed down the submissions and came up with their own concerns and highlights. Then the grants committee of our board of directors interviewed the lead artist for each finalist project and asked some tough questions—questions that came from the e-panel as well as questions that related to Indianapolis and our community specifically,” Linker said. “The panelists were especially drawn to the proposal Hull put forward because of his team’s potential impact on the world of Art Therapy.”

The Arts Council will be documenting the progress of both fellows (Brian Fonseca of Phoenix Theater is the other award recipient) over the course of the two years and plans to share highlights via video and other means. “The impact may be hard to measure at first,” Linker said. “We understand that this project may just be the beginning of a magnificent idea that will grow over many years.”

Discussion: Vietnam War protestors, reporter to share story of how they exposed FBI secret surveillance program

Date: Monday, Nov. 9, 2015John Raines, Vietnam Protestor and Activist
Time: 7:00 PM-9:00Pm
Locaton: Phoenix Theater, 749 N. Park Ave.

INDIANAPOLIS — It was 1971. The nation was gripped by anti-war and civil-rights protests.

John and Bonnie Raines were part of an eight-member group Bonnie Raines, Vietnam Protsor and Activistof anti-Vietnam War protestors who broke into an FBI office outside of Philadelphia and stole as many as 1,000 documents. The group leaked the files to journalists, who used them to produce months of headlines. The stolen documents would expose COINTELPRO, a secret FBI surveillance program that targeted Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Angela Davis and many others.

The Raineses will take the stage in Indianapolis next month to share their story of civil disobedience, civil rights and the role of government surveillance in modern society during a public panel discussion. A related film will be shown the next day at the Central Library location of the Indianapolis Public Library.

Betty Medsger, the Washington Post reporter who broke the COINTELPRO story and revealed the identities of the burglars in her 2014 book, “The Burglary: The Discovery of J. Edgar Hoover’s Secret FBI,” will join the Raineses for the panel discussion, titled “Surveillance, Resistance, and Civil Rights,” from 7 to 9 p.m. Monday, Nov. 9 at the Phoenix Theater, 749 N. Park Ave.

The IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute is the event’s sponsor. Free registration is available online.

Lecture: Celebrated digital computer artist Jason Seiler to speak at IUPUI Oct. 29

Date: October 29, 2015Jason Seiler cover illustration for Time magazine
Time: 6:00 PM
Location: Room CE 450B in the Campus Center, 420 University Blvd.

INDIANAPOLIS — Jason Seiler, perhaps the most celebrated digital computer artist in the world, will speak at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis on Oct 29. The event is free and open to the public.

Seiler, whose caricatures and illustrations have been featured on the covers of Rolling Stone, Billboard, Time, The New Yorker and many other publications, will discuss his work and demonstrate the illustration techniques he uses in Photoshop.

The presentation will take place in Room CE 450B in the Campus Center, 420 University Blvd., beginning at 6 p.m.

“For anyone involved in the digital computer arts field, this is a rare opportunity to see and meet a living legend who is still delivering new digital art daily,” said Dan Baldwin, director of computer graphics technology in the School of Engineering and Technology’s Department of Computer Information and Graphics Technology.

The department and the student chapter of SIGGRAPH IUPUI are hosting the event. The artist will sign copies of his book, “The Complete Artist: A Guide on How to Succeed in the Creative Industry,” following his presentation.

Seiler is a Chicago-based artist who studied fine-art illustration at the American Academy of Art in Chicago for two years before beginning his professional work in earnest.

In addition to illustrations, Seiler has worked with Imaginism Studios, including as a character designer on Tim Burton’s “Alice In Wonderland,” helping create such characters as the Red Queen, the Tweedles and the Bandersnatch. Most recently, Seiler painted six stamps for the United States Postal Service’s Forever series.

Seiler illustrates for publications digitally using a Wacom Cintiq, the same technology the Computer Information and Graphics Technology department installed in the first full lab of Wacom Cintiqs at IUPUI.

IUPUI University Library honored for digital archiving of 120-year-old African-American newspaper

INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis University Library was unnamedamong the honorees as the nation’s fourth-oldest surviving African-American newspaper celebrated its 120th anniversary.

The Indianapolis Recorder, a weekly newspaper, marked 12 decades of publication with an awards ceremony and a reception Oct. 15 at the Indiana State Museum. More than 200 people attended the public event, “The Art of Storytelling.”

The newspaper presented 20 awards honoring “the legacy of those individuals who have played a monumental role in the continuing mission and vision of the paper to educate and inform generations of readers to come.” Honorees included the paper’s creators, columnists and staffers, and longtime community supporters.

University Library’s award recognized its service in digitizing the archives of the Indianapolis newspaper. The Indianapolis Recorder Digital Collection provides access to the paper’s 1899-2003 editions. The Recorder is the longest-published African-American paper in Indiana.

“We believe we are one of the first African-American papers in the nation to be digitized,” said Victoria Davis, the Recorder’s newsroom manager.

Newspapers and print publications in general, especially black publications, have faced challenges with digitalization, Davis said. Having the University Library collection has been invaluable to the Recorder’s readers, who have been able to look up family history, research community events and reflect on historical events through the collection, she said.

“A lot of people use it, and they are really excited that they can do that from the comfort of their own home using the computer,” said Davis, who anticipates the library-newspaper collaboration producing a second project.

“We hope to have our sister publication, The Indiana Minority Business Magazine, digitized as well,” Davis said.

The Indianapolis Recorder Digital Collection currently is the library’s most popular digital collection, averaging about 50 visits and 1,000 pages downloaded each day, according to a library audit. The Recorder collection is one of more than 80 digitized cultural-heritage collections available online through the University Library Center for Digital Scholarship.

The Recorder was founded in 1899 by George P. Stewart and William H. Porter as a two-page church bulletin.

University Library Dean David W. Lewis and Jenny Johnson, digital scholarship outreach librarian, attended the event and accepted the award for the library.

“We are really honored to be a part of such an important community resource. The Indianapolis Recorder is the most significant resource that documents the African-American community in Indiana,” Lewis said. “The award is a recognition of a really good partnership. They trusted us with their content in a way that is not typical. The award shows that we earned the trust they put in us. ”

The library’s award is a framed collage including the cover of the Recorder’s commemorative book, the ceremony invitation and a replica of the paper’s front page with a story thanking the library for its contribution.

Other Recorder anniversary honorees included Amos Brown, award-winning radio host and columnist; Arthur Carter, Tuskegee airman; Mari Evans, poet and author; Wilma Moore, archivist with the Indiana Historical Society; and Barbara Turner, descendant of founder George Stewart.

Funding: Russell Sage Foundation Program on Social Inequality

Russell Sage Foundation Program on Social Inequalityth

Sponsor deadline
: January 5, 2016, Letter of Inquiry

The Russell Sage Foundation’s program on Social Inequality supports innovative research on whether rising economic inequality has affected social, political, and economic institutions, and the extent to which increased inequality has affected equality of opportunity, social mobility, and the intergenerational transmission of advantage. We seek investigator-initiated research projects that will broaden our understanding of the causes and consequences of rising economic inequalities in the United States.

Funding is available for secondary analysis of data or for original data collection. We are especially interested in novel uses of existing data, as well as analyses of new or under-utilized data. Proposals to conduct laboratory or field experiments, in-depth qualitative interviews, and ethnographies are also encouraged. Smaller projects might consist of exploratory fieldwork, a pilot study, or the analysis of existing data.

The Foundation encourages methodological variety and inter-disciplinary collaboration. All proposed projects must have well-developed conceptual frameworks and research designs. Analytical models must be specified and research questions and hypotheses (where applicable) must be clearly stated.​

Spirit and Place Festival | 1971: Paranoia, Surveillance, and the American Dream

1971 Film FlyerThe IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute presents the Spirit and Place Festival Event 1971: Paranoia, Surveillance, and The American Dream.

Date: November 10, 2015
Time: 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
Location: Indianapolis Central Library, 40 E St Clair St, Indianapolis, IN 46204
Free tickets available here

During the 1960s and 70s, thousands asked why the American Dream was out of reach to so many. They organized. They protested. They sought to make America more equal—and entrenched interests fought back. The FBI, led by J. Edgar Hoover, spread paranoia and distrust by use of surveillance, infiltration, and misinformation. The documentary film 1971 tells the story of the protesters and the journalists who exposed COINTELPRO, a secret FBI surveillance program that targeted Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, Angela Davis, and others.

Spirit and Place Festival Logo

After a screening of 1971, join in discussion with filmmaker Johanna Hamilton and Bonnie and John Raines, two of the individuals who broke into FBI offices in 1971 to bring truth to light.

Supported by the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial LibraryIndiana Humanities, and the Indianapolis Public Library.

 

Surveillance, Resistance, and Civil Rights

IUPUI Arts And Humanities Institute presents a discussion on Surveillance, Resistance, and Civil Rights.John and Bonnie Raines image

Date: November 9, 2015
Time: 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
Location: Phoenix Theatre Indianapolis, 749 North Park Avenue, Indianapolis, IN 46202
Click here for free tickets.

During the 1960s and 70s, thousands asked why the American Dream was out of reach to so many. They organized. They protested. They sought to make a more equal America and entrenched interests fought back. The FBI, led by J. Edgar Hoover, spread paranoia and distrust by use of surveillance, infiltration, and misinformation.

This event will introduce Indianapolis audiences to the story of a group of activists that broke into an FBI office in 1971. Their act of disobedience exposed COINTELPRO, a secret FBI surveillance program that targeted Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, Angela Davis, and many others.

The eight individuals who took part in the burglary made their identities public in 2014. Two of them, John and Bonnie Raines, as well as Betty Medsger, the Washington Post reporter who broke the story, will be on stage to discuss the civil disobedience, civil rights, and the role of government surveillance in modern society.

Supported by the Phoenix Theatre and the Vonnegut Memorial Library.

Reiberg Reading Series: Amy Quan Barry

Amy Quan Barry FlyerThe IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and the IUPUI Department of English present the Reiberg Reading Series featuring Amy Quan Barry

Date: November 5, 2015
Time: 7:30 pm
Location: Lilly Auditorium, IUPUI Library; 755 W. Michigan St.
Click here for free tickets

Amy Quan Barry is the author of the four poetry collections Asylum, Controvertibles, Water Puppets, and most recently Loose Strife. Her poems have appeared in The New Yorker, The Missouri Review, Ploughshares, The Kenyon Review, and other literary publications. She is the recipient of the Agnes Lynch Starrett Prize (for Asylum). Her third book, Water Puppets, won the AWP Donald Hall Prize for Poetry and was a PEN/Open Book finalist. She has received NEA Fellowships in both fiction and poetry. Her novel, She Weeps Each Time You’re Born, tells the tumultuous history of modern Vietnam as experienced by a young girl born under mysterious circumstances a few years before the country’s reunification.

Support for the Reiberg Reading Series comes from the Reiberg family, IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, the IUPUI University Library, the IUPUI Office of Academic Affairs, and IUPUI Division of Undergraduate Education.

Reiberg Reading Series: Dan Wakefield

Dan WakefieldThe IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and the IUPUI Department of English present the Reiberg Reading Series featuring Dan Wakefield

Date: November 4, 2015
Time: 7:30 pm
Location: IUPUI University Library, Lilly Auditorium, 755 W. Michigan St.
Get your free tickets here

A native of Indianapolis, Dan Wakefield is a novelist, journalist and screenwriter whose books include Revolt in the South, Going All The Way, New York in the Fifties, The Hijacking of Jesus: How the Religious Right Distorts Christianity and Promotes Prejudice and Hate, and many more. His best-selling novels Going All The Way and Starting Over were produced as feature films. He has recently edited If This Isn’t Nice, What Is?: Advice to the Young, a selection of commencement speeches by Kurt Vonnegut, a longtime friend.

Wakefield has been the recipient of a Neiman Fellowship in Journalism, the Bernard DeVoto Fellowship to the Bread Loaf Writers Conference, a Rockefeller Grant for Creative Writing, and an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. He has taught in the writing programs at Boston University, the University of Massachusetts at Boston, Emerson College, The Iowa Writers Workshop, and is presently Writer in Residence at Florida International University in Miami. He has been a staff writer for The Nation, a Contributing Editor of The Atlantic Monthly, a Contributing Writer for GQ, a Contributing Editor of The Yoga Journal, and is on the advisory board of Image: A Journal of The Arts and Religion.

In 2015, NUVO awarded Wakefield the Lifetime Achievement Cultural Vision Award.

Sponsored by the Reiberg family, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the IUPUI Department of English, IUPUI University Library, IUPUI University College, IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, IU School of Informatics, IUPUI Office of Academic Affairs, and IUPUI Division of Undergraduate Education.