Conference Fund

The Office of Academic Affairs is pleased to announce matching support for academic conferences or symposia organized by faculty members or professional staff and convened in Indianapolis [preferably at IUPUI] between July 1, 2014, and June 30, 2015. Those events that bring external audiences to IUPUI will be given preference. Awards will be made up to $1,500, if matched equally by the school or department.

Requests must predate the conference or symposium by at least one month. The Office of Academic Affairs will review submissions and make awards. Successful applicants will acknowledge IUPUI support in all publicity and in any publications resulting from the conference or symposium.

Brief proposals (not exceeding two pages) should be submitted with the completed application form, and should include:

  • topic, objectives, and description of the conference or symposium
  • venue
  • summary (up to one paragraph) of the background of each prospective and/or confirmed speaker or key participant
  • expected outcomes of the conference (impacts across the IUPUI campus, press releases, proceedings, publications)
  • budget: categories include honoraria, food, lodging, travel, and supplies (awardees should consult with Research and Sponsored Programs to determine allowable expenses for receptions or social events)

Please submit IUPUI Conference Fund applications to Melissa Lavitt, Ph.D., Senior Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs [mlavitt@iupui.edu] in the Office of Academic Affairs, AO126.

The IUPUI Conference Fund Proposal Form for 2014-2015 is available here.

Mack Center Call for Fellowship Applications

facet-full-logoThe Mack Center enhances teaching by advancing the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL). Administered by FACET, the center stimulates inquiry in SoTL, promotes the results of those inquiries, and fosters educational excellence at Indiana University and internationally.

The Mack Center supports SoTL research by Mack Fellows and other faculty to develop highly effective, evidence-based strategies for enhancing teaching and learning; sponsors conferences, workshops, and publications that develop faculty members’ and graduate students’ teaching skills and share knowledge about SoTL; nurtures the growth of university, state, and global communities of teacher-scholars; and collaborates with people and programs worldwide–including FACET initiatives such as the Future Faculty Teaching Fellows Summer Institute and journals–to advance the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.

Each year the Mack Center selects a group of fellows to conduct ambitious research in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning and to participate in our community of SoTL scholars. Mack Fellows receive $1000 in initial research funds and $1000 after they complete their project and submit a paper to a scholarly journal.

For the complete call for submissions, click here.
If you need additional information, contact Beth Kern by email or by phone at (574)520-4352.

Grant Writing Workshop: IU New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities Grant Program

DATE: September 3, 2014
TIME: 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM
LOCATION: IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, Conference Room, University Library 4th Floor

This session will provide participants with an overview of the IU New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities Grant Program. It will offer information on how to apply and, more importantly, on how to develop a competitive proposal. Faculty recipients and members of the New Frontiers grants advisory groups will be present to answer questions.

Register here:

Digital Arts & Humanities Workshops for 2014-15

 

Digital Arts and Humanities Workshop LogoAre you interested in creating a professional blog but don’t know where to start? Have you ever wished that you had the skills to visualize your research data? Do you want to know how to use social media to share your work with the public? The Digital Arts and Humanities Workshop is a new series presented by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute and the IUPUI Center for Digital Scholarship. It will provide hands-on training in skills such as scholarly social media and blogging, data mining, data visualization, online exhibitions, and more. This year, our workshops are targeted to beginners, so please take this opportunity to plunge into the fascinating world of the digital arts and humanities. Workshop events are free to IUPUI faculty, research staff, graduate students, and local non-profit professionals. Space is limited, so be sure to reserve your place as soon as possible.


 

“Introduction to Data Visualization I: Visualization with Gephi” 9 September 2014, 12:00-2:30, UL 2120

Gephi is a popular open source program that facilitates network analysis and data visualization. It is a powerful tool used by universities and news organizations, including the New York Times. However, it can be a bit imposing for beginners. This workshop provides novices with a hands-on introduction to basic data visualization with Gephi. Attendees will become familiar with the Gephi interface and will emerge with basic of Gephi’s applications. Skills learned in this workshop will have relevance to basic research as well as teaching and public engagement. Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/introduction-to-data-visualization-i-visualization-with-gephi-tickets-12090774833


“Introduction to Scholarly Blogging” 6 November 2014, 12:00-2:00, UL 2120

There is a robust and growing community of scholars who share their research through blogging platforms such as WordPress, Blogger, and Drupal. Not only is blogging a way to engage with the public, but it is becoming increasingly important in creating and sustaining scholarly networks and communication. By the end of this workshop, attendees will have a blog up and running on WordPress.com, and they will understand the fundamentals of sharing information, building networks, and engaging with the public. Skills learned in this workshop will have relevance to research, teaching, and public engagement. Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/introduction-to-scholarly-blogging-tickets-12090995493


“Introduction to Data Visualization II: Data Normalization for Network Analysis in Gephi” 16 September 2014, 12:00-2:30, UL 2120

Gephi is a popular open source program that facilitates network analysis and data visualization. It is a powerful tool used by universities and news organizations, including the New York Times. However, it can be a bit imposing for beginners. This workshop provides novices with a hands-on introduction to network analysis with Gephi. Network analysis allows researchers to analyze and visualize qualitative and quantitative relationships between objects, people, and groups. This workshop will focus on how to capture and organize data so that Gephi can visualize network relationships. Skills learned in this workshop will have relevance to basic research as well as teaching and public engagement. Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/intro-to-data-visualization-ii-network-analysis-in-gephi-tickets-12090929295


“Introduction to TEI for the Digital Humanities” 11 February 2015, 12:00-2:30, UL 2120

The Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) sets the standards for text-encoding, born-digital editing, and digital humanities projects.  It is the preferred format for granting agencies such as the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). TEI’s  guidelines define an XML format for textual materials represented in a digital form.

This workshop provides attendees with a hands-on introduction to basic text encoding with TEI. It assumes attendees have some basic knowledge of XML or other markup languages. Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/digital-humanities-workshop-caitlin-pollock-introduction-to-tei-tickets-15408683788?ref=etckt


“Social Media for Scholars” 11 March 2015, 12:00-1:30, UL 2120

Twitter. Facebook. Instagram. Reddit. What do these platforms have to do with scholarly research? As it turns out, quite a bit. Scholars are turning to these platforms to expand the reach of their work — communicating with networks of specialists, students, and non-specialists alike. In this workshop, attendees will learn about the various social media platforms and how to use them in a scholarly capacity. Skills learned in this workshop will have relevance to research, teaching, and public engagement. Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/social-media-for-scholars-tickets-12091039625

 

 

Fashion Design course among fall electives

UntitledIn response to many requests from IUPUI students, Herron School of Art and Design is happy to offer “Fashion Design” this fall. The three credit-hour elective will be held on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:00 p.m to 8:30 p.m. in room 261 of Eskenazi Hall.

 Jo Dean Tipton, a fashion and textiles designer, entrepreneur and professional in the fashion industry, will instruct. Tipton has designed costumes for dance, gymnastics and cheerleading, as well as textile prints. She has taught fabric painting in a workshop

in Taos, New Mexico, and worked with textiles as a fine art medium. Tipton just completed her master’s degree Apparel Design from Ball State University. She studied as an undergraduate at the Fashion Institute of Technology and Purdue University. Most recently,

she exhibited last April in the group show Shaping Visions in the Cultural Arts Gallery in IUPUI’s Campus Center.

The course will explore design principles that are the foundation of creating marketable ideas and designs for the fashion industry.  Students will learn how designs are transformed into products, apply design principles and elements to solve design problems and communicate creative concepts effectively. Students will also produce technically accurate and aesthetically pleasing designs that communicate their ideas visually, investigate and select resources to support the design and solve a given problem independently.

 Enrollment is limited to the first 18 students.

HER-E 220  EXPLORING ART (3 CR)  32809
Variable Title course: FASHION DESIGN
Tuesdays and Thursdays 6:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Herron School of Art and Design room 261

For questions, please contact Anita Giddings by email or by phone at (317)278-9492

IUPUI to significantly bolster its journalism/public relations program

Indianapolis bachelor’s/master’s program moves from Bloomington-based School of Journalism management to IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI

SLA at IUPUI logoGraduate and undergraduate journalism and public relations students at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will have access to an array of new resources beginning July 1, when the long-established Indianapolis location of the IU School of Journalism shifts management from IU Bloomington to the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. The program will be known as the IU Department of Journalism and Public Relations at IUPUI.

The move comes as the IU School of Journalism at Bloomington merges on July 1 with the Department of telecommunications and Department of Communication and Culture to form The Media School.

With the transition to local oversight, the IUPUI journalism department will now offer students and faculty additional resources in academic and career advising, curriculum development, research funding, alumni engagement, philanthropic support and more.

School officials also envision partnerships with other departments and schools on campus — such as telecommunications, informatics, event management, medicine and athletics — to further enhance journalism and public relations programs focusing on sports and health/life sciences, and to give students the versatility needed in a rapidly changing profession.

“We’re honored to have our roots in the 100-year-old IU School of Journalism,” said Jonas Bjork, who will become the first chair of the new department. “But as one of IUPUI’s smallest schools, we didn’t have the depth of resources we needed to take our program to the next level. This move — reinforced by unanimous support from our faculty and staff — will help us achieve that.”

Bill Blomquist, dean of the School of Liberal Arts, said the merger is tailor-made for an urban-serving institution in a capital city ripe with professional opportunities.

“The skills and thinking we teach in journalism and public relations –– the ability to search out and explain information — are much in demand among all kinds of employers,” Blomquist said. “Developing those professional skills, along with the versatility instilled by liberal learning, will help prepare our graduates not only for their first jobs but also for the careers that follow.

“What’s more, in this city full of sports, health, life science, government and other communication opportunities, our classroom learning is supplemented and complemented by real-world learning — internships, service projects, guest speakers and more — that you can’t match anywhere else in this state and in few places around the nation.”

Bjork said the name change — to include public relations — is a decision based on the changing nature of the profession and the marketplace.

“While journalists and public relations professionals are, in many places, treated as adversaries, many of the theories and practices we teach journalists and public relations professionals are, in fact, complementary,” Bjork said. “Often, the two groups of professionals must work together, so it helps that we teach them together here at IUPUI with faculty members who bring real-world experience to the table.”

The new Department of Journalism and Public Relations will offer bachelor’s degrees, master’s degrees and certificates in journalism and public relations with specializations available in sports journalism, health/life science public relations, advertising and other areas.

IUPUI Motorsports engineering and furniture design students build Formula-style race car

391007_w296The Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Formula-style race car competing this week in Lincoln, Neb., is the unique collaborative work of students from two diverse programs on the IUPUI campus – motorsports engineering and furniture design.

The vehicle is one of more than 90 cars entered in the Formula SAE student design competition organized by SAE International, formerly known as the Society of Automotive Engineers.

Students from the motorsports engineering program in the Purdue School of Engineering & Technology at IUPUI designed, built and tested the majority of the IUPUI race car. However, the bodywork is the team work of motorsports students and students in the furniture design program of the Herron School of Art and Design at IUPUI.

“This inventive collaboration is a perfect example of the relevance of art and design to a broad array of applications beyond ‘fine art.’ It also serves as an example of the opportunities afforded to students at IUPUI by faculty who are more than willing to work across school boundaries with their colleagues,” said Glennda McGann, assistant dean for development and external affairs at Herron.

Pete Hylton, associate professor of mechanical engineering technology, is director of the motorsports engineering program at IUPUI, the first U.S. university to offer a bachelor’s degree in motorsports engineering.

Furniture craftsman Cory Robinson, associate professor and chair of Herron’s fine arts department, directed the Herron students working on the race car project.

“It was very interesting to see the kinds of machines that they use to make furniture….and to figure out how to translate our needs to their equipment,” said Nikky Saxon, a motorsports engineering student who worked on the race car project. “The Herron students were very helpful and easy to work with.  It was a great experience.”

According to the description on the SAE website, the concept behind Formula SAE is that a fictional manufacturing company has contracted a design team to develop a small Formula-style race car for a non-professional weekend autocross racer. Each collegiate team designs, builds and tests a prototype based on a series of rules set up both to ensure onsite event operations and promote clever problem solving.

Motorsports engineering students developed the IUPUI race car’s basic shape using 3D computer modeling to fit a shape around the chassis, including an aerodynamic underbody which provides ground effects. The shape of the underside of the body creates down-force by channeling the airflow through a venturi shaped passageway, similar to what is done on IndyCar and Formula One racecars.

The IUPUI engineering students handed off their design to the Herron students who went to work using their school’s gantry mill — typically used to shape wood for furniture design projects — to shape the pieces which were assembled to form the car’s required body shape.

A fiberglass mold was then made of this shape, and finally a composite layup was made using that mold and it was cured with the help of Indy Performance Composites to complete the body parts.  These were then fitted to the chassis, which is a steel tube-frame configuration built with materials donated to the program by AED Motorsports of Indianapolis.

“We were able to make a much more complex shape by using the Herron gantry mill,” Hylton said. “We were able to design the car on the computer using 3D modeling and translate that to hardware using the gantry mill. Working with specialists from another (non-engineering) realm is excellent experience for our students….and very real world.”

The IUPUI vehicle completed its tech inspection Wednesday as one of less than 40 entries to accomplish that requirement on Day 1 of the four-day racing event.

Design judging took place Thursday. Dynamic competitions such as acceleration, skidpad, autocross, and endurance events will take place today and Saturday.

IUPUI last competed in Formula SAE in 2011 when the school was the top finishing rookie team at the event held at Michigan International Speedway.

For further information, contact Motorsports Engineering Director Pete Hylton or FSAE faculty advisor Andy Borme.

Museums, Libraries, and Cultural Organizations: Planning Grants

neh_at_logoNEH’s Division of Public Programs supports activities that engage millions of Americans in understanding significant humanities works and ideas. At the center of every NEH-funded public humanities project is a core set of humanities ideas developed by scholars, matched to imaginative formats that bring those ideas to life for people of all ages and all walks of life. Projects must be analytical and deeply grounded in humanities scholarship in a discipline such as history, religion, anthropology, jurisprudence, or art history. NEH is a national funding agency, so the projects we support must demonstrate the potential to attract a broad, general audience. We welcome humanities projects tailored to particular groups, such as families, youth (including K-12 students), teachers, seniors, at-risk communities, and veterans, but they should also strive to cultivate a more inclusive audience.

Museums, Libraries, and Cultural Organizations grants provide support for museums, libraries, historic places, and other organizations that produce public programs in the humanities.

Grants support the following formats:

  • exhibitions at museums, libraries, and other venues;
  • interpretations of historic places, sites, or regions; and
  • book/film discussion programs; living history presentations; and other face-to-face programs at libraries, community centers, and other public venues.

NEH encourages projects that explore humanities ideas through multiple formats. Proposed projects might include complementary components that deepen an audience’s understanding of a subject: for example, a museum exhibition might be accompanied by a website, mobile app, or discussion programs.

Planning grants support the early stages of project development, including consultation with scholars, refinement of humanities themes, preliminary design, testing, and audience evaluation.

Program Statistics: 

In the last five competitions the Museums, Libraries, and Cultural Organizations: Planning Grants program received an average of 64 applications. The program made an average of six awards per competition, for a funding ratio of 9 percent.

The number of applications to an NEH grant program can vary widely from competition to competition, as can the funding ratio. Information about the average number of applications and awards in recent competitions is meant only to provide historical context for the current competition. Information on the number of applications and awards in individual competitions is available from publicpgms@neh.gov.

Deadline: August 13, 2014 for projects beginning April, 2015

For more information, contact the staff of NEH’s Division of Public Programs by email or by phone at 202-606-8269. Hearing-impaired applicants can contact NEH via TDD at 1-866-372-2930.

Learning Environments Grant

ctlThrough the awarding of small grants, the Learning Environments Grant (LEG) supports the creation of innovative, engaging formal and informal learning environments that meet the needs of both faculty and students.

Proposals will be ranked on the following criterion:

  1. The project must have a demonstrable positive impact on learning
  2. The number of students who will benefit
  3. The project must enable new/critical academic experiences for faculty and/or students
  4. The creativity of projects
  5. The project provides opportunities for faculty-student/student-student interaction
  6. Availability of any additional needed funds
  7. Plans/funds should be in place for repairs and maintenance of all items purchased

*Areas renovated within the past 10 years are not eligible to receive this grant.

Eligibility: Schools and departments at IUPUI and IUPUC are eligible for the LEG.  Registered student groups may also apply.
Submission: Should you have any questions about the online submission process please call the Center for Teaching and Learning at (317) 274-1300 or email.
Deadline: Friday, October 17