Medical Humanities and Health Studies present lecture on hoodia laws in South Africa

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Thursday, February 6, 2014
12:00 Noon—1:00 p.m.
University Library, Room 1126

The Medical Humanities & Health Studies Program and the Hall Center for Law & Health are co-sponsoring a visit by Laura Foster, J.D., Ph.D. Her presentation is entitled “Re-inventing Hoodia: Patent Law and Benefit Sharing as Boundary Objects in Southern Africa.” Foster is Assistant Professor of Gender Studies and Affiliate Faculty, Maurer School of Law at Indiana University.

In 1998 researchers with the South African Center for Scientific and Industrial Research (“CSIR”) isolated and patented certain chemical compositions within the Hoodia gordonii plant responsible for suppressing appetite. Hoodia gordonii suddenly emerged as a patented invention poised to be a blockbuster anti-obesity drug. At the same time, the plant became a symbol of South Africa as nation of innovation, and Indigenous San peoples publicly accused scientists of stealing their knowledge of the plant.Advancing a powerful global campaign, San peoples negotiated a benefit sharing agreement with CSIR giving them 6% of the potential revenue from future Hoodia sales. Hopes for Hoodia, however, ended in 2009 when Unilever terminated the project.

Drawing upon and contributing to feminist post-colonial science studies, this talk considers Hoodia gordonii as a boundary object that brings the divergent interests and stakes of various social actors together. Furthermore, it unpacks the black box of patent law to ask how both science and law work together to determine who is (or is not) considered an inventor and producer of science.

Free and open to the campus and public, but space is limited. Please RSVP to: medhum@iupui.edu.

Fairbanks Ethics Lecture examines “medical improv”

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Wednesday February 5, 2014
12:00-1:00 p.m.
Riley Outpatient Center Auditorium

Visiting Scholar Katie L. Watson will present deliver a presentation entitled, “Practicing for Practice: Medical Improv, Ethics, and Advanced Communication Skills.” Her talk is co-sponsored by the Kaye Woltman Endowed Visiting Lectureship at the IU School of Nursing.

Objectives:

  1. Identify how medical humanities and applied arts can contribute to improving clinicians’ communication skills, particularly in the emotionally charged, high stakes situations often encountered in clinical practice.
  2. Discuss the parallel between improv skills and skill necessary to resolve ethical conflicts.
  3. Identify how medical improv could enhance clinicians’ skills in the realms of cognition, patient communication, and professional teamwork.

Katie Watson is an assistant professor in the Medical Humanities & Bioethics Program at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, where she is a member of the ethics committee at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Editor of the medical humanities publication Atrium, and an award-winning teacher of bioethics, humanities, and law to medical students and MA students. Professor Watson graduated from NYU School of Law in 1992, and after years as a public interest lawyer she completed fellowships in clinical medical ethics at University of Chicago Medical School’s MacLean Center and in medical humanities at Northwestern. Professor Watson also has a background in theater—she is currently an adjunct faculty member at the training center of Chicago’s Second City theatre—and in 2002 she created what appears to be the country’s first medical school improv seminar designed to teach communication skills, a unique interdisciplinary adaptation she calls “medical improv.”

The Kaye Woltman Endowed Visiting Lectureship is made possible by a generous gift from the Woltman Family to the IU School of Nursing. This inaugural lectureship is part of an initiative to develop and implement best-practice models for enhanced healthcare provider communication with patients and their families at the end-of-life.

The Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics sponsors the Fairbanks Ethics Lecture Series as an educational outreach to physicians and staff of Indiana University Health hospitals and interested others in the central Indiana community. Lectures are free, open to all, and do not require pre-registration. Continuing education credit is offered to physicians, nurses, social workers, and chaplains at no charge, regardless of their institutional affiliation.

**Please Note– Lunch will not be provided. Food & Drinks are not permitted in the ROC Auditorium.**

For questions and comments, please contact Amy Chamness at achamnes@iuhealth.org, or (317) 962-1721. For additional information about the Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics, please visit the Fairbanks Center website.

Elee Wood to speak on experiencing objects in U.S. museums

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The School of Liberal Arts Sabbatical Speaker Series
Campus Center, Room 268
Friday January 31, 2014
4:30 PM – 5:30 p.m.

Professor Elee Wood, Museum Studies, will present a talk entitled “Around the Country in 52 Museums: Finding the Objects of Experience.”

Everyday objects remind us about stories from our lives. Explore how museums can build these connections to transform visitor experiences.

RSVP: libarsvp@iupui.edu with Elee Wood talk in the subject line.

David Bell to speak on HIV and social organization

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The School of Liberal Arts Sabbatical Speaker Series
Campus Center, Room 307
Tuesday January 28, 2014
4:30 – 5:30 p.m.

Professor David Bell, Sociology, will present a lecture entitled “The Social Organization of HIV: Who is Protecting Whom?” His talk focuses on three studies of sexual relationships showing how people are successfully or unsuccessfully–but often unknowingly–protecting themselves and others against HIV.

RSVP: libarsvp@iupui.edu with David Bell talk in the subject line.

Vera Bradley Foundation pledges $15 million to IU Simon Cancer Center

The Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer announced today a $15 million pledge to support breast cancer research at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center.

This new pledge adds to the previous $20 million in commitments completed in November 2013 and will continue to fund the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer Research Laboratories, named for the foundation in 2010. The completion of this pledge will bring the total giving to the IU Simon Cancer Center to $35 million.

“We strongly believe in the research team’s focus: precision therapeutics,” said Catherine Hill, executive director of Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer. “Stated simply, precision therapeutics is giving the right medicine to the right patient at the right time based on genetic factors of both the patient and the tumor.”

“Since 1998, the Vera Bradley Foundation has been the IU Simon Cancer Center’s partner in conducting breast cancer research that is saving and extending the lives of women everywhere,” said Patrick J. Loehrer Sr., M.D., director of the IU Simon Cancer Center. “Their $15 million pledge is a testament to their commitment to make a difference in women’s lives. The researchers at the IU Simon Cancer Center will honor the trust they have placed in us by our commitment to our mission to conduct novel, collaborative research that has a meaningful impact on patients with cancer and to train the next generation of scientists to carry forward this mission.”

The gift will support IU researchers as they:

  • Search for gene alterations that drive specific subtypes of breast cancer and look for new or existing drugs that are more likely to be effective
  • Identify genetic markers that will allow them to predict, with a high level of accuracy, who will suffer from life-changing and life-threatening side effects to treatment, or whose cancer is likely to metastasize
  • Combine this knowledge to deliver clinical trials to patients with the goal of improving cure rates and quality of life

The gift will also establish the Vera Bradley Foundation Scholars Program to train scientists and physicians who will be the future leaders in breast cancer research and care. As a result of support from the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer, the number of IU researchers focused on breast cancer has grown to 38, up from six in 1999.

“We are extraordinarily grateful for the commitment and generosity of The Vera Bradley Foundation, which is emerging as one of the nation’s leading supporters of breast cancer research. This generous pledge will help the IU School of Medicine further advance not only its research and education missions, but also to translate these findings to improve the health of women with breast cancer,” said Jay Hess, M.D., Ph.D., MHSA, dean of the IU School of Medicine.

The Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer recently completed its 2013 fiscal year, raising $2.7 million. The Foundation’s main benefactor is Vera Bradley Inc., which contributes approximately $1 million each year to the cause. Additional support comes from several sources, including events and individual donations. Vera Bradley’s co-founders began raising funds for a cure after the loss of a dear friend to the disease in 1993. To learn more about the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer visit http://www.verabradley.org.

Call for applications: Newberry/NEH seminar, “Bridging National Borders in North America”

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A National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar for College and University Faculty
Monday, June 2, 2014 to Friday, June 27, 2014
Deadline to apply: March 4, 2014

The Newberry Library’s Dr. William Scholl Center for American History and Culture will host a four-week summer 2014 NEH seminar for college and university faculty that will explore the history of North America’s border and borderlands, providing participants with a stipend of $3,300.

In keeping with the recent work in the field and the collection strengths of the Newberry Library, this seminar will take a broad geographic approach, framing borderlands as distinct places at particular moments in time where no single people or sovereignty imposed its will. The organizing theme is the process of border-making.

The seminar will examine three aspects of this theme: how nation-states claiming exclusive territorial sovereignty re-drew the continent’s map; the intersection and sometimes collision of these efforts with other ways of organizing space and people; and the social and political consequences of the enforcement of national territoriality.

Two questions will guide examinations of these developments: how did diverse peoples challenge national borders, or use or alter them for their own purposes? And, how does consideration of these topics recast our understanding of the national and intertwined histories of Mexico, the United States, and Canada?

Please visit the Newberry website for more information and how to apply. Contact Benjamin Johnson or the Scholl Center (scholl@newberry.org) for more information.

Taylor Symposium marks 25th year by exploring “Politics. Race. Place.”

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The 25th Joseph T. Taylor Symposium, hosted by the IU School of Liberal Arts at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, will focus on how 25 years of demographic and social change has shaped Indianapolis while exploring the topic, “Politics. Race. Place.”

The symposium will take place from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 25, at the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd.

Registration deadline is Feb. 18, but guests are encouraged to register early to reserve a seat.

A schedule and registration are available on the School of Liberal Arts website. To register by phone or for more information, call 812-855-4224 or 800-933-9330, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, or email iuconfs@indiana.edu. Symposium attendance is free and open to the general public, but conference registration is required. Lunch is available for a fee: Single luncheon tickets are $40 each or $35 if purchased by Feb. 3. Single sponsor tickets are $75, and patron tables of 10 are $550.

Leading local practitioners, politicians, policy-makers and researchers will come together with symposium attendees to examine how shifting demographics and an increasingly diverse population have contributed to the direction of the city and its future path.

The event begins with a conversation between William Blomquist, professor of political science and dean of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, and Rozelle Boyd, retired president of the Indianapolis City County Council, discussing “Understanding the Evolving Indianapolis Electorate.”

“The Taylor Symposium has been a signature event drawing campus and community together for a remarkable 25 years now,” said William Blomquist, dean of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. “I’m looking forward to this year’s symposium in particular, talking about political change in our city over the past quarter-century with Rozelle Boyd, and listening to the other participants—it’s a terrific line-up.”

Panel discussions follow on the topics of “White Flight and the Politics of Place” and ” Building a Multicultural Community.”

Panelists and moderators include:

  • Amos Brown, director of strategic research, 100.9 Radio Now.
  • Patricia Castaneda, cultural consultant, SosaGroup.
  • Olgen Williams, deputy mayor of Indianapolis.
  • David Coats, associate director, The Polis Center.
  • Terri Morris Downs, executive director, Immigrant Welcome Center.
  • Johnny Goldfinger, associate professor of political science, director of prelaw studies, Marian University.
  • Lun Kham Pieper, attorney at law.
  • John Ketzenberger, president, Indiana Fiscal Policy Institute.

Byron D’Andra Orey, professor and chair of political science at Jackson State University, will deliver the keynote address, “Contemporary Topics in the Study of Race and Politics,” during the symposium luncheon. Luncheon activities also include IUPUI Chancellor Charles R. Bantz’s presentation of the Joseph T. Taylor Excellence in Diversity Award and a performance by the Indianapolis improv group ComedySportz.

In the days leading up the event members of the campus community and visitors will also be able to share their views on race and politics in Indianapolis on the IUPUI Democracy Plaza walls.

LEU continuing credits are available to Indiana’s library professionals for select workshops and, pending approval, CLE credits to attorneys for this event.

For questions about the educational credits or event program, contact Lauralee Wikkerink, lstel@iupui.edu or 317-278-1839.

For the past quarter century, the Joseph T. Taylor Symposium has tackled issues of concern to Indianapolis residents. The symposium is named for the late Joseph T. Taylor, the first dean of the School of Liberal Arts. Taylor is remembered for his commitment to dialogue and diversity. The 2014 symposium is presented by the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI in partnership with the Department of Political Science and the Polis Center, with support from the Spirit & Place Festival, IUPUI Democracy Plaza, and the IUPUI Common Theme Project.

Travel grant for John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture

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The John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture, thanks to generous funding from GlaxoSmithKline, is offering travel grants for scholarly research in the collections of the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Duke University.

The John Hope Franklin Research Center collects and makes available materials that document the experience of African and African Americans in a wide range of subspecialties. Primary source collections of personal papers, family papers, and organizational records are augmented with numerous print sources like books and periodicals. Areas of strength within the holdings of the Rubenstein Library include but are not limited to: history of South Africa, travel and exploration of the African continent, slavery in the American South, Jim Crow in America, Civil Rights, the African American experience in Durham, and 20th century African American Intellectuals.

Any faculty, graduate or undergraduate student, or independent scholar with a research project requiring the use of materials held by the John Hope Franklin Research Center is eligible to apply. Grant money may be used for travel and living expenses while pursuing research at the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library. All applicants must reside outside of a 100-mile radius from Durham, NC. The maximum award per applicant is $1,000.

Applicants are encouraged to search the Rubenstein Library catalogue to ascertain if collections match with their research topics.

The deadline for application is January 31, 2014 by 5:00 PM EST. Recipients will be announced March 28, 2014. Grants must be used between April 2014 and June 2015.

For more information and to download a copy of the application form, please visit the grant homepage.

Deadline extended: applications for Liberal Arts scholarships

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Student applications for Liberal Arts school-wide scholarships – deadline extended from Jan. 15 to Jan. 27, 8:00 AM.

Letters of recommendation remain due Feb. 1, 5:00 p.m. to CA401 or CA243D or via email to samsMgr@iupui.edu or aajones@iupui.edu.

Department specific scholarships and awards have deadlines from Jan. 15-Feb. 25.

All department/programs scholarships and awards must submit recipient information by March 1. The website is now being updated.

This extension allows time for faculty to identify students who may be strong candidates for project-based scholarships that require a faculty mentor, such as:

Mary F. Crisler Scholarship (research project – $3,000 each; up to 5 projects can receive funding), The Loretta Lunsford Scholarship (educational project – $3000 each; up to 10 projects can receive funding) and

Ray Russo Faculty/Student Technology Award (technology in the classroom project – $500, 1 recipient).

This applies to other scholarships on the School of Liberal Arts school-wide scholarships website.

University center founders honored at Walker/Douglass lecture series

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Two founders of university centers focused on African American business ventures were honored for their contributions during an Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis lecture series named for historic businesswoman Madam C.J. Walker.

Juliet E.K. Walker, a pioneer scholar of black business history in America, received the first Madame C.J. Walker Lifetime Achievement Award during the inaugural Madame C.J. Walker/Frederick Douglass Annual Lecture Series on Dec. 6 at the Jewel Center in Indianapolis.

Juliet Walker is the founder of the Center for Black Business History, Entrepreneurship and Technology at the University of Texas at Austin, where she has been a professor of history since 2001.

Bessie House-Soremekun, director of Africana studies in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, received the Global African American Activist Ambassador Award.

House-Soremekun is founding executive director of the Center for Global Entrepreneurship and Sustainable Development, part of the School of Liberal Arts. The center’s mission is to build entrepreneurial capacity and sustainable development initiatives in America and African countries.

Juliet Walker, who earned her Ph.D. in American history from the University of Chicago, is considered the foremost scholar in black business history in America. Her development of that field is linked to the publication of her book, “Free Frank: A Black Pioneer on the Antebellum Frontier.” Her book, “The History of Black Business in America: Capitalism, Race, Entrepreneurship,” was the first comprehensive study of African American businesses.

“It is entirely befitting for Professor Walker to receive this prestigious award … for the first woman to establish a major field in black entrepreneurship to (receive the inaugural) award named after the first female self-made millionaire in the United States,” said Walker’s letter of nomination.

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Bessie House-Soremekun

The Walker/Douglass lecture series was co-hosted and co-created by the Africana Studies Program, an academic unit of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, under the leadership of House-Soremekun, and the Frederick Douglass Papers in in the Institute for American Thought in the School of Liberal Arts, led by Professor John Kaufman-McKivigan.

The theme for this year’s event was “The Life and Times of Madame C.J. Walker: The Historical Development of a Business Empire.” Madam Walker was a self-made African American millionaire, having made a fortune from beauty and hair-care businesses before her death in 1919. Juliet Walker was the luncheon keynote speaker for the event.

The Activist Ambassador Award acknowledges House-Soremekun, also professor of political science and Africana studies at IUPUI, for investing in multicultural networking; exhibiting hope and faith for a brighter future for African-Americans; and bridge building to ensure the African-American community is enlightened and enhanced.

“The presentation of this award is emblematic of the impact that Dr. House-Soremekun has made both at home and abroad,” said David A. Scott Sr., who presented the award to House-Soremekun on behalf of the African American Restoration Movement of Indianapolis and the Globe Changers Movement.