IUPUI administrator chosen for IPS superintendent’s transition team

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An IUPUI administrator is among a group of prestigious national and local leaders chosen to serve on Indianapolis Public Schools Superintendent Lewis D. Ferebee’s transition team, the school district announced Monday.

Patricia Rogan, executive associate dean of the School of Education at IUPUI, is one of seven appointees to the team that will analyze and provide feedback to Ferebee on improving the academic performance, operating efficiencies and communication practices for the district.

Rogan is a professor of special education at the School of Education. She has been a university professor for 30 years with interests in secondary education, transition, supported employment and organizational change. Rogan consults nationally and internationally with schools, adult services and state leaders to promote positive practices and systems change.

“Dr. Rogan’s commitment to educating students is only matched by her commitment to improving the quality of that education. Her intelligence, experience and commitment will drive her contributions to Dr. Ferebee’s transition,” IUPUI Chancellor Charles R. Bantz said.

Other Ferebee transition team members are Kelvin Adams, superintendent, St. Louis Public Schools; Linda L. Kirby, program director, Greater Indianapolis Chamber of Commerce; Terry B. Grier, superintendent, Houston Independent; Amos Brown, director of strategic research and editor, Radio One; and Chris Horan, managing partner, Horan Communications.

The transition team will provide recommendations that will be considered as part of the superintendent’s overarching listening tour, which will help guide the development of the district’s next strategic plan. The team will begin interacting with the IPS community this month and will report its findings and recommendations in March.

Historic Deerfield, Inc. 2014 Undergraduate Fellowship Program in Early American History and Material Culture

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Historic Deerfield, Inc. invites applications for an intensive Summer Fellowship Program in History and Material Culture in Deerfield, MA. Undergraduates enrolled as either juniors or seniors as of January 1, 2014 are eligible for 7 openings in the program, which is designed for students in American Studies, Architecture, Archeology, Art and Art History, Design, History, Material Culture, Preservation and Museum Studies. Each participant receives a full fellowship that covers all expenses associated with the program, including tuition, room and board, and field trips. Limited stipends are available for students with demonstrated need to help cover lost summer income.

Summer Fellows:

  • Live in the historic village
  • Explore history and material culture studies in hands-on classroom seminars, walking tours and room studies with Historic Deerfield staff and visiting lecturers
  • Learn to guide and interpret in Historic Deerfield’s furnished museum houses
  • Conduct original research on New England history and material culture
  • using museum and library collections
  • Go on behind-the-scenes visits to historic sites in New England and take a week-long road trip to museums in the mid-Atlantic and Virginia

Program dates: June 9-August 10, 2014.

Application deadline: February 7, 2014.

Applications are accepted online 

Contact: Barbara A. Mathews Phone: (413) 775-7207; email: bmathews@historic-deerfield.org

University of Wisconsin Libraries invites research grant applications

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About Grants-in-Aid

Grants-in-Aid is the Friends program which helps to fund visiting scholars with particular research needs in the University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries. The Friends award a handful of grants-in-aid annually, each of which is generally for one month’s duration, for research in the humanities, sciences and related fields appropriate to the libraries’ collection strengths. The purpose is to foster the high-level use of the University of Wisconsin–Madison Libraries’ rich holdings, and to make them better known and more accessible to a wider circle of scholars. The annual application deadline is February 1 of any year.

Among the distinguished collections of the UW campus libraries, we call particular attention to unique and rare materials and other special collections in

Award Amounts

Awards are made up to $2,000 for recipients from North America and $3,000 for those from elsewhere in the world. Consideration may be given for support for shorter periods of research in Madison, but only for individuals who reside in the United States.

Eligibility

Generally, applicants must have a Ph.D. or be able to demonstrate a record of solid intellectual accomplishment. Scholars and graduate students who have completed all requirements except the dissertation are also eligible. Applicants’ proposals should state the specific areas and collections to be used in our libraries and provide information as to why these collections will be of unique benefit to their research. The grants-in-aid are designed primarily to help provide access to UW-Madison library resources for people who live beyond commuting distance. Preference is given to younger researchers who are within 10 years of completing their Ph.D. or terminal degree, and to scholars who reside outside a 150 mile radius of Madison. The grantee is expected to be in residence during the term of the award, which may be taken up at any time during the year.

Additional Information

The Friends will provide health insurance and reimburse the expenses of obtaining security clearance (SEVIS) for researchers coming from outside the United States, but will not reimburse any fees related to obtaining a United States J-1 “Visiting Scholars” Visa.

Click here to fill out an online application.

IU Women’s Philanthropy Council invites 2014 grant applications

The Indiana University Women’s Philanthropy Council encourages individuals and organizations at all university campuses to submit applications for its third annual grant cycle.

All Indiana University community members — students, faculty and staff — are encouraged to apply. Applications that launch new ventures, address critical needs and develop innovative solutions to social problems are especially welcome.

“The first two years of WPC grants provided crucial and often foundational support for pioneering initiatives that are creating positive and lasting change for IU students and community members in Indiana and around the globe,” said IU first lady Laurie Burns McRobbie, founding co-chair of the Women’s Philanthropy Council. “In our third cycle, I look forward to seeing more new ideas that hold the same promise.”

The philanthropy council established its fund in 2010 and opened up the grants process in 2011. Since then, it has awarded grants totaling more than $228,000 to 20 organizations affiliated with six of the university’s campuses. Projects have included encouraging healthy choices for students through education and health assessments; providing education and connections to medical services for the visually impaired; promoting awareness and opportunities for female IT students; and presenting free opera performances in schools, libraries and other youth venues through a service-learning project aided by student volunteers from the Jacobs School of Music.

The council will award grants that complement Indiana University’s commitment to quality educational opportunities, excellent health care, a clean and safe environment, cultural enrichment through the arts and humanities, and educational programs and services.

“The WPC Fund is another important way that our supporters are transforming lives for the better through IU,” IU Foundation President and CEO Dan Smith said. “The Women’s Philanthropy Council is an inspiring group of leaders whose trailblazing work in the field of women’s philanthropy continues to initiate great things for IU and for all who are touched by the incredible work of the grant recipients.”

Grants are awarded from the philanthropy council fund and administered by the IU Foundation. Philanthropy council members designate a portion of their donations to the foundation for the fund and expect to award up to $100,000 in grants ranging from $2,500 to $25,000 for the 2014-15 academic year. The deadline for applications is Feb. 28, 2014.

A philanthropy council grants working group will review the applications and select finalists who will present to the entire council membership. The philanthropy council will then announce grant recipients in June. Recipients will be asked to submit a final report 12 months after receipt of their grant to show how funds were used and to demonstrate the impact of their projects on their campuses.

The application and additional information are available online.

Women’s Philanthropy Council

Convened by the Indiana University Foundation Board of Directors in 2010, the Women’s Philanthropy Council’s mission is to lead fundraising and engagement efforts that inspire women to give of their time, talent and resources to Indiana University, and to develop female leaders in philanthropy.

Indiana University Foundation

Founded in 1936, the Indiana University Foundation maximizes private support for Indiana University by fostering lifelong relationships with key stakeholders and providing advancement leadership and fundraising services for campuses and units across the university. Today, the foundation oversees one of the largest public university endowments in the country, with a market value in excess of $1.7 billion. In fiscal year 2013, IU received $305.9 million in support from the private sector. IU is consistently ranked among the top four of Big Ten universities in annual voluntary support.

Informatics research team awarded grant for clinical effectiveness research

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute — created by the Affordable Care Act — has awarded a $2 million grant to a research team from the IU School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis to conduct comparative clinical effectiveness research.

Headed by Brad Doebbeling, Department of BioHealth Informatics chair and a professor of informatics, medicine and biomedical engineering, the team is the first in Indiana to receive an institute grant designed to include patients in the discussion of how to improve and expedite medical care.

In the coming months, Doebbeling’s team will work with community health centers around Indiana to understand how to provide better health care in a more timely fashion.

“We were funded to form a collaborative of community health centers from around the state of Indiana to gain a better understanding of how we can improve access to health care in Indiana,” he said.

Doebbeling’s team will examine how patients enter into clinic systems and engage patients, providers and staff in discussions about opportunities for change. They will study best practices and innovations that the community centers have discovered work for them on a physician, staff member or patient level to improve access to care.

“We’re right at the tipping point in health care informatics and health system redesign, where we can effectively use the information and data to make better decisions about organization and to provide more efficient, higher-quality health care,” Doebbeling said. “I’m excited; now is the time to solve those kind of problems. Our country is embarking on a grand experiment to work within existing insurance plans and delivery systems to expand care to the uninsured.

“There is tremendous data and information available that we need to utilize to provide better, safer and more efficient and effective health care. This is exciting because it’s a real partnership between patients, providers, staff, health systems and researchers all working together to solve problems with access to care.”

Khalilah Shabazz appointed director of IUPUI Multicultural Success Center

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Karen Dace has announced the appointment of Khalilah A. Shabazz as director of the IUPUI Multicultural Success Center effective Jan. 1.

The Multicultural Success Center seeks to engage students and the IUPUI community in proactive dialogue around issues of diversity and multiculturalism, including the community voice through service and outreach; and articulate and address the needs of students, faculty and staff across lines of color, gender, ethnicity, ability and orientation.

As director of the Multicultural Success Center, Shabazz will be responsible for the management, planning and continued development of the center, including providing leadership in multicultural awareness and diversity education, as well as ensuring the center serves as an advocate for underrepresented students — including minority, female, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students — by offering educational and social programming aimed at their personal development, retention and success.

“Khalilah’s extensive educational and professional experiences, as well as her keen grasp of the complex issues of diversity and multiculturalism in higher education, make her an ideal candidate for this position,” Dace said. “Her energy, drive and commitment to IUPUI and the success of our students will serve the campus, university and Indianapolis community well.”

Working at IUPUI since 2001, Shabazz has almost exclusively focused on how best to support and retain underrepresented populations. Shabazz first joined campus staff as the assistant director for student retention and scholarship in the Office of Student Scholarships. Most recently, she served as director of University College’s Diversity Enrichment and Achievement Program. There she was responsible for developing and implementing program concepts and objectives that promote retention and success of underrepresented students at IUPUI, as well as offering direction of resources, clarification of documents and other assistance to help entering underrepresented students and their families make a successful transition into IUPUI.

“I consider it an incredible opportunity to serve as the director of the Multicultural Success Center. The IUPUI students, staff and faculty along with the community are key partners in the success of the center,” Shabazz said. “I am excited and look forward to working with everyone to develop a premier Multicultural Success Center that advances IUPUI’s commitment to diversity through education, advocacy and research.”

Shabazz holds a Bachelor of Science in psychology from the Purdue School of Science at IUPUI and a Master of Science in higher education and student affairs from the IU School of Education at IUPUI, with the distinction of summa cum laude. Shabazz is pursuing her Ph.D. in higher education and student affairs at IUPUI with an expected graduation date of May 2014.

2014-2015 Harry Ransom Center Research Fellowships in the Humanities

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The Harry Ransom Center, an internationally renowned humanities research library and museum at The University of Texas at Austin, annually awards over 50 fellowships to support projects that require substantial on-site use of its collections. The fellowships support research in all areas of the humanities, including literature, photography, film, art, the performing arts, music, and cultural history.

The fellowships range from one to three months, with stipends of $3,000 per month. Also available are $1,200 to $1,700 travel stipends and dissertation fellowships with a $1,500 stipend.

The Ransom Center is currently accepting fellowship applications for the 2014-2015 academic year. Applications must be submitted through the Center’s website by January 31, 2014, 5 p.m. CST.

More details about the fellowships and the Ransom Center’s collections are available online at its website. Questions about the fellowships should be directed to ransomfellowships@utexas.edu.

United States Capitol Historical Society Fellowship

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Applications are invited for the twenty-eighth year of the United States Capitol Historical Society Fellowship. This fellowship is designed to support research and publication on the history, art, and architecture of the United States Capitol and related buildings. Graduate students and scholars may apply for periods ranging from one to twelve months; the stipend is $2500.00 per month. (Most awards are for one to four months.)

Applications must be postmarked, e-mailed, or faxed by March 15, 2014, for fellowships beginning in September 2014 and ending in August 2015. Applications should be mailed to Dr. Donald Kennon, U.S. Capitol Historical Society, 200 Maryland Avenue, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20002; faxed to the Architect of the Capitol at (202)-228-4602; or e-mailed in PDF format to bwolanin@aoc.gov and dkennon@uschs.org.

Further details can be found at USCHS website. If you have questions about a potential topic, contact Dr. Barbara Wolanin at (202)-228-2700 or bwolanin@aoc.gov.

Glick Fund Gift to Herron School of Art and Design will provide up to 70 need-based scholarships for Saturday School

Glick Fund Gift to Herron School of Art and Design will provide up to 70 need-based scholarships for Saturday School The Glick Fund, a fund of Central Indiana Community Foundation (CICF), has made a $17,850 gift to Herron School of Art and Design’s Saturday School Program. One of the Glick Fund’s target areas is the arts and creative expression. Herron was one of 49 local organizations in the Fund’s latest round of grants, announced in mid-November, which totaled more than $4 million.

Last spring, 43 students requested tuition aid to attend Herron’s Saturday School. Only two scholarships were available. “This gift will help us better serve students in grades six through 12 from IPS and Wayne and Warren township schools,” said Jodie Hardy, director of community learning programs at Herron. The Glick Fund gift will provide scholarships for up to 70 students. Registration is already underway for spring 2014 Saturday School, which runs January 25 through March 15. Each class session is three hours. Tuition is $255 per student per eight-week session.

“We hope our grants will help address the immediate needs of the community while also building the long-term capacity of the organizations delivering services,” said Marianne Glick, director at the Eugene & Marilyn Glick Family Foundation and The Glick Fund.

About Saturday School
Saturday School student from 2012
Saturday School student from 2012.

Established in 1922, Herron School of Art and Design’s Saturday School program provides quality art instruction for youth and adults for eight Saturdays each fall and spring.

Classes offer a variety of media—painting, ceramics, drawing, photography and more. Students’ ages range from second graders to high school seniors. Classes are also open to adults, allowing families to enjoy creating together. The average student is a creative junior high or high school student interested in discovering more about art and design while learning within a fun, safe and professional environment. Classes are taught by Herron’s degree-seeking students and take place in excellent studio facilities, giving many younger students their first exposure to a university environment.

Each semester concludes with an open house exhibition, reception and awards ceremony.

About the Glick Fund:

The Glick Fund is a donor-advised fund of the Central Indiana Community Foundation. It was established by Eugene and Marilyn Glick in 1998 to support a variety of causes. Grants are awarded by invitation only, with no unsolicited grant applications accepted.

The Glick Fund also strives to align with the Central Indiana Community Foundation’s three broader community leadership initiatives of: Family Success & Making Connections; Inspiring Places; and College Readiness & Success – initiatives aimed at making central Indiana one of the best places in the nation to live, work and raise a family. To date, The Glick Fund has awarded over $49 million in grants to not-for-profit organizations. For more information, please visit the Central Indiana Community Foundation website.

Video now available: ethics lecture “COPE as an Intervention for Palliative Home Care”

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Were you unable to attend the November 6th Fairbanks Ethics Lecture? You can now view the video online. Please note that this video is for informational purposes only and is not for CE/CME credit.

Wednesday November 6, 2013, Methodist Petticrew Auditorium

Cosponsored by the RESPECT Center

Objectives:
  1. Describe the psychoeducational intervention called COPE and ethical implications.
  2. List the most commonly reported symptoms by cancer patients in hospice care as well as those with the highest intensity and the greatest distress.
  3. Describe the impact of the COPE intervention on palliative care patients.
About the Lecturer:

Dr. McMillan, a Distinguished University Professor, is the Lyall and Beatrice Thompson Professor of Oncology Quality of Life Nursing at the University of South Florida (USF) where she coordinates the Oncology Nursing Program in the masters and doctoral programs. Dr. McMillan’s major areas of research have been: a) symptom assessment and management in persons with cancer and b) quality of life of hospice patients with cancer and their family caregivers. She has supported that research with external funding of over $11 million. Dr. McMillan has developed several clinically relevant assessment tools including the Hospice Quality of Life Index, the Caregiver Quality of Life Index and the Constipation Assessment Scale among others. All of these have been used widely in this country and have been translated for use in other countries. Currently, Dr. McMillan is principal investigator on a clinical trials focusing on self care for symptom management in patients with cancer.

The Research in Palliative and End-of-Life Communication and Training (RESPECT) Center is a collaborative, interdisciplinary scientific community of researchers and clinicians working to advance the science of communication in palliative and end-of-life care across the lifespan. For more information please visit the website.

The Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics sponsors the Fairbanks Ethics Lecture Series as an educational outreach to physicians and staff of Indiana University Health hospitals and interested others in the central Indiana community.

For questions and comments, please contact Amy Chamness at achamnes@iuhealth.org, or (317) 962-1721. For additional information about the Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics, please visit the Fairbanks Center website.