Symposium continues exchange between schools of education at IUPUI and Moi University

photo Moi IUPUI

The latest in a continuing exchange of ideas and best practices between the Indiana University School of Education at IUPUI and the Moi University School of Education in Eldoret, Kenya, takes place next week in Indianapolis.

Faculty from Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and Moi will hold the second annual Faculty Symposium on Research and Teaching on Tuesday and Wednesday, Oct. 29 and 30, at the Lilly Auditorium on the lower level of the IUPUI University Library, 755 W. Michigan St. The symposium runs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday and from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday.

The purpose is to bring together faculty from the two schools of education to share their research, teaching interests and scholarship, related to this year’s theme “Interrogating Educational Policy and Practice in Kenya and the U.S.” Through face-to-face presentations and discussions, Moi and IUPUI faculty will hear from each other and explore opportunities for joint scholarship and initiatives.

The first symposium took place in Kenya in August 2012. Pat Rogan, executive associate dean of the IU School of Education at IUPUI, led a group of four faculty who traveled to Eldoret, which is almost 200 miles northwest of Nairobi. Seven faculty from Moi will travel to Indianapolis.

“We are committed to a mutually beneficial partnership that enhances faculty collaboration and student exchanges,” Rogan said. “The symposium will advance our internationalization efforts while strengthening relationships between Moi and IUPUI faculty.”

The symposium is an extension of IU and Moi University’s long-standing relationship, which began with the IU School of Medicine and Moi teaming up on the AMPATH Center, or Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare, a clinic that helps treat Kenyans with HIV and AIDS. In addition, the IU and Moi schools of journalism recently agreed to continue their partnership, and Kenya is now home to the IU Alumni Association Kenya Chapter.

The IU School of Education at IUPUI signed a memorandum of understanding with Moi University to formally partner for continuing professional exchanges. Last year’s symposium in Kenya allowed faculty from both universities to share best practices and research on a variety of topics. The Moi faculty presented on the teacher preparation practices at Moi, how the Moi faculty uses research to inform policy and practice in higher education, and science curriculum. Faculty from IUPUI spoke about teaching techniques with the latest technology, issues surrounding the education of urban youth, and women in education.

“This year’s symposium will offer a wide range of leading edge topics among the seven Moi and seven (IUPUI) School of Education presenters,” Rogan said. “It promises to be a highly informative and exciting event.”

The sessions are free and open to the public. Organizers request attendees pre-register online.

ArtPlace invites letters of inquiry for creative placemaking projects

logo artplace

ArtPlace, a nationwide initiative to drive community revitalization through the arts, is inviting Letters of Inquiry for its fourth round of funding through its Innovation Grants program.

A collaboration of thirteen major national and regional foundations, six of the nation’s largest banks, and eight federal agencies, ArtPlace works to accelerate creative placemaking — defined as “a means of investing in art and culture at the heart of a portfolio of integrated strategies that can drive vibrancy and diversity so powerful that it transforms communities” — in the United States.

Grants will be awarded to projects that involve arts organizations, artists, and designers working in partnership with local and national partners to have a transformative impact on community vibrancy. Applications are encouraged from all fifty states and any U.S. territory. Certain ArtPlace funders also are committed to working in specific states or communities. Currently, these include Akron, Charlotte, Detroit, Macon, Miami, New York City, Philadelphia, San Jose, and St. Paul, as well as communities in Alaska, Arizona, California, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Washington, and Wisconsin. Projects in these areas are particularly encouraged, although applications are welcome and grants may be awarded to projects from anywhere in the U.S.

Award amounts are decided on a case-by-case basis. To date, ArtPlace America has awarded 134 grants to 124 organizations in more than 79 communities across the U.S. for a total of $42.1 million.

While ArtPlace grants are intended to fund a range of costs associated with implementing a creative placemaking project, ArtPlace loans should be used to finance costs associated with a capital project such as pre-development, acquisition, construction, and real estate improvements.

Complete guidelines and Letter of Inquiry submission instructions are available at the ArtPlace Web site.

IUPUI University Library launches Center for Digital Scholarship for Open Access Week

photo center for dig. scholar

In celebration of the sixth annual Open Access Week, IUPUI University Library has announced the opening of the Center for Digital Scholarship.

The center works to provide open access to IUPUI scholarship, research data and the cultural heritage of our communities. With Kristi L. Palmer as director, the center disseminates unique scholarship, data and artifacts created by IUPUI faculty, students, staff and community partners; advocates for the rights of authors, fair use and open access to information and publications; implements best practices for the creation, description, preservation, sharing and reuse of digital collections; and provides digital scholarship consultations and literacy services.

Located in Room 1115 on the first floor of the library, the Center for Digital Scholarship is open for services and questions related to open access. Hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday.

Recent open access collaborations with IUPUI scholars and Indiana community organizations include:

  • Advances in Social Works: A peer-reviewed, open access journal — one of seven journals hosted on Open Journal Systems at IUPUI.
  • Faculty Grants: Supporting the digitization and online organization of open access collections related to faculty scholarship.
  • Indianapolis Recorder: Open access to over 5,000 issues and 106 years of African American history in a community newspaper.
  • Indianapolis Motor Speedway Collection: Open access to over 14,000 historic images dating back to 1909.
  • IUPUI DataWorks: A new open access data repository for preserving and sharing IUPUI digital research data.
  • IUPUI Open Access Publishing Fund: A pilot fund of $47,000 to underwrite reasonable publication charges for articles published in fee-based, peer-reviewed, open access journals.
  • IUPUI ScholarWorks: An open access repository of over 3,000 articles, reports, posters, dissertations and theses by IUPUI faculty and students.
  • Neighborhood of Saturdays: A unique digital humanities collaboration providing open access to over 500 images and artifacts from a multiethnic neighborhood on the near south side of Indianapolis.

The Center for Digital Scholarship will also host a special open house in November for the campus and the community to learn more about its work. The event will take place from 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. Friday, Nov. 22, on the ground floor of the University Library.

Open Access Week

The International Open Access Week, Oct. 21 to 27, is a global event in its sixth year. Open Access Week is a time for the academic community to share the potential benefits of open access, the practice of providing free and unrestricted access via the Internet to peer-reviewed scholarly research, and help integrate the practice in scholarship and research. To learn how you can claim the benefits of open access for your research at IUPUI, visit the IUPUI University Library.

President of Christian Theological Seminary to present talk on role of religion in medicine

photo matthew boulton
Tuesday, October 29, 12:00 – 1:00 PM
Emerson Hall Auditorium, Room 304
2013-2014 Medical Humanities and Health Studies Seminar Series

Matt Boulton, President and Professor of Theology, Christian Theological Seminary, will deliver a presentation titled, “Your Faith Has Made You Well—Or Has It?: Spiritual and Religious Dimensions of Medical Care and Wellbeing.”

For many healthcare professionals and patients, religion and spirituality play important roles in how care and wellbeing are understood and experienced—and yet in many cases, our capacities for exploring these connections are overlooked, underdeveloped, or relegated to specialists.

For example, many healthcare professionals conceive and experience their work as a spiritual or religious vocation; likewise, many patients experience illness, decline, recovery, and wellbeing in religious and spiritual terms. What we require are accessible, inclusive, engaging strategies for exploring these dimensions of life and work. This talk will survey this territory, using some specific Jewish and Christian resources as case studies, but with an eye to other traditions as well.

For more information, please see the flyer here.

Presented by the Spirit of Medicine Program and the Medical Humanities and Health Studies Seminar Series

Leibman Forum to tackle legal and cultural issues surrounding ‘The Art of the Steal’

photo laura holzman

Was the $25 billion art collection of Albert C. Barnes “stolen” decades after his death, as some say, or was it simply “moved in the public interest”?

Art and legal pundits and interested others can judge for themselves during a lively examination of the facts during the annual Jordan H. and Joan R. Leibman Forum on the Legal and Business Environment of Art on Friday, Nov. 1, at the IU McKinney School of Law.

This year’s forum, “Donor Intent vs. Public Interest,” examines the issues raised in the film “The Art of the Steal,” a documentary about the disposition of the Barnes collection. The program includes a screening of the film, followed by a panel discussion featuring legal, art and philanthropic experts.

“Donor Intent vs. Public Interest” takes place from 4 to 8 p.m. in Inlow Hall, 530 W. New York St. The film screening takes place at 4 p.m., followed by the panel discussion at 6 p.m., both in Wynne Courtroom. A reception will follow the discussion at 7:15 p.m. in the Atrium.

At his death in 1951, Barnes had amassed a matchless collection of modern and post-impressionist art. He also left a will with strict instructions for the collection to remain forever at an original location in a Philadelphia suburb. After a battle that included a lawsuit by one faction of Philadelphia residents and a countersuit by another, the collection was relocated to downtown Philadelphia in 2012.

The public debate over moving the collection was one of the most “significant, heated and widespread debates about art, culture and place in Philadelphia” around the turn of the 21st century, said Laura Holzman, a forum panelist.

Holzman, assistant professor of art history and museum studies at the Herron School of Art and Design and the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, is working on a book project about civil discourse and visual culture that includes a study of the discourse about moving the Barnes collection.

“The use of extreme language (like describing the relocated collection as ‘stolen’) is significant because it demonstrates the fervor behind people’s beliefs about what was best for the collection and its publics,” Holzman said. “It also suggests that debates about the ethics of relocation were steeped in concerns about cultural capital, or who has ownership of the art.”

Other forum speakers are:

  • Kenan Farrell, attorney and adjunct professor teaching art and museum law at IU McKinney School of Law.
  • Kathryn Haigh, deputy director for collections and exhibitions at the Indianapolis Museum of Art.
  • Robert A. Katz, professor of law at IU McKinney School of Law and professor of philanthropic studies at IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy.

An additional free screening of “The Art of the Steal” will take place from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 29, in Room 375, Inlow Hall. Online registration is suggested.

The Jordan H. and Joan R. Leibman Forum was established at IUPUI in 2004 to examine issues on the legal and business environment of the arts. It is co-sponsored by the IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law, the IU Herron School of Art and Design and the IU Kelley School of Business Indianapolis.

The forum is free of change, but registration is required online. Indiana continuing legal education credit of 1.4 hour is available free of charge.

For questions, contact Beth Young at ejmoody@iupui.edu.

Distinguished IU Professor of Medicine to present talk on origins of echocardiography

photo harvey feigenbaum
Wednesday, October 30, 12:00 – 1:00PM
Emerson Hall Auditorium, 304

Harvey Feigenbaum, MD, Distinguished Professor of Medicine, IU School of Medicine, will present a talk titled, “History of Echocardiography: How to introduce something new in medicine.”

Echocardiography as we know it today began at Indiana University School of Medicine in the fall of 1963, exactly 50 years ago. This talk will document how this technology became the world’s leading cardiovascular imaging tool.

Dr Feigenbaum joined the faculty of the Indiana School of Medicine in 1962, working in electrophysiology and then cardiac catheterization and hemodynamics, but he is best recognized as the “Father of Echocardiography” for pioneering the use of cardiac ultrasound in the early 1960s. He trained most of the early researchers, held numerous echocardiographic courses and workshops, and wrote the first textbook which is now in its 7th edition. A founder of the American Society of Echocardiography, Dr. Feigenbaum served as its first president and was the first editor of its journal for 20 years.

For more information, see the flyer here.

Presented by the John Shaw Billings History of Medicine Society, the IU Student History of Medicine Organization, adn the Medical Humanities and Health Studies Program.

Please RSVP to medhum@iupui.edu

Trayvon Martin case sparks public IUPUI Dialogue Series

poster race dialogue series

The Florida case involving the 2012 fatal shooting of an unarmed African American youth and the gunman’s acquittal in July proved a social tinder box for racial issues in America.

Diversity leaders on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus have organized a series of public meetings, four dialogue sessions and two town hall meetings built around the high-profile case.

The leaders say the very strands of discord sparked by the Martin case make it a great learning tool. Their hopes are the six meetings will encourage people, particularly students, to engage in civil discourse when faced with hot-button issues.

“It is easy to engage civilly on conversations over matters for which we agree,” said Daniel Griffith, director of the IUPUI Intergroup Dialogue Group, one of the series co-sponsors. “The need for civil discourse is especially important for conversations over matters for which there is significant disagreement and strong emotion. Without civil discourse, where conversation becomes strident and negative, the opportunity for learning and the chance for increasing understanding and finding common ground will be lost.”

The public meetings, titled “A Dialogue Series on Race, Politics and the Pursuit of Justice: America After Trayvon Martin,” kick off with a town hall meeting from 6 to 9 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 24, in the auditorium of Hine Hall, formerly the University Place Conference Center, 850 W. Michigan St.

According to Wayne Hilson, the interim director of the IUPUI Multicultural Success Center and director of Multicultural Academic Relations, the series is a prime example of the spirit of the IUPUI 2013-15 Common Theme, “Find Your Voice and Hear My Voice.”

“People seem to have increasing difficulty speaking to one another about serious matters in a civilized manner,” Hilson said. “We think it’s vital that our young people learn how to engage in productive, positive discourse, even on issues that can be divisive or uncomfortable.”

Hilson and the other organizers are hopeful that participants from various ethnic and racial backgrounds will attend and not just those who might empathize more with Martin because of their own racial or ethnic backgrounds.

“This is for everyone,” Hilson said. “Any true dialogue begins with a willingness to come and learn some things. These meetings will be a safe place to share one’s opinion regardless of what side of the fence you are on.”

The IUPUI Multicultural Success Center, the IUPUI Intergroup Dialogue Group and various academic units are co-sponsors of the series.

Following are the dates, times, locations and topics of the sessions:

  • Oct. 31, Dialogue Session 1: “Legal Aspects + Implications of the Trayvon Martin Case,” featuring IU McKinney School of Law faculty and legal experts from the greater Indianapolis community, 6 to 8 p.m., Room 132, Hine Hall
  • Nov. 7, Dialogue Session 2: “The Impact of Social Injustice: The History and Impact of Profiling,” featuring faculty from the Department of Africana Studies in the School of Liberal Arts, 6 to 8 p.m., Room 132, Hine Hall.
  • Nov. 12, Dialogue Session 3: “Being Stopped by the Police or Others: Managing Confrontation, Avoiding Conflict,” featuring IU Police Department officers and representatives from the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department, 6 to 8 p.m., Presidents Room, The Tower, formerly the University Place Hotel.
  • Nov. 21, Dialogue Session 4: “Cultivating Positive Change on Campus and in the Classroom,” featuring faculty from the Department of Psychology in the Purdue School of Science and the IU School of Education, 6 to 8 p.m., Room 132, Hine Hall.
  • Dec. 5, Town Hall Meeting: Closing session, 6 to 9 p.m., Hine Hall Auditorium.

Cuba’s 2013 Venice Biennale representative to speak at Herron School of Art and Design

compos-pon installation photo

Artist Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons will appear at Herron School of Art and Design as the 2013 Jane Fortune Outstanding Women Visiting Artist Lecturer.

Her artist’s talk, titled “Global Journey,” is scheduled to take place on December 4 in the Basile Auditorium at 6:00 p.m., the same night the Undergraduate Student Exhibition opens in the Berkshire, Reese and Paul Galleries. Both events are free and open to the public.

Inclusion in the juried undergraduate show is an honor for the students whose work is chosen. In a typical year, the jury must select from more than 300 very strong submissions. The exhibition usually contains 60 works across a wide variety of media.

Also opening in the Basile and Marsh Galleries will be two exhibitions from the graduate Collaborative Practices course taught by Professor Andrew Winship and Basile Center Director Kathryn Armstrong.

The three exhibitions continue through December 19.

photo campos-pons
Photo of artist by Ricardo Gay Luger Courtesy of Maria Magdalena studio and Galleries.

Campos-Pons was born in Cuba in 1959. She is a faculty member at the School of The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. According to its website, “Her work of the last 20 years covers an extended range of visual language investigations…from the early 1980s focus on painting and the discussion of sexuality in the crossroads of Cuban mixed cultural heritage to incisive questioning, critique and insertion of the black body in the contemporary narratives of the present.” She represented Cuba in the 2013 Venice Biennale.

“Campos-Pons’s work is largely autobiographical but speaks to a much-needed dialogue about history, place and identity. She does this through a contemporary language that also provides universal access to discussing our current socio-political landscape,” said Herron’s Gallery Director Paula Katz.

It is the generosity of Jane Fortune—author, cultural editor, art historian, art collector and philanthropist—that brings Campos-Pons to Herron. “I want to make an impact on the community that surrounds me and help make the arts accessible to our residents,” she said. This is the sixth Jane Fortune Outstanding Women Visiting Artist Lecture, which has welcomed artists including Judy Chicago, Polly Apfelbaum and Judith Shea to Herron.

Grilled cheese at the center of the newest IUPUI University Library sculpture

installation photo michael helsey

In a playful sculpture of floating cartoon-like images, artist Michael Helsley chooses a favorite comfort food — grilled cheese — to take the edge off his grief, represented by five rocks and a bear. The mobile-style sculpture, installed in the University Library atrium, tells of Helsley’s journey of discovery following a personal time of grief.

Helsley’s sculpture is the newest installation in an annual art competition the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis University Library sponsors for Herron School of Art and Design students. As this year’s winner, Helsley received funding to create the large-scale sculpture. It has been installed in the second-floor atrium in the University Library for display for one year.

Helsley’s art draws in its viewers as the images simultaneously appear and disappear, reflecting the movement of the five stages of grief outlined by Dr. Kubler Ross. Helsley constructed the images from rigid foam sheets, using commercially printed material salvaged from billboards and repainted by hand. The Herron student cast an astronaut as himself, part explorer, part cowboy, among the boulders, a bear and the grilled cheese sandwich as he floats and sometimes falls during his journey of exploration of both the past and the future.

The size and flatness of the images allows them to simultaneously disappear in one location while appearing to a viewer in another location. The act of “revealing” themselves relates directly to the act of discovery, whether it is new or as it relates to memory.

Global Crossroads re-opens with latest technology

photo global crossroads

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis’ Global Crossroads Laboratory can’t reduce distances to faraway places, but it makes engaging the world a lot easier.

A ceremony marking the re-opening of the facility, in Room 2132 in the Education/Social Work building, will take place from 4 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 23. The ceremony will feature a light reception at 4 p.m. and remarks at 5 p.m. by Amy Warner, vice chancellor for external affairs, and others integral in the renovation of the facility. The event is free and open to the public.

Global Crossroads is a collaborative partnership funded by the IUPUI Office of International Affairs, University Information Technology Services and a $25,000 Learning Environment Grant from the IUPUI Center for Teaching and Learning. The facility contributed to IUPUI becoming a recognized leader in comprehensive campus internationalization.

Global Crossroads re-opens with the latest high-definition video conferencing technology, using sensitive microphones suspended from the ceiling and EagleEye Director for voice and facial recognition to personalize live classes and meetings. The technology determines who is talking and switches from a camera classroom view to focus on the individual who is speaking. The classroom view returns when the individual stops speaking.

The interactive video and audio equipment for face-to-face distance communications is designed to support international learning, dialogue and partnership.

Global Crossroads is available for incorporating interactive video into courses on a semester-long or case-by-case basis. To learn more about making international connections for classes or course development ideas, contact Dawn Michele Whitehead, director of curriculum internationalization, at dmwhiteh@iupui.edu. For more information on upcoming training sessions on use of the facility or to reserve the room, email oiaevent@iupui.edu.