IUPUI Student Readings Series

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Indy Reads Books
911 Mass. Ave.
Indianapolis, IN 46202

Join IUPUI students and community members as they perform their poetry, essays, short stories, original songs, and other spoken-word pieces in a casual, fun environment. Refreshments are served, and all audience members will be eligible to win prizes for brief writing activities.

To sign up for a spot on our stage, email Terry Kirts at tkirts@iupui.edu or phone (317) 274-8929. The readings are free and open to the public. Participants need not be IUPUI students.

Readings Series event dates and times this semester:

Thu. October 3, 2013 06:30 PM – 08:30 PM

Wed. November 6, 2013 06:30 PM – 08:30 PM

Thu. Dec 5, 2013 06:30 PM – 08:30 PM

Mellon Fellowships for Dissertation Research in Original Sources

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About the Program

The Council on Library and Information Resources is now accepting applications for the 2014 Mellon Fellowships. The application deadline is 5:00 p.m. Eastern time on Friday, November 15, 2013.

For further information, visit the CLIR Fellowship application website. (Link to the online application system, eligibility requirements, application contents, and FAQ).

The Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) is pleased to offer fellowships generously funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for dissertation research in the humanities or related social sciences in original sources. The purposes of this fellowship program are to:

  • help junior scholars in the humanities and related social science fields gain skill and creativity in developing knowledge from original sources
  • enable dissertation writers to do research wherever relevant sources may be, rather than just where financial support is available
  • encourage more extensive and innovative uses of original sources in libraries, archives, museums, historical societies, and related repositories in the U.S. and abroad, and
  • provide insight from the viewpoint of doctoral candidates into how scholarly resources can be developed for access most helpfully in the future.

The program offers about fifteen competitively awarded fellowships a year. Each provides a stipend of $2,000 per month for periods ranging from 9-12 months. Each fellow will receive an additional $1,000 upon participating in a symposium on research in original sources and submitting a report acceptable to CLIR on the research experience. Thus the maximum award will be $25,000.

Selection Policies

A special committee of scholars in the humanities, archivists, and special-collections librarians will select fellowship recipients.

The committee aims to select representatives from different fields of the humanities and related social sciences consistent with quality in the research proposals. The committee will assess quality with reference to the following criteria:

  • originality and creativity of the research proposal
  • importance of the proposed dissertation to the applicant’s field
  • appropriateness of the primary-source collection(s) and institutions in which the applicant proposes to do research
  • competence of the applicant for proposed research as indicated by references, transcripts, language skills, research experience, and other academic achievements
  • prospects for completing specified research within the time projected and funds awarded (not all dissertation work need necessarily be done within the fellowship period).

Traditional proposals for original source research in such fields as history will be welcome. But the committee will give preference to sound non-traditional projects in all eligible fields such as those that—

  • use newly available or little studied sources
  • make interdisciplinary use of sources
  • use sources in innovative, creative ways
  • use sources in repositories that cannot, themselves, provide financial assistance to researchers.

Fellows may propose to work in more than one repository during the fellowship period, including repositories abroad. Preference is given to applicants working away from their home institutions. The selection committee will assess the applicant’s need for working in multiple repositories, working abroad, or both.

For purposes of this program, eligible fields of the humanities and related elements of the social sciences include the following (this is not an exhaustive list; if you have questions about your eligibility, please contact us at mellon@clir.org).

  • anthropology
  • archaeology
  • area studies
  • art history
  • classics
  • comparative literature
  • critical theory
  • cultural studies
  • drama, dance or theater
  • economic history
  • ethnic studies
  • history
  • history and philosophy of mathematics
  • history and philosophy of science and medicine
  • language and cultural linguistics
  • literature in any language
  • music history
  • musicology
  • philosophy
  • political theory
  • religion (exclusive of theological training for the ministry)
  • rhetoric
  • sociology
  • women’s studies
  • interdisciplinary studies involving fields above

IUPUI Center for Economic Education wins statewide award

photo Mohammad Kaviani

The IUPUI Center for Economic Education has won the 2013 Peter V. Harrington Award for University Centers from the Indiana Council for Economic Education and its executive committee. The center — part of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and directed by senior lecturer in economics Mohammad Kaviani with support from program coordinator Terri Crews — works with Indiana schools to help students become better decision-makers, more knowledgeable consumers and productive citizens.

To accomplish this task, the center works with K-12 educators to improve their understanding of economics and personal finance and provides them with teaching strategies that can be easily integrated into their classroom instruction.

“I firmly believe that developing an economic way of thinking is like learning a foreign language: the younger the better. We need to tackle economic illiteracy early and persistently both in and outside the classroom,” Kaviani said. “The center plays a vital role in helping Central Indiana teachers, students and area residents take a common sense approach to economics.

“The center facilitates programs that engage teachers at all grade levels, on a variety of topics, and helps them learn how to implement economics into their existing curricula. Last year’s programs included workshops on basic economics and personal finance concepts; the role of economics in energy and environmental policy; using children’s literature to teach economics; and the impact and outcome of the recent financial crisis. The center also coordinated two high school competitions: the Economics Challenge and the Personal Finance Challenge. These programs, along with the center’s efforts to build a stronger relationship with teachers in Indianapolis Public Schools, were highlights last year.”

The Indiana Council for Economic Education commended the Center for Economic Education for its K-12 professional development and student-focused programs offered during the 2012-13 school year. The Harrington Judging Committee praised the center for its continued high level of programming, the increase in the number of teachers and students who participated in those programs, and the variety of economic education opportunities it made available to teachers and students last year.

“There are 11 Centers for Economic Education statewide in Indiana, and I’m very pleased that the IUPUI center is receiving this year’s Harrington Award,” said William Blomquist, dean of the IU School of Liberal Arts. The Harrington Award was presented at an event at the Indianapolis Children’s Museum on Sept. 20. The honor comes with a $3,000 award funded by Duke Realty.

Tempel named nonprofit sector’s national “Influencer of the Year”

photo gene tempel

Gene Tempel, founding dean of the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, has been named the “Influencer of the Year” in the U.S. nonprofit sector by The NonProfit Times, a leading nonprofit sector publication.

Tempel was selected for the honor from among 50 leaders nationwide who The NonProfit Times is recognizing as its 2013 “Power and Influence Top 50,” the 50 individuals the publication considers to have the greatest impact on the nonprofit sector.

The “Influencer of the Year” award was announced last night at a gala in Washington, DC, honoring the people who comprise the 2013 Top 50 list. The annual list recognizes leaders for their innovation, their influence on the broader sector, and for developing organizational models that can be replicated. It is compiled by The NonProfit Times’ staff and leaders from the philanthropic sector. Tempel has been honored on the list 12 of the 16 times it has been published since its debut in 1998.

In recognizing Tempel’s leadership, the publication said, “Tempel heads the nation’s first school of philanthropy. He also headed what was the premier Center on Philanthropy. It can be argued that nobody has spent more time effectively building a center of knowledge on the topic of philanthropy, where people turn for answers and illumination.”

Tempel played an integral role in establishing the school and its precursor, the Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University, and served as the Center’s executive director from 1997 through 2008, developing it into a leading national resource

Committed to strengthening the philanthropic sector, Tempel was the first elected president of the Nonprofit Academic Centers Council, a national association of academic centers and programs that focus on the study of nonprofit organizations, voluntarism and philanthropy. He is a past chair of the national Association of Fundraising Professionals’ Ethics Committee and a member of Independent Sector’s Expert Advisory Panel that created national guidelines for nonprofit governance and ethical behavior. He is president emeritus of the Indiana University Foundation.

About Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy: The Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy is dedicated to improving philanthropy to improve the world by training and empowering students and professionals to be innovators and leaders who create positive and lasting change. The School offers a comprehensive approach to philanthropy—voluntary action for the public good—through its academic, research and international programs and through The Fund Raising School, Lake Institute on Faith & Giving and the Women’s Philanthropy Institute.

Classical guitarist Rovshan Mamedkuliev in concert at IUPUI

photo rovshan mamedkuliev

IUPUI Department of Music and Arts Technology and the Indianapolis Society of the Classical Guitar present world-renowned guitarist Rovshan Mamedkuliev in concert on Thursday, October 3rd at 7:30 PM. The concert will take place in the ICTC Building, Room 152.

Rovshan Mamedkuliev has performed throughout the world and has won numerous awards. He is the winner of the 2012 Guitar Foundation of America Competition, and in 2006 he received a special grant for high achievements in the arts from Russian President Vladimir Putin. Tickets are $20 General Admission/$15 Advanced Purchase/$10 for students and ISCG members.

For more information about the artist, please visit his website.

University Library and campus partners jump-start open access publishing at IUPUI

photo david lewis

The University Library and key campus partners have started a fund to support the publication of Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis scholarship in peer-reviewed open access journals. A pilot program that encourages diverse participation across schools on the campus will make $47,000 available to IUPUI faculty over the next two years.

The IUPUI Open Access Fund will underwrite reasonable publication charges for articles published in fee-based, peer-reviewed journals that are openly accessible. This fund addresses changes in scholarly communications while increasing the impact of and access to scholarship created by IUPUI faculty. Key campus stakeholders, including the IUPUI University Library, the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research, IU School of Dentistry and the Robert H. McKinney School of Law, are providing the financial backing for the fund.

Administration of the open access fund will be facilitated by University Library on a first-come, first-served basis, provided the proposed journal meets certain requirements. The venue of publication must be an established open access journal, that is, a journal that does not charge readers or their institutions for unfettered access to the peer-reviewed articles that it publishes.

“Open access makes scholarship freely available to everyone in the world rather than restricting it to those with access to libraries with large budgets,” said David Lewis, dean of the University Library and assistant vice president for digital scholarly communications for Indiana University. “For the scholar, it increases the impact of their work, and this in turn increases their standing in the academy.”

As an added service, the IUPUI University Library will place a copy of funded articles in the IUPUIScholarWorks repository. The placement of an article in the repository helps build the collection of IUPUI–authored publications, supports the self-archiving arm of the open access movement, and gives the article an added element of preservation and discoverability.

More information about eligibility and a link to the application process are available on the University Library website.

Microsoft Research chief will keynote School of Informatics and Computing inauguration ceremonies

photo peter lee

Ceremonies inaugurating the launch of Indiana University’s newly merged School of Informatics and School of Library and Information Science will be highlighted by comments from Microsoft Corporate Vice President Peter Lee, head of Microsoft Research — an organization encompassing more than 1,100 scientists and engineers across 13 labs worldwide.

Lee will speak at 3 p.m. Friday, Sept. 27, at IU Bloomington’s Whittenberger Auditorium as the guest of IU President Michael A. McRobbie and IU School of Informatics and Computing Dean Bobby Schnabel. Anyone wishing to attend either the Bloomington event or a 2 p.m. live ceremony the same day at the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus featuring IU Health President and CEO Daniel F. Evans Jr. are encouraged to RSVP by Friday, Sept. 20.

A live stream of the IU Bloomington ceremony and Lee’s comments will be offered at the IUPUI event, taking place at the Informatics and Communications Technology Complex Auditorium.

“Peter Lee is one of the foremost leaders and visionaries in the computer science community and draws on extensive experience from a distinguished academic career, government service and now as the leader of Microsoft Research,” Schnabel said. “I am delighted that the IU community and our friends will have the opportunity to hear him discuss his vision for the future of computing.”

Lee joined Microsoft in 2008 as distinguished scientist and managing director of the Microsoft Research Redmond Lab. He later took on leadership of Microsoft’s U.S.-based research operations, comprising seven laboratories and over 500 researchers, engineers and support personnel.

Before joining Microsoft, Lee held key positions in both government and academia. His most recent position was at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, where he founded and directed a major technology office that supported research in computing and related areas in the social and physical sciences. Before DARPA, Lee served as head of Carnegie Mellon University’s nationally top-ranked computer science department.

The live event at IUPUI, according to Executive Associate Dean Mathew J. Palakal, will provide guests an opportunity to hear Evans talk about the intertwined relationship between technology and health care.

The School of Informatics, the first of its kind in the country, was founded as a school in 2000 and introduced the nation’s first Ph.D. in informatics; IU’s longstanding Computer Science Department joined the school in Bloomington in 2005. The school is an international research leader in areas including bioinformatics, complex networks and systems, cyber-infrastructure, data and search, human-computer interaction, networks and systems, programming languages, social informatics, and security and privacy.

Dedalus Foundation Institutional Grants in Modern Art

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Fall application deadline: October 15, 2013. Spring application deadline: March 15, 2014.

Institutional Initiatives

In conjunction with its various programs, the Dedalus Foundation supports and partners with nonprofit institutions that share its mission of fostering public understanding of modern art and modernism in the arts.

Awards are made twice annually, in the spring and the fall. The deadline for spring applications is March 15, and the deadline for fall applications is October 15. Grants rarely exceed $25,000, with the majority being between $10,000 and $15,000. Full details, along with other grant opportunities, are available on the Dedalus Grant program website.

The Foundation welcomes proposals for support and partnership from museums, educational institutions, and other nonprofit arts organizations. Such proposals should be made within the context of one of the following four Programs:

Arts Education Program

Supports symposiums and lectures; K-12 programs; community-based programs; residencies; fellowship programs; educational programs at museums, art schools, colleges, and universities.

Research and Publication Program

Supports scholarly research on modern art and modernism; exhibition catalogues; the publication of scholarly books and periodicals.

Archives and Conservation Program

Supports projects focused on the science and practice of the conservation and restoration of works of art, and the processing, description, cataloging, and preservation of archival materials, as well as oral history programs.

Curatorial Program

Supports exhibitions of modern and contemporary art; and programs in curatorial studies.

The Dedalus Foundation does not support capital campaigns, general operating expenses, or the commissioning of works of art.

Inquiries should be sent to the Grants Manager at grants@dedalusfoundation.org.

Huntington Library Research Fellowships 2014-15

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Fellowships at The Huntington 2014-2015

The Huntington is an independent research center with holdings in British and American history, literature, art history, and the history of science and medicine. The Library collections range chronologically from the eleventh century to the present and include seven million manuscripts, 413,000 rare books, 275,000 reference works, and 1.3 million photographs, prints, and ephemera. The Burndy Library consists of some 67,000 rare books and reference volumes in the history of science and technology, as well as an important collection of scientific instruments. Within the general fields listed above there are many areas of special strength, including: Middle Ages, Renaissance, 19th- and 20th-century literature, British drama, Colonial America, American Civil War, Western America, and California. The Art Collections contain notable British and American paintings, fine prints, photographs, and an art reference library. In the library of the Botanical Gardens is a broad collection of reference works in botany, horticulture, and gardening.

The Huntington will award to scholars over 150 fellowships for the academic year 2014-2015. These fellowships derive from a variety of funding sources and have different terms. Recipients of all fellowships are expected to be in continuous residence at the Huntington and to participate in and make a contribution to its intellectual life.

Application deadline for all fellowships: Nov. 15, 2013.

Huntington Fellowships

Short-Term Awards
Long-Term Awards
Dibner History of Science Program

 

For full fellowship and grant program details and deadlines, including application procedure and submission guidelines, visit The Huntington’s website.

Short-Term Awards
Huntington Fellowships

Eligibility: PhD or equivalent; or doctoral candidate at the dissertation stage.

Tenure of fellowship: One to five months.

Amount of award: $3,000 per month.

NOTE: The majority of “Huntington Fellowships” will be awarded to scholars working in the general holdings of the Library; however, we do offer a number of specialized fellowships:

  • Francis Bacon Foundation Fellowships in Renaissance England
  • Reese Fellowship in American Bibliography and the History of the Book in the Americas
  • Trent R. Dames Fellowship in the History of Civil Engineering
  • Christopher Isherwood Foundation Fellowships
  • Francis J. Weber Research Fellowship in Roman Catholic History
  • Molina Fellowships in the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences

Applying for one of the specialized fellowships does not disqualify you from being considered for a “Huntington Fellowship.”

Travel Grants and Exchange Fellowships for Study in Great Britain

Eligibility: PhD or equivalent; or doctoral candidate at the dissertation stage. Applicant must be based in the United States.

Tenure of fellowship: One month.

The Huntington offers several travel grants in any of the fields in which the Huntington collections are strong and where the research will be carried out in libraries or archives in Great Britain. We also offer exchange fellowships with Corpus Christi, Linacre, and Lincoln Colleges, Oxford; and with Trinity Hall, Cambridge.

Linacre College, Oxford

Accommodation is provided by the college with the stipulation that the fellowship must be taken up in July or August of 2014. A stipend of $3,000 is provided by the Huntington to the recipient of the fellowship before traveling to England. The fellow must provide a written report on his or her experience.

Corpus Christi College/Lincoln College/Trinity Hall

Accommodation and hospitality is provided by the college with the stipulation that the fellowship must be taken up in July or August of 2014. The Huntington will reimburse the fellow for economy round-trip airfare before going to England. The fellow must provide a written report on his or her experience.

Travel Grants

Recipients of the travel grants must be conducting research in a library or archive in Great Britain in any of the fields in which the Huntington collections are strong. The Huntington will reimburse the grantee for economy round-trip airfare before the trip. A stipend of $3,000 will be paid after the grantee submits a detailed report on the research conducted. The travel grants can be taken up as early as June 1, 2014, and no later than June 30, 2015.

Clark-Huntington Joint Bibliographical Fellowship

Eligibility: PhD or appropriate research experience.

Tenure of fellowship: Two months (one month at the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library; one month at The Huntington).

Amount of award: $5,500.

Sponsored jointly by the Clark and the Huntington Libraries, this two-month fellowship provides support for bibliographical research in early modern British literature and history as well as other areas where the two libraries have common strengths; eligible projects include textual scholarship, analytical/descriptive bibliography, history of printing and/or publishers, and related fields. For details and application instructions regarding this fellowship only, please contact Dr. Gerald Cloud at gwcloud@humnet.ucla.edu.

Long-Term Awards
Barbara Thom Postdoctoral Fellowships

Eligibility: Non-tenured faculty.

Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.

Amount of award: $50,000.

Fellowship is designed to support non-tenured faculty who are revising their dissertation for publication. Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections and must have received their PhD between 2009 and 2011.

Mellon Fellowship

Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than Nov. 15, 2013.

Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.

Amount of award: $50,000.

Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections.

Dana and David Dornsife Fellowship

Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than Nov. 15, 2013.

Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.

Amount of award: $50,000.

Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections.

National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowships

Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than Nov. 15, 2013, and must be a United States citizen or foreign national with a minimum of three years U.S. residence.

Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.

Amount of award: $50,000 ($4,200 per month from NEH; balance of stipend from Huntington funds)

Applicants must be pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections.

Dibner Program in the History of Science

The Dibner Program in the History of Science offers historians of science and technology the opportunity to study in the Burndy Library and to work in the other resources for the history of science and technology at The Huntington.

Short-Term Awards

Eligibility: PhD or equivalent; or doctoral candidate at the dissertation stage.

Tenure of fellowship: One to five months.

Amount of award: $3,000 per month.

Long-Term Awards

Eligibility: Applicants must have completed all requirements for their PhD by no later than Nov. 15, 2013.

Tenure of fellowship: Nine to twelve months.

Amount of award: $50,000.

Applicants can be conducting research or already be at the writing stage and need reference materials only.

Herron Professor Anila Agha presents new exhibition: Intersections

anila agha intersections installation

Assistant Professor of Foundations Anila Quayyum Agha will present an exhibition of works created as part of her 2012-13 New Frontiers Research Grant from Indiana University. The exhibition entitled Intersections will be on view in the Frank and Katrina Basile Gallery from Sept. 25 – Oct.17, 2013.

Agha writes in the artist statement for Intersections:

I used a 2012-13 New Frontier’s Research Grant from Indiana University for a large-scale installation project composed of patterned wood. With this project I explored intersections of culture and religion, the dynamics and interpretation of space and sight as it threaded through cultures and emerged as varied expressions that redefine themselves with the passage of time. In this piece, a motif that is believed to represent certitude is explored to reveal its fluidity i.e. the geometrical patterning in Islamic sacred spaces. This project is meant to uncover the contradictory nature of all intersections; which are simultaneously boundaries and also points of meeting.

The Intersections project takes the seminal experience of exclusion as a woman from a space of community and creativity such as a Mosque and translates the complex expressions of both wonder and exclusion that have been my experience while growing up in Pakistan. The wooden frieze emulates a pattern from the Alhambra, which was poised at the intersection of history, culture and art and was a place where Islamic and Western discourses, met and co-existed in harmony and served as a testament to the symbiosis of difference. I have given substance to this mutualism with the installation project exploring the binaries of public and private, light and shadow, and static and dynamic. This installation project relies on the purity and inner symmetry of geometric design, the interpretation of the cast shadows and the viewer’s presence with in a public space.

The object in the Basile Gallery is a smaller version of the larger design.