Shakespeare at IUPUI: a trailer for a new WFYI documentary

CSI Shakespeare – In the spring of 2102, IUPUI presented the world premiere of a lost 400-year old play by William Shakespeare, titled “The History of Cardenio.” This half-hour documentary highlights the 20 year-effort by world-renowned Shakespeare scholar Gary Taylor to recreate the play, filtering old texts through modern high-tech databases to resurrect the original manuscript.  Viewers will also travel with Gary to the Globe Theatre in London and retrace his academic roots as a precocious and oft-published “enfant terrible” at Oxford University Press.  Then, we return to Indianapolis to witness the first-blown production of the work—an experimental collaboration with Hoosier Bard Productions, including the recording of a period-accurate but original musical score for vocals and lute, to christen the new urban theatre space at IUPUI.
7:30pm, November 1st.
Producer: Jim Simmons

 

 

Fourteenth Annual Meeting: THE MIDWEST PRAGMATIST STUDY GROUP of The Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy, 22-­23 September 2012

John Dewey in 1902

 

DATE: 22-­23 September 2012

LOCATION: Cavanaugh Hall, Room 508; 425 University Blvd.; Indianapolis, IN 46202

No fee, no registration, open to the public

 

 

 

 

Program 

Saturday, September 22, 2012

 

1:00 PM­-2:15 PM:

 

Philosophy as Therapeutic Amelioration: Crisis and Reflection in the Thought of William James, David Rodick, Xavier University

 

2:30 PM-3:45 PM:

Photography and the Emotions, Richard Rubin

 

3:45 PM:

Refreshment Break

 

4:15 PM­-5:45 PM:

Key Texts Session: Racial Remediation: “An Historical Perspective on Current

Conditions” (1976/1977), “Racial Realism” (1992), and “The Space Traders”

(1992) by Derrick Bell; and “Democracy is Radical” (1937) and “Creative

Democracy: The Task Before Us” (1939) by John Dewey. Discussant: Tommy Curry,

Texas A&M University

 

5:45 PM:

Business Meeting

 

7:00 PM:

Dinner

 

 

Sunday, September 23, 2012

 

9:30 AM­-10:45 AM:

“Peirce and Frege on Logic,” Sergio Gallegos, Denison University

 

11:00 AM-­12:15 PM:

“We Who Must Fight in the Shade,” Tommy Curry, Texas A&M University

 

Support for this meeting of the Midwest Pragmatist Study Group comes from

the Institute for American Thought, the Santayana Edition, the Department of

Philosophy, and the American Studies Program in the IU School of Liberal

Arts at IUPUI.

 

Contact: M. A. Coleman <martcole@iupui.edu>

Artist-in Residence Performance: Tim Hardy in The Ancient Mariner, A Dramatic Song Cycle Inspired by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

DATE: Friday, September 14, 2012

TIME: 8:00PM – 9:30PM

LOCATION: Crystal Terrace Ball Room, Columbia Club; 121 Monument Circle; Indianapolis, IN 46202 

Tickets available here. $25 general, $15 students.

The IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute (IAHI) and Butler University’s Jordan College of Fine Art are pleased to present the American premiere of this unique musical program featuring internationally acclaimed performer Tim Hardy of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London, and piano accompaniment by Rebecca Edie.

The 2012 artist-in-residence at the IAHI, Tim Hardy has performed with the Royal Shakespeare Company, with the Opera Music Theatre London, and at prestigious theaters across the United Kingdom and Europe. he has narrated more than 300 television documentaries, and his extensive directing credits include Romeo and Juliet, Twelve Angry Men, and the Crucible.

Award-winning composer Geoff Page has created an impressive body of musicals that include Academy of Death, A Christmas Carol, and The Signalman.

Tickets available here.

 

Ancient Mariner Flyer

Reading at the Table: David J. Bodenhamer, “The Revolutionary Constitution”

Reading at the Table: The Revolutionary Constitution

David J. Bodenhamer
Professor of History
Director, The Polis Center
IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI

September 13, 2012, 11:30 am – 1:00 pm, University Place Faculty Club

The annual Reading at the Table series provides a forum to celebrate published books written by IUPUI faculty. During each luncheon, the featured author will read from his/her work and open the floor to discussion. Buffet lunch is available for $11.80.

Register at: academicaffairs.iupui.edu/

 

David J. Bodenhamer is Founder and Executive Director at The Polis Center, Professor of History, and Adjunct Professor of Informatics at Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis. He is the author or editor of several books on American legal and constitutional history, including Fair Trial: Rights of the Accused in American History, and is co-editor of the International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing.

In The Revolutionary Constitution, David J. Bodenhamer provides a comprehensive new look at America’s basic law, integrating the latest legal scholarship with historical context to highlight how it has evolved over time. The Constitution, he notes, was the product of the first modern revolution, and revolutions are, by definition, moments when the past shifts toward an unfamiliar future, one radically different from what was foreseen only a brief time earlier. In seeking to balance power and liberty, the framers established a structure that would allow future generations to continually readjust the scale. Bodenhamer explores this dynamic through seven major constitutional themes: federalism, balance of powers, property, representation, equality, rights, and security.

Bodenhamer Reading at the Table

Herron’s Dickerson celebrates ‘The Hoosier Spirit’ with new State Fair commission

Herron Junior Jamie Dickerson

Along with the opportunity to eat your way to the Midway, do some superb people watching and check out the barnyard blue ribbons at this year’s Indiana State Fair, you can experience the new outdoor sculpture by Herron junior Jamie Dickerson.

Celebrating the Hoosier Spirit, a work named for the Fair’s 2012 theme, was dedicated August 3. It’s a site-specific, semi-permanent sculpture that will be on display for up to five years in Dow Agro Sciences Celebration Park, in the northeast quadrant of the Fairgrounds by the 4H buildings and free stage.

Jamie Dickerson. Hoosier Spirit. 2012. Indiana State Fair Grounds.
Jamie Dickerson. Hoosier Spirit. 2012. Indiana State Fair Grounds.

Dickerson’s concept “celebrates Indiana as a major agricultural state that is increasingly exploring ways to use its renewable and plentiful resources in the production of biofuels and plastics from corn, beyond food production,” she said.

Celebrating the Hoosier Spirit is comprised of three forms evoking corn husks, ranging in height from 12 to 11 feet, each being about five feet wide, reaching upward to imply a growing, energetic spirit. The forms are large enough for people to walk through “…and explore the beauty and versatility of this resource,” Dickerson said. The Indiana Hardwood Lumbermen’s Association donated the wood for the project.

Fair officials partnered the Arts Council of Indianapolis to issue a request for proposals, specifying that the work be made primarily with recycled materials or materials synonymous with the State of Indiana, and that it “inspire a celebration of the Hoosier spirit”.

The Arts Council’s Public Art Selection Committee—composed of artists, arts advocates, curators, administrators and other arts and community development specialists—reviewed proposals and presented recommendations to Fair officials for the final selection. Dickerson’s was the only student submission.

Lindsey Lord of the Indianapolis Arts Council described the process this way: “In a Request for Proposals we request resume, exhibition history, biography, and things like that, and then we request an actual proposal of what your piece would look like.

“Jamie’s was really nice in that she submitted a 3-D rendering of what the piece would look like on the grounds of the State Fair. She also submitted scale models of the sculpture. She included textures, all sorts of things that really gave you a feel of what the finished product would look like,” said Lord.

Dickerson said, “The curriculum at Herron really helps to prepare you to make professional proposals and to submit them in a way that’s very clean … that you are saying what you mean to be saying…. And also to be clear about what materials you may or may not use, because there are always going to be some alterations in the process ….

“Without the training and working with people who have so much experience, there is no way I could have confidently put this forth.” In addition to help from Herron faculty, Herron alumni James Darr (B.F.A. in Sculpture, ’03), Brose Partington (B.F.A. in Sculpture, ’04) and Brad Dilger of TriForm Studio (B.F.A. in Sculpture, ’04), were on Dickerson’s fabrication crew.

One visitor to Celebration Park, writing for Ag News, admired “…the beautiful green streaks and dark tones of poplar, the rich browns of white oak and the pinkish-red hues of sycamore trees that artist Jamie Dickerson used to showcase the unique textures and grains of Indiana hardwoods in her piece.”

The Fair runs through August 19.

Jamie Dickerson – Indiana State Fair Commission from Herron School of Art and Design on Vimeo.

NEW COURSE: 20th-Century African Fiction

ANNOUNCING FOR FALL 2012:
L382: 20th-Century African Fiction
(Fiction of the Non-Western World)

David Hoegberg, Associate Professor of English
Tuesday evenings 6:00 – 8:40 PM
Course number 12988

The decolonization of Africa in the 1950s and 1960s sparked an explosion of African literature that continues to this day. This literature is vibrant, skillful, and deeply concerned with the social issues facing African nations. This course will introduce students to an exciting range of African fiction written in English from Nigeria, Kenya, Zimbabwe, and South Africa. Emphasis throughout the course will be on making the works accessible and interesting to students, relating them to historical contexts, and working on important reading and writing skills.

Course instructor David Hoegberg is a three-time winner of the Trustees Teaching Award in the IU School of Liberal Arts.

For non-English majors, L382 fulfills the requirement for 300-level courses outside the major. Students in English, History, Anthropology, Political Science, Religious Studies, Sociology, and other departments will find much that is enjoyable and relevant to their work.

L382 is on the list of approved course for the Africana Studies major and minor.
Further questions?

Please contact Prof. David Hoegberg, 274-9823, dhoegberg@aol.com

Fellowship: Getty Scholars Program — Connecting Seas: Cultural and Artistic Exchange Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles, 2013-14

Getty

Getty Scholars Program — Connecting Seas: Cultural and Artistic Exchange
Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles, 2013-14

Applications due by 1 November 2012

Water has long been a significant means for the movement of goods and people. Sophisticated networks, at a variety of scales, were established in antiquity around the Mediterranean and the Black Seas, and later in the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans. Together with sporadic and accidental encounters, these networks fostered commerce in raw materials and finished objects, along with the exchange of ideas and cultural concepts. Far from being barriers, seas and oceans were vital links connecting cultures. The 2013–2014 academic year at the Getty Research Institute and Getty Villa will be devoted to exploring the art-historical impact of maritime transport.

How has the desire for specific commodities from overseas shaped social, political, and religious institutions? How has the introduction of foreign materials and ideas transformed local artistic traditions, and what novel forms and practices have developed from trade and other exchanges, both systematic and informal? What role do the objects born of these interactions have in enhancing cultural understandings or perpetuating misunderstandings? How has the rapidly accelerating pace of exchange in recent years influenced cross-cultural developments? The goal of this research theme is to explore how bodies of water have served, and continue to facilitate, a rich and complex interchange in the visual arts.

The Getty Research Institute and the Getty Villa invite proposals focusing on artistic exchange and the transmission of knowledge across bodies of water from ancient times to the present day. Scholars actively engaged in studying the role of artists, patrons, priests, merchants, and explorers in oceanic exchange are encouraged to apply, and projects focusing on the Pacific are particularly welcome.

More details: http://www.getty.edu/research/scholars/years/future.html

NEH “Shared Horizons: Data, Biomedicine, and the Digital Humanities” Symposium Scheduled for April 10-12

August 10, 2012 – The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) recently announced the first initiative of its partnership with the National Library of Medicine (NLM).  NEH’s Office of Digital Humanities, working in cooperation with NLM, the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities of the University of Maryland, and Research Councils UK, will be a part of “Shared Horizons: Data, Biomedicine, and the Digital Humanities,” an interdisciplinary symposium exploring the intersection of digital humanities and biomedicine.

Scheduled to take place April 10-12, 2013, Shared Horizons will provide a unique forum for  participants and their institutions to address questions about collaboration, research methodologies, and the interpretation of evidence arising from the interdisciplinary opportunities in this area of biomedical-driven humanities scholarship.

Shared Horizons aims to create opportunities for disciplinary cross-fertilization through a mix of formal and informal presentations combined with breakout sessions, all designed to promote a rich exchange of ideas about how large-scale quantitative methods can lead to new understandings of human culture. Bringing together researchers from the digital humanities and bioinformatics communities, the symposium will explore ways in which these two communities might collaborate on projects that bridge the humanities and medicine around the topics of sequence alignment and network analysis, two modes of analysis that intersect with “big data.”

Additional information is available on the Shared Horizons website.